Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University

Multi-Faith Chaplaincy

A Multi-Faith Chaplaincy on campus provides religious and spiritual care to the TRU community’s students, faculty and staff. They provide an operating model of interfaith respect and cooperation. The Multi-Faith Chaplaincy acts as a religious and spiritual resource, encouraging thoughtful reflection and dialogue. TRU also provides a Multi-Faith Space where members of our TRU community can reflect, pray and meditate. A Multi-Faith Calendar is available to share when specific observances take place.

 Aims and Objectives
  • To participate in and contribute to all aspects of TRU experience from a religious or spiritual perspective
  • To provide religious and spiritual care for the diverse membership of the TRU community
  • To work as a team, exemplifying multi-faith dialogue and cooperation
  • To serve co-operatively with TRU’s Student Services Counselling, Wellness Centre and other support service providers
  • To support and encourage members of the TRU community in their relationships with the broader community in respect of religious or spiritual interests and concerns
 What We Offer
  • Spiritual or religious supports and encouragement
  • Guidance and resources in times of personal concern, conflict or crisis
  • Opportunities for companionship, prayer, study and service on campus
  • Participation in educational events related to spiritual and religious insight and experience
  • Celebration of holy days and commemorative occasions
  • Connection with local and regional faith communities and events on and off campus
 Spiritual Needs

Spiritual needs and concerns usually relate to what we call the “big” questions of life. These questions may include:

  • Why is this happening?
  • Why is this happening to me?
  • What does it all mean?
  • What is the purpose or meaning of life?
  • How do I make sense of everything?
  • Where do I come from?
  • What gives me comfort and hope?
  • What happens after death?
  • What do I trust? Who do I trust?
  • What, or who – beyond myself – do I believe is important
    in my life?
  • Who is my “beloved community” – who loves me and is
    loved by me, no ma er what?
  • What is truth? Is there such a thing?
  • How can faith strengthen life on campus?
  • How faith can guide us in diffi cult times?

Some people fi nd meaning, comfort, hope, goodness and community through their religious practice, beliefs and/or their community of faith. Some people do not. Regardless of whether religious faith is part of a person’s life, spiritual
concerns, resources and needs can still be very important, especially when life circumstances are in transition or crisis.

 Spiritual Resources

Spiritual resources are practices, beliefs, objects and/or relationships that people may turn to for help in times of crisis or concern. Such resources include:

  • To participate in and contribute to all aspects of TRU experience from a religious or spiritual perspective
  • To provide religious and spiritual care for the diverse membership of the TRU community
  • To work as a team, exemplifying multi-faith dialogue and cooperation
  • To serve co-operatively with TRU’s Student Services Counselling, Wellness Centre and other support service providers
  • To support and encourage members of the TRU community in their relationships with the broader community in respect of religious or spiritual interests and concerns

These resources may help people return to a sense of balance when their lives have been turned upside down. They can help people sort out the “big” questions in order to fi nd meaning, comfort, hope, goodness and community in the midst of a crisis.

 Common Grounds for Learning
  • Bahai “Lay not on any soul a load that you would not wish to be laid upon you, and desire not for anyone the things you would not desire for yourself.”
  • Buddhism “Treat not others in ways that you yourself would find hurtful.”
  • Christianity “In everything, do to others as you would have them do to you; for this is the law and the prophets.”
  • Confucianism “One word which sums up the basis of all good conduct … loving-kindness. do not do to others what you do not want done to yourself.”
  • Hinduism “This is the sum of duty; do not do to others what would cause pain if done to you.”
  • Islam “Not one of you truly believes until you wish for others what you wish for yourself.”
  • Judaism “What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbour. This is the whole Torah; all the rest is commentary. Go and learn it."
  • Native Spirituality “We are as much alive as we keep the earth alive.”
  • Sikhism “I am a stranger to no one; and no one is a stranger to me. Indeed I am a friend to all.”
  • Taoism “Regard your neighbour’s gain as your own gain and your neighbour’s loss as your own loss.”
  • Unitarianism “We affi rm and promote respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.”
 Video Resources
 

How to get in touch with us

General Inquiries:

Phone: 250-371-5940
Email:kamloopscya@gmail.com
In person: Old Main, OM 1421

Inquiries to specific chaplains

Send an email to one of our chaplains listed below.

Who we are
Adele Huculak (Chair) Roman Catholic kamloopscya@gmail.com
Walter Hayashi Alliance walterhayashi@tru.ca
Narayan Mitra Kamloops Christian Ministries Society narayanmitra@tru.ca
Jeff Torrans Baptist jtorrans@hotmail.com
Kerry Hegedus Non-Denominational kerryhegedus@hotmail.com
Pat Davies Centre for Spiritual Living revpatdavies@gmail.com
Ani Gawa Khandro GawaLing Buddhist    gawaling@yahoo.ca
Ahmed K.  Kamloops Islamic Association chaplain@ayeshamosque.com
Jane Gingrich Lutheran jdgingrich11@gmail.com
Fr. Chad Pawlyshyn Ukrainian Orthodox fr.c.pawlyshyn@hotmail.com

Links

  • Multi Faith Calendar — This is a Google calendar tracking different spiritual observances — find out if there is a celebration or observance today.
  • Multi Faith Space — This is where you can find out more information about TRU's Multi Faith Space, a quiet place where you can participate in your spiritual practice.