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Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University
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On-Campus

There are a number of ways to register for on-campus courses at TRU which are determined by your program of study.

Open Learning

We offer 590 courses by distance learning. These courses are offered in several formats, including print-based, web-based and online.


Continuing Studies

Community U provides individuals and organizations with formal and non-formal opportunities to pursue personal and professional goals life-long.

Trades and Technology

Apprenticeship, foundation and continuing studies courses are offered in construction, mechanical trades, professional driving and more.

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Courses - J
Title Name Delivery
JAPA 1110

 Introductory Japanese 1 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course allows beginners to develop cultural knowledge and communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in modern standard Japanese. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR A1 level of proficiency.
Note: Students who have completed Japanese in Grade 11 or equivalent within the last two years may not take this course for credit unless approved by Modern Required Lab: JAPA 1110L

Campus
JAPA 1210

 Introductory Japanese 2 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
Students build on the skills acquired in JAPA 1110: Introductory Japanese 1. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR A1+ level of proficiency.
Note: Students who have completed Japanese in Grade 11 or equivalent within the last two years may not take this course for credit unless approved by Modern Languages. Required Lab: JAPA 1210L

Campus
JAPA 1510

 Japanese for Tourism (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
Tourism students prepare to speak Japanese in order to serve Japanese visitors to Canada in a hotel, restaurant, or retail shop setting. Upon successful completion, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR A1 level of proficiency.
Note: Students who have completed Japanese in Grade 11 or equivalent within the last two years may not take this course for credit unless approved by Modern Languages Required Lab: JAPA 1510L

Campus
JAPA 2110

 Intermediate Japanese 1 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
Students further develop their communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing, and explore language from a variety of different areas, registers and periods. Upon successful completion, students are expected to demonstrate a low CEFR A2 level of proficiency.

Campus
JAPA 2150

 Oral Japanese 1 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course, conducted in Japanese, is designed to enhance oral communicative skills. Students review Japanese grammar and expand their vocabulary. A variety of activities enable students to progress to a superior level of fluency. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR B1+ - B2 level of proficiency.

Campus
JAPA 2210

 Intermediate Japanese 2 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
Students solidify their skills and extend their knowledge while they are introduced to increasingly advanced language structures. Upon successful completion, students are expected to demonstrate an intermediate CEFR A2 level of proficiency.

Campus
JAPA 2250

 Oral Japanese 2 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of JAPA 2150: Oral Japanese 1. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR B2 level of proficiency.

Campus
JAPA 2500

 Japanese for Business 1 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is intended for students with a basic level of Japanese language, and who wish to further their language skills for the Japanese business world. This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of terminology used in functional business areas, and an introductory knowledge of Japanese business customs, manners, and structure.

Campus
JAPA 2510

 Japanese for Business 2 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is intended for students with a basic level of Japanese language, and who wish to further their knowledge of language skills for the Japanese business world. Spoken language skills appropriate for business meetings, the office, politeness strategy, and various business contexts are introduced. This course is a continuation of JAPA 2500: Japanese for Business 1.

Campus
JAPA 2600

 Aspects of Japanese Culture 1 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
In this survey course, students are introduced to aspects of Japanese culture and society. The course explores Japan from the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the Second World War. Students focus on the development of basic Japanese social, cultural, and political ideas. The course is conducted in English; no knowledge of Japanese is required. Required Lab: JAPA 2600L

Campus
JAPA 2610

 Aspects of Japanese Culture 2 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
In this survey course, students are introduced to aspects of Japanese culture and society. The course explores modern Japan in the post-war era. Students focus on the development of basic Japanese social, cultural, and political ideas that have shaped modern Japanese society.The course is conducted in English; no knowledge of Japanese is required. Required Lab: JAPA 2610L

Campus
JOIN 1010

 Entry Level Joinery (Benchwork) Theory (180 hours)


Students are introduced to theory for the following topics: Using safe work practices, using organizational skills, selecting materials, using hand tools, using portable power tools, using woodworking machines, assembling products and applying finishing materials.

Campus
JOIN 1110

 Entry Level Joinery (Benchwork) Practical (420 hours)


Students gain experience from hands-on training in the carpentry shop in the proper and safe use of joinery hand tools, portable power tools, woodworking machines and applying finishing products to wood surfaces.

Campus
JOUR 2010

 Studies in Journalism (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This is a variable content course offering an introduction to topics in contemporary journalism studies. Students explore social and political issues in Canadian journalism, journalism and film, journalism and media studies, and journalism and the new media.

Campus
JOUR 2020

 Media Theory and History (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This is a critical introduction to media theory and history, with an emphasis on the development of journalism as part of the operation of Canadian media organizations. Students are familiarized with basic media theory, and the structure, history, and general operations of media institutions in Canada.

Campus
JOUR 2060

 Introduction to Multimedia (3,0,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Students connect journalistic storytelling with the multi-media and social media tools used by professionals to reach a wide range of audiences. Coursework includes social media; storytelling with audio and video; and the use and critical evaluation of blogs as sources and sites for news.

Campus
JOUR 2200

 Introduction to Reporting Skills and Techniques (3,0,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the basics of gathering information in journalism, including planning, networking, researching, evaluating, interviewing, summarizing, critical thinking and deadline writing. Students explore the basic issues of journalism, including media law and ethics, and the beats of journalism, such as justice reporting and municipal reporting. The practical and applied principles, values and behaviour of effective journalism are discussed.

Campus
JOUR 2210

 Introduction to News Photography and Videography (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the practical skills of photojournalism through planning, composing, shooting and editing digital still photos and digital video in a journalistic, newsworthy style. Students are instructed in the effective visual composition of images, in addition to interviewing technique with a video camera, the creation of the 'decisive moment' in still photos and of narrative in a video form, and the processing of digital images with Photoshop and Final Cut Pro. Students also explore theoretical issues of ethics, privacy and legal considerations in press photography and videography.
Corequisite: JOUR 2200

Campus
JOUR 2800

 Journalism Career Preparation 1 (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
Students explore the range of career possibilities in journalism, public relations and organizational communication. Students develop job-search skills, create and maintain a professional portfolio, and prepare for future work experience in the field of journalism and communication.

Campus
JOUR 3030

 News Writing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course takes the student from a brief review of grammar to the introduction of techniques for journalistic writing, revising, and editing, including copy editing and Canadian Press style. Students start with the basics and progress to increasingly advanced techniques.

Campus
JOUR 3110

 Layout and Design for Newspapers and Magazines (3,0,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Students examine the production of newspapers and magazines in theory and practice, and apply the skills, principles, values and theories involved in print publications. The stages of production are explored, from the conception of a unique publication, to creating stories and photos, and to the designing and laying out of newspapers and magazines using InDesign and Photoshop. Students design and create their own distinctive layout.

Campus
JOUR 3160

 Online Journalism (3,0,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Students focus on developing the skills and knowledge required for online journalism. Students refine their writing, reporting and editing skills by developing news and features for publication on the Web. Basic HTML language skills are acquired as students become familiar with Web editing and design programs. Students produce a personal/professional web page and help to produce an online newspaper project. Emerging issues in online journalism are examined and discussed. Students work on advanced applications in editing, layout and web publishing software.

Campus
JOUR 3230

 Beat Reporting (3,0,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Working in the context of the program's newspapers, students explore and experiment with a number of different specialized types of writing, editing and reporting. A variety of beats are covered, such as politics, arts and culture, business and economics, justice and sports. The exact nature of course material varies with student interest and the availability of instruction.

Campus
JOUR 3400

 National and International Media (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are familiarized with major international and national media, and exposed to a wide variety of print publications, as they explore how the media helps to form and shape societal values. Students evaluate the major global media consortiums that cross-control newspapers, magazines, movie studios, cable TV channels, networks, music programs and Internet providers today. The relationships and dependencies that Canadian media have at the local, regional, national, and international levels are examined, with a consideration of how governments attempt to control the media.

Campus
JOUR 3510

 Photojournalism (3,0,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Students use a digital camera as a reporting tool to reveal events and tell a story about newsworthy subjects that impact society in significant ways. A practical and working knowledge of digital camera equipment is developed as students work with journalistic photo composition and the advanced processing of digital photos through Photoshop. The legal requirements and ethical behaviour of responsible photojournalism is discussed. The photojournalistic image as a distinct form of representation is also explored according to leading theorists.

Campus
JOUR 3520

 Journalism Research Methods (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The basic principles and techniques of research from a journalistic perspective is explored as students are shown how to design and execute a focused research plan for their articles. A broad range of topics are discussed, including how to access public information and historical and legal records, and how to make sense of the gathered information using both traditional ('shoe-leather') methods and more advanced techniques, such as computer-assisted reporting.

Campus
JOUR 3540

 Feature Writing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Building on the news writing skills acquired in JOUR 3030: News Writing, students are introduced to the feature article. Through the use of modelling and other techniques, students learn to recognize a good idea for a feature article and how to execute that idea in a publishable finished product. Additional topics include the essentials of revising for publication and the basics of freelance feature writing.

Campus
JOUR 3550

 Media and Public Relations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop key skills and techniques used in the field of media and public relations, such as how to prepare and distribute press releases and media kits; how to arrange press conferences and media events; and coaching organizational spokespersons in media relations.

Campus
JOUR 3700

 Media Law and Ethics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an overview of the legal and ethical situations and circumstances that commonly confront journalists and other media professionals. Topics include libel, contempt of court, freedom of information, privacy legislation, copyright, confidentiality, protection of sources, and the use of 'off-the-record' remarks.

Campus
JOUR 3800

 Journalism Career Preparation 2 (0,1,0)

Credits: 1
Students are instructed in how to find and apply for field experience in journalism-related placements. Students explore strategic planning and job-hunting techniques; prepare professional cover letters and resumes, and build and maintain a professional portfolio.

Campus
JOUR 3980

 Journalism Internship (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
Through a six-to-twelve-week supervised field experience, this course helps students explore the range of career possibilities in journalism, public relations, and organizational communication. Students will propose internship placements in collaboration with department faculty. Department supervision and evaluation of field work is completed in collaboration with a field supervisor.

Campus
JOUR 3990

 Directed Study: Internship (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
Journalism Internship Studies provides guided online support for those Journalism students engaged in 12-week internships. Working with an instructor via the Journalism Internship Web site, students will complete assignments designed to help support the internship experience.

Campus
JOUR 4020

 Advanced Media Theory (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore cultural-critical theories of mass communication, drawing on the works of theorists, such as John Thompson, Robert McChesney, and Neil Postman. Students apply the critical perspectives discussed in this course to their own media use.

Campus
JOUR 4110

 Issues in Journalism: A Case Studies Approach (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore journalism decision-making by studying real-life incidents involving journalists on the job. The case-study method allows students to consider the complexity of the challenges facing journalists on a daily basis, such as questions involving ethics, reporting and interviewing techniques, sourcing, bias and objectivity, news cycles, societal and personal assumptions, and changing technology - all while operating under deadline in a competitive and often stressful environment. Students also read and discuss critical assessments of journalism and analyze the performance of journalists today.

Campus
JOUR 4130

 Advanced Online and Multimedia Journalism (3,0,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Students build on skills and concepts learned in previous online journalism and multimedia classes. Students become familiar with advanced multimedia and online news presentation techniques. Advanced skills and techniques are then used to produce collaborative multimedia news projects.

Campus
JOUR 4150

 Popular Science, Nature, and Technology Writing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn the history and application of skepticism and critical thinking to journalism as it filters, evaluates, translates and packages information about science, technology and the environment in a form acceptable to a general mainstream audience. Styles and strategies of critical non-fiction writing are explored, and the essential communication issues of narrative, voice, and ethics are examined. Students develop their own distinct and original writing for science, nature, or technology, designed for a typical mainstream publication in print, video or online.

Campus
JOUR 4210

 Freelance Writing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an intensive workshop in freelance writing, focused on the researching, writing, and selling of freelance articles. The course acts as a form of self-directed study with a collaborative edge. Students are expected to keep a writing log in which they zero in on special interests and special problems. Work is submitted (and revised and re-submitted when necessary) for publication. This course is designed to refine and strengthen the individual's sense of writing self (to facilitate the charting of a freelance career), and to provide a solid introduction to the business of professional freelance writing.

Campus
JOUR 4270

 Investigative Journalism (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are instructed in the high-level research skills used by investigative journalists to uncover information that has often been deliberately hidden from public scrutiny. Students learn to recognize opportunities for, and execute, investigative work.

Campus
JOUR 4310

 Literary Journalism: Studies in Narrative Non-Fiction (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides a topical introduction to literary journalism and additional forms of creative nonfiction through a survey of the best works in the genre. Through close reading of selected works and targeted writing exercises, the course enhances students' appreciation for the craft of journalism and for the range of literature, beyond daily reportage, that the craft accommodates.

Campus
JOUR 4540

 Magazine Writing and Production (2,2,0)

Credits: 3
Working as a team, students will produce a community magazine.

Campus
JOUR 4580

 Alternative Media (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines the history and development of alternative media from the underground newspapers of the 1960s through the alternative press that grew up in its wake (into the now-familiar entertainment rags of most sizeable North American cities) to a final survey of the dizzying profusion of so-called alternatives (zines, indymedia sites, and the like) available - indeed, ever multiplying - in the current electronic environment and information era. The purpose of such examination is twofold: to instill in aspiring journalists a critical and historical awareness of media forms (and their relation to content) and to foster understanding of the important role of that journalists play in the push-and-pull of public discourse.

Campus
JOUR 4590

 Outlaw Journalists (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Journalism has a strong tradition of outlaw writers who break the conventions of society and of journalism. These writers do that through style and content and through the way they practise the craft of writing. Some of these journalists found an audience that allowed them to rebel from inside newspapers and the publishing industry, and others are outcasts who used the craft of writing to rage against their circumstances. The effect of these writers has been so strong that they have altered the path of journalism and made changes in both society and writing.

Campus
JOUR 4750

 Journalism Senior Project (0,3,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Students complete an independent journalism project. Acceptable projects include original investigative stories or a series of stories on a specific subject or issue. Students may do print, broadcast or web-based projects and are encouraged to have their work published in a professional publication, news program or website. Students meet in a weekly seminar to discuss and critique their work.

Campus
JOUR 4800

 Journalism Career Preparation 3 (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
Students prepare for the transition to a career in journalism, public relations or communication. As the last in a series of career preparation courses, this course provides a final opportunity for students to understand the career possibilities in the field; develop job-search skills and abilities; create and maintain professional portfolios; prepare for field experience during their education; and transition successfully from school to work after graduation.

Campus
JOUR 4950

 Directed Study (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students work independently, under the supervision of a faculty member on a selected journalism topic. There are generally 1-3 students enrolled in the course. The instructor provides students with a syllabus or program of study and a set of assignments on the material. Students meet regularly with the instructor throughout the semester to discuss the material and gauge progress. The department Chair and the Dean must approve course topics. With the permission of the program Chair, students may be permitted to undertake independent study in an area of special interest in the field of journalism

Campus
JUST 1140

 Human Behaviour (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students analyze elements of human behaviour from the criminal justice perspective. Four fundamental themes are examined. The first theme explores the importance of self-awareness in developing effective communication in a team-based environment. Building upon the individual's awareness of personal behavioural tendencies and preferences, the second theme focuses on the development and enhancement of critical communication and conflict resolution skills. To provide students with an overview of mental health issues that affect criminal justice personnel and the public they assist, the third theme examines elements of psychological distress and dysfunction as well as support strategies for people in crisis. The final component of the course conveys a variety of aspects relating to a justice-related career including mental health, harassment, and multicultural issues.

Campus
JUST 1250

 Tactical Communication Skills for Criminal Justice (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course contains two core themes pertaining to effective communication skills for public safety personnel. The first theme examines the foundation for communication skills required to effectively interview witnesses, victims and accused, including: probing, questioning techniques, listening, paraphrasing, summarizing, and documentation. The second theme builds on previous interviewing skills by incorporating conflict resolution and crisis intervention techniques. A variety of strategies to identify deceptive people, and response techniques for law enforcement personnel are practiced and discussed. The National Use of Force Model is introduced, and the use of verbal intervention skills using the Use of Force Model is also discussed.

Campus
JUST 1310

 Introduction to Criminal Justice Services in Canada (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers a complete overview of the Canadian criminal justice system. Students begin by examining the legislative, structural, and operational components of the criminal justice system, and reviewing the roles and responsibilities of the professionals who work within this system. Next, students follow the process and discuss the rights of an accused person as they travel through the system, from the commission of an offence to conviction and sentencing. Students also examine the rights of the victims of crime and their impact on the sentencing of adult and young offenders. Finally, alternatives to the criminal justice court process and their affects on the system as a whole are considered.

Campus
JUST 2350

 Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an overview of the basic legal institutions in Canada, and the fundamental principles of common law. Students discuss how laws are developed and evolve, the Canadian court system, and the exercise of judicial power. The course also includes a general introduction to the substantive areas of torts, family law, administrative law, and criminal law.

Campus
JUST 2450

 Police Skills (2,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course offers students an opportunity to practice the use of force techniques in the gymnasium. Students engage in hand-to-hand self defence training, including handcuffing techniques, pressure points and control tactics, defensive baton techniques, and subject control techniques. This course is physically intensive and provides hands-on practical experience for students.

Campus
JUST 2510

 Introduction to Policing (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
The objective of this course is to provide the foundation for students on policing in Canada, from the principles of Sir Robert Peel to policing in the present. Students explore navigating the Criminal Code, identify offences, prepare reports on criminals, learn about Community Policing principles, and discover various departments within police organizations. Students also participate in crime scene investigations, including the taking of fingerprints, the collection of evidence, and recording information in their police notebooks.

Campus
JUST 2810

 Field Work Practicum (0,2,2)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to various aspects of the field of justice by participating in hands-on activities. Students are expected to develop and present a community policing activity to the public during the semester, including creating all instructional media, meeting with schools or service groups, and setting up their presentations. Other topics include Possession and Acquisition Licence (PAL) firearms training; RCMP Physical Abilities Requirement Evaluation (P.A.R.E.) testing; driving course(s); directing traffic; and accident investigations and scenario-based training using actors. Students also tour law enforcement facilities and participate in recruiting sessions with law enforcement groups.

Campus