Student for a Day

March 14 - March 31

Are you considering university? Do you want to see what campus life at TRU is all about? Here’s your chance to find out! Join us on campus and become a TRU Student for a Day.

Visit campus, sit in on lectures, take a campus tour, have lunch with a Future Student Ambassador (current TRU student), and connect with a Future Student Advisor to get important information.

We’ve reached the end of the registration period for Student for a Day.


You can still book an individual or family campus tour with us!
Future Student Advisors are also available for virtual or phone appointments.

Book a virtual appointment

Book a phone appointment: 250-828-5006


Lecture Schedule

Monday
Option 1: Biology and Engineering

BIOL 1210 - Principles of Biology II

This course offers a survey of the kingdoms of life, while emphasizing their ecology and evolutionary relationships.


ENGR 1200 (lab) - Engineering Design II

Students apply the knowledge of the engineering design process by developing and completing relatively complex and self-directed engineering project that consists of electrical, mechanical, and software sub-systems. Students learn the incorporation of sustainability, regulatory, environmental, ethical, health, and safety-related issues relevant to the design of an engineering product. Students are exposed to several engineering tools to manage time and resources. Students work in team, complete design project through several milestones, and generate technical reports and oral presentations. Students understand the role of an engineering profession towards society and ethical obligations.

Tuesday
Option 1: Natural Resource Science and Psychology

NRSC 1220 - Dendrology II

Students explore a variety of British Columbian, North American, and introduced coniferous tree species.


PSYC 1110 - Introduction to Psychology I

Students explore selected topics in contemporary psychology, including the history of psychology, methodology, heredity and learning, physiology and neuropsychology, consciousness, sensation and perception, learning, and memory.

Option 2: Tourism Management and Psychology

TMGT 1110 - Introduction to Tourism

This course provides an introduction to tourism as an industry and a phenomenon. Topics covered during the semester will include the economic, social, environmental and political environment in which tourism operates at a global and local level. Students will be introduced to tourism products and experiences in BC and be given the opportunity to identify career opportunities in the tourism industry.


PSYC 1110 – Introduction to Psychology I

Students explore selected topics in contemporary psychology, including the history of psychology, methodology, heredity and learning, physiology and neuropsychology, consciousness, sensation and perception, learning, and memory.

Option 3: Business and Biology

MNGT 1710 – Introduction to Business

Students are introduced to basic management principles and the functional areas of business. Topics include the business environment from a legal, regulatory, economic, competitive, technological, social, ethical, and global perspective; the functions of management, specifically planning, organizing, leading, and control; the different business functions, including human resources, supply chain management, marketing, and financial management; and the forms of business ownership and the importance of entrepreneurship.


BIOL 1210 - Principles of Biology II

This course offers a survey of the kingdoms of life, while emphasizing their ecology and evolutionary relationships.

Wednesday
Option 1: History

HIST 1260 - Europe: 1789-1939

In this course participants learn to evaluate and understand the complex forces involved in the development of the modern state. Topics include the French Revolution and Napoleonic Europe, the Congress of Vienna, the social and political struggles of the nineteenth and early twentieth century, and the fissures in European society during the interwar period. Lectures and seminars introduce the political, intellectual, cultural and social aspects of European society, and participants work with a variety of primary and secondary historical sources.

Option 2: Chemistry and Business

CHEM 1520 - Principles of Chemistry

This course is the second half of first year chemistry designed for students with a strong background in Chemistry. The topics include gas laws, equilibrium, redox reactions, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, entropy and free energy.


MNT 1710 - Introduction to Business

Students are introduced to basic management principles and the functional areas of business. Topics include the business environment from a legal, regulatory, economic, competitive, technological, social, ethical, and global perspective; the functions of management, specifically planning, organizing, leading, and control; the different business functions, including human resources, supply chain management, marketing, and financial management; and the forms of business ownership and the importance of entrepreneurship.

Thursday
Option 1: Architectural Engineering and Biology

ARET 1300 - Building Technology I

Students are introduced to basic platform framing, commonly used in residential buildings that are regulated under Part 9 (Housing and Small Buildings) of the British Columbia Building Code.


BIOL 1210 - Principles of Biology II

This course offers a survey of the kingdoms of life, while emphasizing their ecology and evolutionary relationships.

Option 2: Philosophy and Psychology

PHIL 1100 – Introduction to Philosophy: Problem and Themes

This course is a general introduction to philosophy. Questions that are typically discussed include: What is morality? Is there a God? Is there life after death? What can we know and how can we know it? What is the nature of reality? Is there free will? Are there fundamental rights? What constitutes a 'good life'? What is the nature of society? What form of government should we have? What is the relation of the mind to the body? What is art? Is censorship a good idea?


PSYC 1210 - Introduction to Psychology II

Students explore selected topics in contemporary psychology, including intelligence, development, personality, social psychology, emotion, motivation, and psychopathology.


What will your day look like?

Your schedule will depend on the topics you choose, as lectures happen all throughout the day. For most, the day will begin at 10:00 a.m. and end at 4:00 p.m. Here is an example schedule—but, keep in mind that not everyone’s day will look like this.

Schedule

Check-in
NRSC Lecture
Campus Tour A
Lunch at the DEN (optional)
PSYC 1110 Lecture
Student Appointments (optional)
Check-in
9:30am - 10:00am
NRSC Lecture
10:00am - 11:15am
Campus Tour A
11:30am - 12:30pm
Lunch at the DEN (optional)
12:30pm - 1:30pm
PSYC 1110 Lecture
1:30pm - 2:20pm
Student Appointments (optional)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Contact Us

Questions? Contact the Future Students Office:

Future Students
250-828-5006

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