Indigenous TRU

Thompson Rivers University campuses are on the traditional lands of the Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc (Kamloops campus) and the T’exelc (Williams Lake campus) within Secwépemc'ulucw, the traditional and unceded territory of the Secwépemc. Our region also extends into the territories of the St’át’imc, Nlaka’pamux, Nuxalk, Tŝilhqot'in, Dakelh, and Syilx peoples.

Vernie Clement

Recording by Vernie Clement, Lhoosk’uz Dene, Dakelh

 

Indigenization at TRU

Good work takes time, and at TRU, indigenizing initiatives are wide-ranging and ongoing. Here are some examples:

partnership agreement

A partnership with Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc

Digitized Secwepemc Resources

Material from the Secwepemc Cultural Education Society

Indigenous Awareness Week

Indigenous Awareness Week activities

Stop/Estil

Estil, Secwepemctsin for ‘stop’, is stopping traffic

Ch'nook Scholars

Ch’nook Scholars program for business students

bearing witness

School of Nursing Bearing Witness program

partnership agreement

A partnership with Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc

Digitized Secwepemc Resources

Material from the Secwepemc Cultural Education Society

Indigenous Awareness Week

Indigenous Awareness Week activities

Stop/Estil

Estil, Secwepemctsin for ‘stop’, is stopping traffic

Ch'nook Scholars

Ch’nook Scholars program for business students

bearing witness

School of Nursing Bearing Witness program

Coyote Project

The Coyote Project is TRU’s roadmap to achieving the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s calls to action. It has united all of TRU in creating a campus that is welcoming and supportive to all, especially Indigenous students and staff. Faculties and departments are addressing barriers to recruitment, retention and completion for Indigenous students.


Beyond the classroom

We embrace inclusiveness and celebrate Indigenous cultures with events, clubs and many other ways for you to get involved with your campus community.

Annual TRU powwow

Indigenous awareness week

Drumming circle

Cultural activities

Indigenous grad ceremony

TRUSU Indigenous rep

Intercultural ambassador

Indigenous law club

Indigenous study abroad


Jessy's Story

Even as a child, Jessy Dame knew his future would be tied to health care. With a nursing degree at TRU at hand, this young Métis student is well on his way to fulfilling his calling — but beyond clinic and classroom, Jessy’s time at TRU has also nourished his Indigenous roots, expanded his understanding of the planet and strengthened his capacity to create positive change.



Stories

Standing in support with T’exelc

President Brett Fairbairn writes with thoughts for the Williams Lake First Nation (T’exelc), who have identified potential burial sites.

Award supports Indigenous health-care professionals

A team of TRU grant holders are the proud recipients of the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research Reach Award for their Participatory Indigenous Nursing Knowledge Translation project.

Student wins scholarship for Indigenous women in STEM

Sophie Collins, a TRU math scholar, is the only woman awarded this fall's Indigenous Women in Technology Scholarship.

Panoramic view of Kamloops North Shore Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education logo

More than 40 TRU Elders, deans, faculty and staff are the proud recipients of this year’s Alan Blizzard Award from the Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education. This national award recognizes excellence in their collaborative teaching through the Knowledge Makers, which mentors Indigenous students to success as Indigenous researchers.


Thompson Rivers University is dedicated to Indigenous student success, to fostering meaningful relationships with Indigenous communities and to promoting Indigenous knowledges and scholarship. Through collaboration, innovation, respect and humility, the university fosters a welcoming environment that is grounded in the principles of reconciliation and is able to address the calls to action placed on everyone in this country.





Traditional Secwepemc (Shuswap) Territory

Kamloops and Williams Lake campuses are both situated on the traditional and unceded Secwepemc (Shuswap) territory.

We acknowledge and give honour to the Secwepemc — the ancestral peoples who have lived here for thousands of years — upon whose traditional and unceded land Thompson Rivers University is located. The Secwepemc maintain a spiritual and practical relationship to the land, water, air, animals, plants and all things needed for life on Mother Earth. It is with that in mind that we owe this debt of gratitude.

There are approximately 7,000 Secwepemc people in the territory, which spans 180,000 square kilometres through the interior plateau of south central British Columbia. The mountain ranges, grasslands and river valleys surrounding the Fraser, and North and South Thompson rivers create the boundaries of the territory.

TRU has one of the largest Indigenous student populations among BC post-secondary institutions, with well over 2,000 students (about 10 percent), representing 16 First Nation and Indigenous peoples enrolled in new, continuing, open learning and trades programs.

In addition to Secwepemc students, Indigenous students at TRU come from several BC nations, including the Carrier, Okanagan, Nuxalk, and Nlaka'pamux, as well as students of Métis and Inuit ancestry.


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