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Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University
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On-Campus

There are a number of ways to register for on-campus courses at TRU which are determined by your program of study.

Open Learning

We offer 590 courses by distance learning. These courses are offered in several formats, including print-based, web-based and online.


Continuing Studies

Community U provides individuals and organizations with formal and non-formal opportunities to pursue personal and professional goals life-long.

Trades and Technology

Apprenticeship, foundation and continuing studies courses are offered in construction, mechanical trades, professional driving and more.

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Courses - C
Title Name Delivery
CARP 1900

 Carpentry Trade Sampler (120 hours)


This course is a sampler of the carpentry trade based on the Carpentry Foundation Program Outline from the Industry Training Authority of BC. Students will gain familiarity with the safe use of hand tools, portable power tools and other equipment regularly used by carpenters, as well as gaining familiarity with many of the construction materials used in the Trade. The emphasis of this course is on developing practical, hands-on carpentry skills.

Campus
CARP 2000

 Carpentry Apprentice Level 1 (210 hours)


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on shop experience in the following topics: safe work practices, documentation and organizational skills, tools and equipment, survey instruments, perform site layout, build concrete framework, frame residential housing and building science.

Campus
CARP 3000

 Carpentry Apprentice Level 2 (210 hours)


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on shop experience in the following topics: safe work practices, documentation and organizational skills, tools and equipment, survey instruments, access, rigging and hoisting equipment, perform site layout and concrete formwork and building science.

Campus
CARP 4000

 Carpentry Apprentice Level 3 (210 hours)


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on shop experience in the following topics: documentation and organization skills; tools and equipment; survey instruments; frame residential housing; applying finishing materials; and building science.

Campus
CARP 5000

 Carpentry Apprentice Level 4 (210 hours)


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on shop experience in the following topics: documentation and organizational skills, survey instruments, perform site layout, build concrete formwork, frame residential housing, apply finishing materials and apply building science.

Campus
CFTL 2010

 Instructional Skill for Industry: Educator Skills (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
The purpose of this course is to provide industry and community trainers with instructional skills to prepare them for classroom teaching. The course will present tools, techniques and terminology for the new instructor to hit the ground running and to be effective educators.

Campus
CFTL 2020

 Instructional Skills for Industry: Learning Theory (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
The purpose of this course is to provide industry and community trainers with a range of theories regarding teaching and learning for adults. This course will introduce the student to current learning theories of adult education and their application to industry training. The course will focus on the characteristics of adult learners, principles of adult education within a cultural context, and theoretic approaches to learning that promote a learner-centered, teacher facilitated learning environment.

Campus
CFTL 2030

 Instructional Skills for Industry: Practicum (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This course prepares the student to experience hands-on, practical training through the delivery of a series of classroom lessons in a peer based learning environment within a real-life classroom setting. Students experience peer and instructor feedback and self-reflective practices to improve the quality of their teaching practice.

Campus
CHBI 3980

 Introduction to Research (0,1,0)

Credits: 1
This course is available to 3rd year students contemplating entry into the Honours program or undertaking a directed studies research project in their 4th year. The seminar enables students to focus on the formulation of a research hypothesis and the production of a research proposal, in preparation for their application to do an Honours or Directed Study research project. Honours students are expected to take this course, although the learning objectives may be completed under the supervision of an individual faculty member.

Campus
CHBI 4980

 Honours Seminar (0,2,0)

Credits: 2
This course allows students enrolled in the Chemical Biology Honours program to explore and discuss topics of general interest to scientists, with a focus on how scientific research is carried out and presented. Honours students are provided with constructive criticism of their thesis research projects and presentation skills. Seminars consist of readings, group discussions, and presentations by students, interested faculty and guest speakers.
Corequisite: CHBI 4990

Campus
CHBI 4990

 Honours Thesis in Chemical Biology (L)

Credits: 6
Students in the Chemical Biology Honours program of the Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) degree conduct original research projects. The projects are completed under the direction of individual faculty members from Biology and Chemistry. A scientist from outside the university may act as a supervisor, with co-supervision by a Biology or Chemistry faculty member. Students accepted into the Chemical Biology Honours program register in this course in both the Fall and Winter semesters of their final academic year.
Corequisite: CHBI 4980

Campus
CHEM 0500

 Foundations of Chemistry 1 (5,0,2)(L)

Credits: 4
ABE - Advanced: This course is designed for those students who have taken no previous high school chemistry course but who now require the equivalent of Chemistry 11 for entry into a certain program or course. Topics covered include chemical arithmetic, chemical nomenclature, chemical formula calculations, energy, solutions, atomic theory, chemical bonding, acids and bases, and physical properties. The laboratory reinforces concepts introduced in the lectures.
Note: This course is taught by the University Preparation department Required Lab: CHEM 0500L

Campus
CHEM 0501

 Principles of Chemistry


This course is equivalent to Grade 11 chemistry. Students start with the basics of chemistry as a science, SI metric system, and safety rules. Then students study properties and classification of matter, the periodic table, chemical names and formulae, molecular shapes and polarity, chemical reactions, the mole concept, solutions, the gas laws, and organic compounds.
More information about this course

Distance
CHEM 0600

 Foundations of Chemistry 2 (5,0,2)(L)

Credits: 4
ABE - Provincial: A pre-university level course for students requiring a more in-depth introduction to chemistry than provided by CHEM 0500 or Chemistry 11. The course is an acceptable prerequisite for CHEM 111. Topics covered will be similar to those dealt with in Chemistry 12 and will include gas laws, reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, solubility of ionic substances, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction and organic Chemistry. The laboratory exercises will illustrate and reinforce topics covered in the lectures.
Corequisite: Principles of Math 12, or MATH 0600 or equivalent, is strongly recommended
Note: This course is taught by the University Preparation Department Required Lab: CHEM 0600L

Campus
CHEM 1310

 The World of Chemistry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will look at a variety of chemistry issues that have changed history or are in the news today. Everything from Napoleon's buttons to climate change will be covered. No backgrounds in Science or Mathematics is required. This is an introductory chemistry course for non-Science students. This is a credit course for all bachelor degrees except Science.
Note: CHEM 1310 is designed as an introductory science course for those who have taken no previous Chemistry and who do not intend to major in the sciences. No credit will be given for CHEM 1310 towards a B.Sc. Credit will be given towards a B.A. degree.

Campus
CHEM 1500

 Chemical Bonding and Organic Chemistry (4,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This course provides an overview of general concepts of chemical bonding, Lewis structures, molecular shape, and valence bond theory of bonding. The organic chemistry portion of the course focuses on the bonding and structure of organic compounds, functional groups, conformational and stereochemical features, oxidation-reduction reactions, substitution and elimination reactions, and enolate chemistry. The laboratory work stresses basic precision techniques in quantitative analytical chemistry as well as experiments in instrumental analysis and organic chemistry. The laboratory also introduces students to some spectroscopic techniques.

Campus
CHEM 1503

 Chemical Bonding & Organic Chemistry

Credits: 3
This course is the first half of a fundamental first year chemistry course. Topics include general concepts of chemical bonding, Lewis structures, molecular shape, and valence bond theory of bonding. The organic chemistry portion of the course focuses on the bonding and structure of organic compounds, compound naming, functional groups, conformational and stereo chemical features, oxidation reduction reactions, substitution and elimination reactions, and enolate chemistry.
More information about this course

Distance
CHEM 1505

 Chemistry Laboratory 1

Credits: 1
This course is the first laboratory in a fundamental first-year chemistry course, designed for students who have completed CHEM 1503: Chemical Bonding and Organic Chemistry. The topics include a review of laboratory safety and equipment, chemical changes, laboratory techniques and measurements, separation of mixtures, properties of gases, liquids and solids, physical and chemical properties, identification of metallic ions, ionic reactions, stoichiometry of a precipitation reaction, caloric content of food, and water-hardness determination. Students are expected to become familiar with these topics, and demonstrate their proficiency in various laboratory techniques.
More information about this course

Distance
CHEM 1510

 Fundamentals of Chemistry (4,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This is the second half of a fundamental first year chemistry course, designed for students who have completed CHEM 1500: Chemical Bonding and Organic Chemistry, and have a Chemistry 11 background. The topics include a brief review of stoichiometry, gas laws, thermochemistry, equilibrium and electrochemistry. Students are expected to become familiar with these topics, and demonstrate their proficiency in various laboratory techniques. The laboratory stresses fundamental precision techniques in quantitative analytical and physical chemistry.

Campus
CHEM 1520

 Principles of Chemistry (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is the second half of first year chemistry designed for students with a strong background in Chemistry. The Department of Chemistry defines a strong background as at least a B in Chemistry 12 or CHEM 0600; however, the course is available to any student with CHEM 1500 and Chemistry 12 or CHEM 0600. The topics include gas laws, equilibrium, redox reactions, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, entropy and free energy. Students are expected to become familiar with these topics during the course, and demonstrate their proficiency in various laboratory techniques. The laboratory stresses fundamental precision techniques in quantitative analytical and physical chemistry.

Campus
CHEM 1523

 Principles of Chemistry

Credits: 3
This course is the second half of first year chemistry theory designed for students with a strong background in Chemistry. Course topics include gas laws, equilibrium, redox reactions, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, entropy, and free energy.
More information about this course

Distance
CHEM 1525

 Chemistry Laboratory II

Credits: 1
Chemistry 1525 is the second laboratory for a fundamental first-year chemistry course, designed for students who have a Chemistry 11 background. The topics include a review of laboratory safety and equipment, colligative properties and osmotic pressure, Le Chatelier's Principle, Beer's Law and colorimetry, chromatography of food dyes, titration of acetic acid in vinegar, using buffers, determination of Ka for a weak acid, reaction order and rate laws, oxidation-reduction activity series, electrochemical cells and cell potentials, and qualitative anion and cation tests. Students are expected to become familiar with all these topics during the course and demonstrate their proficiency in various laboratory techniques.
More information about this course

Distance
CHEM 2000

 Relativity and Quanta (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore special relativity: Lorenz transformations; and dynamics and conservation laws. The quantum physics section of this course includes the experimental evidence for quantization, and a qualitative discussion of the concepts of quantum mechanics and their application to simple systems of atoms and nuclei. This course is identical to PHYS 2000.
Note: Students may receive credit for only one of either CHEM 2000 or PHYS 2000 Required Seminar: CHEM 2000S

Campus
CHEM 2100

 Introductory Analytical Chemistry (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the principles of analytical chemistry and their practical application to solution samples. Topics include statistical method of data analysis, quantitative principles of chemical equilibrium, and fundamental concepts of gravimetric, spectrophotometric, electrochemical, and chromatographic methods of analysis. In the laboratory component, students perform experiments using the same state-of-the-art instrumentation used in many commercial and research laboratories. An analysis of samples of clinical, environmental, and biochemical interest is completed to illustrate the material discussed in lectures.

Campus
CHEM 2120

 Organic Chemistry 1 (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is a study of the compounds of carbon with an emphasis on reaction mechanisms, to illustrate the basic principles of organic chemistry. The topics include structure and bonding, preparations and reactions of the functional groups, and stereochemistry. Biological and biochemical applications are also discussed. The laboratory work illustrates basic separation, purification and identification techniques, and spectroscopic techniques are introduced.
Note: ECHE 1110/ECHE 1210 are not prerequisites for 2nd year Chemistry courses. Engineering students who may wish to take 2nd year Chemistry courses should meet with their Engineering Advisor and the Chair of the Department of Physical Sciences as early as possible.

Campus
CHEM 2123

 Organic Chemistry I

Credits: 3
Students review the basic principles of chemical bonding as they apply to organic molecules and are introduced to the concepts of functional groups, nomenclature, stereochemistry, and reaction mechanisms. The systematic chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers are discussed, in addition to the theory and use of spectroscopy in identifying organic compounds. Students are expected to apply their knowledge to problem-solve, deduce structures, and synthesize simple organic molecules using the studied reactions. The relationships between organic chemistry and other disciplines are noted.
More information about this course

Distance
CHEM 2125

 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

Credits: 1
In this five-day lab course, students perform experiments that illustrate the principles learned in CHEM 2123: Organic Chemistry I.
More information about this course

Distance
CHEM 2160

 Structure, Bonding and Spectroscopy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop fundamental quantum ideas in chemistry and apply them to topics in chemical bonding and spectroscopy. Bonding concepts revolve around electrostatic models applied to ionic compounds and transition metal complexes. Covalent bonding is approached from the molecular orbital point of view, while students survey homo- and heteronuclear diatomics, and briefly consider larger molecules. Fundamental concepts in spectroscopy are introduced, and vibrational, electronic, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is discussed. Fundamental aspects of symmetry guide several of these treatments.

Campus
CHEM 2220

 Organic Chemistry 2 (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of CHEM 2120: Organic Chemistry 1, in which students further explore the principles of organic chemistry. Topics include structure and bonding; preparations and reactions of the functional groups; stereochemistry; biological and biochemical applications; and basic separation, purification, identification, and spectroscopic techniques in the laboratory.

Campus
CHEM 2223

 Organic Chemistry II

Credits: 3
Students continue their study of organic chemistry by discussing aromatic compounds, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, and organic nitrogen compounds. Synthesis using carbanion and enolate ion methods are emphasized. Students also explore the chemistry of various organic compounds found in biological systems: carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins and peptides, and nucleic acids. Working through this course, students are expected to apply their knowledge to problem-solve, deduce structures, and synthesize simple organic molecules using the studied reactions. Relationships between organic chemistry and other disciplines are noted.
More information about this course

Distance
CHEM 2225

 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

Credits: 1
CHEM 2225 (previously CHEM 246) is the companion laboratory course for CHEM 2223 (previously CHEM 241) (Organic Chemistry II).
More information about this course

Distance
CHEM 2250

 Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This course, intended for science majors, introduces chemical kinetics and thermodynamics with applications to gas behaviour and phase and reaction equilibria. The laboratory work involves preparative and kinetic studies, as well as the experimental study of the aspects of thermodynamic measurements.
Note: Students with credit for CHEM 2110 and CHEM 2210 will not receive credit for CHEM 2150 and CHEM 2250 Required Lab: CHEM 2250L

Campus
CHEM 3010

 Aqueous Environmental Chemistry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the properties and composition of natural waters. Topics include hydrologic cycle, water quality, partitioning, transport, chemical equilibria, pH, complexation, redox processes, and water treatment.

Campus
CHEM 3020

 Atmospheric Environmental Chemistry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to structure, composition, and chemical processes occurring in the Earth's atmosphere. These include interactions with solar radiation, stratospheric ozone layer, photochemical smog, and acid rain.

Campus
CHEM 3060

 Physical Chemistry 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Prior knowledge of physical chemistry is required for this upper-level course. Students explore four main topics: phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium, solutions of electrolytes, and electrochemistry.

Campus
CHEM 3070

 Physical Chemistry 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of CHEM 3060. The course topics include chemical kinetics, elements of spectroscopy and introductory statistical thermodynamics. This course assumes prior knowledge of thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium and basic chemical kinetics.

Campus
CHEM 3080

 Physical Chemistry Laboratory (0,0,4)

Credits: 1
In this laboratory course, students perform a selection of physical chemistry experiments to illustrate various physical chemical principles.

Campus
CHEM 3100

 Instrumental Analysis (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the wide range of instrumental methods used in chemical analysis, as they are applied to modern analytical chemistry. The topics include statistical evaluation of chemical data, electrochemical methods, optical spectroscopic methods, mass spectrometry and chromatography.

Campus
CHEM 3120

 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (0,0,4)(L)

Credits: 1
This laboratory course is designed to accompany CHEM 3100: Instrumental Analysis. Students acquire practical, hands-on laboratory experience in performing chemical analysis using the chemical instrumentation encountered in CHEM 3100. Students perform statistical evaluations of experimental chemical data.
Corequisite: CHEM 3100

Campus
CHEM 3140

 Method Development and Applications in Analytical Chemistry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will focus on analytical method development, including sampling and sample handling, extraction, determination, and data acquisition. The analysis of organic and inorganic compounds in a variety of matrices will be discussed. Case studies from the literature will illustrate typical applications.

Campus
CHEM 3170

 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory for Chemical Biology (0,0,4)(L)

Credits: 1
This is a laboratory course designed to give students practical hands-on experience with the instrumentation discussed in CHEM 3100: Instrumental Analysis. Students focus on the needs of chemical biologists while performing a variety of chemical analyses and gaining independent experience in analytical experimental design and method application to real samples.

Campus
CHEM 3220

 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This is a lecture course that covers the theory and practice of modern organic synthesis. The emphasis is on important carbon-carbon bond forming reactions, significant reactions of functional groups and the use of protecting group strategies in organic synthesis. In addition, the chemistry of amino acids, peptides, carbohydrates and heterocycles is studied in the context of the above topics.

Campus
CHEM 3230

 Organic Spectroscopy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This is a lecture course that covers the theory and practice of modern spectroscopic techniques for the structural elucidation of organic compounds. The emphasis is on both the theory and practice of spectroscopic techniques, particularly NMR spectroscopy, for determining the structures of pure organic compounds.

Campus
CHEM 3240

 Organic Chemistry Laboratory (0,0,4)(L)

Credits: 1
In this laboratory course, students perform a selection of organic chemistry experiments that are designed to develop synthetic skills and application of spectroscopic techniques to organic molecules.

Campus
CHEM 3310

 Inorganic Chemistry 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the varied aspects of transition metal chemistry and a wide variety of techniques which have been applied to these systems. Topics include coordination numbers, stereochemistry, diastereomers, enantiomers, coordination equilibria, and the kinetics and mechanisms of substitution and electron transfer reactions. Crystal field and molecular orbital descriptions of bonding are developed and applied to electronic spectra and magnetic properties. Application to some bioinorganic systems are introduced.

Campus
CHEM 3320

 Inorganic Chemistry 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the varied aspects of main group chemistry and a wide variety of techniques which have been applied to these systems. Topics include ionic bonding and the solid state, simple ideas of covalent bonding, and molecular orbital descriptions of main group compounds. A systematic survey of selected chemistry of main group elements may be conducted.

Campus
CHEM 3330

 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (0,0,4)(L)

Credits: 1
In this laboratory course, students perform a selection of inorganic chemistry experiments that are designed to develop synthetic skills and application of spectroscopic and magnetic techniques to inorganic systems.

Campus
CHEM 3730

 Introduction to Biochemistry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to cellular chemistry and the structure and function of biological molecules including nucleic acids, enzymes and other proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and vitamins. Students also explore metabolic pathways and bioenergetics including DNA synthesis, transcription and translation, glycolysis, fermentation and respiration, oxidation of fatty acids, and photosynthesis.
Note: This course is the same as BIOL 3130 except it is only available to Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry majors

Campus
CHEM 4070

 Selected Topics in Physical/Environmental Chemistry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This lecture course will consider in depth a selection of topics drawn from the areas of Physical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry. The particular topics chosen may vary each time the course is offered.
Corequisite: CHEM 3010 and/or CHEM 3020
Note: CHEM 4070 is offered in odd numbered years.

Campus
CHEM 4090

 Introductory Computational Chemistry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This is an introductory course on computational chemistry with a primary focus on the practical aspects of this subject. Students will be introduced to the methods currently used, the approximations involved and the ways in which these approximations can by systematically improved. Computational chemistry methods will be applied to the investigation of various chemical/environmental problems.

Campus
CHEM 4220

 Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry (3,0,0)(Options A and B)

Credits: 3
Students consider (Option A) the isolation, structural identification, and synthesis of secondary metabolites produced by living things, either as a defence strategy against other organisms or for some other biochemical purpose; OR (Option B) principles and factors which govern the course of organic chemical reactions and the reactivity of organic molecules.
Note: CHEM 4220 is offered in the winter semester of 'even' numbered years

Campus
CHEM 4320

 Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (3,0,0)(Options A and B)

Credits: 3
Students consider (Option A) the chemistry of compounds containing organic groups directly bonded to metals and metalloids via a metal-carbon bond, with emphasis placed on the structure and bonding of the compounds and their use in synthetic, catalytic and industrial chemistry; OR (Option B) the chemistry of inorganic compounds in the functioning of biological systems, with emphasis on the structure and bonding of the metal in biologically active systems, and the use of inorganic compounds as drugs and diagnostic probes.
Note: CHEM 4320 is offered in the winter semester of 'even' numbered years

Campus
CHEM 4400

 Advanced Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (0,1*,3*)(L)

Credits: 1
This is a half-semester (6-week) advanced laboratory course in analytical chemistry in which students apply instrumental methods to the chemical analysis of real sample types.

Campus
CHEM 4410

 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (0,1*,3*)(L)

Credits: 1
This is a half-semester (6 week) advanced laboratory course in Inorganic Chemistry which is concerned with the development of synthetic skills, especially using modern, air-sensitive reagents. The application of spectroscopic techniques to inorganic and organometallic systems will be emphasized.

Campus
CHEM 4420

 Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory (0,1*,3*)(L)

Credits: 1
This is a half-semester (6-week) advanced laboratory course in organic chemistry which illustrates advanced techniques and modern synthetic methods found in recent organic chemistry research literature.
Note: CHEM 3230 may be acceptable as a corequisite with permission of the instructor Required Lab: CHEM 4420L

Campus
CHEM 4430

 Advanced Physical and Environmental Chemistry Laboratory (0,1*,3*)(L)

Credits: 1
This is a half-semester (6-week) advanced laboratory course in physical and environmental chemistry which illustrates relevant physical chemistry principles in selected areas of physical and environmental chemistry.
Note: CHEM 3020 may be acceptable as a corequisite with permission of the instructor Required Lab: CHEM 4430L

Campus
CHEM 4450

 Advanced Chemical Biology (2,1,3)(L)

Credits: 3
Lectures and seminars examine the interface of chemistry and biology, and practical laboratory experience introduces students to advanced chemical biology techniques. The emphasis is on providing the knowledge and theory behind biological systems from a chemical perspective, while exposing students to the modern laboratory techniques that are of current value in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. These industries require professionals who have a strong background in organic chemistry, molecular biology and genomics. Current journal articles are incorporated into a problem-based learning approach that has students researching background material in order to complete an assigned project experiment.

Campus
CHEM 4480

 Directed Studies in Chemistry (L)

Credits: 3
Students investigate a specific topic involving experimental work as agreed upon by the student and her/his faculty supervisor and co-supervisor. This course provides experience with research techniques and the presentation of results.

Campus
CHEM 4600

 Selected Topics in Applied Chemistry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This lecture course is divided into modules that focus on applied aspects of several branches of chemistry. The selection of modules available in any particular year may vary due to instructor availability. Topics may include advanced extraction techniques and instrumentation, catalysis, chemometrics, combinatorial chemistry, materials science, medicinal chemistry, petroleum chemistry, polymer chemistry, supramolecular chemistry, and water and waste treatment.
Note: CHEM 4600 is offered in the winter semester of 'odd' numbered years

Campus
CHIN 1110

 Introductory Chinese 1 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course enables beginners to develop cultural knowledge and communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing in modern standard Chinese (Mandarin). Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR A1 level of proficiency.
Note: Students who have completed Chinese (Mandarin) in Grade 11 or equivalent within the last two years may not take this course for credit unless approved by Modern Languages. Required Lab: CHIN 1110L

Campus
CHIN 1210

 Introductory Chinese 2 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course builds upon skills acquired in CHIN 1110 to further develop cultural knowledge and communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing in modern standard Chinese (Mandarin). Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR A1+ level of proficiency.
Note: Students who have completed Chinese (Mandarin) in Grade 11 or equivalent within the last two years may not take this course for credit unless approved by Modern Languages. Required Lab: CHIN 1110L

Campus
CMNS 1160

 Introduction to Communications (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course explores the nature of communication by introducing students to a range of communication theories and critical thinking skills. Students address how information is transmitted, how meaning is created, and how people are persuaded. This course qualifies as a Writing Intensive designated course.

Campus
CMNS 1290

 Introduction to Professional Writing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the theories and practice of professional business and technical communication. Students learn basic writing techniques and practice editorial skills as these relate to business and technical writing. Elements of style, awareness of audience and clarity of purpose are stressed as integral aspects of effective writing and speaking. This course is non-program specific and to complement the foundations of academic composition.

Campus
CMNS 1291

 Intro to Professional Writing

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the theories and practice of professional business and technical writing. Students will learn writing techniques and practice editorial skills as these relate to business and technical writing. Elements of style, awareness of audience, and clarity of purpose will be stressed as integral aspects of effective writing and speaking. This course is designed to be non-program specific and to complement the foundations of academic composition.
More information about this course

Distance
CMNS 1300

 Communications English 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to the practice of effective, written, oral and visual communication skills specific to the horticulture field. Students review basic writing skills, develop research and computer skills, and learn to write in various genres appropriate for Horticulture students.

Campus
CMNS 1310

 Communications English 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students build on the skills learned in CMNS 1300: Communications English 1. Students continue to develop their writing, research, oral presentation and computer skills, and focus on report writing and job search skills.

Campus
CMNS 1490

 Technical Communication for Applied Industrial Technology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course emphasizes effective technical communication skills in the field of electronics. Students review basic writing skills and create business correspondence, such as technical instructions, technical description, an informal recommendation report, and an oral presentation.

Campus
CMNS 1660

 Occupational Writing for Animal Health Technologists (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Occupational writing and oral presentation skills are the focus of this course. Students learn and practice the career uses of various writing genres appropriate for Animal Health Technologists.

Campus
CMNS 1810

 Business, Professional and Academic Composition (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn the theory and practice of successful academic, business, and professional writing. The similarities and differences involved in writing for business and academic purposes are examined in detail. Students also study and apply conventional methods of academic research and documentation involved in completing essays and reports.

Campus
CMNS 1811

 Business, Professional, and Academic Composition

Credits: 3
Students in this course learn the theory and the practice of successful academic, business, and professional writing. They examine the similarities and differences involved in writing for business and academic purposes. Students also study and apply conventional methods of academic research and documentation involved in completing essays and reports.
More information about this course

Distance
CMNS 1850

 Technical Writing 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to complement the ARET program. Students are provided an opportunity to improve grammar, writing, and oral presentation skills and learn the types of writing modes and patterns they will need to use in the technical vocations.

Campus
CMNS 1910

 Report Writing and Business Presentations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop skills in business communication and persuasion. Students focus on the content, organization, and format of various types of business reports; on the process of writing them; on methods of documenting their sources of information; and on orally presenting such reports to professional audiences.

Campus
CMNS 1920

 Professional Presentation and Communication (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop skills in business communication, employment search, and persuasion. Students focus on the content, organization, documentation and format of various types of business reports; on the professional employment search; and on the effective oral presentation.

Campus
CMNS 1970

 Report Writing and Presentation for Students of Respiratory Therapy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The skills developed in professional communication, research, and group collaboration learned in CMNS 1810: Business, Professional and Academic Composition are expanded. Students examine the content, organization, and format of professional reports and presentations essential to the success of health care professionals. This includes the process of writing reports; methods of documenting sources of information; and the practice of orally presenting such reports to professional audiences.

Campus
CMNS 1980

 Professional Presentation/Communication, Police and Justice Studies (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore activities such as research, interviewing, communication, effective report writing skills, and the differences between academic and technical forms of writing. Students focus on the content, organization, production, and formatting of police reports, and conducting primary and secondary research. Effective report writing and effective interviewing skills are also emphasized.

Campus
CMNS 2160

 Mass Communication and the Popular Culture Industry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided a perspective based on professional practices within the total media environment in which our society operates. This includes an examination of the historical, sociological and economic realities of industries such as television, film, music, advertising, public relations and journalism.

Campus
CMNS 2170

 Interpersonal Communication (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides students with a broad and critical understanding of the nature and meaning of interpersonal communication as dialogue. Students develop essential communication skills such as self-awareness, self-disclosure, active listening, and critical response, and they also examine the contemporary realities of multiculturalism, cyberspace, conflict resolution, and mourning.

Campus
CMNS 2180

 Social Networks, Online Identities and Internet Memes (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course explores the recent proliferation of communication tools known as social media. Students consider how collaborative networks create and foster unique models of identity construction and offer opportunities for new methods of creating knowledge. Students examine these issues through hands-on approaches and on-line assignments.

Campus
CMNS 2200

 Technology and Communication (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the interface of technology and communication, from the telegraph to the Web, by examining historical and present cases. Students learn how people adapt to, and innovate within, the limitations to communications imposed by technology, and are informed about the choices they face in their personal use of media and technology. This course qualifies as a Writing Intensive designated course.

Campus
CMNS 2290

 Professional, Business and Technical Writing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Intended to support students who plan careers in business, government, public service, and research institutions, this course presents the professional skills required for effective oral and written communications. Students learn appropriate background material on relevant communication theory, create a variety of business documents and deliver an oral presentation.

Campus
CMNS 2300

 Critical Thinking and Writing for Science and Technology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students analyse and discuss examples of writing from scientific and technical literature to improve their communication skills for lay and scientific audiences.

Campus
CMNS 2850

 Technical Writing 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students build on the skills they learned in CMNS 1850: Technical Writing 1. Report writing, technical correspondence, and job search skills are emphasized. During the course, students focus on organizing their summer research projects into a major technical report.

Campus
CMNS 3000

 Research Methods in Communication (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an overview of the philosophy and practice of communication research. Students are introduced to a range of methods for research in communication and media studies, combining theoretical and epistemological issues with methodological concerns. This course qualifies as a Writing Intensive designated course.

Campus
CMNS 3020

 Travel Media (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course studies novels, journals, blogs, films, and guidebooks in order to understand and produce texts in the complex matrix called "travel media." It examines many examples of travel media, both commercial and personal in order to understand how it has developed and currently works. These examples are considered from many perspectives such as the figure of "the Other," colonialism, the flaneur, postmodernism, and even visual and document design. The course considers the strategies of design that constitute the various genres of travel media, from logs, vlogs, and multimedia, to guides, and even stories.

Campus
CMNS 3050

 Communication Marketing and Design (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the practical and theoretical aspects of professional and technical writing from rhetorical and semiotic perspectives. Topics may include information design, visual rhetoric, advertising and digital design.

Campus
CMNS 3070

 ***Studies in Rhetoric (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course covers special topics in rhetorical theories and their applications.

Campus
CMNS 3080

 Advanced Composition 1 - Personal Expression (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on the rhetoric of personal expression, especially description and narration. Students are introduced to the concept of how multiple literacies variously compete and interact in the world around us. In practical terms, students explore how personal expression can be used to improve writing skills at an advanced level. This course is open to all third-year students and is designed to be especially relevant to students contemplating a career in Journalism, Education, or Communications.

Campus
CMNS 3210

 Digital Communities (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course investigates the communities that emerge due to social media. Students consider the formation of peer groups, educational innovations, and online business identities and relations, especially as these are transforming our relationships within the non-digital world. This blended learning course engages students in both a synchronous and asynchronous online environment.

Campus
CMNS 3230

 Information Design (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students investigate the theory and practical design of the delivery of information in professional and everyday contexts. Topics may include typography, weight, line, space, color and image. Media may include recipes, forms, data arrays, instructional manuals, quick reference guides, graphic novels and webpages.

Campus
CMNS 3240

 Advanced Professional Communication (1,2,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn the practice of successful business and professional communication with a particular focus on correctness and applying revising and editing strategies to various types of documents and multimedia presentations. Students examine and practice effective use of online communication, electronic media, and social media. Students study advanced research strategies, report production, and presentation skills in this course.

Campus
CMNS 3250

 

Credits: 3

Campus
CMNS 3500

 Selected Topics in Communication and Public Relations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore a selection of contemporary topics in communication theory and practice as they relate to public relations. Topics may vary depending on faculty and student interest and current developments in the field. Contact the department chair for more details.

Campus
CMNS 3510

 Intercultural and Cross-Cultural Communication (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the way culture shapes communication practices, and focus on the issues that arise within organizations when individuals from different cultural perspectives attempt to work together. Students also investigate the ways in which different cultures interact in practice. This course qualifies as a Writing Intensive designated course.

Campus
CMNS 3600

 Studies in Communication, Film, and Digital Production (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore a selection of contemporary topics in communication theory and practice as they relate to film studies and digital production. Topics may vary depending on faculty and student interest and current developments in the field. Contact the department chair for details. This course qualifies as a Writing Intensive designated course.

Campus
CMNS 3700

 Selected Topics in Communication and New Media (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore a selection of contemporary topics in communication theory and practice as they relate to new media. Topics may vary depending on faculty and student interest and current developments in the field. Contact the department chair for details. The course qualifies as a Writing Intensive designated course.

Campus
CMNS 3800

 Communication and New Media (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine new media studies from a communication perspective. Subjects include the distinctions between old and new media; the relationship between technology and communication; the convergence of cultural artifacts across media forms; and the influence of design principles on new media architecture. The course qualifies as a Writing Intensive designated course.

Campus
CMNS 4220

 Mountain Studies (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Mountain Studies allows students the opportunity to engage in an intercisciplinary study of mountain environments, communities, resorts, activities, web presence, arts, sustainability, and destination experiences, with an emphasis on undergraduate research. Topics vary from year to year; potential areas of focus include mountain culture (literature, painting, film, photography, history, new media) and web-mapping with the provision of rich content; the development and sustainability of mountain national parks in Western Canada; mountain literature and art; comparative studies of the mountain resorts that ring TRU; mountains and participant-observer new media applications; and public relations and mountain resorts.
Note: Same course as TMGT 4220

Campus
CMNS 4530

 Organizational Communications (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the theory and practice of organizational communications. The course includes an overview of different models of organizational communication and management, a review of common problems and dilemmas in this field, and consideration of a variety of internal publications. This course qualifies for Writing Intensive designation.

Campus
CMNS 4610

 Field Course in Documentary Film Production (6,0,0)

Credits: 6
Students develop practical and applied skills in digital documentary film creation, from storyboarding, to camera operation, and final editing. After completing a study of theory and techniques on campus, each student produces a complete documentary, working independently in the field, at various locations, in BC, Canada and abroad.

Campus
COAP 2000

 Cook Workplace Apprenticeship Level 1 (180 hours)


This Cook 1 Workplace Apprenticeship Program is designed for currently employed cooks who seek the Apprentice level 1 certification. Students demonstrate their ability to follow recipes, weigh and measure food accurately, and have an understanding of the major techniques and principles used in cooking, baking, and other aspects of food preparation. A Professional Cook 1 usually works in a supervised environment and performs basic cooking and food preparation tasks utilizing knife skills, correct terminology, and a variety of cooking methods.

Campus
COAP 3000

 Professional Cook Apprentice Level 2


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on lab experience in the following topics: occupational skills; stocks, soups and sauces; vegatables and fruits; starches; meats; poultry; seafood; garde manger; and baked goods and desserts.

Campus
COAP 4000

 Professional Cook Apprentice Level 3


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on lab experience in the following topics: occupational skills; handling meat, poultry, and seafood; beef; veal; pork; lamb; poultry; seafood and freshwater fish; game; and processed meat products.

Campus
COMP 0120

 Intermediate Computing

Credits: 3

Campus
COMP 0500

 Introduction to Personal Computers (1,2,3)

Credits: 3
ABE - Advanced: This course is designed to introduce students to the personal computer environment at an advanced level. Students gain basic computing skills, including File Management, the Internet, Email, Word Processing, Spreadsheets, and slide presentation using popular word processing software. Historical and social issues arising from the use of computer technology is also covered.
Note: This course is taught by the University and Employment Preparation Department Required Lab: COMP 0500L Required Seminar: COMP 0500S

Campus
COMP 0600

 Introduction to Programming (2,0,4)

Credits: 3
ABE - Provincial: A programming course designed for students who are planning to take a first year course in computer programming at the college or university level, CSOM or as a prerequisite for COMP 1130. It assumes no previous experience on computers and aims to develop problem solving skills and knowledge of a computer language. Students will learn the VISUAL BASIC.NET programming language.
Note: This course is taught by the University Preparation Department Required Lab: COMP 0600L

Campus
COMP 0650

 Introduction to Desktop and Web Publishing (0,5,0)

Credits: 3
ABE V Provincial: This is a computer studies application course intended to develop problem-solving and critical thinking skills using computer application software, including Adobe Photoshop and InDesign. Students will develop Desktop Publishing, Digital Photograph manipulation and Web page creation skills.
Note: This course is taught by the University Preparation Department

Campus
COMP 1000

 Introduction to Information Technology (3,0,1)

Credits: 3
Students are provided an introduction to the 'computer world,' and an opportunity to enhance their proficiency in using computer resources for common daily tasks. The basic computer knowledge required to be an effective academic student as well as be competitive in the modern workplace is acquired, in addition to an understanding of the computer as a collection of resources (local and global). Students learn how to use computer resources to complete assignments and projects, whether at school or in the workplace, giving them the ability to adapt to further advances and changes in information technology. Notes: 1. Students may not receive credit for more than one of COMP 1000, COMP 1350, COMP 1910, COMP 1700, BBUS 1370 and BBUS 2370 2. Students planning on completing a Major in Computing Science or Mathematical Sciences are NOT required to complete COMP 1000

Campus
COMP 1010

 Introduction to Computing Science (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This course offers a broad overview; students develop an appreciation for and an understanding of the many different aspects of the computing science discipline. Topics include information and data representation; computer hardware and architecture; algorithmic problem solving; an introduction to programming; operating systems; networks; applications; artificial intelligence and robotics; social implications; ethics; and a history of computing. The course is intended for students expecting to continue in computing science as well as for those taking it for general interest.

Campus
COMP 1020

 Introduction to Spreadsheets (0,1,0)

Credits: 1
This course provides students with an introduction to spreadsheets using Excel. Students develop the spreadsheet skills they need for other courses, and ultimately the modern workplace.

Campus
COMP 1030

 Introduction to Databases (0,1,0)

Credits: 1
Students are introduced to DBMS (Database Management System). The DBMS used in this course is Microsoft Access. Students enhance their ability to create, query, and maintain a database in MS Access, in addition to creating forms and reports. This course provides basic database knowledge.

Campus
COMP 1040

 Introduction to Web Animation (0,1,0)

Credits: 1
This is an introductory animation course using Adobe Flash software. Students explore the principles of animation using Flash software, and apply these principles to create a series of animation assignments.

Campus
COMP 1050

 Computer System Maintenance (0,1,0)

Credits: 1
Students focus on computer system maintenance, trouble shooting, and optimization. Both hardware and software aspects of the computer as a system are covered. The course utilizes the Windows operating system; installing, uninstalling and working with applications; installing and troubleshooting devices; maintaining systems and optimizing performance.

Campus
COMP 1060

 Introduction to Desktop Publishing (0,1,0)

Credits: 1
creditStudents are provided with a comprehensive introduction to current publishing software to create professional presentations, documents, marketing communications materials and Web pages. This course is intended for students who have little or no exposure to Microsoft Office products.

Campus
COMP 1070

 Introduction to Digital Media (0,1,0)

Credits: 1
Students are introduced to digital media. The goal is to use freely available shareware to edit photo, music and video files in a series of practical assignments. Students also learn the basic vocabulary and theory behind digital forms of media.

Campus
COMP 1080

 Introduction to Web Development (0,1,0)

Credits: 1
This course provides an introduction to web development. This course covers only client-side web development with a brief introduction to HTTP protocol and web servers.

Campus
COMP 1090

 Introduction to Linux (0,1,0)

Credits: 1
This course provides an introduction to Linux Operating System such as Linux evolution, graphical environments, terminal interfaces and shell, the file system, file manipulation commands, data manipulation commands, editors, software tools, networking tools, and system administration tools.

Campus
COMP 1130

 Computer Programming 1 (3,1,1)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the use of structured problem solving methods, algorithms, structured programming, and object-oriented programming concepts. Students use a high level programming language to learn how to design, develop, and document well-structured programs using software engineering principles. Students learn the workings of a computer as part of programming. This course is for students who plan to take further courses in Computing Science or to learn basic programming concepts. Required Lab: COMP 1130L Required Seminar: COMP 1130S

Campus
COMP 1131

 Computer Programming I

Credits: 3
This course provides problem solving and computer programming skills for students with no prior experience in the area of programming. Students use Java, a high-level, object-oriented computer programming language, to learn the fundamentals of computer programming including how to write, compile and execute programs. Some familiarity with computers is beneficial.
More information about this course

Distance
COMP 1140

 Visual Basic Computer Programming (3,1,1)

Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to the use of structured problem solving methods, algorithms, structured programming, or object-oriented programming as well as event-driven programming. Students use a high-level programming language to design, develop, and document well-structured computer programs using software engineering principles. The language used in the course is Visual Basic.NET.

Campus
COMP 1150

 Introduction to 3D Animation (0,1,0)

Credits: 1
This course introduces the basic principles and concepts of 3 dimemsional animations. Students will gain experience with Alice, a fun and interactive way to design and create virtual worlds by using animated 3 dimemsional graphical images. Students will gain the knowledge of princples and techniques common to all animations and particularly how to render 3 dimensional images.

Campus
COMP 1230

 Computer Programming 2 (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of Computer Programming 1course. Students are introduced to the foundation for further studies in computer science. Students continue to learn the disciplined approach to the design, coding, and testing of programs in the object oriented paradigm. Students learn object-oriented programming in detail, and are introduced to the data structures and algorithm analysis.
Note: Students may not receive credit for more than one of COMP 1230 and 2120. Required Seminar: COMP 1230S

Campus
COMP 1231

 Computer Programming II

Credits: 3
In this continuation of COMP 1131: Computer Programming I, students are introduced to the programming tools required to solve a more advanced set of problems. Students further develop their knowledge of the principles of object-oriented design and programming, including the use of interfaces and inheritance, and learn the fundamentals of sorting data and data structures.
More information about this course

Distance
COMP 1240

 Visual Basic Computer Programming 2 (3,1,1)

Credits: 3
In this continuation of COMP 1140: Visual Basic Computer Programming, students are provided a foundation for further studies in computing science, using Visual Basic.NET . The objectives of this course are to continue developing a disciplined approach to the design, coding and testing of computer programs written in Visual Basic.NET. Students examine concepts of data abstraction, encapsulation and inheritance, as well as the notion of information hiding and objects. There is an introduction to increasingly complex data structures, files and databases. Students use a report writer (Crystal Reports) and learn the management of exceptions in programs and classes. Students are also introduced to the creating of web applications using VB.NET, ADO.NET and ASP.NET, understanding XML, and creating web services.

Campus
COMP 1350

 Information Systems and Computerized Information Analysis (3,1,1)

Credits: 3
creditsThe purpose of this course is to introduce computer terminology and system development techniques as they apply to information systems within the discipline. Students learn the principles and usage of computerized systems for data gathering, analysis, and reporting. Students develop an understanding of how to design, implement, and use database systems, how to analyze data via databases and spreadsheets, and how to report results both as text and graphics. Students delve into a comprehensive case study that integrates various software environments that may be encountered in the workplace.
Note: Students may not receive credit for more than one of COMP 1000, COMP 1350, COMP 1910, COMP 1700, MIST 2610 Required Lab: COMP 1350L Required Seminar: COMP 1350S

Campus
COMP 1380

 Discrete Structure 1 for Computing Science (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to the basic mathematical concepts used in computing science. Topics include the binary number system; computer arithmetic; logic and truth tables; Boolean algebra; logic gates and simple computer circuits; vectors and matrices; sets; counting; probability theory and statistics (mean, variance, median, mode, and random variables).
Note: 1. This course is identical to MATH 1380 2. Students may not receive credit for more than one of COMP 1380 and MATH 1380 Required Seminar: COMP 1380S

Campus
COMP 1390

 Discrete Structure 2 for Computing Science (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces further mathematical concepts used in Computing Science. Topics include relations; functions; graph theory; trees; languages; grammars; finite state machines; an introduction to proofs and mathematical induction; and algorithm analysis.
Note: A programming background is recommended Required Seminar: COMP 1390S

Campus
COMP 1520

 Principle of Software Development (3,0,2)

Credits: 3
This course offers a practical introduction to problem-solving on a computer, and emphasizes a structured approach to the design of algorithms and proper programming style. Students use a high-level programming language to learn how to design, develop, and document well-structured programs in order to solve problems from the field of Engineering. In addition, students are introduced to data analysis using MATLAB.
Note: Students may obtain credit for only one of COMP 1130 and COMP 1520 Required Lab: COMP 1520L

Campus
COMP 1570

 Data Processing Tools and Techniques 1 (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course serves as an introduction to the tools and techniques commonly used for the processing and presentation of data. Throughout the course, students work on data processing problems typical of a business setting, including record keeping applications, data capture and validation, and report creation procedures. Students can expect to do a substantial amount of work in this course using spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel), desktop databases (Microsoft Access), and basic Web pages (HTML).

Campus
COMP 1670

 Data Processing Tools and Techniques 2 (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
The primary themes in this course build on those from COMP 1570: Data Processing Tools and Techniques 1, namely processing and presentation of data in a business context. Topics include advanced features of desktop databases; the use of reporting packages; editors and file handling utilities; and commercial application packages. Students also discuss software quality, documentation, and testing methodology.

Campus
COMP 1700

 Introduction to Computing (3,0,1)

Credits: 3
This course, intended for non-science students and non-mathematics students, is designed to offer a general introduction to the world of computers including terminology, history, uses, impact on society, and programming. Students experience and focus on operating and using a microcomputer in addition to common microcomputer software, such as Windows, word processing, spread sheets, presentation packages and graphics. The Internet as a research tool and programming is also introduced. Notes: 1. COMP 1700 is not recommended for students in the BBA program. These students should register in BBUS 1370 2. Students may not receive credit for more than one of COMP 1000, COMP 1350, COMP 1910, COMP 1700, BBUS 1370 and BBUS 2370 3. This course is not currently offered. Interested students should enroll in COMP 1000 Required Lab: COMP 1700L

Campus
COMP 1810

 Game Design and Development 1 (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Building a high quality game is a complex and challenging process. A key element to its success is the design. The fundamentals of game design and development are discussed, in addition to different elements of game design, such as game concepts, character development, storytelling and narrative, core mechanics, and creating the User Interface. Students build and develop computer games. Required Seminar: COMP 1810S

Campus
COMP 1910

 Introduction to Computers and Business Information Systems (1,1,2)

Credits: 3
Students explore computing in the business environment. Emphasis is placed on computer applications in business including Windows, word processing, spreadsheets, presentation packages and the Internet. Topics relating to computer needs for business are also discussed.
Note: Students may not receive credit for more than one of COMP 1000, COMP 1350, COMP 1910, COMP 1700, BBUS 1370 and BBUS 2370 Required Lab: COMP 1910L Required Seminar: COMP 1910S

Campus
COMP 1980

 Foundations of Computing Science (3,2,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides breadth in the area of Computing Science for Computing Science Majors. Topics include hardware and software design, including logic design; basic computer organization and system software; programming paradigms; external storage, sequential file processing and elementary relational databases; networks and electronic information services; artificial intelligence; and ethical and societal considerations.
Corequisite: COMP 1230 Required Seminar: COMP 1980S

Campus
COMP 2120

 Computer Programming Java (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to programming and program design using the Java programming language. This is a programming course, and as such, the requirements placed on students are beyond simply using the computer as a tool. Students must employ problem-solving skills to evaluate and solve word problems, and create Java programs using the basic language constructs to implement the solutions. This course is designed for students who have had exposure to university-level programming, and previous experience in programming languages other than JAVA.

Campus
COMP 2130

 Introduction to Computer Systems (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn the basic concepts of computer systems. Students are introduced to the concepts of computer architecture, the 'C' and assembly programming languages as well as the use of Linux operating system. Students learn about memory organization, data representation, and addressing. Students are introduced to the concepts of machine language, memory, caches, virtual memory, linkage and assembler construction as well as exceptions and processes.

Campus
COMP 2160

 Mobile Application Development 1 (3,1,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Students learn how to develop applications for mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets. Students are introduced to the survey of current mobile platforms, mobile application development environments, mobile device input methods, as well as developing applications for two popular mobile platforms. Students design and build a variety of Apps throughout the course to reinforce learning and to develop real competency.

Campus
COMP 2210

 Programming Methods (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the programming environments of visual and scripting language along with tools and techniques of software development process. Students learn a combination of visual programing using C# and scripting language using Python in this course. Students learn the techniques of event driven visual application development, database and web connectivity, scripts, functions, strings, tuples and text file handling.

Campus
COMP 2230

 Data Structure, Algorithm Analysis, and Program Design (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the basic methods of representing data in Computing Science. Students review, implement and analyze several fundamental data structures including lists, stacks, queues, and graphs. Students learn the implementation of algorithms using these data structures and the efficiency and cost tradeoffs of each of them.

Campus
COMP 2231

 Data Structures and Algorithms

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to new types of data structures such as trees (including binary and multiway trees), heaps, stacks and queues. Students will also learn how to design new algorithms for each new data structure studied, create and perform simple operations on graph data structures, describe and implement common algorithms for working with advanced data structures and recognize which data structure is the best to use to solve a particular problem.
More information about this course

Distance
COMP 2520

 Programming in C++ (3,0,1)

Credits: 3
This course is a programming course in Visual C++. Students are introduced to C++ using Microsoft Visual Studio, including the basics of the language, and the concepts and syntax of object-oriented programming with C++. The course examines the building of classes, provides an introduction to data structures, sorting and searching, and explores advanced features of classes.

Campus
COMP 2530

 Small Computer Systems: Organization and Architecture (3,1,0)(L)

Credits: 3
This course presents the organization and architecture of modern, small computer systems. A discussion of representation and manipulation of information inside computers is followed by logic design basics, computer organization, and an introduction to computer architecture. Students are then introduced to the principles of operating systems, including the management of computer system resources, and provided an overview of current popular small systems operating systems. Topics are complemented by a seminar type workshop to give students hands-on experience with maintenance, configuration troubleshooting, upgrading, optimization, and usage of small computer systems.

Campus
COMP 2540

 Information Resource Management and Issues (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Information Systems (IS) are an important service to organizations and the management of information systems is important to understand, both for the employee in the organization and for individuals interested in becoming IS managers. This course explores IS management and how it must effectively address the needs and imperatives of organizations, technologies and society. The computer profession has emerged as an essential player in organizations as they vie for improved competitive positions by making strategic use of computer technology. Case studies and guest lecturers (where possible) are used to provide an IS overview, and examine the duties and organization of IS departments (including control of resources, staffing, security and disaster plans); the organization of IS to support end-user computing; and the quality of life, work, professionalism and ethics for IS professionals.

Campus
COMP 2560

 Database Processing (3,0,1)

Credits: 3
Students review the major components of the database environment and the evolution of database technologies. Database design techniques are then introduced using both the Entity Relationship model and an object-oriented approach. As students design and implement a case study project, they learn the relational database model and data normalization. Structured Query Language (SQL) is discussed in depth, including Data Definition Language (DDL), Data Manipulation Language (DML), Data Control Language, and data integrity checking. Client and Server architecture is also discussed.

Campus
COMP 2570

 Systems Analysis and Design 1 (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to systems analysis and design. Topics in analysis include project initiation, preliminary investigation, definition of project scope, cost/benefit analysis, interviewing techniques, presentation techniques, detailed systems investigation, and analysis. Topics in design include object-oriented design, input, output, files, systems processing and systems controls. This course may use CASE tools in the lab component.

Campus
COMP 2590

 Program Design and Data Structure for Engineers (4,3,0)

Credits: 4
Students examine the two main aspects of computer software (data structures and algorithms), and developing medium-sized programs (as opposed to suites of programs). The object-oriented programming paradigm is utilized. Students acquire knowledge of the basic data structures and algorithms commonly used in Computing Science; an understanding of the techniques appropriate for developing middle-sized computer programming projects; the skills appropriate for small, team programming projects; and practical programming skills in an object-oriented and procedural language, such as Java or C++.

Campus
COMP 2620

 E-Commerce Systems Development (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the design, implementation, and operation of Electronic Commerce systems. Emphasis is placed on the technology involved in creating Web databases, data marts, data mining systems, and interactive data warehousing. Students also discuss financial issues (electronic payments system, customs, and taxation), privacy, security, and legal issues. Students are required to prepare a team project of a working E-Commerce system using a variety of current tools. Upon completion, students have a strong understanding of the basic building blocks (concepts and technology) and their interrelations in the E-Commerce system, and are capable of developing a small size E-Commerce transaction processing system using current tools.

Campus
COMP 2630

 Small Computer Systems: Communication and Networks (3,1,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Current advances in computer technology are bringing a new dimension to small computer systems networking. The networking of fast, reliable, and inexpensive small computer systems is revolutionizing the organization of companies, downsizing applications, and is a major new area of employment. The course introduces the fundamentals of data communication and computer networks. A discussion of information transfer and data communication is followed by an overview of computer networks. Students focus on Local Area Networks (LAN), including their design, organization, installation, maintenance, and administration, as well as issues of data security, data backups and recovery. LAN access to Wide and Global computer networks is explored. Student learning is supported by a series of hands-on practical workshops and seminars on the design, installation, and administration of a typical LAN system.

Campus
COMP 2640

 Languages - Advanced Programming (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine advanced programming techniques using object-oriented methodology for enterprise design and implementation. The following topics are developed: (1) Use of Component Object Model for system development; (2) Design and implementation of a run time libraries for modern window applications including classes and ActiveX components, including ActiveX DLL's, ActiveX EXE's, and ActiveX Controls; and (3) client server techniques used for distributed systems and for use over the Internet. Visual Basic is the programming vehicle used in this course.

Campus
COMP 2660

 Advanced Object Oriented Programming (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This is an advanced computer programming course with an emphasis on object-oriented concepts (such as inheritance, encapsulation, abstraction, and polymorphism) and design modeling using the Unified Modeling Language (UML). Topics include multi-threading, network sockets, and Graphical User Interface (GUI) programming techniques. Students use Managed Visual C++.NET and Java for programming.

Campus
COMP 2670

 Systems Analysis and Design 2 (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Continuing from COMP 2570: Systems Analysis and Design 1, students carry out a detailed analysis of an existing business system, and design an improved system under guidance of the system management. Topics include the design of systems controls, project management, scheduling and control, systems implementation, and evaluation. This is a major hands-on training course. For non-co-op students, this course may only be taken in the graduation semester.

Campus
COMP 2680

 Web Site Design and Development (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the overview of website development. Students learn major aspects of Web site design and development, including basic Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML), Extensible Hypertext Markup Language (XHTML), Dynamic Hypertext Markup Language (DHTML), Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), Java Script programming, and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). Students explore prevailing tools and standards - including the Internet, World Wide Web, client-server, Hypertext Markup Language 5 (HTML5), Cascading Style Sheets 3 (CSS3), multimedia, database - and are introduced how they function together in today's web environment.

Campus
COMP 2681

 Web Site Design and Development

Credits: 3
This course covers major client-side web application design and development applications including HTML, HTTP, Java Script programming, and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS).
More information about this course

Distance
COMP 2730

 Introduction to Computer Security (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This is an introductory course on computer and information system security. Students discuss key security requirements such as Confidentiality, Integrity, and Availability (CIA), and the mechanisms used to ensure them, such as Authentication, Access Control, and Auditing (triple-A). The course lays the foundation for further study, and for students seeking industry certifications, such as CompTIA Security+ or CISSP.

Campus
COMP 2810

 Game Design and Development 2 (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Building a high-quality game is a complex and challenging process; a key element to its success relies on the game interface design. Students build on the fundamentals of game design learned in COMP 1810: Game Design and Development 1. Different genres of game are considered, such as action games, strategy games, role-playing games, sports games, simulation or serious games, adventure games, artificial life and puzzle games, and online gaming. Students learn to effectively design game Interfaces that enable players to participate in unique and engaging experiences.

Campus
COMP 2910

 Computer Applications in Business (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This is a business software applications course for students in tourism programs. Building upon computer skills acquired in COMP 1910: Introduction to Computers and Business Information Systems, students in this course complete business-related software projects. The emphasis of the course is on computer applications in the tourism industry. In addition, a common thread throughout the course is the application and integration of communications technologies with business software. Students make extensive use of the World-Wide-Web and internet-based applications.
Note: Students entering the Bachelor of Computing Science program must see the program coordinator before registering for BCS courses Required Seminar: COMP 2910S

Campus
COMP 2920

 Software Architecture and Design (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn how to establish, define and manage the requirements for a software system. Students gain knowledge of fundamental concepts and methods of software design. Students learn how to use design notations of unified modeling language to develop design of a software product. Students are introduced to the design guidelines, quality, and evaluation criteria of software architecture. Students study how to design, generate, and modify software patterns and their use in software development.

Campus
COMP 3050

 Algorithm Design and Analysis (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students begin by defining what an algorithm is, discuss what it means to do algorithm analysis, and analyze why it is important in Computing Science. Topics include tools and methods for algorithm analysis and design; mathematical notations; choice of data structure; and space and time efficiency; Computational complexity and additional advanced algorithms are examined.
Note: Students taking the Computing Science major, or the Mathematical Sciences major, in the Bachelor of Science program must see the B.Sc. advisor before registering in 3rd or 4th year courses. Required Seminar: COMP 3050S

Campus
COMP 3051

 Algorithm Design & Analysis

Credits: 3
This is a three-credit course in which students learn algorithm definition; tools and methods for algorithm analysis and design; mathematical notations; choice of data structure, space and time efficiency, computational complexity, and algorithms for searching and sorting.
More information about this course

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COMP 3110

 Models of Computation (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Computer Science is the study of computers and programs, and the collections of instructions that direct the activity of computers. Computers are made of simple elements but they often perform complex tasks. The great disparity between the simplicity of computers and the complexity of computational tasks offers intellectual challenges. Theoretical computer science develops methods and models of analysis to meet those challenges. This course provides an introduction to general computational models (logic circuits, upper bound on the size and depth of the circuits for important problems); automata (finite-state, random-access, and Turing machines); formal languages; and computational complexity (time- and space-bounded complexity classes, and space-time tradeoffs).

Campus
COMP 3120

 Programming Languages (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a comparative study of programming languages including their syntax, semantics and run-time behavior. Students discuss data abstraction, programming paradigms (functional, object-oriented, procedural, and relational) and their appropriate applications. Interpretation versus compilation as well as concurrent computations are discussed.

Campus
COMP 3130

 Formal Languages, Automata and Computability (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students discuss formal grammars, normal forms, the relationship between grammars and automata, regular expressions, finite state machines, pushdown automata, and Turing machine computability. Additional topics include the Halting Problem; an introduction to recursive function theory; application to programming languages; and editors and command languages (operating systems).

Campus
COMP 3140

 Object Oriented Design and Programming (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to object-oriented design and programming. Topics include object-oriented concepts, object-oriented programming, development of console-based applications in C++, Visual C++, Visual Basic .Net, and an introduction to Microsoft Foundation Classes (MFC) and inter-object communication. Students design and develop systems using object-oriented design and programming methodologies in console and Windows-based applications.
Corequisite: COMP 2230 Required Seminar: COMP 3140S

Campus
COMP 3141

 Object-Oriented Design and Programming

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to object-oriented design and programming. Upon completion, students should have a good understanding of object-oriented design and programming including understanding and developing console-based applications in C++, Visual C++ applications and an introduction to Microsoft Foundation Classes (MFC) and inter-object communication. Students will be able to design and develop systems using object-oriented design and programming methodologies in console- and Windows-based applications. They will also have an introductory knowledge base in MFC that will allow them to analyze and use these library functions in application development.
More information about this course

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COMP 3150

 Java Programming (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
The Java programming language is a modern object-oriented language designed with two very important features: (1) platform independence, which allows the program to be executed on different machines and under the control of different operating systems; and (2) direct support for HTML (and similar) documents. These two features made Java a language of choice for internet-based applications. This course consists of an overview of the Java environment, syntax, and libraries; object-oriented program design in java; program design in Java for the internet (applets, servlets); and multiprogramming in Java (multithreading).

Campus
COMP 3160

 Mobile Application Development 2 (3,1,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to advanced mobile application development. Topics include databases, GPS and other sensors, maps, 2D graphics, 3D graphics, sound, music and other media, game development, and network communication.

Campus
COMP 3260

 Computer Network Security (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore how information is exchanged on the Internet and the security issues that arise due to information exchange between different technologies. Students learn concepts of authentication, authorization, access control in computer networks. Students gain knowledge about Use of cryptography for data and network security. Students are introduced to the topics such as firewalls, public key infrastructure, security standards and protocols, virtual private networks, and wireless network security. Students also explore privacy, legal issues and ethics in context of network security.

Campus
COMP 3261

 Internet and Security Issues

Credits: 3
This course presents the most practical of Internet/Intranet technologies and techniques to students. It covers Internet protocols, addressing and architecture, Intranet and Extranet design, installation and management, as well as all aspects of Internet/Ilntranet security and user/data authentication.
More information about this course

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COMP 3270

 Computer Networks (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn about computer network design principles and concepts, network architecture, Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model, error detection and recovery, local area networks, bridges, routers and gateways, network naming and addressing, routing protocols, inter-networking, wireless networks, and Internet Protocol v6 network addressing. Students first gain knowledge about basic local area networks, and then learn about the wireless Local Area Networks, techniques to extend Local Area Networks, inter-networking and emerging network technologies.

Campus
COMP 3271

 Computer Networks

Credits: 3
The main emphasis of this course is on the organization and management of local area networks (LANs). The course objectives include learning about computer network organization and implementation, obtaining a theoretical understanding of data communication and computer networks, and gaining practical experience in installation, monitoring, and troubleshooting of current LAN systems. Students are introduced to computer communication network design and its operations, and discuss the following topics: Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) communication model; error detection and recovery; local area networks; bridges, routers and gateways; network naming and addressing; and local and remote procedures. On completion of the course, students should be able, in part, to design, implement and maintain a typical computer network (LAN).
More information about this course

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COMP 3320

 Computational Methodology (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers selected topics in numerical computations with an emphasis on computer arithmetic, analysis of roundoff errors, propagation of errors, and environmental paremeters. Students explore computational metholology as applied to solving problems in Numerical Linear Algebra (Direct and Iterative Methods), non-linear equations and non-linear systems of systems of equations. Students are also introduced to the use of numerical software libraries and the design of numerical software packages.

Campus
COMP 3410

 Operating Systems (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to provide students basic knowledge of operating systems, difference between the kernel and user modes, concepts of application program interfaces, methods and implementations of interrupts. Students are introduced to the schedulers, policies, processes, threads, memory management, virtual memory, protection, access control, and authentication. Students learn system calls in different popular operating systems used in the industry.

Campus
COMP 3411

 Operating Systems

Credits: 3
This course introduces principles and techniques for the design and implementation of operating systems (OS) including: interrupts; computer resource management (memory management, processor management, I/O management, file management, process management and security management); and process communication. Additional topics include Job Control Language and batch processing; case studies of operating systems; Real Time OS; and Concurrent computations. This course includes a practical OS design project.
More information about this course

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COMP 3450

 Human-Computer Interaction Design (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the concepts and practices of interaction design from a human-computer perspective. Students learn both theoretical and practical concepts of human-computer interaction and study how to develop user interfaces using a user-centered approach. Students learn both the general principles and specific techniques of interaction design and user experience design for various applications (mobile, web, and desktop). Students produce user interfaces through assignments following the guidelines discussed during the lectures. Students evaluate their user interfaces using various evaluation methods.

Campus
COMP 3510

 System Implementation and Development Tools (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers tools and techniques to promote programming productivity and software quality. Topics include specifications; code review and inspection techniques; testing and debugging methods and tools; reusable software components and templates; file system navigation; scripting languages; software configuration management; software tools; environments; and instrumenting and profiling.

Campus
COMP 3520

 Software Engineering (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the different software process models and management of modular inter-communication, software engineering tools, software testing and project management including resource estimation, team organization and review. Students learn software engineering techniques for dependable and secure systems, reliability engineering, software evolution, software maintenance, quality management, configuration management, reuse and ethical issues in software engineering.

Campus
COMP 3521

 Software Engineering

Credits: 3
This 3rd year course introduces students to large-scale software development including software design, implementation, and maintenance. Topics include software life cycle; design techniques; psychology and economics of software testing; organization and management of modular inter-communication; software engineering tools; project management, including resource estimation; and team organization and review. Students apply the new techniques and knowledge from this course to develop a software project in a software engineering project course.
More information about this course

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COMP 3540

 Advanced Web Design and Programming (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students review client-side web technologies used for static webpages and interactive web applications on clients. Students examine advanced topics in Hyper Text Markup Language, Cascade Style Sheet and JavaScript for interactive web applications that use rich user interfaces. Students then continue with server-side web technologies for dynamic web applications, such as server-side scripting programming, database access for three-tier data-driven applications, and asynchronous communication between client and server for fast partial update of client windows.

Campus
COMP 3541

 Web Site Design & Programming

Credits: 3
This 3rd year course examines all major aspects of WEB site design and programming including HTML, HTTP, Java Script and Visual Basic scripting, as well as Java WEB programming. The course also includes advanced techniques in HTML programming (frames and style sheets) and concurrent programming for the Web (multithreading). Students concentrate on client-side Web programming, and are introduced to server-side Web programming.
More information about this course

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COMP 3610

 Database Systems (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the database concepts. Students review the underlying data structures that make up databases. Students learn database design techniques using both the Entity Relationship model as well as an object oriented approach to designing database systems. Students study the relational database model and data normalization as they design and implement a case study project. Students also learn data description language, data manipulation language (updates, queries, reports), and data integrity. Students complete a case study work using a relevant and current relational database management system, database management system, software product. C
Corequisite: COMP 2230 Required Seminar: COMP 3610S

Campus
COMP 3611

 

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to database concepts and reviews the underlying data structures that make up databases. Database design techniques are introduced using both the entity relationship model as well as an object-oriented approach to designing database systems. The relational database model and data normalization will be taught as students design and implement a case study project. Data description language, data manipulation language (updates, queries, reports) and data integrity checking will also be covered. Case study work will be completed using a relevant and current relational database management system software product.
More information about this course

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COMP 3710

 Applied Artificial Intelligence (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students investigate non-deterministic computer algorithms that are used in wide application areas but cannot be written in pseudo programming languages. Non-deterministic algorithms have been known as topics of machine learning or artificial intelligence. Students are introduced to the use of classical artificial intelligence techniques and soft computing techniques. Classical artificial intelligence techniques include knowledge representation, heuristic algorithms, rule based systems, and probabilistic reasoning. Soft computing techniques include fuzzy systems, neural networks, and genetic algorithms.

Campus
COMP 3820

 Computer Graphics and Visualization (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to computer graphics and visualization. The course covers basic principles and techniques that are used for graphics applications through simple examples. Students are exposed to current graphics and Application Programming Interfaces (API) for desktop computers and mobile devices, and learn the development of graphics applications (interactive games, visualizations, simulations) through assignments and a project.

Campus
COMP 4110

 Language Processors (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This compiler design course includes topics such as translators; compilers; assemblers and interpreters; compiler organization; compiler writing tools; use of regular expression; finite automata and context-free grammars; scanning and parsing; run- time organization; semantic analysis; and storage allocation and code generation.

Campus
COMP 4120

 Distributed Systems (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the evolution of technology and the concepts underlying distributed computing systems. Topics include the fundamentals and principles of distributed computing; language constructs for distributed programming; formal specification of distributed systems; distributed algorithms; elements of distributed operating systems; and elements of fault-tolerant distributed architectures.

Campus
COMP 4230

 Advanced Computer Networks (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed as a follow-up course on computer networks. The application of networking concepts taught in computer networks, as well as additional topics in advanced Computer Networks are emphasized.

Campus
COMP 4240

 Internet/Intranet (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are presented with the most practical internet and intranet technologies and techniques. Topics include internet protocols, addressing and architecture, intranet and extranets design, installation, and management, and all aspects of internet/intranet security and user/data authentication.

Campus
COMP 4250

 Computer Network Administration (3,1,0)(L)

Credits: 3
This course emphasizes the implementation and the administration of network and network servers, and network security. Topics include administration of internet working and server software on network servers; network traffic surveillance; network security problems, firewall, intrusion detection and defense; and the implementation of a practical LAN.

Campus
COMP 4260

 Mobile Computing (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on the basic knowledge of mobile applications, and progress to the mobile application service platform and the development of mobile applications, using Mobile Java Technology. Topics include wireless Internet service, Wireless Markup Language and Wireless Application Protocol, Connected Limited Device Configuration, and Mobile Device Information Profile.

Campus
COMP 4320

 Advanced Computational Methodology (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on selected advanced topics in numerical computations with an emphasis on the analysis of errors. The study of computational methodology as applied to solving problems in interpolation and approximation includes splines and least spares data fitting; numerical differentiation and integration; numerical initial value ordinary differential equations; and partial differential equations. Students design a numerical software package.

Campus
COMP 4340

 Modelling and Simulation (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine numerous concepts related to modelling and simulation, including numeric models of dynamic systems with an emphasis on discrete stochastic systems; state descriptions of models, common model components and entities; simulation using algebraic languages; methodology of simulation (data collection, model design, analysis of output, optimization, and validation); elements of queuing theory and its relationship to simulation; and the application of models of computer systems. Students also discuss common simulation languages, such as Simula, GPSS, Simscript, GASP, and Dynamo.

Campus
COMP 4480

 Directed Studies in Computing Science

Credits: 3
Students undertake an investigation on a specific topic as agreed upon by the student and the faculty member.

Campus
COMP 4510

 Systems Software Design (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on systems software components and their functions; operating software, translators, linkers, loaders, and cross assemblers; utility software; the relationship of operating software to hardware; developing system software components; single user, multiprogramming and distributed systems (LANs) operating software; and terminate and stay resident programs.

Campus
COMP 4530

 Advanced Software Engineering (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course builds on the material students learned in COMP 3520: Software Engineering. Students examine the management perspective of software development, such as project management, planning, quality and configuration management. Advanced topics are also explored, such as dependability and security engineering, service-oriented architecture, aspect- oriented software engineering and embedded system development.

Campus
COMP 4540

 Advanced Web Design and Programming (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of COMP 3540 (Web Site Design and Programming) and will discuss advanced web design concepts, technologies and techniques. It will cover server side programming aspects including advanced CGI techniques, ASP (Active Server Pages) and JSP (Java Server Pages), XML and the document model.

Campus
COMP 4610

 Advanced Database Systems (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course continues with database concepts introduced in COMP 3610: Database Systems. Students begin with a review of database design and implementation principles, and progress to discussions about the relational database model, designing for optimization, and normal forms. Topics include domain/ key normal form; relational database strategies for Database Manipulation Languages (DMLs); database administration and multi-user database issues (control, security, optimization and related); and distributed database systems with an emphasis on Client/Server, data warehousing, object-oriented database systems, and web-based database issues.

Campus
COMP 4620

 Web-based Information Systems (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides students with the concepts and technologies involved in the design, implementation, and operation of web-based information systems. Students use a variety of web development tools and programming/scripting languages. Emphasis is placed on the technologies for rich web application, including the aspect of web programming paradigm; the information exchange between client and server; the model-view-controller architecture; web application frameworks; content management systems; web services; web data mining; and security issues.

Campus
COMP 4630

 Distributed Databases and Distributed Data on the World Wide Web (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers instruction in three major types of distributed architecture: client/server paradigm (2-tier, 3-tier, N-tier), distributed database environments (homogenous and heterogeneous), and data-centered co-operative systems. Topics include distributed system design; database transactions; query optimization; data replication; partitioning; and models for metadata. Students are required to work on small projects using a variety of current DBMS software and tools, such as MS SQL Server 7.0, Oracle 8, MS Access 2000, XML, MSXML, ODBC, OLE-DB, ASP, and VBScript on Web server.

Campus
COMP 4740

 Expert Systems (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to artificial intelligence theory and practice underlying expert systems. Topics include knowledge bases; inference engines; knowledge representation formalisms; knowledge acquisition; search and reasoning techniques; and other practical issues in the development of expert systems. For logic-based approaches, students explore rule-based systems, semantic networks, frames, and mixed representation formalisms. For uncertainty management, certainty factors, Bayesian network, D-S belief functions, and fuzzy logic are discussed.

Campus
COMP 4750

 Natural Computing (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Natural Computing is about methods of computation that are inspired by nature including the ways in which humans compute. Characteristic for man-designed computing inspired by nature is the metaphorical use of concepts, principles and mechanisms underlying natural systems. This type of computing includes evolutionary algorithms, neural networks, fuzzy logic, swarm intelligence, molecular computing and quantum computing. Students discuss the problem of intelligent systems design using neural computing/soft-computing/computational intelligence (NC/SC/CI) techniques in an integrated manner, and are presented with theory and applications, including industrial applications. Traditional artificial intelligence (AI) techniques are mainly based on mathematical techniques of symbolic logic. These are referred to as 'crisp' techniques by the soft computing community. NC/SC/CI seeks inspiration from the world of biology, and is being used to create numerous real-world intelligent systems with the aid of NC/SC/CI tools.

Campus
COMP 4830

 Multimedia (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the concepts, theories, and practices involved in the development of multimedia applications. The course covers fundamental concepts and theories of different digital media, the principles of good design, and the most recent technologies for the development of multimedia applications. Students explore practical knowledge and techniques of multimedia programming by completing course assignments and a project related to web-based and mobile applications. Students enrolled in this course are expected to increase their proficiency in the development of multimedia applications using these contemporary technologies.

Campus
COMP 4910

 Computing Science Project

Credits: 3
Students in this "capstone" project course must complete a practical design and implementation of a supervised project in an area of specialisation in Computing Science. Students will develop a `live' project either working with an external client or a research project with an individual faculty supervisor.
Corequisite: COMP 4530

Campus
COMP 4911

 Computing Science Project

Credits: 3
This course is designed as a capstone course for a computing science degree program and includes the practical design and implementation of a supervised project in an area of specialization in computing science. The students will develop a 'live' project and part of their learning experience will include working with an external client.
More information about this course

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COMP 4930

 Professional and Ethical Issues in Computing Science (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine current computer issues and selected topics from these, including the impact of computer technology on society; historical perspectives; social and economic consequences of large-scale information processing systems and automatic control; legal and ethical problems in computer applications; intellectual property. Additional topics include the computer and the individual; machine versus human capabilities; facts and fancy; problematic interface between man and machine; privacy and security; the need for standards and the implications of non-standardization; and ethics.

Campus
COMP 4960

 Honours Thesis in Computing Science

Credits: 6
Each student in this course is required to conduct, under the supervision of a member of the Department of Computing Science, an individual investigation into a Computing Science topic or problem at the advanced undergraduate level, the results of which are to be typed and submitted as an Honors Thesis. The thesis is defended at a public lecture before an examining committee.

Campus
COMP 4980

 ***Current Topics in Computer Science (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to selected current topics in computing science at the advanced undergraduate level. Due to the rapidly changing nature of computing science, the course content varies from year to year.

Campus
CONS 1000

 Construction Craft Worker Apprenticeship Level 1 (120 hours)


This course is intended for BC ITA sponsored apprenticeship level 1 students and covers how to install utility piping, place concrete, construct roads, perform selective demolition, and perform underground work. Apprentices will also learn to: assist skilled tradespersons such as Carpenters, Bricklayers and Cement Finishers in construction activities; help Heavy Equipment Operators secure special attachments to equipment; guide operators in moving equipment and perform laboring activities at construction sites.

Campus
CONS 2000

 Construction Craft Worker Apprenticeship Level 2 (120 hours)


This course is intended for BC ITA sponsored apprenticeship level 2 students and covers how to install utility piping, place concrete, construct roads, perform selective demolition, and perform underground work. Apprentices will also learn to assist skilled tradespersons such as Carpenters, Bricklayers and Cement Finishers in construction activities, help Heavy Equipment Operators secure special attachments to equipment, guide operators in moving equipment and perform laboring activities at construction sites.

Campus
CONV 1000

 Events and Conventions Practicum 1 (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
This course requires the student to practice skills and theory acquired during the first year of their studies in the Sports Event Management Diploma. Students will be required to spend one hour per week in a classroom setting where instruction will include such topics as interviewing skills, resume writing and job search. As well, students will be exposed to trends and opportunities in the field of sports even management. At the conclusion of the academic year, students will be required to complete 160 hours of fieldwork. Although no numeric grade is given for this course, the students must successfully complete this course before certification is given by UCC.

Campus
CONV 1010

 Introduction to Tourism (40 hours)

Credits: 3
The course is designed to provide an introduction to the tourism industry. Consideration is given to the concepts and vocabulary common throughout the eight tourism sectors. A critical examination of the competition for resources with other industries in British Columbia will be examined.

Campus
CONV 1011

 Introduction to Tourism

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the tourism industry. Consideration is given to the concepts and vocabulary common throughout the tourism sectors. Students critically examine the competition for resources with other industries.
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CONV 1020

 Introduction to Special Event Management (40 hours)

Credits: 3
This course provides insight into how communities (local, regional and national) and the cultures within these communities can be attracted to and successfully included in special events. Consideration is give to cross-cultural issues and the challenges of creating an authentic experience while respecting the local environment and the traditions of the people who live in the location a special event is hosted. Some approaches and techniques for incorporating the traditions of communities and cultures into special events will be demonstrated.

Campus
CONV 1021

 Introduction to Special Events Management

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the planning and management of special events and festivals. The highly interdisciplinary course addresses the systems, tools and checklists necessary for successful festival and event planners.
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CONV 1030

 Celebrating Community and Culture (40 hours)

Credits: 3
This course provides insight into how communities (local, regional and national) and the cultures within these communities can be attracted to and successfully included in special events. Consideration is given to cross-cultural issues and the challenges of creating an authentic experience while respecting the local environment and the traditions of the people who live in the location a special event is hosted. Some approaches and techniques for incorporating the traditions of communities and cultures into special events will be demonstrated.

Campus
CONV 1031

 Celebrating Community and Culture

Credits: 3
Students explore how communities and cultures within these communities can be attracted to and successfully included in special events. Consideration is given to cross cultural issues and challenges of creating 'authentic' experiences while respecting the local environment and traditions of the people who live there.
More information about this course

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CONV 1040

 Event Volunteer Management (40 hours)

Credits: 3
The course is designed to introduce the student to the concepts and theories for the successful management of event volunteers. Current trends and their impacts on volunteer organizations will be examined. The student will participate in volunteering for a special event.

Campus
CONV 1041

 Event Volunteer Management

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to concepts and theories for the successful management of event volunteers. Current trends and their impacts on volunteer organizations are examined. Students participate in volunteering for a special event.
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CONV 1050

 Legal Liability and Risk Management (40 hours)

Credits: 3
The goal of CONV 1050 is to provide an introduction to event management law and risk management. This course has been designed to provide a broad perspective about the legal and risk management issues involved in planning and hosting tourism events. It will provide an overview of many topics that can be studied at greater depth in future law courses.

Campus
CONV 1051

 Legal Liability and Risk Management

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to event management law and risk management. This course has been designed to provide a broad perspective about the legal and risk management issues involved in planning and hosting tourism events. Students are also provided with an overview of many topics that can be studied at greater depth in future law courses.
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CONV 1060

 Event Marketing (40 hours)

Credits: 3
This course reviews the concepts and tools used to design and implement a successful event marketing strategy. The focus of the course is on applying contemporary principles of strategic marketing to the process of event management. These concepts are applicable to the broadest definition of the event management industry including festivals, sporting events, community celebrations, cultural events, and arts productions. A student-defined case study further defines the application of course content.

Campus
CONV 1061

 Event Marketing

Credits: 3
This course reviews the concepts and tools used to design and implement a successful event marketing strategy. The focus of the course is on applying contemporary principles of strategic marketing to the process of event management. These concepts are applicable to the broadest definition of the event management industry including festivals, sporting events, community celebrations, cultural events and arts productions. A student-defined case study further defines the application of course content.
More information about this course

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CONV 2100

 Conference Management 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Part 1 of a 2 semester course designed to give the students the skills necessary to plan, organize, manage and evaluate a festival, special event, meeting, seminar or conference. In addition to an overview of the industry, emphasis will be placed on objective setting, team building and program planning.

Campus
CONV 2110

 Conference Management 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Part 2 of a 2 semester course is designed to give the students some practical experience in planning, organizing, managing and evaluating a special event or conference. As well, lecture topics will include transportation arrangements, selection of speakers, and audio-visual arrangements.

Campus
CONV 2170

 Fundraising for Non-Profit Organizations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The intent of this course is to provide the learner with some of the basic skills needed to conduct a fundraising campaign on behalf of a non-profit organization. In addition to discussions about the origins and evolution of philanthropy, learners will be exposed to various campaign models, public relations strategies and techniques for motivating volunteers.

Campus
CONV 2190

 Destination Marketing Organizations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Using a Convention and Visitors Bureau as a model, the student will learn about the role that Destination Marketing Organizations play in attracting all types of tourists to a city, region or country. In addition to learning about key market segments and how to attract them, students will learn how Destination Marketing Organizations are structured and funded.

Campus
CONV 2240

 Sports Event Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The intent of this course is to provide the learner with an overview of the sports tourism industry and to provide them with some of the basic tools needed to successfully plan a sporting event. Learners will be introduced to the sports event and sport tourism industries and be given the opportunity to explore such topics as risk management for sporting events, volunteer management and event sponsorship.

Campus
CONV 2250

 Sports Event Marketing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce students to some of the skills necessary to effectively market a sporting event. Students will learn how to develop a plan to go after relevant markets including attendees, competitors and sponsors. In addition, students will be exposed to such business concepts as product development, market opportunities and marketing plans.

Campus
CONV 2260

 Managing Festivals and Events (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course covers the basic skills needed for a businesslike approach to planning and managing a well run, high quality community celebration. The focus of the course is on increasing organizational effectiveness and developing sound managerial strategies. Practical subjects such as fundraising and sponsorship, motivating volunteers, developing effective checklists, developing themes and creative ideas, resources and contacts, and samples of event publicity are also covered.

Campus
CONV 2500

 Field Trip Activity Fee (Year 2 Events and Conventions Management Diploma)


Required for all second year students of the Events and Conventions Management Diploma program. The opportunity to better understand concepts discussed in the classroom by exposure to their application in industry.

Campus
COOK 1100

 Culinary Introduction 1 (420 hours)


This course, based on the Provincial Professional Cook Training curriculum for the Professional Cook 1 program, familiarizes students to food handling procedures surrounding safety and sanitation. Students learn safe use of tools and equipment, safe work practices, product identification, and food preparation methods, including seasoning and presentation. This course is the first level of the Provincial Apprenticeship program.
Corequisite: Registered Cook Apprenticeship with the Industry Training Authority

Campus
COOK 1110

 Culinary Introduction 2 (540 hours)


This course, based on the Provincial Professional Cook Training curriculum for the Professional Cook 1 program, familiarizes students to food handling procedures surrounding safety and sanitation. Students learn safe use of tools and equipment, safe work practices, product identification, and food preparation methods, including seasoning and presentation. This course is the first level of the Provincial Apprenticeship program.
Corequisite: Registered Cook Apprenticeship with the Industry Training Authority

Campus
COOK 1200

 Culinary Dining Room (420 hours)


This course is based on the Provincial Professional Cook Training curriculum for the Professional Cook 2 program. Students develop a preliminary understanding of food costing, menu planning and purchasing processes. Using multiple cooking methods, students complete a variety of cooking, baking (including deserts) and food preparation tasks. This course is the second level of the provincial apprenticeship program.
Corequisite: Registered Cook Apprenticeship with the Industry Training Authority

Campus
COOK 2100

 Culinary Apprentice 3 (180 hours)


This course is based on the Provincial Professional Cook Training curriculum for the Professional Cook 3 program. Students develop a preliminary understanding of food costing, menu planning and purchasing processes. Using multiple cooking methods, students complete a variety of cooking, baking (including deserts) and food preparation tasks. This course is the third level of the Provincial Apprenticeship program.
Corequisite: Registered Cook Apprenticeship with the Industry Training Authority

Campus
COOP 0900

 Co-operative Education Career Management Prerequisite


This non-credit course is the prerequisite for co-op students admitted into their respective co-op program. Students admitted into their co-op program must complete this non-credit course prior to their first co-op work term. The course will cover the basics of a career package during the first 4 weeks. The latter part of the course will focus on career management theory, networking, workplace culture and issues specific to co-op work-terms. There will be a tuition of $100 for the prerequisite course.

Campus
COOP 1000

 Career Management (1.5,0,0)

Credits: 1
Students admitted into co-operative education must complete this pre-requisite one credit course prior to their first work term. The course will cover an introduction to co-operative education, career development theory, self-assessment, career communications, interview skills, workplace dynamics, networking, workplace culture and issues specific to co-operative education work terms. Students who are not enrolled in coopertive education may still take this course, but they should determine whether it is accepted by their certificate, diploma, or degree program before registering.

Campus
COOP 1050

 CSOM Co-op Work Term

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 1070

 ARET Co-op Work Term 1

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 1100

 NRSC Co-op Work Term 1

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 1110

 CHEM Co-op Work Term 1

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 1120

 BIOL Co-op Work Term 1

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 1130

 BCS Co-op Work Term 1

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 1140

 CPSC Co-op Work Term 1

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 1150

 PHYS Co-op Work Term 1

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 1170

 BTM Co-op Work Term 1

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 1190

 BA Co-op Work Term 1

Credits: 3
This course will provide Bachelor of Arts students with access to Co-op Education. Co-operative Education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience. Co-op provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their academic majors. Co-op work terms appear on students transcripts, as non-credit and are transferable within BC post-secondary institutions.

Campus
COOP 1210

 MATH Co-op Work Term 1

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 1550

 CS Parallel Co-op Work Term

Credits: 3
These 3 credit elective courses will provide TRU students increased access to Co-operative Education programming. Co-operative Education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience. Co-op provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study. Parallel Co-op occurs over two academic semesters (typically fall and winter semesters) and allows students to gain career related experience while enrolled in full-time studies.

Campus
COOP 1600

 NRSC Parallel Co-op Work Term

Credits: 3
These 3 credit elective courses will provide TRU students increased access to Co-operative Education programming. Co-operative Education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience. Co-op provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study. Parallel Co-op occurs over two academic semesters (typically fall and winter semesters) and allows students to gain career related experience while enrolled in full-time studies.

Campus
COOP 1610

 CHEM Parallel Co-op Work Term

Credits: 3
These 3 credit elective courses will provide TRU students increased access to Co-operative Education programming. Co-operative Education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience. Co-op provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study. Parallel Co-op occurs over two academic semesters (typically fall and winter semesters) and allows students to gain career related experience while enrolled in full-time studies.

Campus
COOP 1620

 BIOL Parallel Co-op Work Term

Credits: 3
These 3 credit elective courses will provide TRU students increased access to Co-operative Education programming. Co-operative Education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience. Co-op provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study. Parallel Co-op occurs over two academic semesters (typically fall and winter semesters) and allows students to gain career related experience while enrolled in full-time studies.

Campus
COOP 1630

 BCS Parallel Co-op Work Term

Credits: 3
These 3 credit elective courses will provide TRU students increased access to Co-operative Education programming. Co-operative Education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience. Co-op provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study. Parallel Co-op occurs over two academic semesters (typically fall and winter semesters) and allows students to gain career related experience while enrolled in full-time studies.

Campus
COOP 1640

 BSc CPSC Co-op Work Term

Credits: 3
These 3 credit elective courses will provide TRU students increased access to Co-operative Education programming. Co-operative Education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience. Co-op provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study. Parallel Co-op occurs over two academic semesters (typically fall and winter semesters) and allows students to gain career related experience while enrolled in full-time studies.

Campus
COOP 1650

 PHYS Parallel Co-op Work Term

Credits: 3
These 3 credit elective courses will provide TRU students increased access to Co-operative Education programming. Co-operative Education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience. Co-op provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study. Parallel Co-op occurs over two academic semesters (typically fall and winter semesters) and allows students to gain career related experience while enrolled in full-time studies.

Campus
COOP 1670

 BTM Parallel Co-op Work Term

Credits: 3
These 3 credit elective courses will provide TRU students increased access to Co-operative Education programming. Co-operative Education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience. Co-op provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study. Parallel Co-op occurs over two academic semesters (typically fall and winter semesters) and allows students to gain career related experience while enrolled in full-time studies.

Campus
COOP 1690

 BA Parallel Co-op Work Term

Credits: 3
These 3 credit elective courses will provide TRU students increased access to Co-operative Education programming. Co-operative Education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience. Co-op provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study. Parallel Co-op occurs over two academic semesters (typically fall and winter semesters) and allows students to gain career related experience while enrolled in full-time studies.

Campus
COOP 1710

 Mathematics Parallel Co-op Work Term

Credits: 3
These 3 credit elective courses will provide TRU students increased access to Co-operative Education programming. Co-operative Education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience. Co-op provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study. Parallel Co-op occurs over two academic semesters (typically fall and winter semesters) and allows students to gain career related experience while enrolled in full-time studies.

Campus
COOP 2050

 CSOM Co-op Work Term

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 2070

 ARET Co-op Work Term 2

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 2080

 EECE Co-op Work Term 1

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 2100

 NRSC Co-op Work Term 2

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 2110

 CHEM Co-op Work Term 2

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 2120

 BIOL Co-op Work Term 2

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 2130

 BCS Co-op Work Term 2

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 2140

 CPSC Co-op Work Term 2

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 2150

 PHYS Co-op Work Term 2

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 2170

 BTM Co-op Work Term 2

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 2180

 EECE Co-op Work Term 2

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 2190

 BA Co-op Work Term 2

Credits: 3
This course will provide Bachelor of Arts students with access to Co-op Education. Co-operative Education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience. Co-op provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their academic majors. Co-op work terms appear on students transcripts, as non-credit and are transferable within BC post-secondary institutions.

Campus
COOP 2200

 Co-op Abroad

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 2210

 MATH Co-op Work Term 2

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3050

 CSOM Co-op Work Term

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3070

 ARET Co-op Work Term 3

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3100

 NRSC Co-op Work Term 3

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3110

 CHEM Co-op Work Term 3

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3120

 BIOL Co-op Work Term 3

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3130

 BCS Co-op Work Term 3

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3140

 CPSC Co-op Work Term 3

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3150

 PHYS Co-op Work Term 3

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3160

 BBA Co-op Work Term 1

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3170

 BTM Co-op Work Term 3

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3190

 BA Co-op Work Term 3

Credits: 3
This course will provide Bachelor of Arts students with access to Co-op Education. Co-operative Education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience. Co-op provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their academic majors. Co-op work terms appear on students transcripts, as non-credit and are transferable within BC post-secondary institutions.

Campus
COOP 3200

 Co-op Abroad

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3210

 MATH Co-op Work Term 3

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3220

 BIS Co-op Work Term 1

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3230

 BIS Co-op Work Term 2

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3240

 BIS Co-op Work Term 3

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3250

 BIS Parallel Co-op Work Term

Credits: 3
These 3 credit elective courses will provide TRU students increased access to Co-operative Education programming. Co-operative Education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience. Co-op provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study. Parallel Co-op occurs over two academic semesters (typically fall and winter semesters) and allows students to gain career related experience while enrolled in full-time studies.

Campus
COOP 3550

 CSOM Co-op Work Term

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3600

 NRSC Co-op Work Term 4

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3610

 CHEM Co-op Work Term 4

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3620

 BIOL Co-op Work Term 4

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3630

 BCS Co-op Work Term 4

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3640

 CPSC Co-op Work Term 4

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3650

 PHYS Co-op Work Term 4

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3660

 BBA Co-op Work Term 2

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 3690

 BA Co-op Work Term 4

Credits: 3
This course will provide Bachelor of Arts students with access to Co-op Education. Co-operative Education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience. Co-op provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their academic majors. Co-op work terms appear on students transcripts, as non-credit and are transferable within BC post-secondary institutions.

Campus
COOP 3710

 MATH Co-op Work Term 4

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 4100

 NRSC Co-op Work Term 5

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 4110

 CHEM Co-op Work Term 5

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 4120

 BIOL Co-op Work Term 5

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 4130

 BCS Co-op Work Term 5

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 4140

 CPSC Co-op Work Term 5

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 4150

 PHYS Co-op Work Term 5

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 4160

 BBA Co-op Work Term 3

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 4170

 BTM Co-op Work Term 5

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 4190

 BA Co-op Work Term 5

Credits: 3
This course will provide Bachelor of Arts students with access to Co-op Education. Co-operative Education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience. Co-op provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their academic majors. Co-op work terms appear on students transcripts, as non-credit and are transferable within BC post-secondary institutions.

Campus
COOP 4200

 Co-op Abroad

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 4210

 MATH Co-op Work Term 5

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COOP 4660

 BBA Co-op Work Term 4

Credits: 3
This course provides TRU students access to co-op education. Co-operative education integrates academic studies with paid periods of relevant work experience and provides students with the opportunity to develop specific competencies, professional skills and technical knowledge related to their field of study.

Campus
COUN 5500

 Introduction to Counselling Skills (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is the study of the helping professions and the skills needed to communicate effectively with diverse populations. The purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for the development of counselling skills and improved interpersonal relationships through the exchange of ideas, feelings and attitudes. Through interaction and experiential learning activities, students will develop a working knowledge of counselling skills and procedures.

Campus
COUN 5510

 Theories in Counselling (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course consists of a study of the major counselling approaches and a study of some of the issues faced by counsellors and by individuals who are considering becoming counsellors.

Campus
CRIM 1011

 Introduction to Criminology

Credits: 3
Students examine the core concepts, basic data sources, and general research findings in the field of criminology, with particular attention to Canadian developments. Topics include crime measurement, patterns and trends in crime, crime types, criminological theories, and how the theories are related to public policies and the criminal justice system.
More information about this course

Distance
CRIM 1161

 Introduction to the Canadian Legal System

Credits: 3
This course focuses on the history, development and present day operation of the Canadian legal system. The topics that will be examined include: constitutional law; criminal, contract and tort law; human rights; administrative law; the court system; the functions of judges and lawyers; and the basic elements of legal reasoning.
More information about this course

Distance
CRIM 2261

 Criminal Law

Credits: 3
This course is designed to give students an understanding of Canadian criminal law. The course will begin with a review of the sources of criminal law and how criminal law operates within the structure of the justice system. Students will be introduced to the role of criminal law in society through a discussion of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and recent cases. This will be followed by a thorough examination of the principles of substantive Canadian criminal law. The substantive criminal law will be explained and examined by the use of the case method. General principles of law will be discussed in the context of specific cases decided by the courts. Students will be encouraged to consider the law critically, from both an academic and societal perspective.
More information about this course

Distance
CRIM 2521

 Criminal Justice and Corrections

Credits: 3
This introductory course, also offered as SOCI 2521: Criminal Justice and Corrections, consists of three modules. The first module provides an introduction to the operation of the criminal justice system and examines the organization and operation of police in Canada. The second module considers the criminal courts, and the third module examines the operation of the correctional system.
More information about this course

Distance
CRIM 3151

 Aboriginal Restorative Justice

Credits: 3
As an introduction to the aboriginal restorative justice paradigm, students critically examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Aboriginal/Indigenous peoples in Canada. The idea of "justice" is explored and compared amongst some Indigenous, restorative, retributive and rehabilitative conceptions. Particular attention is paid to the importance of values, relationships, needs, and healing for those who cause harm and have been harmed. Indigenous and restorative justice approaches are evaluated in the context of law enforcement, the law, corrections, community development, and crime prevention.
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CRIM 3311

 Advanced Theoretical Perspectives in Criminology

Credits: 3
Students explore the diverse nature of theory within the field of crime and deviance by focusing on modern, post-modern, and critical theories. The selected paradigms are studied with regard to their explanatory domain, role in examining social and criminological problems and research implications.
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CRIM 3321

 Sociology of Law

Credits: 3
Students examine law from a sociological perspective, with particular attention to understanding major theories and empirical studies on various aspects of law and how law works in the real world, or what socio-legal scholars call "law in action." Topics include exploring law as a mode of social control, dispute resolution, social change, and how intersecting factors such as, race/ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, age, and ability shape the law and legal institutions.
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CRIM 3821

 Socio-Ethnographic Research Methods

Credits: 3
Students examine the ways social scientists employ qualitative research to identify, document and critically analyse complex social phenomena and patterns and practices of interaction. The course is intended to provide an overview of particular techniques in research design, data collection, and data analysis most commonly associated with qualitative research.
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CRIM 4121

 Crime and Media

Credits: 3
Students examine the interrelationships between crime, criminal justice, and mass media, with particular attention to how the media represents, distorts, and/or filters crime and justice issues. Topics include media portrayal of police, courts, corrections, and how various forms of media shape public perceptions about crime, the criminal justice system, and criminal justice policy.
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CRIM 4991

 Directed Studies in Criminology

Credits: 3
Students are required to review the literature, both original and interpretative, in their particular area of study, offer critical assessment of the literature, and submit a major research paper based on the course reading list.
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CSSW 1650

 Field Work (0,2,14P)

Credits: 4
This course requires students to be in the field two days per week and to attend weekly two hour practicum seminars. At this time such topics as team work, time management, advocacy, sexuality and family support for individuals with challenges will be discussed, in addition to practicum related issues/concerns. There will be a two week block fieldwork experience at the end of this course.

Campus
CTMR 1000

 Commercial Transport Vehicle Mechanic Apprentice Level 1


Commercial Transport Vehicle Mechanic means a person who maintains, rebuilds, overhauls, reconditions, does diagnostic troubleshooting and repair of motorized commercial truck, bus and road transport equipment. Technical Training Content: Electrical and Electronic Systems; Wheels, Hubs and Brakes; Frames, Chassis and Steering; Cabs, Bodies and Access.

Campus
CTMR 2000

 Commercial Transport Vehicle Mechanic Apprentice Level 2


Commercial Transport Vehicle Mechanic means a person who maintains, rebuilds, overhauls, reconditions, does diagnostic troubleshooting and repair of motorized commercial truck, bus and road transport equipment. Technical Training Content: Work Practices and Procedures; Electrical and Electronic Systems; Cabs, Bodies and Accessories; Fuel Systems; Drive Train; Engines and Support Systems.

Campus
CTMR 3000

 Commercial Transport Vehicle Mechanic Apprentice Level 3


Commercial Transport Vehicle Mechanic means a person who maintains, rebuilds, overhauls, reconditions, does diagnostic troubleshooting and repair of motorized commercial truck, bus and road transport equipment. Technical Training Content: Electrical and Electronic Systems; Fuel Systems; Engines and Support Systems.

Campus
CTMR 4000

 Commercial Transport Vehicle Mechanic Apprentice Level 4


Commercial Transport Vehicle Mechanic means a person who maintains, rebuilds, overhauls, reconditions, does diagnostic troubleshooting and repair of motorized commercial truck, bus and road transport equipment. Technical Training Content: Work Practices and Procedures; Wheels, Hubs and Brakes; Electrical and Electronic Systems; Cabs, Bodies and Accessories; Fuel Systems; Engines and Support Systems.

Campus
CYCA 1820

 Practicum 1 (0,2,8p)

Credits: 4
A practicum course which combines classroom activities and a work-place experience to assist students to integrate core concepts into their practice as child and youth care workers, to develop their skills as practitioners to engage in the design and delivery of individual and/or group programs with agency supervision and faculty contact.

Campus
CYCA 2000

 Introduction to Professional Foundations of Child and Youth Care (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an overview of the foundations of professional child and youth care practice. Topics include a review of the history of the child and youth care field and an identification of current child and youth care practice settings. Current theory and practice perspectives are explored, in addition to issues related to professional identity, ethical practice, children's rights, and interdisciplinary work.

Campus
CYCA 2020

 Theoretical Foundations in Child and Youth Care (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to theory and practice and how these two concepts relate. Students explore three specific ways of thinking about, understanding, and dealing with behaviour and behaviour change: behavioural, psychodynamic, and systemic. The influence of normative development, multiculturalism, and gender sensitivity on therapeutic interventions is discussed.

Campus
CYCA 2500

 Special Topics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided an opportunity to examine selected current issues in child and youth care.

Campus
CYCA 2530

 Self and the Helping Relationship as a Context for Change (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
An effective helper must be aware of the values, language, contextual speech, gender, and cultural differences affecting his or her relationships. The ideas, concepts, and topics in this course emphasize the role and development of self as helper, and the importance and use of the helping relationship as a context for facilitating change.

Campus
CYCA 2620

 Introduction to Self in Groups (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine group development theory and the use of theories in human service practice. Participants develop an awareness of themselves as group participants. Topics include planning for group work, facilitating groups, dealing with group dynamics and challenges, and enhancing group safety. There is an emphasis on group work with children and youth.

Campus
CYMH 5511

 Context and Theory in Child and Youth Mental Health Practice

Credits: 3
This course is an interdisciplinary course that is designed to enable bachelor's and master's prepared students to provide assessment and treatment for clients who experience mental health conditions. The course introduces and examines core concepts, theoretical foundations and competencies in child and youth mental health clinical practice. The course is broken down into the following age grouping: 0-5, 6-12 and 13-19, refelctive of the research literature and direct practice in the mental health field. Case studies, case assessments and treatment cases will be used to address all three age groups over a broad cross section of direct practice issues.
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CYMH 5521

 Assessment for Intervention in Child and Youth Mental Health

Credits: 3
This interdisciplinary course is designed to enable bachelor's and master's prepared students to provide assessment and treatment for clients with mental health disorders. The course provides an understanding of assessment issues and approaches relevant to the support of children and youth with mental health concerns and their families. Students will be introduced to a range of issues and considerations that guide a thorough and accurate evaluation and diagnosis and develop an understanding of specific assessment processes and instruments associated with specific conditions.
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CYMH 5531

 Intervention in Child and Youth Mental Health

Credits: 4
This is an interdisciplinary course that is designed to enable bachelor's and master's prepared students to provide and implement intervention plans for children with mental health disorders. The course provides an understanding of intervention issues and approaches relevant to the support of children and youth with mental health concerns and their families. Students will be introduced to a range of issues and considerations that guide intervention plans.
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CYMH 5541

 Child and Youth Mental Health Internship and Capstone

Credits: 5
This course will provide the structure and supervision for field experience in child and youth mental health. Field education will provide students with an opportunity to enhance and refine their child and youth mental health skills. Students who are currently working in a mental health position must ensure that their placement work is specifically with children and youth and appropriate supervision is available within or can be contracted outside of the agency. Included in this course is a Capstone Project which will integrate theory, practice, and research.
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CYMH 5611

 Introduction to Adoption and Permanency Planning

Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide participants with a foundation in the theoretical underpinnings of adoption competent mental health practice. Based on the Center for Adoption Support and Education training for Adoption Competency this course is designed for professionals in the mental health and child welfare field who want to develop their knowledge and skills to better serve adopted children and their families. Throughout the course participants will be encouraged to reflect upon their own attitudes and beliefs about adoption, the diversity of adoptive families, and the challenge when mental health behaviors occur. In addition to an understanding of the theoretical, organizational, legal and ethical issues impacting adoption, the course will focus on developmental stages of children and their adoptive families and the psycho-emotional challenges in adoptive families.
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CYMH 5621

 Mental Health Practice Skills for Adoption Facilitators

Credits: 3
This course builds on the concepts introduced in (CYMH 5611: Intro to Adoption and Permanency Planning) and focuses on ways of supporting adoptive children and families who are experiencing mental health challenges. This second course focuses on clinical skill development and is based on the Center for Adoption Support and Education training for Adoption Competency. Participants will integrate adoption competent knowledge, skills, and values into their practice with adopted children, adoptive families, birth parents and extended family members. Particular attention will be focused on the multiple mental health challenges children present in adoptive families and ways of supporting adoptive families through the process of healing in order to enhance healthy family formation.
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