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Student for a Day

March 13 - March 31

Are you considering university? Do you want to see what campus life at TRU is all about? Here’s your chance to find out! Join us on campus and become a TRU Student for a Day.

Visit campus, sit in on lectures, take a campus tour, have lunch with a Future Student Ambassador (current TRU student), and connect with a Future Student Advisor to get important information.

This is a totally free opportunity! Registration will open in early February. Check back for more information.

Interested in a particular subject? Check out the proposed lecture schedule below.


Lecture Schedule

*Lecture offerings are subject to change.

Monday
Option 1: Biology and Psychology

BIOL 1210 - Principles of Biology II

This course offers a survey of the kingdoms of life, while emphasizing their ecology and evolutionary relationships.


PSYC 1210 - Introduction to Psychology II

Students explore selected topics in contemporary psychology, including intelligence, development, personality, social psychology, emotion, motivation, and psychopathology.

Option 2: Marketing and Accounting

MKTG 2430 – Introduction to Marketing

Students receive an overall view of the marketing function, the role of marketing in society and its application within organizations. Topics include an overview of marketing; developing a marketing plan and strategies; analyzing the marketing environment; consumer behaviour; segmentation, targeting, and positioning; developing new products; product, branding, and packaging decisions; pricing concepts and strategies; distribution strategies; and integrated marketing communications.


ACCT 2210 – Financial Accounting

Students develop the skills necessary to prepare and analyze the financial statements of a public corporation. Topics include the conceptual framework; accounting standards; the accounting cycle; financial statements; internal control, cash and bank reconciliations; short-term investments and receivables; inventory; long-term assets including intangibles; liabilities including bonds payable; shareholders' equity, dividends, and share repurchases; comprehensive income and the statement of shareholders' equity; statement of cash flows; and financial statement analysis.

Tuesday
Option 1: Tourism and Event Management

TMGT 1110 – Introduction to Tourism

This course introduces tourism as an industry and a phenomenon. Topics will include the economic, social, environmental and political environment in which tourism operates at a global and local level. Students are introduced to tourism products and experiences in B.C. and given the opportunity to identify career paths in the tourism industry.


EVNT 2250 – Sport Event Marketing

This course is designed to introduce students to skills necessary to effectively market a sporting event. Students will learn how to develop a plan to target relevant markets including attendees, competitors and sponsors. Students will be exposed to business concepts such as product development, market opportunities and marketing plans.

Option 2: Natural Resource Science

NRSC 2100 – Forest Ecology and Silvics

Students develop an understanding and appreciation of the complexities and interactions that encompass forest ecosystem structures and functions, and learn how to apply this knowledge to predict forest ecosystem responses to natural and human-induced disturbances. Students assess how forest ecosystem structures and function interact, how they change over time, and how they affect forest management practices. This course provides hands-on practical experience for students.


NRSC 1220 – Dendrology II

Students explore a variety of British Columbian, North American, and introduced coniferous tree species.

Wednesday
Option 1: Natural Resource Science and Biology

NRSC 2100 – Forest Ecology and Silvics

Students develop an understanding and appreciation of the complexities and interactions that encompass forest ecosystem structures and functions, and learn how to apply this knowledge to predict forest ecosystem responses to natural and human-induced disturbances. Students assess how forest ecosystem structures and function interact, how they change over time, and how they affect forest management practices. This course provides hands-on practical experience for students.


BIOL 1210 - Principles of Bioloy II

Students will explore evolution as unifying principle of biology: how it occurs, and how it leads to increasing biological diversity through speciation. They will develop an understanding of how evolutionary opportunities and constraints are reflected in the history of life on Earth and will examine the evolutionary conundrum of sexual reproduction (or lack thereof) in both plants and animals. They will develop important skills useful for biologists such as working in teams, finding and disseminating information, conducting research projects by developing and testing hypotheses, and communicating research results effectively.

Option 2: Engineering and Architectural Engineering

ENGR 1200 (lab) – Engineering Design II

Students apply the knowledge of the engineering design process by developing and completing relatively complex and self-directed engineering project that consists of electrical, mechanical, and software sub-systems. Students learn the incorporation of sustainability, regulatory, environmental, ethical, health, and safety-related issues relevant to the design of an engineering product. Students are exposed to several engineering tools to manage time and resources. Students learn theories related to teamwork and leadership. Students work in team, complete design project through several milestones, and generate technical reports and oral presentations. Students understand the role of an engineering profession towards society and ethical obligations.


ARET 1300 - Building Technology I

Students are introduced to basic platform framing, commonly used in residential buildings that are regulated under Part 9 (Housing and Small Buildings) of the British Columbia Building Code.

Thursday
Option 1: English and Chemistry

ENGL 2250 – Women’s Bodies/Women’s Roles

Students continue to develop close critical reading comprehension through an exploration of women’s writing from a variety of time periods, diverse sociocultural backgrounds, and genres. Students critically and creatively interpret and evaluate the work of women writers, applying concepts of body theory and feminist perspectives on social roles, as well as literary terminology, techniques, and rhetorical strategies. They also consider the complexities and multiplicities of female ways of knowing and being in the world, including such elements of difference as social class, ethnicity/culture, gender identity and sexual expression and how they affect our understanding of social and corporeal experiences and possibilities.


CHEM 1510 – Fundamentals of Chemistry

This is the second half of a fundamental first year chemistry course. The topics include a brief review of stoichiometry, gas laws, thermochemistry, equilibrium and electrochemistry. Students are expected to become familiar with these topics, and demonstrate their proficiency in various laboratory techniques.

Option 2: Marketing and Event Management

MKTG 2430 – Introduction to Marketing

Students receive an overall view of the marketing function, the role of marketing in society and its application within organizations. Topics include an overview of marketing; developing a marketing plan and strategies; analyzing the marketing environment; consumer behaviour; segmentation, targeting, and positioning; developing new products; product, branding, and packaging decisions; pricing concepts and strategies; distribution strategies; and integrated marketing communications.


EVNT 2250 – Sport Event Marketing

This course is designed to introduce students to skills necessary to effectively market a sporting event. Students will learn how to develop a plan to target relevant markets including attendees, competitors and sponsors. Students will be exposed to business concepts such as product development, market opportunities and marketing plans.


Friday
Option 1: Chemistry and Biology

CHEM 1520 – Principles of Chemistry

This course is the second half of first year chemistry designed for students with a strong background in Chemistry. The topics include gas laws, equilibrium, redox reactions, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, entropy and free energy.


BIOL 2340 – Introduction to Genetics

Students explore the connections between the genetic composition of an organism and the outward expression of characteristics. They gain an appreciation for genetics as an exciting and important field, which lets them delve deeper into topics such as genetic engineering, regulation of gene expression and other aspects of molecular biology and biotechnology. They examine classical Transmission Genetics, which encompasses the basic principles of heredity and how traits are passed from one generation to the next. They also develop a basic understanding of Population Genetics, which explores the genetic composition of groups of individuals of the same species and how that composition changes over time and space.

What will your day look like?

Your schedule will depend on the topics you choose, as lectures happen all throughout the day. For most, the day will begin at 10:00 a.m. and end at 4:00 p.m. Here is an example schedule—but, keep in mind that not everyone’s day will look like this. You will receive email communication before your visit that details your individual schedule.

Schedule

Check-in
Lecture 1
Campus Tour
Lunch
Lecture 2
Check-in
9:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Lecture 1
10:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Campus Tour
11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Lunch
12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Lecture 2
1:30 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.
Contact Us

Questions? Contact the Future Students Office:

futurestudents@tru.ca
250-828-5006

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