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Courses - M
Title Name Delivery
MATH 0101

 Practical Mathematics


This basic-level course provides a review of arithmetic with an emphasis on practical applications and examples. The course is an adult equivalent to completing Grade 9 mathematics. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but Mathematics Self-Assessment Tests are available from Student Services and are recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MATH 0300.
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Distance
MATH 0300

 Fundamental Math (8,0,0)

4 credits
Adult Basic Education - Fundamental: This is an entry-level math course, which focuses on operations involving whole numbers, fractions, decimal, percents, and measurement. Problem-solving is practiced in all topic areas. Note: This course is taught by the University and Employment Preparation Department
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MATH 0400

 Basic Math Skills (6,0,0)

4 credits
Adult Basic Education - Intermediate: Students practice and develop basic math skills, including a review of whole numbers, decimals, fractions, and percentages. Additional topics include systems of measurement, geometry, and an introduction to algebra. Prerequisite: Minimum C+ standing in MATH 0300, or placement on the TRU entry assessment test at a MATH 0400 level; prerequisites must have been attained within the last two years Note: This course is taught by the University and Employment Preparation Department. Prerequisites must have been attained within the last two years. Students cannot receive credit for both MATH 0401 and MATH 0400
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MATH 0401

 Intermediate Mathematics


This ABE intermediate-level math course is equivalent to Grade 10 Algebra. Upon completion of this course, students are well-prepared for the ABE advanced-level course, MATH 0523: Advanced Mathematics, or Algebra 11. This course is also good preparation for studies in a variety of technical, business, and scientific fields requiring an understanding of intermediate-level mathematics. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but Grade 9 Math is recommended. Mathematics Self-Assessment Tests are available from Student Services and are recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MATH 0400.
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MATH 0410

 Algebra 1 (6,0,0)

4 credits
Adult Basic Education - Intermediate: Students prepare for entry into Math 0510 or Math 0520, by reviewing basic math skills, graphing linear equations, performing operations with polynomials, handling inequalities, solving first and second degree equations and systems of two equations, and simplifying and solving rational and radical expressions and equations. Students are also introduced to right-triangle trigonometry. Together with MATH 0400: Basic Math Skills, this course fulfills the Adult Basic Education-Intermediate requirements. Prerequisite: Minimum C+ standing in Math 0400, or placement on the TRU entry assessment test at a MATH 0410 level Note: The prerequisite must have been attained within the last two years. This course is taught by the University and Employment Preparation Department. Students cannot receive credit for both MATH 0500 and MATH 0410
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MATH 0510

 Algebra 2 (6,0,0)

4 credits
Adult Basic Education - Advanced: This course provides an advanced treatment of the topics covered in MATH 0410 and includes additional topics such as functions, graphs of quadratic functions, higher order radicals, systems of inequalities, and the trigonometric laws of sines and cosines. Prerequisites:Foundations of Mathematics and Pre-Calculus 10 with a minimum C+ or MATH 0410 with a minimum C or equivalent. Note: Prerequisites must have been attained within the last two years. This course is taught by the University and Employment Preparation Department. Students cannot receive credit for both MATH 0523 and MATH 0510
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MATH 0520

 Foundations of Mathematics (6,0,0)

4 credits
Adult Basic Education – Advanced: Students learn and practice math skills that include basic algebra, rates, linear relations, systems of linear equations/inequalities, quadratic functions, geometry, and trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 0410 or Foundations of Math & Pre-Calculus 10 Note: This course is taught by the University and Employment Preparation Department
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MATH 0523

 Advanced Mathematics


This advanced-level algebra course is equivalent to Grade 11 Algebra. The course offers an optional review component for students who have not studied algebra for some time. Topics include equations, graphs, polynomials, rational equations, radical equations, and trigonometry. Prerequisites: MATH 0401 or Grade 10 Algebra, or equivalent. Mathematics Self-Assessment Tests are available online at http://www.tru.ca/distance/services/advising.html#assessments. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MATH 0510.
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Distance
MATH 0550

 Advanced Business and Technical Mathematics (6,0,0)

4 credits
This course will provide the students with practical applications useful in future vocational training, careers, and personal life. Required outcomes include operations with real numbers, first degree equations and inequalities, and equations and graphing. Also learners must complete a minimum of three of the following optional learning outcomes: consumer mathematics, finance, data analysis, measurement, geometry, trigonometry, systems of equations, and trades option. Prerequisite: MATH 0400
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MATH 0600

 Pre-Calculus 1 (6,0,0)

4 credits
Adult Basic Education - Provincial: This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental background to study calculus. Topics include a review of intermediate algebra, an introduction to functions, and a study of linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Together with MATH 0610: Pre-Calculus 2, this course fulfills the ABE - Provincial Level (Grade 12 equivalency) requirements. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 11 (minimum C) or equivalent, in the last two years Note: This course is taught by the University and Employment Preparation Department. See transfer guide for transferability to other institutions.
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Campus
MATH 0610

 Pre-Calculus 2 (6,0,0)

4 credits
Adult Basic Education - Provincial: Students build on the skills developed in MATH 0600: Pre-Calculus 1. Topics include polynomial, rational, and trigonometric functions; analytical trigonometry; and sequences and series. Together with MATH 0600, this course fulfills the ABE Provincial Level (Grade 12 equivalency) requirements. Prerequisite: MATH 0600 (minimum C), within the last two years Note: This course is taught by the University and Employment Preparation Department
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MATH 0630

 Provincial Pre-Calculus Mathematics (9,0,0)

4 credits
This course is designed to give students the necessary background to study calculus. Students become proficient in the use of polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, analytic trigonometry, and sequences and series to solve problems. Prerequisite: MATH 0510 (minimum B standing) or Principles of Math 11 (minimum B standing) or Pre-calculus 11 (minimum B standing) or permission of course instructor and completion of prerequisites within the last two years
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MATH 0633

 Pre-Calculus


This course is equivalent to Math 12 and provides the mathematical foundation for an introductory course in calculus. Topics include a review of basic algebra; equations and inequalities; graphs of functions; polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; trigonometric equations and identities; conic sections; and sequences and series. This course fulfils the requirement for Provincial Level Math. Prerequisite: MATH 0523, or Grade 11 Mathematics or equivalent. Some basic algebra is required.
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MATH 0650

 Provincial Foundations of Mathematics (6,0,0)

4 credits
Adult Basic Education - Provincial: This course is designed to prepare students with the math skills necessary for entry to programs or courses where Foundations of Math 12 is a prerequisite. Topics include logical reasoning and set theory, permutations and combinations, probability, exponential and logarithmic functions, polynomial and sinusoidal functions, and financial mathematics. Prerequisite: Foundations of Math 11 or Pre-Calculus 11 (minimum C) or equivalent, within the last two years
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Campus
MATH 1000

 Pre-Calculus (5,0,0)

3 credits
This course provides the mathematical foundation for an introductory calculus course. Topics include equations and inequalities; functions, models, and graphs; polynomial and rational functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric functions, identities and equations. Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 60% (C) or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 0600 with a minimum grade of B or equivalent. Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1000 or MATH 1001.
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Campus
MATH 1001

 Pre-Calculus Mathematics

3 credits
This course provides the mathematical foundation for an introductory calculus course. In addition to a brief review of basic algebra, students are instructed in equations and inequalities; functions, models, and graphs; polynomial and rational functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric functions; and trigonometric identities and equations. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but Pre-calculus 12, MATH 0633, a completed Mathematics Assessment are recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MATH 1157, MATH 1171, MATH 1141, MATH 0610, MATH 1000, MATH 1001.
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MATH 1070

 Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
This course is designed for Business and Economics students. Topics include linear and non-linear functions and models applied to cost, revenue, profit, demand and supply, systems of equations (linear and nonlinear), matrices, linear programming, difference equations, and mathematics of finance (including simple and compound interest, annuities, mortgages, and loans). Prerequisite: Foundations of Math 12 / Pre-Calculus 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or equivalent. Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 or MATH 1101.
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MATH 1071

 Fundamentals of Mathematics for Business and Economics

3 credits
This course is designed for Business and Economic students. Topics include the review of linear and non-linear functions and models (including cost, revenue, profit, demand and supply), solving linear and non-linear systems of equations, matrices, linear programming, difference equations, and mathematics of finance (including simple and compound interest: discrete and continuous, annuities, mortgages, loans). Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but Pre-calculus 12, MATH 1001 within the last two years are recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MATH 1091, MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1100, MATH 1101.
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MATH 1091

 Business Mathematics

3 credits
Students are introduced to mathematics of management, which includes such concepts as simple interest, discounts, present value, time value of money, compound interest, annuities, sinking funds, capitalized cost, and bonds and stocks. This course assumes no prior knowledge of the mathematics of finance, as each of the topics is presented in a step-by-step manner, with examples provided. Prerequisites: Pre-calculus 11, Foundations of Mathematics 12, MATH 0523 Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MATH 1070, MATH 1071. Note: This course is NOT the equivalent of TRU's MATH 1070 or MATH 1071. Normally, students in business programs offered through TRU-OL take only one of MATH 1091 and 1071. This course does not meet the mathematics/science requirement for arts and science degree programs offered through TRU-OL
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MATH 1100

 Finite Math with Applications 1 (3, 1.5, 0)

3 credits
This course is intended primarily for Liberal Arts or Tourism students. Students solve problems that have direct relevance in the “real world." Topics to be covered include sets, counting, probability, matrices, linear programming, and math of finance. Prerequisites: Foundations of Math 11 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or Pre-Calculus 11 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum grade of 60% (C) or MATH 0510 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0520 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0523 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C- Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 or MATH 1101.
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Campus
MATH 1101

 Finite Mathematics

3 credits
First year university students are provided an opportunity to develop mathematical skills in areas other than calculus. The course has a numerical leaning tied to solving problems that have direct relevance in the 'real world,' and including such topics as systems of linear equations, linear programming, finite probability, and descriptive statistics. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but Pre-calculus 11, Foundations of Mathematics 11, MATH 0523 are recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MATH 1100, MATH 1101.
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MATH 1130

 Calculus 1 for Engineering (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
Students build a strong mathematical foundation for engineering by learning ideas, methods and applications of single-variable differential calculus. Limits and derivatives are defined and calculated, derivatives are interpreted as slopes and rates of change, and derivatives are then applied to many sorts of problems, such as finding maximum and minimum values of functions. Prerequisite: Admission to the Engineering program. Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
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MATH 1140

 Calculus 1 (3,1.5,0) or (5,0,0)

3 credits
Students study differential calculus for functions of one variable, with applications emphasizing the physical sciences. Topics include calculation and interpretation of limits and derivatives; curve sketching; optimization and related-rate problems; l'Hospital's rule; linear approximation and Newton's method. Prerequisites: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C- Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
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MATH 1141

 Calculus I

3 credits
This is considered a first course in calculus, primarily for students intending to continue to advanced courses in calculus, and mathematics in general. Students conduct a detailed study of differential calculus and its applications, and are introduced to antiderivatives. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but Pre-calculus 12 or MATH 0633, or equivalent skills as established by the math placement test are recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MATH 1157, MATH 1171, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1130, MATH 1170, MATH 1171, MATH 1150.
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MATH 1150

 Calculus for the Biological Sciences 1 (5,0,0)

3 credits
Students study differential calculus for functions of one variable, with applications emphasizing the biological sciences. Topics include calculation and interpretation of limits and derivatives, curve sketching, and optimization problems. MATH 1140 is recommended rather than MATH 1150 for students planning to take second-year MATH courses. Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C- Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
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MATH 1157

 Calculus for Biology and Social Sciences

3 credits
This course emphasizes applications rather than theory. Students begin with a review of algebra, to ensure the necessary mathematical skills to succeed in the course, and before they are introduced to limits and continuity. Students then progress to differential and integral calculus for polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and their applications to curve sketching, maxima, and minima. Students apply these mathematical tools to a variety of 'real-world' problems, including medical issues, epidemics, carbon dating, memory and criminology. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but Pre-calculus 12 or MATH 1001, or MATH 0633, are recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MATH 1150, MATH 1130, MATH 1141, MATH 1140, MATH 1170.
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MATH 1170

 Calculus for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
This course is intended for Business and Economics students. Topics include calculation and interpretation of derivatives, curve sketching, optimization (applied to business and economics), multivariable functions (including partial derivatives, optimization and Lagrange multipliers). Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1070 with a minimum grade of C- Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
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MATH 1171

 Calculus for Business Management Sciences

3 credits
This introductory course emphasizes the application of differential and integral calculus to the problems encountered in business and management science. Students begin with a brief review of algebra in order to ensure the necessary mathematical skills to succeed in the course. Students are then introduced to limits and continuity, and progress to differential and integral calculus for polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and their applications to curve sketching, maxima, and minima. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but Pre-calculus 12 or MATH 1001, or MATH 0633, are recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MATH 1157, MATH 1141, MATH 1170, MATH 1171.
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MATH 1230

 Calculus 2 for Engineering (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
Students learn the ideas and techniques of single-variable integral calculus from an engineering perspective. Integrals are defined, evaluated and used to calculate areas, volumes, arc lengths and physical quantities such as force, work and centres of mass. Differential equations are introduced and used to model various physical phenomena. Ideas about infinite series are pursued, including some convergence tests, with particular emphasis on Taylor series. Prerequisite: MATH 1130 with a minimum grade of C. Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1230, MATH 1240, MATH 1241 or MATH 1250.
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MATH 1240

 Calculus 2 (3,1.5,0) or (5,0,0)

3 credits
This course covers integral calculus for functions of one variable, with applications emphasizing the physical sciences. Topics include Riemann sums, definite and indefinite integrals, techniques of integration, improper integrals, applications of integration (including area, volume, arc length, probability and work), separable differential equations, and series. Prerequisites: MATH 1130 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1140 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1141 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1150 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1157 with a minimum grade of C- Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1230, MATH 1240, MATH 1241 or MATH 1250.
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MATH 1241

 Calculus II

3 credits
This course is intended for students who have already completed a Calculus I course in differential and integral calculus, and need to further develop their skills in this subject. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but MATH 1141 is recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MATH 1240, MATH 1250.
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MATH 1250

 Calculus for the Biological Sciences 2 (5,0,0)

3 credits
This course covers integral calculus for functions of one variable, with applications emphasizing the biological sciences. Topics include Riemann sums, definite and indefinite integrals, techniques of integration, improper integrals, first-order differential equations and slope fields, applications (including area, probability, logistic growth and predator-prey systems), and series. MATH 1240 is recommended instead of MATH 1250 for students planning to take 2nd-year MATH courses. Prerequisites: MATH 1130 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1140 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1141 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1150 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1157 with a minimum grade of C- Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1230, MATH 1240, MATH 1241 or MATH 1250.
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MATH 1300

 Linear Algebra for Engineers (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
This course is designed for engineering students, with applications chosen accordingly. Topics include real vectors in two and three dimensions, systems of linear equations and row-echelon form, span and linear dependence, linear transformations and matrices, determinants, complex numbers, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and orthogonality and Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization. Prerequisite: Admission to the Engineering Program Corequisite: MATH 1130 Exclusions: MATH 2120 and MATH 2121
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MATH 1380

 Discrete Structures 1 Computing Science (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
An introduction to the basic mathematical concepts used in computing science. Topics covered include the binary number system, computer arithmetic, logic and truth tables, Boolean algebra, logic gates and simple computer circuits, sets, relations, functions, vectors and matrices, counting, probability theory and statistics (mean, variance, median, mode, random variables). Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of C+ Exclusions: MATH 1650, MATH 1651 and COMP 1380
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MATH 1390

 Discrete Structures 2 for Computing Science (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
In this continuation of MATH 1380: Discrete Structures 1 for Computing Science, students build upon and apply mathematical concepts used in computing science. Topics include graph theory in terms of directed graphs; binary trees; languages; grammars; machines; an introduction to proofs and mathematical induction; and algorithm analysis. Prerequisites: COMP 1380 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 1380 with a minimum grade of C Exclusions: COMP 1390, MATH 1700 and MATH 1701
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MATH 1420

 Mathematics for Visual Arts (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
Students explore mathematical concepts and techniques that are useful in a visual arts context. Topics include real numbers, ratios, geometry, and perspective. Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus 11 or MATH 0500.
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MATH 1540

 Technical Mathematics 1 (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
Students are instructed in mathematical concepts that are relevant to architecture, design, and engineering. Topics include trigonometry, an introduction to two- and three- dimensional vectors, functions and graphs, solving linear and quadratic equations, coordinate geometry, areas and volumes of standard geometric shapes, elementary statistics and probability, and problem solving. Prerequisite: Admission to the Architectural and Engineering Technology program
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MATH 1640

 Technical Mathematics 2 (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
This is a calculus course for students in the Architectural and Engineering Technology program. Topics include systems of linear equations and matrices; differentiation and integration, with applications to curve sketching, extreme values and optimization; related rates; areas; volumes. Prerequisites: MATH 1540 and Admission to the Architectural and Engineering Technology program
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MATH 1650

 Mathematics for Computing Science (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
This course surveys several mathematical concepts used in Computing Science. Topics include logic; circuits; number systems; finite state machines; vector and matrix algebra; systems of linear equations; linear transformations; discrete and continuous probabilities; statistics and random variables; decision analysis. Prerequisites: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or MATH 0600 with a minimum grade of B or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C- Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following COMP 1380, MATH 1380, MATH 1650 or MATH 1651.
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MATH 1651

 Mathematics for Computing Science

3 credits
This course introduces further mathematical concepts used in Computing Science. Topics include vectors and matrices; geometry; sets, relations, and functions; logic, circuits, and number systems; counting and probability; random variables; and decision analysis. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but one of Pre-calculus 12 or Foundations of Mathematics12 (or equivalent) with a minimum C+; within the last two years is recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MATH 1650, MATH 1651, MATH 1380, COMP 1380.
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MATH 1700

 Discrete Mathematics 1 (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
Students are introduced to the foundation of modern mathematics. Topics include basic set theory; counting; solutions to recurrence relations; logic and quantifiers; properties of integers; mathematical induction; introduction of graphs and trees; asymptotic notations. Prerequisites: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or MATH 0600 with a minimum grade of B or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C- Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following COMP 1390, MATH 1390, MATH 1700 or MATH 1701.
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MATH 1701

 Discrete Mathematics

3 credits
Students are introduced to the foundation of modern mathematics including basic set theory; counting; solutions to recurrence relations; logic and quantifiers; properties of integers; mathematical induction; asymptotic notation; introduction of graphs and trees; finite state machines and formal languages; Boolean algebra. Prerequisites: One of Pre-calculus 12 or Foundations of Mathematics12 (or equivalent) with a minimum C+; within the last two years. Note: Students who already have credit for MATH 1380 and MATH 1390 may not take MATH 1701 for further credit. Cannot have credit for both Math 1700 and Math 1701.
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MATH 1900

 Principles of Mathematics for Teachers (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
This course is designed for students who wish to enter the Elementary Teaching Program, emphasizes conceptual understanding of elementary mathematical methods and ideas. Topics include problem solving, numbers and number theory, operations, geometry, measurement, proportional reasoning and probability. Additional topics may be included at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisites: Foundations of Math 11 with a minimum 67% (C+) or Pre-calculus 11 with a minimum 67% (C+) or MATH 0510 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0520 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0550 with a minimum grade of C- Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1900 or MATH 1901.
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MATH 1901

 Principles of Mathematics for Teachers

3 credits
This course is primarily for students who wish to enter an Elementary Teaching program. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding of elementary mathematical methods and ideas. Topics include numbers, operations, proportional reasoning, number theory, algebra, geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but Pre-calculus 11, or Foundations of Mathematics 11, or MATH 0523, or equivalent skills as established by the Math Placement Test are recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MATH 1900.
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MATH 2110

 Calculus 3 (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
The concepts of single-variable calculus are extended to higher dimensions by using vectors as variables. Topics include vector geometry and the analytic geometry of lines, planes and surfaces; calculus of curves in two or three dimensions, including arc length and curvature; calculus of scalar-valued functions of several variables, including the gradient, directional derivatives and the Chain Rule; Lagrange multipliers and optimization problems; double integrals in rectangular and polar coordinates. Prerequisites: MATH 1230 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 1240 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 1241 with a minimum grade of C. Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 2110, MATH 2111 or MATH 2650.
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MATH 2111

 Calculus III-Multivariable Calculus

3 credits
This course takes calculus from the two dimensional world of single variable functions into the three dimensional world, and beyond, of multivariable functions. Students explore the following topics: vector geometry and analytic geometry of lines, planes and surfaces; calculus of curves in two or three dimensions, including arc length and curvature; calculus of scalar-valued functions of several variables, including the gradient, directional derivatives and the Chain Rule; Lagrange multipliers and optimization problems; double integrals in rectangular and polar coordinates; triple integrals in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; calculus of vector fields, including line integrals, curl and divergence, fundamental theorem for line integrals, and Green's theorem. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but a course in differential and integral calculus, such as MATH 1141 and MATH 1241 is recommended. Students should have done well in these courses in order to succeed in this difficult course. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MATH 2110, MATH 2111.
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MATH 2120

 Linear Algebra 1 (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
Students are introduced to linear algebra. Topics include vector spaces, Matrix algebra and matrix inverse, systems of linear equations and row-echelon form, bases and dimension, orthogonality, geometry of n-dimensional space, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, linear transformations. Prerequisites: MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1241 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1700 or MATH 1701 all with a minimum grade of C. Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1300, MATH 2120 or MATH 2121.
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MATH 2121

 Linear Algebra

3 credits
Students explore the following topics: systems of linear equations, matrix arithmetic, determinants, real vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors and diagonalization. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but Pre-calculus 12, or MATH 0633, or MATH 1001, or MATH 1141 are recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MATH 2120, MATH 2121.
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MATH 2200

 Introduction to Analysis (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
Analysis is a broad area of mathematics that includes calculus. This course presents some basic concepts of analysis in a mathematically rigorous manner, using theorems and proofs. Students are expected to develop some ability to understand proofs and to write their own proofs. After a survey of essential background material on logic, set theory, numbers and functions, the course covers suprema and infima of sets, completeness, basic metric topology of the real numbers (neighbourhoods, interior points and cluster points), continuity and limits. Prerequisite: MATH 1240 or equivalent calculus. B- minimum strongly recommended. Required Seminar: MATH 2200S
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MATH 2220

 Discrete Mathematics (3,1,1)

3 credits
This course is an introduction to discrete mathematical structures and their applications, intended for Computing Science majors especially but not exclusively. Topics include sets, propositions, permutations, combinations, relations, functions, graphs, paths, circuits, trees, recurrent relations, and Boolean algebra. Prerequisite: MATH 1140 and COMP 1130, or equivalent Note: This course is the same as COMP 2200 - Introduction to Discrete Structures Required Seminar: MATH 2220S
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MATH 2240

 Differential Equations 1 (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
This course examines ordinary differential equations and related initial-value problems, and emphasizes their many applications in science and engineering. Students discuss methods for solving such equations either exactly or approximately. Topics include first-order equations; higher order linear equations; modelling with differential equations; systems of linear equations; and phase plane analysis of nonlinear systems. Prerequisites: MATH 1240, MATH 1241, MATH 2120 or MATH 2121 all with a minimum grade of C.
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MATH 2650

 Calculus 3 for Engineering (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
Engineering students see how the concepts of single-variable calculus are extended to higher dimensions using vectors. Topics include analytic geometry of lines, planes and surfaces; calculus of curves in two and three dimensions, including arc length and curvature; calculus of real-valued functions of several variables, including the gradient, directional derivatives and the Chain Rule; multi-variable Taylor approximations; optimization and Lagrange multipliers; double and triple integrals in rectangular coordinates and other coordinate systems; general variable changes in integrals; vector fields and gradient fields, curl and divergence. Prerequisite: MATH 1230 and MATH 1300 Note: Credit will not be given for more than one of MATH 2110, MATH 2111 and MATH 2650
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MATH 2670

 Calculus 4 for Engineering (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
Engineering students complete the calculus sequence by studying several topics that are important as background for professional engineers: vector calculus, including line integrals, conservative fields, Green's theorem, surface integrals, Stokes' theorem and the divergence theorem; ordinary differential equations, including methods of solution for first-order equations and higher order linear equations, Laplace transform methods and applications to mechanical vibrations and electric circuits; and basic Fourier series. Prerequisite: MATH 2650 Note that students cannot receive credit for both MATH 2670 and MATH 3170
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MATH 2700

 Discrete Mathematics 2 (3,1.5,0)

3 credits
This course is a sequel to MATH 1700. Topics include combinatorial arguments and proofs, deriving recurrence relations; generating functions; inclusion-exclusion; functions and relations; countable and uncountable sets; and graph theory. Prerequisite: COMP 1390 or MATH 1390 or MATH 1700 or MATH 1701 all with a minimum grade of C.
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MATH 3000

 Complex Variables (3,1,0)

3 credits
Students are introduced to the classical complex function theory, a cornerstone of mathematics. Topics include: complex derivatives and the Cauchy-Riemann equations; the complex exponential function and related elementary functions; integration along curves and Cauchy's theorems; Taylor and Laurent series; zeros and singularities; residues; and evaluation of integrals using the residue theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 2110 or MATH 2111 and MATH 3170 or MATH 2200 all with a minimum grade of C or with departmental permission.
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MATH 3020

 Introduction to Probability (3,1,0)

3 credits
This course provides a theoretical foundation for the study of statistics. Topics include basic notions of probability, random variables, probability distributions (both single-variable and multi-variable), expectation and conditional expectation, limit theorems and random number generation. Prerequisite: MATH 2110
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MATH 3030

 Introduction to Stochastic Processes (3,1,0)

3 credits
Students examine simple random processes, including discrete and continuous Markov chains, Poisson processes and Brownian motion. Renewal theory is also discussed. Prerequisite: MATH 3020 Required Seminar: MATH 3030S
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MATH 3070

 Linear Algebra 2 (3,1,0)

3 credits
Fundamental ideas about vector spaces and subspaces, bases and dimension, linear transformations and matrices are studied in more depth than in MATH 2120. Topics include matrix diagonalization and its applications, invariant subspaces, inner product spaces and Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization, linear operators of various special types (normal, self-adjoint, unitary, orthogonal, projections), and the finite-dimensional spectral theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 1300 or MATH 2120 or MATH 2121 all with a minimum grade of C.
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MATH 3080

 Euclidean Geometry (3,1,0)

3 credits
Students begin with the axiomatic development of geometry, and briefly explore possible variations in axioms. Students then progress to classical Euclidean geometry; geometric transformations; and the relevance of geometric transformations to computer graphics. The course concludes with a discussion of non-Euclidean geometries and projective geometry. Prerequisite: MATH 2120 Required Seminar: MATH 3080S
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MATH 3120

 Elementary Number Theory (3,1,0)

3 credits
The course begins with integer divisibility and the related ideas of prime numbers, unique prime factorization, and congruence. Attention is then directed to arithmetic functions, including the Euler totient function. The Chinese Remainder Theorem and quadratic reciprocity are studied, and some Diophantine equations are considered. Lastly continued fractions and primitive roots are discussed. Prerequisite: MATH 2120 Required Seminar: MATH 3120S
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MATH 3160

 Differential Equations 2 (3,1,0)

3 credits
This course is divided into three parts. The first part examines methods for solving ordinary differential equations. Power series methods are applied to obtain solutions near ordinary points and regular singular points, and the real Laplace transform is discussed. In the second part, students consider Sturm-Liouville boundary-value problems, Fourier series, and other series of eigenfunctions, including Fourier-Bessel series. In the last part of the course, the method of separation of variables is used to solve initial-value and boundary-value problems involving partial differential equations, especially the heat equation, the wave equation and Laplace's equation, with applications in physics. Prerequisites: MATH 2240-Differential Equations with a minimum grade of C Exclusion Requisites: PHYS 3120- Introduction to Mathematical Physics
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MATH 3170

 Calculus 4 (3,1,0)

3 credits
The concept of a definite integral is extended to double and triple integrals and the calculus of vector fields are studied. Topics include triple integrals in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, general change of variables in double and triple integrals, vector fields, line integrals, conservative fields and path independence, Green's theorem, surface integrals, Stokes' theorem and the divergence theorem, with applications in physics. Prerequisites:MATH 2110 and MATH 2111 Exclusion Requisites:MATH 2670
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MATH 3200

 Real Variables (3,1,0)

3 credits
The core of this course is a careful study of continuity and limits of real functions and convergence of real sequences and series, in addition to basic topology of the real line. Limit points and subsequences are discussed, leading to the Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem and the concept of a compact set. Metric spaces are introduced. Prerequisites: MATH 2200, MATH 3070, MATH 3080, MATH 3120 and MATH 3220
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MATH 3220

 Abstract Algebra (3,1,0)

3 credits
Students in this course study some abstract algebraic structures. The main structures are groups and rings. Topics include groups and subgroups, cyclic groups, permutation groups, group homomorphisms and quotient groups, rings and ring homomorphisms, integral domains, ideals and quotient rings, prime and maximal ideals, and fields. Prerequisites:MATH 2120, MATH 2121, MATH 2200, MATH 2700, MATH 3070, MATH 3080 and MATH 3120
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MATH 3400

 Introduction to Linear Programming (3,1,0)

3 credits
Algorithms for linear programming are introduced and studied in this course, from both theoretical and applied perspectives. Topics include the graphic method; simplex method; revised simplex method; and duality theory. Special linear programming such as network flows and game theory are also explored. Prerequisites:MATH 2120 or MATH 2121
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MATH 3510

 Problem Solving Applied Math (3,1,0)

3 credits
This course provides learners with a systematic approach to problem solving. Students use a variety of analytical techniques to solve problems drawn from various disciplines. This course is of interest to students in any program where numerical problems may occur. Prerequisites: MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170, MATH 1171, MATH 1650, MATH 1651, MATH 1700, MATH 1701, STAT 1200, STAT 1201 or STAT 2000
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MATH 3650

 Numerical Analysis (3,1,0)

3 credits
This course introduces standard numerical methods, including algorithms for solving algebraic equations (linear and nonlinear, single equations and systems) and for polynomial approximation and interpolation. Prerequisite: MATH 2110 or MATH 2111 and MATH 2120 or MATH 2121 all with a minimum grade of C. Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following COMP 3320 or MATH 3650.
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MATH 3700

 Introduction to the History of Mathematics (3,1,0)

3 credits
Students trace the development of numeration, arithmetic, geometry, algebra and other areas of mathematics, from their beginnings to their modern forms. The historical development studies is enhanced by the solution of mathematical problems using the techniques that were available in the period under study. Prerequisite: MATH 1240 or equivalent Required Seminar: MATH 3700S
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MATH 3990

 Selected Topics in Mathematics (3,1,0)

3 credits
Students consider, in depth, a selection of topics drawn from Mathematics. The particular topics may vary each time the course is offered. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in 6 credits of MATH numbered 2000 or higher or permission of the instructor.
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MATH 4410

 Modelling of Discrete Optimization Problems (3,1,0)

3 credits
Real-world optimization problems are formulated in order to be resolved by standard techniques involving linear programming, integer programming, network flows, dynamic programming and goal programming. Additional techniques may include post-optimality analysis, game theory, nonlinear programming, and heuristic techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 3400-Intro to Linear Programming with a minimum grade of C
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MATH 4420

 Optimization in Graphs and Networks (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students will be introduced to networks in graph theory and the corresponding algorithms. Topics include graph theory, tree searching algorithms, shortest paths, maximum flows, minimum cost flows, matchings, network optimization and graph colouring. Prerequisites: MATH 3400-Intro to Linear Programming with a minimum grade of C
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MATH 4430

 Introduction to Graph Theory (4,0,0)

3 credits
An introductory course deals mostly with non-algorithmic topics, including connectivity, Eulerian graphs, Hamiltonian graphs, planarity and Kuratowski's Theorem, matchings, graph colouring, and extremal graphs. Applications of graphs are discussed. Prerequisites: MATH 2700-Discrete Mathematics 2 with a minimum grade of C or A minimum grade of C in at least 12 credits of Mathematics or Statistics courses numbered 2000 or higher.
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MATH 4950

 Honours Thesis in Mathematics (0,3,0)(0,3,0)

6 credits
Students are required to conduct an independent investigation into a mathematical topic or problem at the advanced undergraduate level, under the supervision of a member of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. The results of the study are to be typed and submitted as an Honours Thesis, and is defended orally at a public lecture before an examining committee. Prerequisite: Admission into the Mathematics Honours Program (as part of a Bachelor of Science degree or a Bachelor of Arts degree) and the identification of a supervisor
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MATH 4980

 ***Directed Studies in Mathematics

3 credits
Students undertake an investigation on a specific topic as agreed to by the faculty member and the student. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
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MATH 4990

 ***Selected Topics in Mathematics (3,1,0)

3 credits
Students consider, in depth, a selection of topics drawn from Mathematics. The particular topics may vary each time the course is offered. Prerequisite: 6 credits of MATH at the 3000 level or higher, or permission of the instructor
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MATH 5210

 Advanced Modelling Techniques (3,1,0)

3 credits
The objectives of this course are to learn to apply mathematical tools to solve open-ended, real-world problems, to understand the benefits and limitations of mathematical modelling, and to critically assess the predictions based on mathematical models, as well as to stimulate interest in studying more advanced mathematics topics (e.g. numerical analysis, differential equations, probability and statistics, and optimization.) Prerequisite: MATH 2120, MATH 2240
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MATH 5220

  Advanced Optimization Methods (3,1,0)

3 credits
In this course, we introduce discrete optimization and expose students to some of the most fundamental concepts, techniques and algorithms in the field. It covers linear optimization, integer and mixed programming, network optimization, goal programming, multi-criteria decision analysis, constraint programming, and game theory. The techniques and algorithms will be applied to complex practical problems in areas such as scheduling, network security, social network, vehicle routing, supply-chain optimization, and resource allocation. Students will do a project on an application of their choice. Prerequisite: MATH 3400
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MDLB 1221

 Professional Practices and Safety in Health Care

3 credits
This course takes an in-depth look at the basic principles of professional and safety issues related to the position of medical laboratory assistant (MLA). The main objectives are as follows: clarify the role of the MLA in health care; promote the need for professionalism in the position of MLA; convey the importance of good interpersonal and communication skills; and provide important information about workplace safety. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but HLTH 1981, HLTH 1141 are recommended.
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MDLB 1321

 Phlebotomy Procedures and Specimen Preparation

3 credits
This in-depth course examines the practice of phlebotomy and provides a comprehensive background in the related theory and principles. The course also covers the theory of body fluid analysis, automated instrument loading, slide staining and laboratory information systems. Practitioner safety is emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but HLTH 1981, HLTH 1141, MDLB 1221 are recommended.
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MDLB 1515

 Phlebotomy Workshop


This practical course allows students to develop and demonstrate the skills learned in MDLB 1321 and to further explore the roles and professional responsibilities of a Medical Laboratory Assistant (MLA), and to gain experience in performing venipuncture under the guidance of experienced MLA's. Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Administrator, Science
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MDLB 1521

 Microbiology Specimen Preparation

3 credits
This in-depth course examines the Microbiology department and provides a comprehensive background in the relatedtheory and principles. The course also covers the theory of specimen types, specimen preparation, aseptic technique,media selection, and preparation of parasite specimens. Practitioner safety is emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisites Recommended: HLTH 1981, HLTH 1141, MDLB 1221 and MDLB 1321
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MDLB 1525

 MLA Workshop


This practical course allows students to develop and demonstrate the skills learned in MDLB 1221, 1321 and 1521,to further explore the roles and professional responsibilities of a Medical Laboratory Assistant (MLA), and to gainexperience in performing venipuncture, electrocardiograms, and laboratory procedures under the guidance ofexperienced MLA's. Prerequisite: Admission to the Medical Laboratory Assistant Program and completion of HLTH 1981, HLTH 1141, MDLB 1221,MDLB 1321, and MDLB 1521 are required. MDLB 1321, and MDLB 1521 are required. Note: Students who have already completed MDLB 0521 cannot receive further credit for MDLB 1525 ***This course is only available for registration to students residing in Canada***
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MDLB 1611

 Pre-Analytical Procedures for Histopathology

3 credits
This course is designed for the working Medical Laboratory Assistant and the basic concepts of pre-analytical histopathology including: anatomic pathology/ histology specimens, preparation for cutting, processing and accessioning. It also includes a cytology component covering specimen preparation, processing and accessioning. Prerequisites: Admission to the Medical Laboratory Assistant program. Proof graduation from a recognized Medical Laboratory Assistant program. Current employment in a clinical lab. A letter from a qualified employer stating the employer is willing to support the training required for this course.
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MDLB 1721

 Laboratory Practicum Evaluation of Competencies (120P hours)

3 credits
Laboratory Practicum - Evaluation of Competencies This practicum course is designed to evaluate specific technical and non-technical aspects of the Medical Laboratory Assistant's work, according to criteria and curriculum developed by the British Columbia Society of Medical Laboratory Science (BCSLS), which includes a minimum of 120 hours of practicum training and 200 successful venipunctures. This practicum is a competency based training program held at a laboratory or clinical facility. The specific length and timing of the practicum will vary by facility. Prerequisites: Admission to the Medical Laboratory Assistant program and completion of HLTH 1981, HLTH 1141, MDLB 1221, MDLB 1321, MDLB 1521, MDLB 0521.
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MDLB 1991

 Laboratory Practicum -- Evaluation of National Competencies (210P hours)

4 credits
This practicum course is designed to evaluate specific technical and non-technical aspects of the Medical Laboratory Assistant's work, according to criteria and curriculum developed by the Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science (CSMLS). This practicum is a competency-based training program held at a laboratory or clinical facility. The specific length and timing of the practicum will vary by facility. Prerequisites: HLTH 1981, MDLB 1221, MDLB 1321, MDLB 1521, MDLB 1611. ***This course is only available for registration to students residing in Canada****
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MEAT 1010

 Safety and Sanitation (30 hours)


In this practice-based course with theory components, students are introduced to meat lab sanitation procedures. Topics include refrigeration guidelines and safety practices for all handtools, and power equipment used in a retail meat processing operation. Prerequisite: Admission into the Retail Meat Processing program
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MEAT 1020

 Beef and Veal Carcass Processing (150 hours)


In this practice-based course with theory components, students are introduced to beef and veal carcass breaking procedures, merchandising practices for wholesale primals and sub-primals into retail cuts. Beef meat inspection and grading regulations, and product identification are also covered. Prerequisite: Admission into the Retail Meat Processing program
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MEAT 1030

 Meat Science (30 hours)


This is a theory-based course with practical lab applications and observation designed to introduce students to the study of meat structure, common diseases, meat coloration, electrical stimulation, post mortem aging, pre-slaughter stress syndrome, meat nutrition and shear force analysis. Prerequisite: Admission to the Retail Meat Processing program
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MEAT 1040

 Pork Processing (80 hours)


In this practice-based course with theory components, students are introduced to pork carcass breaking, merchandising, grading, specifications, variety meats and product identification. Prerequisite: Admission into the RetailMeat Processing program
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MEAT 1050

 Lamb Processing (50 hours)


In this practice-based course with theory components, students are introduced to lamb carcass breaking, merchandising, grading, specifications, variety meats and product identification. Prerequisite: Admission into the Retail Meat Processing program
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MEAT 1060

 Poultry Processing (50 hours)


In this practice-based course with theory components, students are introduced to poultry carcass processing, merchandising, grading specifications and product identification. Prerequisite: Admission into the Retail Meat Processing program
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MEAT 1070

 Seafood Processing (30 hours)


This is a theory-based course with a basic practical component to introduce students to various types of commonly sold retail seafood items in the fresh whole state, fillets, chuck form and frozen states. Prerequisite: Admission into the Retail Meat Processing program
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MEAT 1080

 Product Identification and Nomenclature (100 hours)


In this practice-based course with theory components, students expand on their existing knowledge of retail product legal names, utilizing practical lab sessions, and supporting theory media. Prerequisite: Admission into the Retail Meat Processing program
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MEAT 1090

 Value Added Processing (50 hours)


In this practice-based course with theory components, students are introduced to bacon and ham curing, vacuum tumbled products, jerky processing and the preparation of chicken cordon blue and various types of cutlets. Prerequisite: Admission into the Retail Meat Processing program
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MEAT 1100

 Fresh, Smoked and Cured Sausage (150 hours)


In this practice-based course with theory components, students are introduced to the history of sausage manufacturing. Topics include: processing and packaging materials; equipment and safety; spices; curing; smoking; and diseases associated with sausage manufacturing. Prerequisite: Admission into the Retail Meat Processing program
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MEAT 1110

 Meat Nutrition and Cooking (30 hours)


This is a theory-based course with practical components designed to introduce students to the nutritional value of meat products, the cooking of raw meats, and advising consumers on cooking for various meat products. Prerequisite: Admission into the Retail Meat Processing program
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MEAT 1120

 Customer Service and Employment Skills (150 hours)


This is a practice-based course with theory components and two separate three-week sessions, totalling six weeks. Students evaluate industry work experiences in two different locations, and are introduced to resume and cover letter writing skills for the retail meat processing industry. Customer service skills are developed through participation in the TRU meat store and complimented with course assignments and theory. Prerequisite: Admission into the Retail Meat Processing program
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MEAT 1130

 Business Related Math (100 hours)


A theory based course with practical lab applications designed to introduce students to industry related business math that focuses on metric conversion, mark up, mark down, cutting analysis, shrinkage analysis, and break even. Inventory management controls include gross profit statements, wage and profit ratios and price booking. Prerequisite: Admission into the Retail Meat Processing program
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MEAT 2000

 Meatcutting Apprentice Level 1 (140 hours)


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on lab experience in the following topics: occupational skills; handling beef, veal, pork, lamb, poultry, and seafood and freshwater fish. Prerequisite: Registered Meatcutter Apprentice with the Industry Training Authority
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MEAT 3000

 Meatcutting Apprentice Level 2 (140 hours)


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on lab experience in the following topics: occupational skills; handling beef, veal, pork, lamb, poultry, seafood and freshwater fish, game, and processed meat products. Prerequisite: Registered Meatcutter Apprentice with the Industry Training Authority
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MFAB 1100

 Metal Fabricator Level 1 (150 hours)


This course will introduce students to the full range of knowledge, abilities and skills required in the process of metal fabrication and fitting. Upon successful completion of this program the students should have the ability to interpret drawings in order to layout, mark, cut, burn, saw, shear, punch, drill, roll, bend, shape, form, straighten, fit, assemble, bolt, rivet, weld, test and inspect, prime and paint structural fabrications constructed from plates and structural shape of ferrous and non-ferrous metals.
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MFAB 1500

 Metal Fabricator - Foundation (690 hours)


This course will introduce students to the full range of knowledge, abilities and skills required in the process of metal fabrication and fitting. Upon successful completion of this program the students should have the ability to interpret drawings in order to layout, mark, cut, burn, saw, shear, punch, drill, roll, bend, shape, form, straighten, fit, assemble, bolt, rivet, weld, test and inspect, prime and paint structural fabrications constructed from plates and structural shape of ferrous and non-ferrous metals. Prerequisite: Grade 10 minimum, however, Grade 12 is strongly recommended. Acceptable score on the Entry Assessment Test.
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MFAB 2000

 Metal Fabricator Level 2 (150 hours)


This is the second level of the BC ITA Apprenticeship and will further students full range of knowledge, abilities and skills required in the process of metal fabrication and fitting.
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MFAB 3000

 Metal Fabricator Level 3 (150 hours)


This course will introduce students to the full range of knowledge, abilities and skills required in the process of metal fabrication and fitting. Upon successful completion of this program the students should have the ability to interpret drawings in order to layout, mark, cut, burn, saw, shear, punch, drill, roll, bend, shape, form, straighten, fit, assemble, bolt, rivet, weld, test and inspect, prime and paint structural fabrications constructed from plates and structural shape of ferrous and non-ferrous metals.
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MFAB 4000

 Metal Fabricator Level 4 (150 hours)


Upon successful completion of this fourth and final apprenticeship course, students should have the ability to interpret drawings in order to layout, mark, cut, burn, saw, shear, punch, drill, roll, bend, shape, form, straighten, fit, assemble, bolt, rivet, weld, test and inspect, prime and paint structural fabrications constructed from plates and structural shape of ferrous and non-ferrous metals.
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MICR 1580

 Veterinary Microbiology 1 (2,0,2)(L)

3 credits
This course is an introduction to veterinary microbiology. Topics include microbial anatomy and physiology, culture media, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, sterilization and disinfection, mycology and virology. Prerequisite: Admission to the Animal Health Technology program Required Lab: MICR 1580L
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MICR 1680

 Veterinary Microbiology 2 (0,1,3)(L)

2 credits
Students are instructed in the theory and application of laboratory methods. Prerequisite: MICR 1580. Admission to the Animal Health Technology program. Required Lab: MICR 1680L
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MIST 2610

 Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students acquire the knowledge and skills to effectively utilize information systems and technology in support of organizational strategy. Topics include an introduction to information systems; information systems strategy; ethics, privacy, and policy; data security; data and knowledge management; networks and communications technologies; wireless and mobile computing; e-business and e-commerce; Web 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and social networks; systems development and managing information systems projects; and personal productivity software, including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software. Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BBUS 1370, BBUS 1371, BBUS 2370, COMP 1000, COMP 1350, COMP 1700, COMP 1910 or MIST 2611
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MIST 2611

 Management Information Systems

3 credits
Students acquire the basic knowledge and skills needed to effectively utilize information systems and technology in support of organizational strategy. Topics include an introduction to information systems in organizations; strategy and information systems leadership; databases and data management; information networks; the Internet and social media; enterprise resource planning and business applications; e-business; wireless and mobile technology; knowledge management; developing and implementing information systems; security and information systems auditing; information ethics and privacy; and practical skills using operating systems, word processing and spreadsheet software. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but ENGL 1101 is recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of COMP 1000, COMP 1350, COMP 1700, COMP 1910, MIST 2610, MIST 2611.
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MIST 3620

 Web-Enabled Business Applications (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students develop a comprehensive understanding of web technologies and their applications in business. Topics include foundation of e-business; overview of the technological foundations of the Internet and web; revenue models and payment systems; building a web presence; marketing on the web; legal and ethical issues; hardware and software for developing and hosting websites; online security and payment systems; and improving efficiency and reducing costs in business-to-business activities. Prerequisite: CMNS 1290; MIST 2610
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MIST 3630

 Data and Knowledge Management (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students develop a theoretical and practical understanding of how to manage two of the most important assets of an organization: data and knowledge. Students examine issues related to the analysis, development, maintenance, and retention of information required for various organizational needs, and learn the fundamentals of how to implement solid knowledge management practices. Topics include an overview of data and knowledge management, modeling data in the organization, logical database design and the relational model, physical database design, data processing for business intelligence, data analysis and reporting, and managing organization data and knowledge. Prerequisite: CMNS 1290; MIST 2610
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MIST 4610

 Strategic Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students acquire the knowledge and skills to support decision-making and problem-solving processes in business and accounting. An emphasis is placed on managing the entire lifecycle of data, from collecting to interpreting, to modelling, to decision making, and finally to communicating the results. Topics include accounting information systems development; information technology auditing, including data and network security; developing enterprise reporting systems; managing data, principles of extensible markup language (XML), and extensible business reporting language (XBRL); and constructing, analyzing, and presenting a suite of spreadsheet-based, decision-making models. Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 or FNCE 3120, SCMN 3320 Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BBUS 4280 or MIST 4610
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MIST 4620

 Information Security Management (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students develop a general understanding of information technology security. Dependency on computer technology and the Internet has grown to a level where all organizations must devote considerable resources to managing threats to the security of their mobile, desktop and networked computer systems. Topics include introduction to information security; basic need for security; legal, ethical, and professional issues; risk management; information security policies and procedures; information security planning; access control systems and methodology; principles of cryptography; and operations security. Prerequisite: CMNS 1290; MIST 2610
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MIST 4630

 Information Technology Management for Business (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students develop knowledge and experience in project management, as it applies to business software and information systems development. Topics include the foundations of information systems project management for business; project management process stages; developing the project charter and baseline project plan; the human side of project management; defining and managing project scope; the work breakdown structure and project estimation; the project schedule and budget; managing project risk; project communication, tracking, and reporting; information systems project quality management; and project implementation and evaluation. Prerequisite: MIST 3620; MIST 3630; MIST 4620
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MKTG 2430

 Introduction to Marketing (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students receive an overall view of the marketing function, the role of marketing in society and its application within organizations. Topics include an overview of marketing; developing a marketing plan and strategies; analyzing the marketing environment; consumer behaviour; segmentation, targeting, and positioning; developing new products; product, branding, and packaging decisions; pricing concepts and strategies; distribution strategies; and integrated marketing communications. Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 (minimum C-) or equivalent Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 2430, MKTG 2431, MKTG 3430, TMGT 1150, BBUS 3430 or BBUS 3431
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MKTG 2431

 Marketing

3 credits
Students receive an overall view of the marketing function, the role of marketing in society and its application within organizations. Topics include marketing value; understanding customer's value needs; creating value; communicating value; and delivering value. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but CMNS 1290, or CMNS 1291 is recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of ADMN 3651, MKTG 3430, MKTG 3430, MKTG 2430, MKTG 2430, MKTG 2431, TMGT 1150.
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MKTG 3430

 Marketing (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students receive an overall view of the marketing function, the role of marketing in society and its application within organizations. Topics include an introduction to marketing; developing a marketing plan and strategies; analyzing the marketing environment; consumer behaviour; segmentation, targeting, and positioning; developing new products; product, branding, and packaging decisions; pricing concepts and strategies; distribution strategies; and integrated marketing communications. Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 (minimum of C-) or equivalent Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 2430, MKTG 3430, MKTG 2431, TMGT 1150, BBUS 3430 or BBUS 3431
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Campus
MKTG 3450

 Professional Selling (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students will gain an overall view of the professional selling function. They will come to understand the role of personal selling in marketing and society and its application within organizations. Topics include relationship selling opportunities; creating value with a relationship strategy; developing a relationship strategy; communication styles; creating production solutions; buying process and buyer behavior; approaching the customer; developing and qualifying a prospect base; determining customer needs; sales demonstration; negotiating buyer concerns; and closing and confirming the sale. Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 3450, MKTG 3451, HMGT 2120, BBUS 3450 or BBUS 3451
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Campus
MKTG 3451

 Professional Selling

3 credits
Students examine an overall analysis of the professional selling function, and gain insight into the role of personal selling in marketing and society and its applications within organizations. Topics include being a professional salesperson; knowing your product; finding customers; presenting successfully; closing sales; and managing and being managed. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but MKTG 2431 is recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of HMGT 2120, MKTG 3450, MKTG 3451, MKTG 3450.
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Distance
MKTG 3470

 Consumer Behaviour (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students examine the psychological, social and cultural theories and concepts that provide insight into consumer behaviour and then apply these principles to different consumer decision-making contexts. Topics include defining consumer behaviour and consumer behaviour research and examining how perception, learning and memory, motivation and affect, self-perception, personality, life-style, values, attitude, group influences, income, social class, family structure, subcultures, and culture affect consumer decision making. Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 3470, MKTG 3471, TMGT 4130, BBUS 3470 or BBUS 3471
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Campus
MKTG 3471

 Consumer Behaviour

3 credits
Students develop an appreciation for the influence consumer behavior has on marketing activities. Students apply psychological, social and cultural concepts to marketing decision making. Topics include the importance of consumer behaviour and research; internal influences such as motivation and involvement, personality, self-image, life-style, perception, learning, attitude formation and change, and communication; external influences such as culture, subculture, social class, reference groups and family, and the diffusion of innovations; and consumer decision making. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but MKTG 2431 is recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MKTG 3470, MKTG 3471, TMGT 4130.
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MKTG 3480

 Marketing Research (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students develop an understanding of marketing research and its values in analyzing consumers, markets, and the environment. Topics include an introduction to market research, the marketing research industry and research ethics, the marketing research process, secondary data and databases, qualitative research, traditional survey research, primary data collection, measurement, questionnaire design, basic sampling issues, sample size determination, and statistical testing. Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 and ECON 2330 (minimum C- grades) or equivalent Note: Students cannot receive credit for both MKTG 3480 and TMGT 3050 Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 3481, TMGT 3050, BBUS 3480 or BBUS 3481
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Campus
MKTG 3481

 Marketing Research

3 credits
Students gain an understanding of marketing research and its value in analyzing consumers, markets, and the environment. Topics include an overview of market research and research design, exploratory research; descriptive research; scaling; sampling; and data analysis and reporting. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but MKTG 2431, ECON 2331 are recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MKTG 3480 , MKTG 3481.
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Distance
MKTG 4400

 Professional Sales Management (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students prepare for the role of an effective sales manager in today's hyper-competitive global economy by integrating current technology, research, and strategic planning activities. Topics include the role of the sales manager; buying and selling processes; customer relationship management; organizing the sales force; sales forecasting and budgeting; selecting, training, compensating, and motivating the salesperson; and evaluating salesperson performance. Prerequisite: MKTG 3450 (minimum C-) or equivalent Note: Students may not receive credit for more than one of MKTG 4400 or BBUS 4400
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MKTG 4410

 Services Marketing (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students develop a thorough understanding of the extended marketing mix and service quality in service businesses. Topics include new perspectives on services marketing; consumer behaviour in a service context; positioning services in competitive markets; developing service products; distributing services through physical and e-channels; the pricing and promotion of services; designing and managing service processes; balancing demand and productive capacity; crafting the service environment; managing people for service advantage; and service quality. Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent Note: Students may not receive credit for more than one of MKTG 4410, MKTG 4411, BBUS 4410 or BBUS 4411
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MKTG 4411

 Services Marketing

3 credits
Students examine the important issues facing service providers and the successful implementation of a customer focus in service-based businesses. Topics include an overview of services marketing; understanding the customer in services marketing; standardizing and aligning the delivery of services; the people who deliver and perform services; managing demand and capacity; and promotion and pricing strategies in services marketing. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but MKTG 2431 is recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MKTG 4410, MKTG 4411.
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Distance
MKTG 4412

 New Product Development (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students develop the conceptual, analytical and decision-making skills and knowledge of industry best practices needed to successfully develop and launch new products and services. Topics include opportunity identification and selection; concept generation; concept evaluation; product/service development and product testing; and marketing testing and managing the product/service launch. Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 and MKTG 3480 (minimum C- grades) or equivalent
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MKTG 4420

 Brand Management (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students learn how brands are managed as strategic assets. They develop the necessary knowledge and skills for creating, measuring, maintaining and growing brand equity in a competitive market place. Topics include an introduction to brands and brand management, identifying and establishing brand positioning and values, planning and implementing brand marketing programs, measuring and interpreting brand equity, and growing and sustaining brand equity. Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent Note: Students may not receive credit for more than one of MKTG 4420 or BBUS 4420
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MKTG 4422

 Social Media Marketing (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students examine the growing importance of social media as part of Internet marketing. The goal is to produce attractive up-to-date content that users will share as part of their own social networking websites. Topics include the role of social media marketing; goals and strategies; identification of target audiences; rules of engagement for social media marketing; social media platforms and social networking sites; microblogging; content creation and sharing; video marketing; marketing on photo sharing websites; discussions, news, social bookmarking and question and answer sites; content marketing; mobile marketing; social media monitoring; tools for managing the social media marketing effort; and social media marketing plan. Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 or equivalent with a minimum C-
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MKTG 4430

 Retail Management (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students develop an in-depth understanding of retail and services management as well as non-store retailing. Topics include defining retail, customer behaviour, retail location decisions, merchandising, design and layout, retail pricing, promotion, retail employees, customer loyalty, and international retailing. Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent Note: Students may not receive credit for more than one of MKTG 4430, MKTG 4431, BBUS 4430 or BBUS 4431
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MKTG 4431

 Retail Marketing

3 credits
Students develop an in-depth understanding of retail and services management as well as non-store retailing. Topics include an overview of retail marketing; retail marketing, financial and location strategy; merchandising; pricing and distribution; promotion including communications, store layout, store design, visual merchandising; and customer service. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but MKTG 2431 is recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MKTG 4430, MKTG 4431.
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Distance
MKTG 4450

 E-Commerce (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students examine how the internet is rapidly becoming one of the primary communications, marketing and commercial medium for businesses in almost every industry, and how managers can effectively use this tool to execute their organization's strategic plans. Topics include the E-Commerce business models and concepts; E-Commerce infrastructure; building E-Commerce presence; E-Commerce security and payment systems; E-Commerce marketing and advertising concepts; social, mobile and local marketing; ethical, social and political issues in E-Commerce; online retailing and services; online content and media; social networks, auctions and portals; and business-to-business E-Commerce. Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent Note: Students may not receive credit for more than one of MKTG 4450, MKTG 4451, BBUS 4450, BBUS 4451 or BBUS 4453
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MKTG 4451

 E-Commerce

3 credits
Students examine how the Internet is rapidly becoming one of the primary communication, marketing and commercial medium for businesses in almost every industry, and how managers can effectively use this tool to execute their organization's strategic plans. Topics include an overview of electronic commerce; e-marketplaces including auctions and portals; online marketing and consumer behaviour; business-to-business e-commerce; e-government; e-learning; social networks; search engine maximization; e-commerce security; payment solutions and order fulfillment; e-commerce security; e-commerce strategy and global issues; legal, ethical and tax issues; and launching an e-commerce business. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but MKTG 2431 is recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MKTG 4450, MKTG 4453.
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MKTG 4460

 Marketing Strategy (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students learn how to effectively analyze marketing problems and opportunities in a rapidly changing environment, and then develop appropriate strategies. Emphasis is placed on building long-term customer relationships and adopting a strong customer orientation through imagination, vision and courage. Topics include segmentation, targeting and positioning (STP); creating competitive advantage; marketing program development; implementation of the marketing plan; and developing and maintaining long-term customer relationships. A marketing strategy simulation, marketing project, or marketing audit is used to reinforce course concepts. Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 (minimum C-) and MKTG 3480 (minimum C-) or equivalent Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 4460, MKTG 4461, BBUS 4460 or TMGT 4140
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MKTG 4470

 International Marketing (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students explore all aspects of marketing from a global perspective to better respond to international opportunities and competitive situations. Topics include an overview of international marketing; history and geography and its effect on culture; cultural dynamics in assessing global markets; culture, management style and business systems; the political environment; assessing global market opportunities in the Americas, Europe, Africa, Middle East, and Asia Pacific Region; planning for global market entry; products and services for international consumers; products and services for international businesses; and international marketing channels. Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent Note: Students may not receive credit for more than one of MKTG 4470, MKTG 4471, BBUS 4470 or BBUS 4471
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MKTG 4471

 International Marketing

3 credits
Students explore all aspects of marketing from a global perspective to better respond to international opportunities and competitive situations. Topics include an overview of international marketing; social, cultural, political, and legal environments; international market-entry opportunities; planning and managing market entry strategies and products; global distribution and pricing; international promotion, sales, and negotiation; and international market planning. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but MKTG 2431, IBUS 3511 are recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MKTG 4470, MKTG 4471.
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Distance
MKTG 4480

 Integrated Marketing Communications (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students examine the promotional mix including advertising, publicity, personal selling and sales promotion from an integrative perspective. They then learn how to create and manage these promotional tools to successfully execute a business' strategic plan. Topics include an introduction to integrated marketing communication; organizing integrated marketing communication; consumer behavior and target market review; communication response models; objectives and the integrated marketing communication plan; brand positioning strategy decisions; creative strategy decisions; creative tactics decisions; types of media; media planning and budgeting; social, ethical and legal issues; and international marketing communications. Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent Note: Students may not receive credit for more than one of MKTG 4480, MKTG 4481, BBUS 4480 or BBUS 4481
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Campus
MKTG 4481

 Integrated Marketing Communication

3 credits
Students examine the promotional mix including advertising, publicity, personal selling and sales promotion from an integrative perspective. Students create and manage these promotional tools to successfully execute a business' strategic plan. Topics include an overview of integrated marketing communications (IMC) and brand building; basic IMC strategies; creating, sending, and receiving brand messages; IMC functions; social, legal and ethical issues in IMC; international marketing communication; and effectiveness, measurement, and evaluations. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but MKTG 2431 is recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MKTG 4480, MKTG 4481.
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MKTG 4490

 Business-to-Business Marketing (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students examine how important the marketing of products and services to other businesses and organizations is to the economy, the unique nature of business customers' needs, and the different marketing strategies that can be employed to meet those needs. Topics include business markets and business marketing; character of business marketing; organizational buyer behavior; legal and regulatory environment; marketing strategy; market opportunities for current and potential customers via market research; segmentation, targeting and positioning in the business-to-business context; developing and managing product and service offerings; innovation and competitiveness; pricing; business development and planning; sales; branding; business marketing channels and partnerships; connecting through advertising, trade shows, and public relations; marketing via the Internet; and business ethics. Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent Note: Students may not receive credit for more than one of MKTG 4490, MKTG 4491, BBUS 4490 or BBUS 4491
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MKTG 4491

 Business-to-Business Marketing

3 credits
Students examine the importance and impact of marketing products and services to other businesses and organizations in the economy, the unique nature of business customer's needs, and the different marketing strategies that can be employed to meet those needs. Topics include exploring business markets and business marketing; creating value for business customers; designing product and channel strategies; establishing strong communications; building strong sales and pricing; and managing programs and customers. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but MKTG 2431 is recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MKTG 4490, MKTG 4491.
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MLAN 0120

 Local Language

Campus
MLAN 1110

 Introductory World Language 1 (3,0,1)(L)

3 credits
This shell course provides students with an opportunity to study a language not regularly offered in the Modern Languages program. It is offered periodically, and the language taught may vary from year to year.
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MLAN 1210

 Introductory World Language 2 (3,0,1)(L)

3 credits
This shell course provides students with an opportunity to continue their study of a language not regularly offered in the Modern Languages program. The language taught may vary from year to year. MLAN 1210 is offered as the continuation of MLAN 1110, and is subject to demand. Prerequisite: MLAN 1110 or instructor permission
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MLAN 2700

 Field School in Modern Languages (3,3,0)

6 credits
Students travel to another country for the purpose of studying language and culture. Field schools may be offered in Chinese, German, French, Japanese, Spanish, or other languages which might be taught in the future in the Modern Languages program. In the case of French only, travel may be within Canada (i.e. to Quebec). Field schools vary in length up to 6 weeks, and this may include classroom time prior to travel. Prerequisite: Students must have completed at least one year of study (or equivalent) in the field school target language. The field school instructor authorizes equivalency. Note: This course may be taken more than once.
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MLAP 1120

 Anatomy, Physiology and Medical Terminology (2,0,0)

2 credits
In this course the focus is on developing knowledge and comprehension in basic anatomy and physiology, medical terminology measurement units. The emphasis is on medical terminology.
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Campus
MLAP 1130

 The Electrocardiogram (1,0,0)

1 credits
This introductory course covers the theory behind the specific anatomy of the heart, the conductive system of the heart, the electrocardiogram, as well as the diagnostic aspects of the electrocardiogram.
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Campus
MLAP 1210

 Professional and Safety Issues (3,0,0)

3 credits
The main objectives of this course are to clarify the medical laboratory assistant's role in health care, to promote the need for professionalism and to present a positive attitude towards safety in the workplace.
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Campus
MLAP 1310

 Laboratory Procedures and Protocols (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course focuses on specific laboratory procedures and protocols. Topics include specimen collection, specimen handling and distribution, culture media preparation and office and billing procedures.
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Campus
MLAP 1410

 Evaluation of Competencies (3,0,0)

3 credits
Specific technical and non-technical aspects of the MLA's work is evaluated, according to criteria and curriculum supplied by BCSMT. The evaluation will normally be conducted by a medical laboratory technologist in a supervisory position at the clinical facility in which the MLA is employed.
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MLAP 1510

 General Pre-Analytical Specimen Preparation (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course is designed for the Medical Laboratory Assistant and covers the basic concepts of pre-analytical specimen preparation including Microbiology, Serum Separation, loading specimens on automated instruments, and Urinalysis. Prerequisite: Graduate of a recognized Medical Laboratory Assistant program or equivalent
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Campus
MLAP 1610

 Pre-Analytical Histo-Pathology (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course is designed for the Medical Laboratory Assistant and covers the basic concepts of pre-analytical Histo-Pathology including: Anatomic Pathology/Histology specimens, preparation for cutting, processing and accessioning. It will also include a Cytology component covering specimen preparation, processing and accessioning. Prerequisite: Graduate of a recognized Medical Laboratory Assistant program or equivalent
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MLWT 1000

 Industrial Mechanic (Millwright) Apprenticeship Level 1


This course is intended for sponsored first-year apprentices in the Industrial Mechanic (Millwright) field. Students will be introduced to and trained to perform the following skills safely; dismantle, install, set up, repair, overhaul and maintain machinery and heavy mechanical equipment. This includes; power transmissions, conveyors, hoists, pumps, compressors, alignment, fluid power and performing vibration analysis. Prerequisite: BC ITA sponsorship
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Campus
MLWT 1500

 Industrial Mechanic (Millwright) Foundation


This course is intended for those without prior experience in the Industrial Mechanic (Millwright) field. Students will be introduced to and trained to perform the following skills safely; dismantle, install, set up, repair, overhaul and maintain machinery and heavy mechanical equipment. This includes; power transmissions, conveyors, hoists, pumps, compressors, alignment, fluid power and performing vibration analysis. Prerequisite: Admission to the Industrial Mechanic (Millwright) Foundation Certificate program
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Campus
MLWT 1900

 Industrial Mechanic (Millwright) Trade Sampler (120 Hours)


Students will be introduced to the Millwright/Machinist trade, the type of work these trades entail and the opportunities for jobs in these trades. Referring to the Program Outlines from the Industry Training Authority of BC, they will learn about safe work practices for these trades, safe use of hand tools and machinery lockout procedures. Students are then exposed to hands-on practical competencies using hand tools, drill press, lathe, taps & dies and milling machine, as well as repair, overhaul, alignment and maintenance of machinery such as conveyors, bearings, reducers, pumps, alignment, power transmissions, rigging and hydraulics. Prerequisite: Completion of Grade 10
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Campus
MLWT 2000

 Industrial Mechanic (Millwright) Apprenticeship Level 2


This course is intended for those with their level one certification and prior experience in the Industrial Mechanic (Millwright) field. Students will learn to dismantle, install, set up, repair, overhaul and maintain machinery and heavy mechanical equipment including; power transmissions, conveyors, hoists, pumps, compressors, alignment, fluid power and performing vibration analysis. Prerequisite: BC ITA sponsorship
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Campus
MLWT 3000

 Industrial Mechanic (Millwright) Apprenticeship Level 3


This course is intended for those with their level two certification and have substantial prior experience in the Industrial Mechanic (Millwright) field. Students will learn to dismantle, install, set up, repair, overhaul and maintain machinery and heavy mechanical equipment including; power transmissions, conveyors, hoists, pumps, compressors, alignment, fluid power and perform vibration analysis. Prerequisite: BC ITA sponsorship
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Campus
MLWT 4000

 Industrial Mechanic (Millwright) Apprenticeship Level 4


This course is intended for those with their level three certification, have substantial experience in the Industrial Mechanic (Millwright) field and are prepared for their final level of certification with the BC ITA. Students will learn to dismantle, install, set up, repair, overhaul and maintain machinery and heavy mechanical equipment including; power transmissions, conveyors, hoists, pumps, compressors, alignment, fluid power and perform vibration analysis. Prerequisite: BC ITA sponsorship
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Campus
MNGT 1111

 Supervision

3 credits
Students are exposed to front-line management and the duties and responsibilities of supervisors. Topics include the management functions of planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and control; effective communications, problem-solving, and decision making; training, motivating, counselling, and appraising employees; facilitating team work and increasing employee productivity; and managing diversity, change and conflict.
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Distance
MNGT 1211

 Management Principles and Practices

3 credits
Students examine a basic framework for understanding the role and functions of management and an explanation for the principles, concepts and techniques that can be used in carrying out these functions. Topics include planning, organizing, staffing, leading and controlling, as well as decision-making and managing change. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but Provincial Grade 12 or mature student status is recommended.
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Distance
MNGT 1221

 Supervision

3 credits
Students explore the duties and responsibilities of supervisors and front-line management practices in modern dynamic organizations. They apply the principles of management namely planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling, and also learn to work through and with people in order to achieve organizational goals and objectives. Topics include an introduction to supervision; planning and control; decision-making; organizing an effective department; staffing; performance appraisal; motivation; leadership; communication; conflicts and politics in the workplace; change and stress management; and disciplining employees. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but MNGT 1211 is recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MNGT 1111 Supervision.
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MNGT 1710

 Introduction to Business (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students are introduced to basic management principles and the functional areas of business. Topics include the business environment from a legal, regulatory, economic, competitive, technological, social, ethical, and global perspective; the functions of management, specifically planning, organizing, leading, and control; the different business functions, including human resources, supply chain management, marketing, and financial management; and the forms of business ownership and the importance of entrepreneurship. Prerequisite: English Studies 12/English First Peoples 12 with a minimum of 73% or equivalent; or ENGL 0600 with minimum C+; or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a C+. Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MNGT 1711, MNGT 1701 or MNGT 1710
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Campus
MNGT 1711

 Introduction to Business

3 credits
Students are introduced to basic management principles and the functional areas of business. Topics include the business environment; important business trends; forms of business ownership and the importance of entrepreneurship; different business functions including marketing, accounting, finance, human resources, and information systems; and the functions of management including planning, organizing, leadership, and control. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but English Studies 12/English First Peoples 12 with a minimum of 73% or equivalent; or completion of ENGL 0600 with a minimum C+; or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a minimum C+ are recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MNGT 1700, MNGT 1710, MNGT 1711, MNGT 1701.
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MNGT 2131

 Motivation and Productivity

3 credits
Students explore the supervisory aspects of management, with a specific focus on effectively motivating employees as a means of increasing productivity. Topics include motivational obstacles and their causes; job design; leadership; goal setting and management by objectives; rewards; and supervisory communications. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but MNGT 1221, or MNGT 1211 are recommended.
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MNGT 3710

 Business Ethics and Society (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students explore the complex business environment and the relationships organizations have with each other, civil society, and the natural environment. Through this examination, students learn how critical ethical decision-making is to the successful management of any organization. Topics include elements of critical thinking, business ethics fundamentals, frameworks for ethical thinking, awareness of ethical pitfalls, ethical reasoning, ethical principles, drafting a code of ethics, illustrating an ethical decision-making process, applying ethical decision-making skills, ethical decision-making in the workplace, corporate social responsibility and sustainable development, and stakeholder theory. Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BBUS 3030, MNGT 3711, BBUS 3031 or MNGT 3710
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Campus
MNGT 3711

 Business Ethics and Society

3 credits
Students explore the complex business environment and the relationships organizations have with civil society, the natural environment, and each other. Through this examination, students learn that ethical decision-making is critical to the successful management of any organization. Topics include primary and secondary stakeholder groups; the impacts of various organizational-stakeholder relationships; the varying levels of responsibility of stakeholder groups; the biases, influences, and reasons that drive stakeholder perspectives; changing economic, political, social, and cultural forces and their influences on business and society; the continuum of socially responsible management and ethical business practices; and the challenges and opportunities that influence where an organization fits on the continuum. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but CMNS 1291 is recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MNGT 3710.
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MNGT 3730

 Leadership (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students cultivate a deep understanding of what leadership is and what leaders do to be successful. An emphasis is placed on the development of practical leadership skills. Topics include an introduction to leadership, leadership traits, leadership style and philosophy, leadership and relationships, developing leadership skills, leadership and ethics, creating a vision, leadership and out-group members, leadership and conflict, and managing obstacles to effective leadership. Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and ORGB 2810 Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BBUS 3671, MNGT 3731, BBUS 3641 or MNGT 3730
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Campus
MNGT 3731

 Leadership

3 credits
Students develop an in-depth understanding of what leadership is and what leaders do to be successful. Emphasis is on the development of practical leadership skills. Topics include reflection, self-awareness, and leadership; building trust and maintaining trust; developing successful interactions; and coaching fundamentals and feedback techniques. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but CMNS 1920, ORGB 2811 are recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MNGT 3730 , MNGT 3731.
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Distance
MNGT 4710

 Decision Analysis (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students focus on the development, implementation, and utilization of business models for making informed managerial decisions. Models and management cases from diverse industries, and functional areas are used extensively to illustrate important decision tools, their assumptions and limitations, and how to communicate decisions to management. Topics include critical thinking, avoiding bias in decision making, data analysis, decision analysis, forecasting, resource allocation, and risk analysis. Prerequisite: ACCT 2250; ECON 2330 or equivalent; MNGT 3730 Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MNGT 4711, BBUS 3621 or MNGT 4710
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Campus
MNGT 4711

 Decision Analysis

3 credits
Students focus on the development, implementation, and utilization of business models for making informed managerial decisions. Topics include an introduction to decision making; problem definition and opportunity delineation; compiling relevant information; generating ideas; evaluating and prioritizing potential solutions; financial forecasting; and developing the implementation plan. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but ACCT 2251, ECON 2331, MNGT 3731 are recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MNGT 4710, MNGT 4711.
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Distance
MNGT 4720

 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students are introduced to the fundamental theories of negotiation and conflict resolution and the essential skills required to be a successful negotiator. The negotiation process is pervasive in business, and the ability to negotiate is an essential skill for successful managers. Topics include the nature of negotiation; strategy and tactics of distributive bargaining and integrative negotiation planning; integrative negotiation; negotiation, planning, and strategy; perception, cognition, and emotion; communication and the negotiation process; power; and ethics. Prerequisite: MNGT 3730
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Campus
MNGT 4730

 Business Project Management 1 (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students are introduced to the concepts and frameworks of project management. Topics include an introduction to project management, life-cycle management, feasibility, selection, scope management, scheduling, costing, leadership, and managing teams. Prerequisite: ACCT 2250; ECON 2330 or equivalent; MNGT 3730 Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MNGT 4751, BBUS 4681, or MNGT 4730
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MNGT 4740

 Business Project Management 2 (3,0,0)

3 credits
Building on on MNGT 4730: Business Project Management 1, students further develop their understanding of the practical and systematic tools used to successfully plan and manage complex projects. Topics include resource constrained schedules; budgeting; performance and progress reporting; risk management; communication, organization, and time management; advanced management and control; special topics such as contracts, environmental sustainability, and international projects; and applications of project management practice in various industries and environments. Prerequisite: MNGT 4730 Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MNGT 4751, BBUS 4681 or MNGT 4740
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Campus
MNGT 4751

 Project Management

6 credits
Students are provided with the essential knowledge, skills, and competencies to lead a project to a successful completion. They learn to combine the operational aspects of managing a project with the leadership qualities required to inspire the project team and to interact with project stakeholders. Topics include defining a project; scoping a project; planning a project; engaging the team; developing a work plan; managing the project; and project conclusion. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but ACCT 2251, ECON 2331, MNGT 3731 are recommended. Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of MNGT 4730, MNGT 4740.
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MNGT 4780

 Strategic Management (4,0,0)

3 credits
Students explore the basic concepts and methodologies of developing and executing successful business strategies in a dynamic global environment. Effective strategy is about developing competitive advantage. Learners develop insights into the working of CEOs and top management teams in preparation for senior positions in organizations. Topics include an introduction to strategic management, an analysis of the internal and external environments, business-level strategy, competitive strategy and dynamics, corporate-level strategy, acquisition and restructuring strategies, international strategies, and strategy implementation. Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 or FNCE 3120; MKTG 2430 or MKTG 3430; HRMN 2820 or HRMN 3820; SCMN 3320; IBUS 3510 Note: It is recommended that this course be taken in the student's final year. Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BBUS 4701, BBUS 4780, MNGT 4781 or MNGT 4780
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MNGT 4781

 Strategic Management

3 credits
Students explore the basic concepts and methodologies of developing and executing successful business strategies in a dynamic global environment. Effective strategy is about developing a competitive advantage. Learners develop insights into the workings of CEO and top management teams in preparation for senior positions in management. Topics include an overview of strategic management; creating competitive advantages; strategies for creating a competitive advantage; and implementing strategies. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but FNCE 2121, MKTG 2431, HRMN 2821, IBUS 3511 are recommended. Not: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MNGT 4781, PADM 4779.
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Distance
MPET 1900

 Motorcycle Technician Trade Sampler (120 hours)


This course is a sampler of the motorcycle technician trade based on the Motorcycle Technician Foundation Program outline from the Industry Training Authority of BC. Students will gain familiarity with the safe use of hand tools, portable power tools and other equipment regularly used by motorcycle technicians, as well as gaining familiarity with many of the materials used in the trade. The emphasis of this course is on developing practical, hands-on motorcycle technician skills. Prerequisite: Completion of Grade 10
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MTST 4700

 The Mountain Village Experience (3,0,0)

3 credits
In this interdisciplinary course, students explore the artistic, political, cultural, representational, touristic, marketing, policy, and/ or philosophical dimensions of the mountain village experience, including the creation and consumption thereof. Prerequisite: 3rd year standing
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MTST 4800

 Mountain Studies Field Course: Mountain Resorts (3,0,0)

3 credits
This interdisciplinary capstone course is offered in co-operation with a mountain resort experience company. The issues and theories studied thoughout the Mountain Studies in the Bachelor of Tourism Management program are augmented by giving students the opportunity to apply, test, and understand them in a real-life context. Classes occur on campus and at selected winter resorts, with the participation of resort personnel to offer expertise. Prerequisite: TMGT 3050 and either 4th year standing in the Bachelor of Tourism Management's concentration in Mountain Studies or 2nd year standing in the Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in Tourism in Mountain Environments
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MUSI 1700

 Chorus 1 (0,3,0)

3 credits
Students explore vocal and part-singing techniques, large ensemble skills, note and rhythm reading skills, and pronunciation of various language texts. The human body as a musical instrument is studied, with special emphasis on postural alignment, breath support, and sound production. Students are evaluated on their comprehension of theory, musical proficiency, and efficient use of rehearsal time by way of written and aural examinations, and a class performance.
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MUSI 1800

 Chorus 2 (0,3,0)

3 credits
A continuation of MUSI 1700, students further explore vocal and part-singing techniques, large ensemble skills, note and rhythm reading skills, and pronunciation of various language texts. Students expand their understanding of the human body as a musical instrument in the study of postural alignment, breath support and sound production. Students are evaluated on comprehension of theory, musical proficiency and efficient use of rehearsal time by way of written and aural examinations and a class performance. Prerequisite: MUSI 1700 or audition
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MUSI 2700

 Advanced Chorus 1 (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students study choral music from several periods of Western history. Special emphasis is placed on early music and polyphony. Students explore music from composers such as Tallis, Palestrina, Handel, Bach and Mozart. Students apply basic sight singing skills and vocal technique appropriate to choral singing and are expected to participate in several public performances. Prerequisite: MUSI 1800 with a minimum grade of B- or instructor permission
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MUSI 3800

 Senior Chorus 1 (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students study in greater depth music of the Western choral tradition. Emphasis is placed on the Romantic and 20th-Century eras. Students should be able to sight-sing with some support. With a strong emphasis on performance, students will be expected to perform a cumulative repertoire of works. There is a strong focus on skills which are applicable to choral conducting. Students learn the basics about choral warm up and rehearsal structure, with the unique opportunity to conduct their peers. Prerequisite: MUSI 2700 with a minimum grade of B- or instructor permission
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