Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University
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On-Campus

There are a number of ways to register for on-campus courses at TRU which are determined by your program of study.

Open Learning

We offer 590 courses by distance learning. These courses are offered in several formats, including print-based, web-based and online.


Continuing Studies

Community U provides individuals and organizations with formal and non-formal opportunities to pursue personal and professional goals life-long.

Trades and Technology

Apprenticeship, foundation and continuing studies courses are offered in construction, mechanical trades, professional driving and more.

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Courses - H
Title Name Delivery
HDCT 1010

 Heavy Duty Commercial Transport Mechanic Foundation Theory



Campus
HDCT 2010

 Heavy Duty Commercial Transport Mechanic Foundation Practicum



Campus
HDMC 1000

 Heavy Mechanical Apprenticeship Level 1 (300 hours)


This course is the first level of the Heavy Duty Equipment Technicians apprenticeship program. Students will learn to service components of equipment such as graders, loaders, shovels, tractors, trucks, forklifts, drills, and wheeled and tracked vehicles. Working from manufacturers' specifications, they identify and repair problems in structural, mechanical, or hydraulic systems.

Campus
HDMC 1500

 Heavy Mechanical Foundation (1080 hours)


This course is intended for those without prior experience in the Heavy Duty Equipment field. Students will learn to overhaul, repair and service equipment such as graders, loaders, shovels, tractors, trucks, forklifts, drills, and wheeled and tracked vehicles. Working from manufacturers' specifications, they identify and repair problems in structural, mechanical, or hydraulic systems.

Campus
HDMC 2000

 Heavy Mechanical Apprenticeship Level 2 (240 hours)


This course is the second level of the Heavy Duty Equipment Technician apprenticeship program. During this course students will further the ability to work on industrial and construction vehicles, such as mining trucks and bulldozers; on heavy equipment used in construction, forestry, materials handling, landscaping, and land clearing; as well as on buses and large trucks.

Campus
HDMC 3000

 Heavy Mechanical Apprenticeship Level 3 (180 hours)


This course is the third level of the BC ITA Heavy Duty Equipment Technicians program. During this course you will learn to diagnose and repair powertrain components.

Campus
HDMC 4000

 Heavy Mechanical Apprenticeship Level 4 (120 hours)


This course is the fourth and final level of the BC ITA Heavy Equipment program. In it you will learn to diagnose and repair advanced hydraulic systems, electric drive systems, wheeled equipment steering, track machine steering, undercarriages, working attachments, and pneumatic systems.

Campus
HDME 1900

 Heavy Duty/Commercial Transport Technician Trade Sampler (120 hours)


This course is a sampler of the Heavy Duty/Commercial Transport Technician trade based on the Heavy Duty/Commercial Transport Technician Foundation Program outline from the Industry Training Authority of BC. Students will gain familiarity with the safe use of hand tools, portable power tools and other equipment regularly used by Heavy Duty/Commercial Transport Technicians, as well as gaining familiarity with many of the materials used in the Trade. The emphasis of this course is on developing practical, hands-on Heavy Duty/Commercial Transport Technician skills.

Campus
HEAL 1000

 Health 2: Lifestyle and Choices (30 hours)

Credits: 2
Students are introduced to a holistic concept of health and the components of a health-enhancing lifestyle. Participants are invited to reflect on their own experience of health recognizing challenges and resources that can impact lifestyle choices. Students are also introduced to a model that is applied in other courses understand the multi-faceted aspects of health and healing.
Corequisite: HEAL 1050 and HEAL 1150

Campus
HEAL 1010

 Health and Healing: Concepts for Practice (70 hours)

Credits: 3
Developing a theoretical framework for practice, students are introduced to the philosophical values and theoretical understandings that provide a foundation for competent practice as a Health Care Assistant. This course focuses on concepts of caring and person-centered care, basic human needs, human growth and development; and family, culture and diversity as they relate to health and healing. Students are also introduced to a problem-solving model that will be critical to their practice.
Corequisite: HEAL 1000, HEAL 1050, HEAL 1100, HEAL 1150 and HEAL 1200

Campus
HEAL 1050

 Health 1: Interpersonal Communications (50 hours)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on the development of self-awareness, increased understanding of others and development of effective interpersonal communication skills that can be used in a variety of care-giving contexts. Students are encouraged to become more aware of the impact of their own communication choices and patterns. Participants develop and use communication techniques that demonstrate personal awareness, respect and active listening skills.
Corequisite: HEAL 1000, HEAL 1010, HEAL 1100, HEAL 1150, HEAL 1200, HEAL 1250, HEAL 1300 and HEAL 1350

Campus
HEAL 1100

 Health Care Assistant: Introduction to Practice (30 hours)

Credits: 2
This course provides an introduction to the role of the HCA within the British Columbia health care system. Students are introduced to the healthcare team and the roles and functions of the HCA within the team. Students also have opportunities to develop self-reflective skills required for competent practice.
Corequisite: HEAL 1000, HEAL 1010, HEAL 1050, HEAL 1150 and HEAL 1200

Campus
HEAL 1150

 Healing 3: Personal Care and Assistance (120 hours)

Credits: 3
This practical course offers students the opportunity to acquire personal care and assistance skills within the parameters of the Health Care Assistant role. The course is comprised of class and supervised laboratory experiences which enables students to integrate theory from other courses and develop caregiver skills that maintain and promote the comfort, safety and independence of individuals in community and facility contexts.
Corequisite: HEAL 1000, HEAL 1010, HEAL 1050, HEAL 1100 and HEAL 1200

Campus
HEAL 1200

 Healing 1: Caring for Individuals Experiencing Common Health Challenges (115 hours)

Credits: 4
This course introduces students to the normal structure and function of the human body and normal bodily changes with aging. Students explore common challenges to health and healing in relation to each body system. Students also examine person-centered practice as it relates to the common challenges to health and, in particular, to end of life care.
Corequisite: HEAL 1010, HEAL 1050, HEAL 1100, HEAL 1150, HEAL 1250, HEAL 1300 and HEAL 1350

Campus
HEAL 1250

 Practice Experience in Home Support, Assisted Living and/or Group Home Setting (60 hours)

Credits: 3
Students are provided with an opportunity to apply knowledge and skills from all other courses with individuals and families in a community setting. Students become more familiar with the role of the Health Care Assistant within a Home Support Agency, Assisted Living Faculty and/or Group Home to gain abilities that will prepare graduates for employment in these settings. It is important that students understand the philosophy of community care setting and its emphasis on client choice and independence.
Corequisite: HEAL 1300
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of HEAL 1250 or HLTH 1251

Campus
HEAL 1300

 Practice Experience in Multi-Level and/or Complex Care (210 hours)

Credits: 7
This supervised practice course provides students with an opportunity to apply knowledge and skills from all other courses in the program with individuals in a multi-level or complex care setting. A portion of this clinical experience will be devoted to working with individuals experiencing dementia. Students gain expertise and confidence with the role of the Health Care Assistant within a residential care facility.
Corequisite: HEAL 1200

Campus
HEAL 1310

 Psychosocial Rehabilitation Principles (60 hours)

Credits: 2

Campus
HEAL 1320

 Psychosocial Rehabilitation Practice (70 hours)

Credits: 3
Students continue to build on the concept of recovery in mental health care, integrating the knowledge gained in the HEAL 1310: Psychosocial Rehabilitation (PSR) course through a practicum experience, related assignments and seminar sessions. The course consists of 30 hours seminar and 40 hours practicum.

Campus
HEAL 1350

 Healing 2: Caring for Individuals Experiencing Cognitive or Mental Challenges (60 hours)

Credits: 3
Building on content from other courses, students explore concepts and caregiving approaches that will allow them to work effectively with individuals experiencing cognitive or mental challenges. Emphasis is on recognizing the behaviors and identifying person-centered intervention strategies.
Corequisite: HEAL 1010, HEAL 1050, HEAL 1150, HEAL 1200, HEAL 1250 and HEAL 1300

Campus
HEAL 3330

 Death and Dying, Life and Living (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an analysis of death, dying, and bereavement. It includes such topics as facing death, coping with dying, hospice care, bereavement, grief and mourning; funeral practices; lifespan perspectives on death; suicide; and assisted suicide, and euthanasia.

Campus
HIST 0120

 20th Century History

Credits: 3

Campus
HIST 1030

 An Introduction to Ancient Greece and Rome (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
In this course, students engage with the history of the Mediterranean world from classical Greece and Rome to the early Roman empire. Topics include the rise and decline of Hellenic civilization, early Rome and the Republic, the Augustan Age, and the foundations of imperial Rome. Required Seminar: HIST 1030S

Campus
HIST 1120

 An Introduction to Canadian History (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the development of Canada to 1867. An emphasis is placed on Aboriginal-European relations, the history of New France, military conflicts, the political and economic development of British North America, social and cultural history, and the project of Confederation. Required Seminar: HIST 1120S

Campus
HIST 1121

 Canadian History to 1867

Credits: 3
This course provides a general chronological overview of Canadian history in the pre-Confederation era. In addition, it introduces some of the major political, economic, and social events and developments that shaped Canada in that period. Students explore such themes as the relationship between European and First Nations populations; French-English relations; the changing relationship between colonies and their mother countries; the changing structure of the economy; the growth of political, economic, and social institutions; and, at the end of this period, the Confederation of the British North American colonies into one political unit, Canada.
More information about this course

Distance
HIST 1160

 Europe: 1500 - 1789 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
In this course participants learn to evaluate and understand the complex processes involved in the development of early modern Europe from 1500-1789. Topics include the Renaissance, the Reformation, Absolutism, the Enlightenment, and the outbreak of the French Revolution. Lectures and seminars introduce political, intellectual, cultural and social aspects of European society, and participants work with and discuss a variety of primary and secondary historical sources. Required Seminar: HIST 1160S

Campus
HIST 1161

 Modern European History: 1450-1800

Credits: 3
This introductory course provides an overview of Canadian history since 1867, concentrating on the main lines of political, social, and economic development. Students analyze important and controversial issues and events, such as the Riel Rebellion, the economic policies initiated by the Macdonald government, Canada's shift from a rural to an urban society, the effects of the two World Wars on Canada, the Great Depression, the social problems created by rapid industrialization, relations between English and French Canadians, and provincial demands for autonomy.
More information about this course

Distance
HIST 1220

 History of Canada, 1867 to the Present (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the political, social, military, and cultural history of Canada since 1867. Topic include state formation, relations with Britain and the United States, military engagements, social movements, regional and ethnic diversity, Aboriginal history, industrialization and urbanization, and French-English relations. Required Seminar: HIST 1220S

Campus
HIST 1221

 Post-Confederation Canadian History

Credits: 3
This introductory course provides an overview of Canadian history since 1867, concentrating on the main lines of political, social, and economic development. The thirteen units of the course analyze important and controversial issues and events, such as the Riel Rebellion, the economic policies initiated by the Macdonald government, Canada's shift from a rural to an urban society, the effects of the two world wars on Canada, the Great Depression, the social problems created by rapid industrialization, relations between English and French Canadians, and provincial demands for autonomy. This course was previously known as HIST 121.
More information about this course

Distance
HIST 1260

 Europe: 1789 - 1939 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
In this course participants learn to evaluate and understand the complex forces involved in the development of the modern state. Topics include the French Revolution and Napoleonic Europe, the Congress of Vienna, the social and political struggles of the nineteenth and early twentieth century, and the fissures in European society during the interwar period. Lectures and seminars introduce the political, intellectual, cultural and social aspects of European society, and participants work with a variety of primary and secondary historical sources. Required Seminar: HIST 1260S

Campus
HIST 2020

 Native History of Canada (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the history of the Aboriginal peoples of what is now Canada. The course begins with pre-contact perspectives, however, emphasis is on the social, cultural, political, economic and military interactions between Aboriginal peoples and newcomers. Examples are drawn from all regions to reveal the breadth and variety of Aboriginal culture, history, and experience. Topics include Aboriginal involvement in the fur trade and later economic developments, the treaty-making process, and Aboriginal responses to government policy. Required Seminar: HIST 2020S

Campus
HIST 2160

 History of England: Roman Britain to the Glorious Revolution, 1688 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed for those who wish an acquaintance with the broad sweep of British history. The course will examine the social, political, economic and religious issues which affected the following periods of British history: Roman, Norman, medieval, the Tudors and Stuarts. Required Seminar: HIST 2160S

Campus
HIST 2170

 Major Issues in American History from the Colonial Period to the Civil War (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines the key political, economic, and social issues in the development of the United States from its colonial beginnings to the cataclysm of the Civil War. Required Seminar: HIST 2170S

Campus
HIST 2180

 Medieval Europe 1: From the Fall of Rome to the Crusades (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
In this course, students engage with European civilization during the early and beginning of the central middle ages. An emphasis is placed on the development of various structures and their changes, the ordering of society, belief systems and ideas, the organization of communities, and the emergence of religious and political institutions. Required Seminar: HIST 2180S

Campus
HIST 2200

 ***Topics in British or European History (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore special topics that provide an introduction of British or European history, rather than an in-depth analysis of a narrowly defined topic. The specific topic(s) will be decided by the instructor and approved by the Department. Required Seminar: HIST 2200S

Campus
HIST 2250

 Cultural and Artistic Traditions of Europe (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to some of the major artistic and literary monuments and movements of the Western tradition, and investigate post-Renaissance cultural achievements in their historical context. Themes include humanism and the legacy of religious upheaval, the impact of science on philosophy, the challenge of neoclassicism, cultural responses to political and industrial revolution, and modernist experimentation. Required Seminar: HIST 2250S

Campus
HIST 2251

 History of British Columbia

Credits: 3
This course surveys the past two centuries of the history of Canada's west coast province, and includes an overview of the major historical events in British Columbia. Students analyze their significance, and examine the roles played by economics, geography, politics, and social factors. This course is of interest to history majors and other arts students, teachers of social studies and local history enthusiasts.
More information about this course

Distance
HIST 2260

 History of England: The Glorious Revolution to Victorian Britain (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce students to British history from the Glorious Revolution of 1688 to the end of the reign of Queen Victoria. The course will examine the political, social and economic issues which determined Britain's development. Required Seminar: HIST 2260S

Campus
HIST 2270

 American History Since 1865 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the key political, economic, and social issues in the development of the United States from the Civil War to the present. Required Seminar: HIST 2270S

Campus
HIST 2280

 Medieval Europe 2: From the Crusades to the Renaissance (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students engage with the continuity in the economic, social, political, and religious foundations of high and late medieval Europe, and the accompanying philosophical, literary, artistic, and cultural achievements of European civilization during this period. Required Seminar: HIST 2280S

Campus
HIST 2480

 ***Topics in North American History (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore special topics that provide an introduction, rather than an in-depth analysis of a narrowly-defined topic, of North American History, allowing for more regional studies (e.g. "The Pacific Northwest") or more topical content. Specific topics for this course will be decided by the instructor and approved by the Department. Required Seminar: HIST 2480S

Campus
HIST 2700

 The History of Women in Canadian Society (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the history of women in Canada. Organized chronologically and thematically, this course surveys women's history from the era of Aboriginal-European contact through to the postwar years. Topics include the family, the workplace, sexuality, education, and politics. An emphasis is placed on the diversity of women's experiences. Required Seminar: HIST 2700S

Campus
HIST 3000

 The Historian's Craft (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the practice of history, and the history of history: how the study of the past has changed over time. What do historians do, and why do they do it? What is the purpose of history? What is historical evidence, and how is it used? Students examine these questions in an effort to broaden and deepen their understanding of the historian's craft.

Campus
HIST 3010

 Canada in the Age of Nations (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine Canada in the first half of the twentieth century: its imperial connections, the rise of nationalism, war and commemoration of both the Great War and World War II. A number of forces which marked these years are highlighted, especially technology and consumerism, and their accompanying social changes.

Campus
HIST 3040

 The History of the Canadian Prairie West (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines the history of the Canadian Prairie West from pre-Aboriginal-European contact to the modern era. Topics include an examination of the First Nations' traditional economic and social life, and their adaptation to the arrival of Europeans and the fur trade; the rise of the Metis and their changed economic and living conditions as a result of Canadian government policies; Euro-Canadian immigration and settlement; the Great War and the rise of nativism; the economic depression of the 1930s, as well as World War II and the modern West. Students investigate the myths versus the realities of 'cowboys and Indians', the ranching frontier, women, and Mounties.

Campus
HIST 3050

 British Columbia (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course explores the history of British Columbia from the beginnings of Aboriginal-European contact through to the post-World War II era. It examines the social, economic, political, and cultural development of British Columbia, and situates the province within national and international context. Topics include Aboriginal-European relations, the fur trade, immigration, the resource economy, military engagements, social reform, gender issues, class relations, and political developments. Throughout the course, key debates in the historiography of British Columbia are emphasized.

Campus
HIST 3060

 Quebec: History and Politics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the history and political development of Quebec, from the period of the French regime to modern French-English relations within Canada. Students focus on significant social and political developments in the modern period, such as the Rebellions of 1837-38, the emergence of the 'state of siege' mentality after 1840, the impact of industrialization and Confederation, the Quiet Revolution, and nationalism. Contemporary issues are also addressed, including recent debates over 'reasonable accommodation,' national identity, and the relationship between Quebec and Canada.

Campus
HIST 3120

 Canada in the Cold War Era (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the history of Canada, from the end of the Second World War to the early 1990s. This course is organized thematically rather than chronologically. Topics include anti-Communism, immigration, sexual regulation and resistance, family ideals and realities, labour organizing, Aboriginal activism, and student radicalism.

Campus
HIST 3140

 Tudor England, 1485-1603 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students investigate the political, religious, economic, cultural, and social transformations in England during the reigns of the Tudor monarchs. This period was one of dynamic, and at times violent, change, much of it within the context of the religious reformations. Students apply critical thinking skills as they conduct in-depth analysis of historical manuscripts and other key primary sources.

Campus
HIST 3150

 Stuart England, 1603-1688 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an exploration of the significant political, religious, economic, cultural and social developments in England during a time in which English men and women experienced civil war. Students consider the philosophical, ideological, and political factors contributing to the challenges emerging during this time to traditional faith, secular power, and religious authority. Analytical, critical thinking and interpretation skills are refined through a study of historical manuscripts and modern historical interpretations.

Campus
HIST 3160

 European Social History (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Participants explore various social and cultural perspectives of European history. Aspects of domestic life, economic activity, religion, and popular culture provide the basis for related thematic considerations, including family and sexual relationships, social stratification, violence and public order, and leisure, ritual, and education in pre-industrial and industrial Europe. Participants work with a variety of complex historical sources.

Campus
HIST 3170

 Ethnic, Cultural and Religious Identities and the Birth of Europe (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students engage with the profound changes that marked the passage from the Western Roman empire to the European world which took place over many centuries. Students focus on the transforming identities of populations and cultures greatly affected by a rapidly changing world, filled with migrations, conquests, and evangelization, until a new European identity could be formed.

Campus
HIST 3190

 Women in Medieval History (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students engage with the roles and contributions of women in medieval history. The revolutionary changes in feminist and gender theory, and the problems medieval historiography has had to overcome in trying to uncover women's lives from this remote period of history are examined. Students focus on the diverse avenues open to medieval women for agency and independence, and their varied roles within a patriarchal society.

Campus
HIST 3210

 Western European Political Thought: From Cicero to Machievelli (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the evolution of European political thought and its practical applications from Ancient Rome to the Renaissance. This course is an exploration of the major foundational theories and their influence upon the creation of institutional structures, and the governmental apparatuses and ideologies designed to uphold them.

Campus
HIST 3270

 American Colonial History: 1607-1763 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the social, economic and political characteristics of the thirteen colonies as they changed from small European outposts to mature societies.

Campus
HIST 3300

 The United States, 1812-1865 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an examination of the development of the new American nation, with special emphasis on expansion, regionalism, Jacksonian democracy, social reform, and the coming of the Civil War.

Campus
HIST 3310

 The United States, 1865-1896 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an examination of the political and social development in Post-Civil War America, with special emphasis on Reconstruction, industrialization, and the Gilded Age.

Campus
HIST 3360

 The United States, 1900 - 1945 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on the political, social, and cultural history of the United States from 1900 to the end of World War II.

Campus
HIST 3370

 The United States, 1945 - Present (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on selected issues relating to the political, social, and cultural history of the United States from the end of World War II to the present.

Campus
HIST 3390

 The American Revolution and the Formation of the United States, 1763-1812 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a study of the revolutionary origins of the United States and the establishment of the American republic.

Campus
HIST 3410

 The Emergence of Victorian Britain (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the far-reaching transformations in Britain as the nation moved into imperial expansion. Key topics include the institutional, political, and social responses to Britain's move into position as the world's first industrial and urban society. Lectures, discussions, and research engage students in an active critical analysis and interpretation of historical documents, as well as a modern historical anaylses of this period.

Campus
HIST 3420

 Victorian Britain, 1850-1901 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the responses to, and influences of, institutions, families, social groupings, religious institutions, aesthetic perspectives and other elements within British society, during the Victorian time period, in and outside of that society. Comprehension of the transformations and forces emerging in this society is enhanced through a study of historical documents, as well as a review of modern historical analyses and debates.

Campus
HIST 3510

 The History of Childhood and Education (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students consider the historic experience of children in Western society, particularly in Canada, while focusing on the place of education in children's lives. Educational structures are examined, including the development of leading and influential theories about the education of children.

Campus
HIST 3520

 Knowledge and Belief in Medieval to Early Modern Europe (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students complete an in-depth and active investigation into the intersections of early science, religious doctrine and practice, and popular beliefs, in Europe, during the period from 1000 A.D. to 1750. Philosophical, superstitious, medical, and technological concepts are considered, with an emphasis on the use of historical manuscripts and documents in research and discussion. Abstract concepts of science are clarified in their historical context, and the developments that brought science into its modern empirical form are studied.

Campus
HIST 3530

 The Concentration Camp: Global History and Politics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The Concentration Camp is an institution of the Twentieth Century. This course will give an overview of historical precedents for the concentration camp, such as the ghetto, and then will examine the history and politics of the concentration camp, from the Spanish-American and Anglo-Boer Wars near the turn of the century (the first times the term, "concentration camp", was used), to the more notorious examples of Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. Other examples, such as camps in Canada and the USA, China, parts of Africa, and even the "War on Terror" will be examined in detail. Why have modern states - across the ideological spectrum - made use of the concentration camps against real and preveived enemies?
Note: Same course as POLI 3530

Campus
HIST 3610

 Britain, 1900 -1930 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine a wide range of aspects of British life and society, after the Victorian period, including the emergence of political parties; cross-party dynamics; social reforms; civil discontent; emergence of Labour interests and ideologies; 'Bohemian' culture and influences; class systems; women's challenges to traditional perspectives on the right to vote; economic transformations and responses to Depression; and British roles in World War I and in the interwar period. Students engage in active research in and discussion of the intercultural realities in Britain, using primary and modern sources.

Campus
HIST 3620

 Britain, Since 1930 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
The Great Depression of the 1930s, and World War II contributed to tremendous socio-economic and political changes in Britain. Students investigate the legacies of such events through an analysis and discussion of the nationalization of British industry, the emergeing welfare state, immigration, and modern British culture. Students engage in a critical analysis of historical documents and modern perspectives.

Campus
HIST 3991

 Environmental History

Credits: 3
In this online seminar, students examine the reciprocal relations between humans and non-human nature through a historiographic perspective. The course addresses the changing impact of human populations, their technology and their ideas on the physical environment, as well as how climate, topography, plants, and animals have enabled, constrained, and altered the path of human societies. A North American context is emphasized.
More information about this course

Distance
HIST 4030

 Topics in Canadian Gender History (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore selected topics in the history of gender in Canada. Constructions of femininity and masculinity in Canadian history are examined, in addition to the experiences of women and men in the past. Topics may include paid work, sexuality, the family, courtship, religious participation, politics and activism, and leisure. Particular attention is paid to the intersections between gender and race, ethnicity, class, and region.

Campus
HIST 4050

 Topics in British Columbia History (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine selected topics in the history of British Columbia. Topics may include race and racism, immigration, economic issues and development, social and cultural history, religion and society, postwar diversity and dissent, and/or political culture.

Campus
HIST 4060

 Topics in Local History (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines the history of Kamloops and region, with an emphasis on the methodologies and practices used to study history. Students explore various historical tools, methods, and sources, and gain hands-on experience in investigating and communicating local history.

Campus
HIST 4120

 ***Topics in European History: Ancient to Early Modern (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students engage with various themes relating to the cultural, political, philosophical, religious, or economic history of the ancient Mediterranean, medieval, and early modern worlds. Cultural and social history is emphasized. Students are offered an opportunity to explore a unique subject matter (not normally offered in other courses), or further examine a specialised, scholarly field. Thematic considerations vary from year to year. Students may learn about the beginning or end of a civilization, cultural and religious change, or continuity from one civilization to the next.

Campus
HIST 4130

 Reformation Europe (2,1,0)(2,1,0)

Credits: 6
This course is an exmaination of European history during a time of intense religious change. Students are provided with material that is critical to a modern understanding of spiritual and doctrinal distinctions between denominations in Western society. Students investigate the Protestant and Cathcolic Reformations in the broader context of the political, social, artistic, and economic transformations during the early modern era.

Campus
HIST 4200

 ***Topics in European History (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Participants focus on selected themes relating to the cultural, social, political, institutional, or economic history of Europe. The course accommodates subject matter that is not usually offered in other courses, and themes vary from year to year. Participants learn the dynamics of complex historical processes related to such issues as domestic politics, the interaction of states, the formation of new states, social and economic transformations, and major cultural expressions. Advanced students of history focus on applying the skills they have learned in order to examine complex topics in European history.

Campus
HIST 4250

 ***Topics in Canadian History (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore selected topics in the history of Canada. Topics may include immigration and ethnicity, war and society, environmental history, religion, sexuality, Aboriginal history, state formation, and popular culture.

Campus
HIST 4350

 Topics in the History of the American Civil War (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine America's greatest crisis, from its origins in the early nineteenth century to the abandonment of Reconstruction. Specific topics vary, however, emphasis is placed on the political, military, social, and cultural dimensions of the war.

Campus
HIST 4460

 American Foreign Policy, 1945 to Present (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine selected topics in American foreign policy, from World War II to the present.

Campus
HIST 4480

 ***Topics in American Social History (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on selected issues relating to the social and cultural history of the United States. Thematic considerations vary from year to year.

Campus
HIST 4510

 Topics in Early Modern Britain (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine aspects of British history typically in the forefront of modern research, from the period between the Protestant and Catholic reformations of the early 1500s and the Industrial Revolution of the 1700s. The topical focus of this course changes with each offering, however, the themes relate to the economic, social, religious, political and economic history of this period. Students engage in discussion and research that centres on historical documents, and modern historical interpretations and debate.

Campus
HIST 4520

 Topics in Modern Britain (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an in-depth examination of selected themes relating to the social, cultural, economic and political history of modern Britain, up to the present day. Discussions and lectures address diverse topics, which range from immigration issues and intercultural change in Britain to transformations in popular culture and political expectations. Students investigate subject matter which is often not offered in other courses, and utilize historical materials ranging from manuscripts to modern electronic sources.

Campus
HIST 4710

 Communism and the Environment (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will focus on the history and politics of communism and the environment. As such, it will explore environmental issues and policies in the Soviet Union, China and Cuba. Students will examine other related issues, such as the writings of Marx, Engels, Lenin, and others; ideology, political philosophy and the environment; and the role of communism and socialism in environmental movements, today. Students will also be asked to compare environmental practices in communist countries with those of capitalist countries.
Note: Same course as POLI 4710

Campus
HIST 4900

 ***Special Topics in History (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
Students analyze issues related to the theory and practice of historical work. Students wishing to explore unique areas of research in History, often with inter- and cross-disciplinary significance, may find this course especially relevant to their program of study. Students may be offered a unique opportunity to study with a scholar who is new to the faculty of History, and who brings specialization in research areas that are not usually addressed by the standard range of course offerings.

Campus
HIST 4910

 ***Reacting to the Past (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students adopt roles in this course, which are informed by classic history texts, and experience history through elaborate games set in the past. Students run class sessions entirely, while instructors advise and guide students and grade their oral and written work. Students experience the virtual world of Reacting to the Past (RTTP), engage wit big ideas, and improve their intellectual and academic skills. Events and time periods will vary for each course iteration as determined by the instructor and the Department. Required Seminar: HIST 4910S

Campus
HIST 4991

 Directed Studies

Credits: 3
This course is a requirement for completion of the Bachelor of Arts, History major and may be taken to complete the Psot-Baccalaureate Certificate in Liberal Arts. Students are required to review the literature, both original and interpretative, in their particular area of study, offer critical assessment of that literature, and submit a major research paper based on the reading list prepared for the course.
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HLSC 2550

 Health Science 3: Introduction to Pathophysiology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The major emphasis of this course is to gain a foundational knowledge of the concepts related to human pathophysiology. The course examines the presentation and pathogenesis of health challenges across the life span including genetics, nutrition, immunology, and environmental impacts on health. Topics are closely coordinated with the practice and nursing courses.
Corequisite: NURS 2730, NURS 2740

Campus
HLSC 2650

 Health Science 4: Pathophysiology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The major emphasis of this course is to build on concepts related to human pathophysiology introduced in Health Science 3 but with increasing complexity. This course examines the presentation and pathogenesis of health challenges across the life span including genetics, nutrition, immunology, and environmental impacts on health. Topics are closely coordinated with the practice and nursing courses.
Corequisite: HLSC 2660, NURS 2840

Campus
HLSC 2660

 Health Science: Pharmacology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The emphasis of this introductory course is to gain a foundational knowledge on the essential pharmacological principles and the major drug classifications. Consideration will be given to client education, pharmacognasy, adverse effects, and medication administration safety. The major concepts of this course will be examined across the lifespan.
Corequisite: HLSC 2650, NURS 2830

Campus
HLSC 3020

 Data Analysis in the Health and Human Service Professions (3,0,1)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to facilitate learner understanding of the data analysis process in relation to research based professional practice in nursing and social work. Students apply a range of analytical techniques to both qualitative and quantitative data. This course enhances the learner's ability to analyze data and critically review research literature applicable to their professional practice.

Campus
HLSC 3040

 Environmental Change - Challenges for Health (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the most recent developments in the science of climate change and the resulting impact on the health of populations worldwide. Changes in disease risk and emerging diseases and conditions are reviewed. Since health care is one of the most wasteful systems in regard to its carbon footprint, various efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are reviewed. Students discuss the effects of global warming and how it necessitates new approaches to health and new responses to the spreading of tropical diseases.

Campus
HLSC 3550

 Health Science 5: Advanced Pathophysiology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course builds on concepts introduced in Health Science 3 and 4 with an emphasis on multisystem or highly complex health challenges. The presentation and pathogenesis of health challenges across the lifespan are examined, including a major focus on immunology, and where applicable, genetics, nutrition, and environmental impacts on health. Topics are closely coordinated with practice and the health courses.
Corequisite: NURS 3730

Campus
HLSC 3690

 Human Sexuality for Health Professionals (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Sexuality is an important aspect of human health. This course advances a health care professional's capacity to address issues of sexuality and sexual health with clients across the lifespan. Theories and research informing health professionals of sexual development, gender, sexual orientation, sexual practices, and sexual health are examined. Self awareness, along with the development of skills to address sexuality inclusion in professional practice, is central to course objectives.

Campus
HLSC 3830

 Health and Healing: Global Health Perspectives (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Participants develop an understanding of people's experience with health and healing related to a variety of increasingly complex chronic and episodic global health challenges and issues. Emphasis is placed on the role of the nurse as care provider, community organizer and facilitator, educator, and advocate within the context of the global society and the changing health care environment. Learners examine a variety of emerging health issues and trends using these as a context for further developing a personal understanding of nursing practice that supports meaningful interactions with individuals, families, groups, communities, and society.

Campus
HLTH 1001

 Lifestyles and Choices

Credits: 2
Students are introduced to a holistic concept of health and the components of a health enhancing lifestyle. Participants are invited to reflect on their own experience of health while recognizing challenges and resources that can impact lifestyle choices. Students are also introduced to a model that is applied to understanding the multi-faceted aspects of health and healing.
More information about this course

Distance
HLTH 1011

 Health and Healing: Concepts for Practice

Credits: 3
Developing a theoretical framework for practice, students are introduced to the philosophical values and theoretical understandings that provide a foundation for competent practice as a Health Care Assistant (HCA). This course focuses on concepts of caring and person-centred care, basic human needs and human development, and family, culture and diversity as they relate to health and healing. Students are also introduced to a problem-solving model that will be critical to their practice.
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HLTH 1021

 Nutrition for Health and Changing Lifestyles

Credits: 3
This course provides an introduction to the relationship between nutrition and health. The focus is on healthy eating, understanding strategies for modifying food patterns within the context of lifestyle and culture, and identifying standards of healthy eating in Canada.
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HLTH 1051

 Health 1: Interpersonal Communications

Credits: 3
This course focuses on the development of self-awareness, increased understanding of others, and development of effective interpersonal communication skills that can be used in a variety of care-giving contexts. Students are encouraged to become more aware of the impact of their own communication choices and patterns. Participants develop and use communication techniques that demonstrate personal awareness, respect, and active listening skills.
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HLTH 1061

 Medical English

Credits: 3
Participants develop and strengthen their understanding of medical terminology as it is used in a Canadian health care context. Language development will be facilitated through the use of case scenarios, dialogues and discussions related to body systems, medications, and medication administration as well as health care contexts. Through the use of reading for general meaning, word expansions and vocabulary building, internationally-educated health care providers are able to acquire career-specific language development.
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HLTH 1101

 Health Care Assistant: Introduction to Practice

Credits: 3
This course provides an introduction to the role of the Health Care Assistant within the British Columbia health care system. Students are introduced to the healthcare team and the roles and functions of the HCA within the system. Students will also have opportunities to develop self-reflective skills required for competent practice and will be introduced to effective job-finding approaches.
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HLTH 1121

 Foundational Human Anatomy

Credits: 3
This course promotes the entry-level health professional's understanding, communication and application of foundational anatomy and physiology knowledge, for the promotion of continuing physical health for people of all ages, from birth to older adults. Foundational to the practice of health is awareness of body systems and the recognition of body system changes across the lifespan. Students gain knowledge of appropriate interventions to maintain physical health and reduce the chances of disease from physiological dysfunction, and develop the ability to communicate this knowledge to others.
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HLTH 1131

 Electrocardiogram

Credits: 1
This introductory course covers the theory behind the specific anatomy of the heart, the conduction system, and the electrocardiogram, as well as some diagnostic aspects of the heart as related to the medical laboratory assistant. This course was previously known as MLAP 113.
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HLTH 1141

 Introduction to Electrocardiography

Credits: 3
This course is designed specifically for health care practitioners interested in gaining the knowledge required to perform 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs). Information on the anatomy and physiology of the heart, lead theory, ECG equipment, troubleshooting and dealing with a variety of patient situations, will also be reviewed. Emphasis will be placed on the 12-lead ECG, recognition of arrhythmias that require immediate response and the properties that comprise an accurate ECG tracing.
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HLTH 1153

 Personal Care & Assistance Theory

Credits: 3
This practical course offers students the opportunity to acquire personal care and assistance skills within the parameters of the Health Care Assistant role. The course will assist the student to integrate theory from other courses and develop a theoretical understanding of care-giver skills that maintain and promote the comfort, safety, and independence of individuals in community and facility contexts.
Corequisites: HLTH 1001 HLTH 1011, HLTH 1051, HLTH 1101, HLTH 1201, HLTH 1351
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HLTH 1155

 Personal Care and Assistance - Lab

Credits: 1 or 3
This course offers students the opportunity to acquire personal care and assistance skills within the parameters of the Health Care Assistant role. The course is comprised of class and supervised laboratory experiences which assist the student in integrating theory from other courses.This allows the student to develop caregiver skills that maintain and promote the comfort, safety, and independence of individuals in community and facility contexts.
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HLTH 1201

 Healing 1: Caring for Individuals Experiencing Common Health Challenges

Credits: 4
Students focus on the normal structure and function of the human body and normal bodily changes associated with aging. Common challenges to health and healing in relation to each body system are explored. Participants are encouraged to analyze person-centred practice as it relates to the common challenges to health and, in particular, to end-of-life care.
More information about this course

Distance
HLTH 1251

 Practice Experience in Home Support, Assisted Living, and/or Group Setting

Credits: 2
This course provides students with an opportunity to apply knowledge and skills from all other courses with individuals and families in a community setting. Opportunities are provided for students to become more familiar with the role of the Health Care Assistant within a Home Support Agency, Assisted Living Facility and/or Group Home, and gain abilities that prepare graduates for employment in these settings. It is important that students understand the philosophy of community care settings and its emphasis on client choice and independence.
More information about this course

Distance
HLTH 1301

 Practice Experience in Multi-Level or Complex Care

Credits: 7
This supervised clinical practice experience provides students with the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills gained from all courses in the program with individuals in a multilevel or complex care setting. A portion of this clinical experience will be devoted to working with individuals experiencing ognitive challenges. Students gain expertise and confidence with the role of the Health Care Assistant within a ontinuing care facility.
More information about this course

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HLTH 1351

 Healing 2: Caring for Individuals Experiencing Cognitive or Mental Challenges

Credits: 2
This course builds on content from other courses to assist students in exploring concepts and caregiving approaches that will allow them to work effectively with individuals experiencing cognitive or mental challenges. Emphasis is placed on recognizing behaviours and identifying person-centered intervention strategies.
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Distance
HLTH 1981

 Medical Terminology

Credits: 3
This course uses a systematic approach to teach medical terminology to those who plan to be involved in or are already engaged in the medical, dental, nursing, veterinary, allied health fields. It also gives the student a basic understanding of body systems, anatomical structures, medical processes and procedures, and diseases. This course was previously known as CEHS 198.
More information about this course

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HLTH 2121

 Pharmacology Principles and Applications

Credits: 3
Students explore basic concepts of pharmacology required to safely administer medications to a diversity of clients across the lifespan, in a variety of health care contexts. This course provides students with a working knowledge of drug therapy, in preparation for using a comprehensive, systematic, and evidence-based approach to drug therapy when treating patients with various health challenges. Drug therapy is present within a framework of body systems, using client care situations to enhance the integration of content learned in human anatomy and physiology. The major drug classes are discussed using prototype drugs.
More information about this course

Distance
HLTH 2501

 Pathophysiology

Credits: 4
This course focuses on the general principles of disease and then further explores information dealing with specific disorders of body systems or individual organs. This course is intended for health care practitioners.
More information about this course

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HLTH 2511

 Introduction to Pharmacology

Credits: 3
Students develop an understanding of the theoretical concepts surrounding pharmacology, such as the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, and the concepts surrounding pharmacotherapy. This course gives specific information concerning cardiopulmonary, vascular, central and peripheral nervous system, and antimicrobial drug classifications, as well as common examples in each classification. With each classification of drugs covered, their mode of action, their clinical effects and side effects will be emphasized.
More information about this course

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HLTH 2573

 Arterial Blood Gases

Credits: 3
This in-depth course examines the basic principles of chemistry and physics related to blood gases and the physiology of respiration. The interpretation, collection, and sampling of blood gases, and non-invasive measurements, are examined with particular emphasis on clinical applications.
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HLTH 2707

 Seniors Living Observational Practicum

Credits: 1
Students explore the roles and skills required for employment in the seniors living industry and develop an understanding of the seniors' living environment. This course should be completed early in the certificate program.
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HLTH 2911

 Perinatal Nursing: Foundational Concepts

Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide participants with the opportunity to gain a solid foundation in the basic knowledge required in perinatal practice. The course focuses on facilitating participants' understanding of key concepts related to antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum nursing care, including the assessment and care of the newborn. Learning activities are designed to foster participants' understanding of social, ethical, and cultural influences on the childbearing family, the health care resources available to support families, and of the entry-level nursing competencies and standards of care required in perinatal practice.
More information about this course

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HLTH 2931

 Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing

Credits: 3
HLTH 2931 is an introduction to the assessment and treatment of clients with mental health challenges. The goal of the course is to develop sound knowledge and skills related to psychiatric nursing within the Scope of Practice of the College of Registered Nurses of British Columbia (CRNBC). Mental health is explored on a continuum from health to illness, from adaptability to maladaptability. An introduction to pharmacology is included in the course. Diagnoses and interventions are studied from medical, nursing, and psychosocial perspectives. The importance of the nurse-client relationship is identified as the core component of all interactions with mental health clients. Communication theory assists in development of the special therapeutic communication skills required in this field of nursing. Critical-thinking exercises throughout the course enhance self-awareness of the values and beliefs related to caring for clients with mental health challenges.
More information about this course

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HLTH 3101

 Client-Directed Care Management

Credits: 3
This online course is intended for professionals working in the health system, and upper-level students in health degree programs wising to develop their knowledge and skill in care management. Students explore the theory of care management within a client-directed service philosophy including ethical decision-making using bioethical principles, the balancing of autonomy and risk, the legal context of care management, and system barriers to client-directed service delivery. Using both teleconferences and online discussions, the course is delivered in the context of current and emerging health policy and organizational structures.
More information about this course

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HLTH 3200

 Field Course in Cardiopulmonary Healthcare (0,2,0,5)

Credits: 3
Students examine cardiopulmonary health issues, approaches, and the people involved in healthcare in a selected country. Students work alongside local healthcare professionals to provide assessment, treatment, and education in cardiopulmonary health.

Campus
HLTH 3300

 Interdisciplinary Indigenous Health (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to Indigenous people's health in Canada. Students experience Indigenous ways of knowing through a decolonization framework, engaging in local knowledge, methodologies and practices of Indigenous peoples. Students engage in experiential, reflexive learning informed by local Knowledge Keepers. The course embraces Indigenous Knowledge and uses the premise of 'two-eyed seeing'. Students are guided through an inter-professional framework of practice to facilitate collaboration and planning of services to improve Indigenous health.

Campus
HLTH 3501

 Understanding Research in Health Sciences

Credits: 3
This course is for undergraduate students in health and human service professions (also called health sciences). It enables students to acquire knowledge and skills about the research process and prepares them to use these in their professional practice. Students learn how to locate, analyze, and critique peer-reviewed qualitative and quantitative research articles in their own disciplines. They then determine whether they can adopt particular current published research for use in their clinical practice. To this end, they use due diligence and established standards for generalizing research findings to other settings and population groups. With the research knowledge and skills from this course, students can provide their clients with evidence-based care, which is a requirement for professional practice in all the health and human service professions. This course was previously known as HEAL 350.
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HLTH 3611

 Professional Growth

Credits: 3
This course is designed to reacquaint health practitioners with the standards that govern professional practice; update participants' awareness of Canadian health care system trends and perspectives; and advance their understanding of disciplinary inquiry emerging from multiple ways of knowing.
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HLTH 3621

 Relational Practice

Credits: 3
This course is designed to advance the relational knowledge and skill of health professionals. It emphasizes concepts such as communication; leadership; interprofessional practice; teaching and learning; diversity; power; and the client as a person, family and community.
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HLTH 3631

 Clinical Decision Making

Credits: 3
This course is designed to enhance the professional health practitioner's clinical decision-making skills to support safe practice across various health settings and with different client populations with diverse health issues. Using a case-based approach and a clinical decision-making framework, participants are supported to explore the current knowledge required to implement best practices with respect to the assessment and care of clients with various actual or potential health challenges.
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HLTH 3707

 Seniors Living Project Practicum

Credits: 2
This course, to be completed near the end of the certificate, provides an opportunity for the student to consolidate learning throughout the program with the completion of an on-site project.
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HLTH 3711

 Healthy Aging: A Contemporary Perspective

Credits: 3
This course provides a contemporary perspective of health aging in Canada. Changing population demographics highlight the importance of understanding successful and healthy aging in multiple dimensions such as personal health domains (e.g. physical, emotional, social, psychological, spiritual) and social determinant dimensions (e.g. biology, education, income, housing, social networks, work). The course will emphasize contemporary, `health across the lifespan' aging as differentiated from the historical model of declining health and abilities.
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HLTH 3713

 Seniors Residential Site Operations

Credits: 5
Students develop an understanding of the scope of managerial oversight in seniors' residences. Students explore the responsibilities and accountabilities of the manager including managing changing populations within varied segments of the industry (e.g. independent living, assisted living, etc.), sales and marketing, risk management, labor relations in the workplace, staff development and residential services.
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HLTH 4001

 Social Determinants of Health

Credits: 3
This course provides an opportunity for participants to develop or strengthen their understanding of social determinants of health using local, regional, national and international perspectives. Participants will critically examine social inequities and the health consequences in diverse populations.
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HLTH 4011

 Issues in Health Care

Credits: 3
This course explores current issues in health care, and the Canadian health care system. It looks at issues from a range of perspectives, such as those of an individual, family member, health care professional, lobby group, health care administrator, or politician. Also explored are the determinants of health in the global and Canadian contexts. Issue analysis touches on legal and ethical frameworks and builds on an understanding of the code of ethics and the scope of practice for your health care profession.
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HLTH 4021

 Health Policy

Credits: 3
This seminar course introduces students to policy analysis processes, concepts and outcomes of public policy-making, with an emphasis on health. Students use their foundational knowledge on public policy analysis and apply this knowledge to Canadian health policy issues. Students determine how their knowledge of policy analysis might apply in the health care workplace. Students utilize critical thinking, research, and critiquing skills to develop their knowledge of Canada's evolving health care system in response to economic, cultural, technological, political, ideological, and globalization factors and forces. Students experience the whole public policy process as they apply their knowledge on public policy-making to a current major health policy issue in their province or territory, and participate in a simulated policy community.
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HLTH 4410

 Introduction to Mental Health (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the study of mental health, mental illness, and substance use. A variety of perspectives and contextual factors will be examined to explore issues and concepts of mental health. Distribution patterns, risk factors, organization of health systems, and societal efforts toward prevention and treatment will also be reviewed. A vocus will be placed on understanding the social determinants of health and exploring issues from a population and public health perspective.

Campus
HLTH 4411

 Introduction to Mental Health

Credits: 3
Using an interdisciplinary approach to study mental health, mental illness, and substance use, students will examine a variety of perspectives and contextual factors used to explore issues and concepts of mental health. Distribution patterns, risk factors, organization of health systems, and societal efforts toward prevention and treatment will also be reviewed. A focus will be placed on understanding the social determinants of health and exploring issues from a population and public health perspective.
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HLTH 4421

 Assessment and Intervention Approaches to Mental Health Problems

Credits: 3
Building on many of the concepts introduced in HLTH 4411, students will focus on ways of supporting individuals and families and on the use of evidence-informed frameworks, tools and processes.
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HLTH 4441

 Population Based Mental Health Assessment and Intervention

Credits: 3
Students will be introduced to best practices in working with specific populations, such as younger adults, older adults, aboriginal people, LGBT populations, women and families who are experiencing mental health problems.
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HLTH 4510

 Introduction to Problematic Substance Use and Approaches for its Prevention and Treatment (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide participants with grounding in the theoretical underpinning of substance use practices through a review of conceptual, historical, political, and societal factors that influence values, beliefs, approaches, and practices with persons with problematic substance use. Throughout the course participants will be encouraged to reflect upon their own attitudes and beliefs and to consider how prior knowledge and experiences may have influenced their understanding of substance abuse disorders and their perceptions of persons experiencing problematic substance use and their families. Foundational concepts and methods in prevention and treatment of problematic substance use will be introduced.

Campus
HLTH 4511

 Introduction to Problematic Substance Use

Credits: 3
Learners review conceptual, historical, political, and societal factors that influence values, beliefs, approaches, and practices with persons with problematic substance use. Learners reflect upon their own attitudes and beliefs and consider how prior knowledge and experiences may influence their understanding of substance use disorders and their perceptions of persons experiencing problematic substance use and their families. Learners are introduced to foundational concepts and methods in prevention and treatment of problematic substance use.
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HLTH 4520

 Assess/Intervention 1: Work with Individual/Family to Support Recovery Problem Substance Use (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Building on many of the concepts introduced in HLTH 4510 this course will focus on ways of supporting individuals and families who are adversely affected by substance misuse. The intent of this course is to introduce students with key concepts and basic competencies they will build upon in 4530 in order to be successful in their practicum. It will blend evidence-informed practices and core behavioral and technical competencies for addiction professionals through an interprofessional lens. Consideration will be given to the social determinants of health and the impacts these have upon case conceptualization and care planning. Evidence-based interventions will be examined with a special emphasis on skills that illustrate a selection of core technical competencies.

Campus
HLTH 4521

 Assessment and Intervention Approaches to Problematic Substance Use

Credits: 3
Building on many of the concepts introduces in HLTH 4511 this course will focus on ways of supporting individuals and families who are adversely affected by substance misuse. The intent of this course is to introduce students with key concepts and basic competencies they will build upon in HLTH 4530 in order to be successful in their practicum. It will blend evidence-informed practices and core behavioral and technical competencies for addiction professionals through an interprofessional lens. Consideration will be given to the social determinants of health and the impacts these have upon case conceptualization and care planning. Evidence-based interventions will be examined with a special emphasis on skills that illustrate a selection of core technical competencies.
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Distance
HLTH 4531

 Assessment and Intervention Approaches in Concurrent Disorders

Credits: 3
This course builds on HLTH 4521 and the learners focus on the integration of more advanced knowledge, skills and tools required in increasingly complex situations. Learners will begin with an examination of care from a systems level and explore how systems shape the delivery of frontline services. The central focus will be on servicing individuals (and their families) who are living with serious mental illness and addiction. Learners will blend evidence-informed practices and core behavioural and technical competencies for addition professionals through an Interprofessional lens. Consideration will also be given to specific populations. Learners will consider culture, diversity, gender, sexual orientation and race and the impact they have on client health and treatment case studies.
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HLTH 4541

 Population Based Prevention and Intervention

Credits: 3
Learners are exposed to a broadened view of approaches to reducing risk and harms of substance use for individuals, helping systems and communities, including health promotion, prevention, harm reduction and drug policy. Learners consider population as individuals, families, social and demographic cohorts, neighborhoods and larger communities when examining policy, programs, advocacy and legislation aimed at preventing and or reducing problematic substance use..
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HLTH 4551

 Directed Studies Practicum in Substance Use and Concurrent Disorders

Credits: 3
Learners will develop further understanding of the relationships between theory and practice in the treatment and prevention of problematic substance use and mental health disorders during the practicum. Learners will expand their knowledge by having an opportunity to observe services and supports within prevention and treatment systems. Over the course of 13 weeks students will spend 12 days (usually 96 hours) in a practice setting while concurrently completing a series of directed online readings, assignments and experiential learning exercises. Where appropriate, Learners will be provided the opportunity to demonstrate foundational competency in prevention and treatment practice.
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HLTH 5200

 The Canadian Healthcare System (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines the structure and functioning of the Canadian healthcare system in the context of Canadian society, including challenges to the provision of quality care. Students will critically analyze the role of advanced practice in the healthcare system, using the concepts of principled leadership, politics, macroeconomics and the determinants of health as they apply at the local, provincial, territorial and national levels. Comparisons with healthcare systems in other countries will also be made. The emphasis will be on application of knowledge to practice contexts.

Campus
HLTH 5300

 Leadership and Managing Change in Healthcare (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines leadership and management theories in the context of healthcare delivery. Participants will develop leadership skills in advocating for clients and nurses to achieve optimal health outcomes and quality practice environments. Students will examine the literature on the development of strategic collaborative partnerships, build conflict management skills, develop strategies to communicate vision, policy and program directions, increase their ability to assess gaps and capacities in the design of programs, strategies, and policies, and demonstrate team building skills.

Campus
HLTH 5500

 Integrating Information Technology in Healthcare (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will address ethical and appropriate applications of information technology to enhance knowledge development, knowledge transfer, and patient care within healthcare settings. Students will develop advanced understanding and skills in concepts such as the integration of technology within healthcare systems, data storage and retrieval, patient and heath practitioner education, and ways that technology may support complex decision-making, inter-disciplinary communication, and evaluation of healthcare outcomes. Future uses and/or designs of technology will be discussed. Integral to the course will be enhancing students' ability to adapt to as well as influence the design of continually evolving types, uses, and forms of information technology in healthcare.

Campus
HLTH 6000

 Research in Healthcare (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The focus of this course is the development of knowledge and skills to conduct research. Specific emphases are: theory and conduct of studies in various research traditions, appraisal of studies for scientific merit, interpretation and dissemination of research findings, research utilization and evidence based practice.

Campus
HLTH 6300

 Aboriginal Health Leadership (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
In this course leadership best practices for effective, culturally relevant Aboriginal people's healthcare are examined. Participants develop knowledge of Aboriginal peoples' history, traditional perspectives, health-wellness practices, and challenges inherent in the complex and interrelated socio-cultural, historical, and contextual determinants that influence health. Participants analyze Aboriginal and mainstream knowledge/practices and how each shapes service design and delivery. The importance of respectful relationships, partnership, and Aboriginal leadership in improving healthcare access and outcomes is explored. Course activities will strengthen participant abilities to draw on the literature and other information sources to inform program and policy development, knowledge translation, and evaluating program effectiveness as well as assist in preparing for a major paper or thesis in the area of Aboriginal peoples' health.

Campus
HMGT 1110

 Catering and Service Management (3,0,5)

Credits: 3
This course presents a basic overview of the principles of catering and service management in a hospitality environment. Students review and critique styles of service, and develop an understanding of how to make food and beverage outlets more guest-friendly and profitable. Service management is introduced by both theory and practice, and students reflect on contemporary issues related to providing service excellence in different service environments.

Campus
HMGT 1210

 Food and Beverage Preparation (1,1,3)

Credits: 3
This course explores the techniques and procedures of quality and quantity food production and service, and provides the principles underlying the selection, composition and preparation of major food products. Students gain practical experience by working one night per week in the College Dining Room kitchen or an off-campus kitchen for the applied portion of this course.

Campus
HMGT 1410

 Hotel Operations 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The intent of this course is to help prepare students for positions in the hotel industry by providing an overview of the complexities of the Hospitality industry. Students are introduced to the history of the hotel industry, current industry trends and the various departments and managers' responsibilities that are key elements of a hotel operation. Through lectures, presentations, assignments and readings, students complete this course with a foundation in practical and theoretical hospitality.

Campus
HMGT 2100

 Food and Beverage Cost Control (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course covers the principles and procedures involved in an effective food and beverage control system. Students are introduced to the logic and the systems involved with managing costs, from maintaining sales and cost histories to developing systems for monitoring current activities and projecting future profits. Additional topics include budgeting techniques, standards determination, purchasing systems and menu pricing.

Campus
HMGT 2110

 Resort Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers a complete approach to the operation of resort properties. Beginning with historical development, details are presented in planning, development, financial investment management and marketing that deal with the unique nature of the resort business. The course also examines the future and the impact of the condominium concept, time sharing, technological change and the increased costs of energy and transportation.

Campus
HMGT 2120

 Hotel Sales and Service (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides insight into the scope and various segments of the groups market and shows the relationship between professional service and operational success. Students will be given a comprehensive introduction to the complexities of managing a convention facility as well as exposure to key group markets and techniques for attracting them to the property.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both HMGT 2120 (C+ minimum) and MKTG 3450

Campus
HMGT 2210

 Food and Beverage Management (2,1,1)

Credits: 3
This course discusses the management of Food and Beverage Operations within a hotel. Students will learn aspects of front of the house and back of the house operations of this department and will have an overview of the complexities of managing this dynamic area. Topics that will be covered include: product knowledge, legal issues, responsible beverage service, industry trends, service styles, marketing, sales and profitability.

Campus
HMGT 2500

 Field Experience (0,2,3P)

Credits: 3
This course offers students the opportunity to connect academic course work with practical application by participating in a multi-day field experience within a world-class destination. Prior to engaging in the field experience, students use seminars to develop a deeper understanding of the field experience. Students research the chosen destination, set personal and group objectives, liaise with industry partners and plan their travel itinerary within a budget. Upon return, the students undertake reflective oral and written assignments.
Note: This course has an activity fee attached

Campus
HMGT 2510

 Hotel Operations 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
A continuation of HMGT 1410, the intent of this course is to focus student learning on the rooms division area of hotel management. Regardless of the level or variety of services offered by the lodging facility, essentially all properties provide accommodation and the services required to register the guest and ensure that the guestroom is maintained. Therefore the focus of this course is on the guest cycle (reservations, registration, occupancy and check-out). Students are introduced to basic front office operating procedures theory and application with a Hotel Property Management System (PMS) as well as principals of revenue management, hotel security and housekeeping issues.

Campus
HMGT 2610

 Resort and Hotel Operations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course builds on concepts learned in Hotel Operations 1 and 2, and provides students with an introduction to the operation of resort properties. Course content includes a historical perspective of resort development, followed by planning, developing, managing and marketing issues that are unique to resorts operations. Students also use a hotel operational training simulation (HOTS), in a business simulation exercise, to integrate management concepts learned throughout Resort and Hotel Management courses.

Campus
HMGT 3000

 Resort Hospitality Operations and Performance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides students with professional and technical knowledge about the management of hospitality facilities, especially in the context of resorts. Emphasis is on the exploration of the complex factors that can influence the survival and development of hospitality enterprises. Students will evaluate issues of efficiency and effectiveness of diverse operating procedures in the delivery of the hospitality product to the consumer within the context of resorts. Topics covered include the need, and the resources required, for staging events such as banquets and conferences and the impact of the events sector on the hospitality field and on resort communities in particular.

Campus
HMGT 4800

 Resort Management Case Study (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
In this capstone course, students synthesize and apply theoretical and practical knowledge gained throughout their coursework in the Resort Experience concentration in the Bachelor of Tourism Management, toward problem-solving in the context of a hypothetical or real resort organization. Working in small groups, students take on the role of a research and consultancy team and produce a report advising how specific problems or issues may be resolved.

Campus
HORT 1500

 Basic Horticulture (38 hours)

Credits: 2
This course introduces students to plant structure, growth and development. Topics to be covered include structure and function of plant parts, plant classification, nomenclature and identification, germination, photosynthesis and respiration, plant hormones and environmental effects on plant growth and development.

Campus
HORT 1510

 Greenhouse Production (38 hours)

Credits: 2
Students learn about the basic structure of greenhouses, heating and ventilating systems, soil mixes, supplemental lighting, fertilization, chemical growth regulators and irrigation systems.

Campus
HORT 1520

 Diseases and Insect Pests (38 hours)

Credits: 2
The course deals with insect structure and development, important insect orders, causal agents of plant diseases and disorders, and various control measures.

Campus
HORT 1540

 Soil Science (38 hours)

Credits: 2
The topics covered in this course include components of soil, texture, porosity, conductivity, cation-exchange capacity, salinity, soil organisms, mineral nutrients and soil amendments.

Campus
HORT 1600

 Weeds (26 hours)

Credits: 1
In this course, students study the biology of weeds, identification of weeds, control measures and common herbicides.

Campus
HORT 1610

 Nursery Production and Retailing (26 hours)

Credits: 1
Nursery production is an important aspect of the horticulture industry in British Columbia, with a significant volume of landscape plants exported to the rest of Canada. Topics to be covered include site selection, management of field and containerized stock, plant propagation, fertilization, soil mixes and irrigation. Additional topics include the retailing of nursery stock and horticultural products in a garden centre.

Campus
HORT 1620

 Fruit and Vegetable Production (26 hours)

Credits: 1
The topics of fruit production examined in this course include site selection, rootstocks, pollination, pruning, and the use of chemical growth regulators. Areas covered in vegetable production include seed germination, growing transplants, cultivation, fertilization, irrigation and the cultural requirements of selected important vegetables.

Campus
HORT 1630

 Landscaping (26 hours)

Credits: 1
Landscaping is an important and integral part of the urban environment. Students explore the principles of landscape design, developing a landscape plan, hard landscaping, landscape installation and landscape maintenance.

Campus
HORT 1640

 Turfgrass Management (26 hours)

Credits: 1
Students learn about the botany of grasses, selection of different grass species, seeding and sodding of lawns, fertilizers, irrigation, mowing and cultivation.

Campus
HORT 1700

 Horticulture Practical 1 (595 hours)

Credits: 3
Practical sessions are an integral part of the program and are designed to give students hands-on experience in developing required skills. The following are the major topic areas followed by the apportioned class hours: Plant Studies (30), Insect Studies (13), Soil Studies (10), Weed Studies (8), Indoor Plant Identification (14), Landscape Plant Identification (30), Plant Propagation (39), Greenhouse Crop Production (33), Greenhouse Practices (59), Grounds Maintenance (71), Landscape Design (45), Landscape Installation (71), Pruning (15), Basic Carpentry (25), Small Engines (25), Pesticide Dispensers and Applicator's Course (18).

Campus
HORT 1800

 Horticulture Practical 2 (595 hours)

Credits: 3
In this second term continuation, students resume their study of the topics listed in HORT 1700.

Campus
HORT 1900

 Horticulture Practicum

Credits: 3
The objective of this practicum is to enhance and culminate the education acquired within the university environment with work experience at participating businesses and organizations. This practicum allows students to solidify information learned at Thompson Rivers University, to see its application in the workplace, and to participate in the day-to-day operation of a business. Through the practicum, students gain a deeper insight into the direction they wish to pursue within the horticulture industry.

Campus
HORT 2000

 Greenhouse Production (2,0,4)

Credits: 3
Students are provided an opportunity to acquire new skills and improve on existing skills in a hands-on work-related environment. The main emphasis of this course is bedding plant production.

Campus
HORT 2500

 Horticulture Technician Foundation (900 hours)


This course will provide the foundation knowledge required to become a "Landscape Horticulturist". They select, handle and utilize trees, shrubs and ornamental plants and turf grass for the design, development and maintenance of public and private landscaping spaces. They also prepare soil, plants, cultivate, prune and irrigate to maintain plant vigor. Furthermore they control plant pests utilizing appropriate integrated pest management techniques. The program is intended to serve as a common core towards years one and two of Production Horticulturist, Landscape Horticulturist and Arboriculturist (when developed) and enable graduates to follow three possible career paths: 1. Entry into industry as skilled worker 2. Academic credits towards second year of 2-year diploma program 3. Entry into level three of Horticulture (Production & Landscape) Apprenticeship Program

Campus
HRMN 2820

 Human Resource Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the management of an organization's workforce through the design and implementation of effective human resource policies and procedures. Current Canadian issues and practices are emphasized. The topics include the strategic role of human resources management; human resources planning; job analysis and design; recruitment and selection; employment equity; compensation; training and development; performance appraisal; occupational health and safety; and employee and industrial relations.
Note: Students may not receive credit for more than one of HRMN 2820, HRMN 3820 and TMGT 1140

Campus
HRMN 2821

 Human Resources Management

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the management of an organization's workforce through the design and implementation of effective human resources policies and procedures. Current Canadian issues and practices are examined. Topics include the need for human resources management and its growing professionalism; human resource planning including job design and analysis; recruitment and selection; compensation; employee development; workplace health and safety; and employee relations.
More information about this course

Distance
HRMN 3820

 Human Resources (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the management of an organization's workforce through the design and implementation of effective human resource policies and procedures. Current Canadian issues and practices are emphasized. The topics include the strategic role of human resources management; human resources planning; job analysis and design; recruitment and selection; employment equity; compensation; training and development; performance appraisal; occupational health and safety; and employee and industrial relations.
Note: This course should be taken by students in the Minor in Management only. Students may not receive credit for more than one of HRMN 3820, HRMN 2820 or TMGT 1140.

Campus
HRMN 3830

 Human Resource Planning and Staffing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the policies and procedures for the planning, acquisition, deployment, and retention of a workforce of sufficient size and quality to allow an organization to attain its strategic goals. Topics include the strategic importance of staffing; the staffing environment; human resource planning; job analysis and design; recruitment; applicant screening; employee testing; interviews; references; decision making; employment contracts; methods of evaluating the hiring process; deployment; and retention.

Campus
HRMN 3831

 Human Resource Planning and Staffing

Credits: 3
Students examine the policies and procedures for the planning, acquisition, deployment, and retention of a workforce of sufficient size and quality to allow an organization to attain its strategic goals. Topics include the strategic importance of staffing; the staffing environment; human resource planning; job analysis and design; recruitment; applicant screening; employee testing; interviews; references; decision making; employment contracts; methods of evaluating the hiring process; deployment; and retention.
More information about this course

Distance
HRMN 3840

 Employee and Labour Relations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the different aspects of union-management relations focusing on both the Canadian and international experience. The topics include an introduction to labour relations; labour relations environment; union membership, structure and actions; employment legislation and the Labour Relations Act; collective bargaining; managing the collective agreement; dispute resolution; human resources in an union environment; international labour relations; and future trends and issues in labour relations.

Campus
HRMN 3841

 Employee and Labour Relations

Credits: 3
Students examine the different aspects of union–management relations focusing on the Canadian experience. Topics include an introduction to industrial relations; theories of industrial relations; the history and structure of unions in Canada; union organizing; collective bargaining; strikes and lockouts; third-party interventions including conciliation, mediation and arbitration; grievance arbitration; changes to the union or employer; and future issues in Canadian unionism.
More information about this course

Distance
HRMN 4830

 Total Rewards (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop an understanding of the different rewards systems available to employers to attract, motivate and retain a sufficient number of qualified employees. The topics include the components of total rewards; the rewards environment; motivational theories and rewards; rewards strategies; types of compensation; non-monetary rewards; and rewards and performance management, attraction, and retention.

Campus
HRMN 4831

 Total Rewards

Credits: 3
Students develop an understanding of the different rewards systems available to employers to attract, motivate and retain qualified employees. The topics include impact of rewards on attraction, retention and performance management; strategic framework for compensation; behavioural framework for compensation; components of compensation strategy; formulating rewards and compensation strategies; job evaluation; evaluating the labour market and individuals; designing base pay, performance pay and indirect pay plans; and implementing, managing, evaluating and adapting compensation systems.
More information about this course

Distance
HRMN 4840

 Organizational Learning, Training and Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the educational activities provided by organizations to enhance the current performance of individuals or groups of employees and instil a commitment to continuous improvement and advancement. They study how organizations can become more adaptive by learning from their experiences and reacting more quickly to environmental change. Topics include organization learning; training and development; learning and motivation; needs analysis; training design, methods, and delivery; transfer of training; training evaluation; and cost and benefits of training programs.

Campus
HRMN 4841

 Organizational Learning, Training and Development

Credits: 3
Students examine the educational activities provided by organizations to enhance the current performance of individuals or groups of employees and instil a commitment to continuous improvement and advancement. They study how organizations can become more adaptive by learning from their experiences and reacting more quickly to environmental change. Topics include organization learning; training and development; learning and motivation; needs analysis; training design, methods, and delivery; transfer of training; training evaluation; and cost and benefits of training programs.
More information about this course

Distance
HRMN 4890

 Selected Topics in Human Resource Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine a selection of contemporary issues in human resource management. Topics include occupational health and safety, human resource information management, and professional practice.
Note: Students may not receive credit for more than one of HRMN 4890, HRMN 4891, or BBUS 4860

Campus
HRMN 4891

 Selected Topics in Human Resource Management

Credits: 3
Students examine a selection of contemporary issues in human resource management. Topics include occupational health and safety, human resource information management, and professional practice.
More information about this course

Distance
HUMN 3011

 The History of Science

Credits: 3
This course examines the development of science in society. The course begins with the earliest scientific ideas, progressing to science in the modern era and beyond. A philosophical analysis of the advances, functions, and implications of science in society is used to study how science has changed over time, and how these changes have impacted our world. The discussion addresses issues such as societal attitudes toward science, the achievements of great scientists, and the effect on future generations of today's social policies regarding science. Central questions include: What is science for? Whom is it for? How has science changed over time? How does--and how should--society use science?
More information about this course

Distance
HUMN 3981

 Issues In Latin American Studies

Credits: 3
This online seminar course explores the social aspects of the economic, political, and cultural issues facing Latin American countries. After an introduction to the basic issues for understanding Latin America as a region, students examine and research such issues as the distribution of wealth and economic globalization, democracy and social movements, and various aspects of Latin American culture. This course is suitable for students completing degrees in a number of discipline areas, including science, engineering, humanities, fine arts, social science, business, education, and general studies.
More information about this course

Distance
HUMN 3991

 Issues in Science and Society

Credits: 3
This course examines the effect of science on society through the use of sample readings and websites, and by encouraging students to discover their own collection of resources on science in modern society. The course begins with a summary of the historical development of scientific ideas; then examines the advances, functions, and implications of science in society. The discussion includes social forces that can lead to misuse of science andor science fraud and focuses on current and future controversies in life sciences and technological innovation as examples of the influence of science on daily life. The powerful presence of science in society raises a number of questions that the course explores: What is science? Is science truly objective and autonomous? How does-and how should-society use science? This upper-level course requires a significant amount of reading, Web research, independent work, and conference-based discussion. This course is suitable for students completing degrees in disciplines such as science, engineering, humanities, fine arts, social science, education, business, and general studies.
More information about this course

Distance
HUMS 1091

 Introductory Counseling

Credits: 4
This course provides the opportunity to acquire basic communication and interviewing skills. Using a problem-solving model, students learn how to work with clients to identify issues and through role playing, practise and demonstrate new skills. Before completing the final assignment, students are required to complete HUMS 1101 (previously SSWP 110) (Introductory Counselling Skills). This course begins with an exploration of the concept of relationship as the critical ingredient to effective helping. The course ends with the opportunity to acquire basic communication and interviewing skills in working with clients to resolve issues using the problem-solving model, empowering and relationship building. You will be required to demonstrate personal integration of the helping skills covered in this course in simulated practice sessions using learning partners, teleconferencing, video viewing, and the production of a video with critique. This course was previously known as SSWP 109.
Note: This course will be accepted in the Social Service Program until the replacement courses are available. The replacement courses will be HUMS 1541(previously HUMS 154) and HUMS 1611 (previously HUMS 161). Check the SSWP webpage for updates.
More information about this course

Distance
HUMS 1101

 Introductory Counseling Skills

Credits: 1
This course is designed to give students the opportunity to practice and receive feedback on their core communication, interview, and counselling skills and on their ability to apply the problem-solving model in case-simulation scenarios. The purpose of this course is to: allow the opportunity for role-play interventions in case simulations; clarify the basic communication concepts for social service practitioners; discuss areas of concern and prepare follow-through plans to further your professional growth. This course was previously known as SSWP 110.
Note: This course is offered through distance. If the student is attending the in-person course, travel costs to attend the weekend workshop are the student's responsibility. Enrolment may be limited in the workshop. This course will be accepted in the Social Service Program until the replacement course is available. The replacement course will be HUMS 1611 (previously HUMS 161). Check the SSWP webpage for updates. ***This course is only available for registration to students residing in Canada***
More information about this course

Distance
HUMS 1300

 Introduction to Mental Health (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an excellent introduction to the field of mental health care for those working in the field of human services. Topics include community mental health issues for children, youth, and adults, and the philosophy and values which direct care. Students reflect on person-centred practice, facilitative communication, behaviour management, non-violent crises intervention, the mental health system, and evidence-based practice. Students also have an opportunity to examine practice issues such as cultural competence, the ethics of care, and service delivery models. An overview of various disorders is presented, while mental health is examined through a best-practices approach that encompasses grounded theory, new developments in the field, problem solving, and current research.
Corequisite: Acceptance into the Human Service Diploma program

Campus
HUMS 1540

 Interpersonal Communications and Helping Relationships (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Self-awareness is foundational to the development of competent human service workers. For this purpose, topics furthering self-knowledge and facilitating the development of self-reflection skills are the focus of this course. Topics include the values and ethics of helping, relationship building, interpersonal and intercultural communication, interpersonal conflict, and team work.

Campus
HUMS 1541

 Interpersonal Communications and Helping Relationships

Credits: 3
Self-awareness is a foundation for the development of competent Human Service workers. By focusing on personal development this course offers an opportunity to learn and use interpersonal communication skills effectively. Students will be introduced to knowledge and skills that increase effectiveness in helping relationships with client populations. Topics such as group dynamics, assertive behaviour and conflict management will be covered.
More information about this course

Distance
HUMS 1560

 Introduction to the Family in Human Service Practice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an examination of the family, in both historical and current Canadian contexts, which provides the groundwork for beginning practice with families in human service work. Current social, political, cultural, and economic influences on today's families are presented. Topics include family of origin, family systems theory, and family communication theory.

Campus
HUMS 1580

 Introduction to Human Service Professional Practice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students review the field of human service practice beginning with an overview of the values and ethics that are key elements of professional attitude and conduct. Additional topics include observation, record keeping, community mapping, supervision, team work, and self-care.

Campus
HUMS 1581

 Introduction to Professional Human Service Practice

Credits: 3
This course orients students in the field of human services. Sessions will introduce students to professional values, ethics, conduct and self renewal. Strategies for effective observation and record keeping skills will be covered. This course includes a one week field work experience for students.
More information about this course

Distance
HUMS 1590

 Practical Skills for Community and School Support Workers (3,0,2)

Credits: 3
This course introduces Community and School Support students to the practical aspects of supporting individuals with disabilities in classroom, community and home settings. Students participate in 3 specific learning modules during the semester that cover a variety of healthcare, educational and social supports and which vary according to local need. This course is designed to provide instruction for students working in small community and rural settings.

Campus
HUMS 1600

 Field Work (0,2,14)

Credits: 4
Using a blended community service learning model, this course establishes a link between the classroom and the workplace. Students are provided supervised opportunities to integrate core concepts of human service practice and to demonstrate the relationship of theory to practice within teams in a fieldwork agency.

Campus
HUMS 1610

 Interviewing Skills for Social Service Practice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students review various interviewing skills and techniques, and develop the skills to complete informational and referral interviews as well as facilitate problem-solving interviews. This course offers lecture, discussions, and videotaped practice of simulated interviews.

Campus
HUMS 1611

 Interviewing Skills for Human Service Practice

Credits: 3
Students will learn a variety of interviewing skills including attending, questioning, paraphrasing, summarizing, encouraging, and influencing. Client observation skills, the ability to demonstrate empathy and respond to multicultural encounters is also reviewed.
More information about this course

Distance
HUMS 1640

 Foundations of Community and School Support Work (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the theory and perspectives necessary for understanding issues related to supporting individuals with exceptionalities. Students will learn about significant historical movements in education and community to current practices of inclusion. Specific exceptionalities, their characteristics and etiology will be covered. As well, learning about social relations and family dynamics are addressed.

Campus
HUMS 1650

 Understanding Behaviour: Learning for Independence (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to nonaversive intervention strategies for dealing with problem behaviour. Students will learn the role of team approach, individual program planning and ethics in the development of a behaviour support plan. An educative approach to behaviour change is emphasized.

Campus
HUMS 1660

 Health Care Principles (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course overviews the theory and application of preventive health care planning and personal care principles. Areas of study include body mechanics, basic anatomy and physiology of body systems, nutrition, recognition of illness, referral procedures to health care services and issues related to basic pharmacology. Ethical and legal concepts of human service work in relation to health care practice will be discussed.

Campus
HUMS 1671

 Social Service Field Practicum

Credits: 6
An understanding of field practice is crucial to effective social work training, as generalist social service workers are exposed to a great variety of problem situations daily. This course offers students both independent study and experience, at a beginner level, in a social service setting. The course has two parts. The independent study consists of work outlined in the course study guide, which includes theory, activities, practice, and assignments. The direct work experience consists of client focused activities and job tasks assigned within an agency. The Field Practicum in HUMS 1671 (previously SSWP 215) is offered in a choice of one of two delivery time frames. Students may chose a part-time option where they are placed 3 days a week for 10 weeks in a community agency, or they may elect to arrange a practicum for a 6 week full-time, placement (210 hours in total). The minimum course completion time is fifteen weeks. The program coordinator will offer advice to assist the student in obtaining a suitable practicum placement and give final approval to the arrangements. This course was previously known as SSWP 215.
More information about this course

Distance
HUMS 1750

 Alternative and Augmentative Communication (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to a range of communication strategies used in working with children and adults who have limited or not verbal skills. Technological supports for communication will be introduced.

Campus
HUMS 1770

 Introduction to First Nations and Human Service Practice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the historical and continuing process of colonization in Canada, and the resulting societal, political, linguistic, spiritual, and cultural impacts that are challenging First Nations people today. The development of cultural understanding and the beginning of culturally competent practice occur in this course. Additional topics include self-government, cultural healing and empowerment, and human service practice in First Nations communities.

Campus
HUMS 1771

 Introduction to First Nations Studies and Human Service Practice

Credits: 3
This course will introduce students to the historical process of colonization in Canada, and the resulting societal, political, linguistic, spiritual and cultural impacts that are challenging First Nations people today. Attention will be paid to understanding the past and working with the present and future within a context of self-government, healing and empowerment. A focus will include an introduction to the knowledge, skills and attitudes towards the development of culture and competence and decolonizing practice in the Human Service field.
More information about this course

Distance
HUMS 1790

 Community Resources (2,2,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided an introductory opportunity to work with clients in social service and community support settings, and to identify important aspects of reflective human service practice. These include the use of self, the importance of establishing relationships, and the use of supervision. Students are required to complete a structured volunteer experience in an approved community agency and to participate in a series of bi-weekly seminars that discuss a framework to undertake human service practice with clients.

Campus
HUMS 2000

 Introduction to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided an overview of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, including the effects of alcohol during pregnancy, diagnostic criteria, assessment, and current research. Students also explore addiction issues related to gender, harm reduction, and the historical, cultural, and moral implications of addiction. Students have an opportunity to identify and analyze their beliefs and values related to addictions and invisible disabilities.

Campus
HUMS 2010

 Community Advocacy and Teaming (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop specific skills and knowledge that can be applied to advocacy for children, youth, and adults facing significant social disadvantages, such as disabilities, poverty, and mental health problems. Community systems are examined in terms of how practitioners can facilitate support for clients facing multiple barriers. Prevention programs and community teaming possibilities are discussed, and students are provided opportunities to discover existing resources and identify gaps in services, from a community perspective, for specific populations (such as people with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - FASD).

Campus
HUMS 2030

 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - Developmental Perspectives (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to help students situate their work, with individuals affected by Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), within a developmental context. Students explore fetal alcohol effects as they are experienced across the lifespan, from infancy to adulthood, as well as within specific social systems (family, community, workplace, school, and leisure-related settings). Secondary disabilities are addressed with attention to how these develop over time. Strategies for addressing secondary disability issues are discussed.

Campus
HUMS 2040

 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - Field Practice (3,7,0)

Credits: 3
The primary purpose of this practicum course is to provide opportunities for both demonstration and evaluation of the students understanding and response in supporting individuals and communities coping with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Students with field experience may choose to do a reflective research project which will connect their theoretical knowledge to practice. Those students with limited field experience will have the opportunity to practice in the field for a 12 week period - 1 day a week. During these 12 weeks there will be a 3 hour seminar held weekly in which students can, in consultation with their peers, discuss ethics, practice and application of skills in supporting individuals, families and communities.
Corequisite: HUMS 2000, HUMS 2010, HUMS 2030

Campus
HUMS 2060

 An Introduction to Social Service Practice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to social service work and practice through an exploration of the history, philosophical foundation, and theoretical perspectives of the profession of social service. This exploration includes a review of the relevant codes of ethics and practice standards that guide practitioners. This course provides an overview of the roles in which social service workers become involved, for example, as advocates, policy analysts, administrators, activists, educators, counsellors, facilitators, mediators, organizers and researchers. Social service workers are committed to working for social justice, therefore the course examines the social structures that influence people's lives and how various sources and forms of oppression and marginalization impact the lives of people in Canadian society.

Campus
HUMS 2120

 Introduction to Social Welfare in Canada (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the history and development of human services and social welfare policy in Canada, and British Columbia in particular. Topics include poverty, with particular reference to women and First Nations people, as well as major political ideologies and their impact on social policy. Students explore the structure of government and the development of a social security system in Canada, and one model for policy analysis is introduced.

Campus
HUMS 2220

 Theoretical Foundations in Human Service Practice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to various theories for human service practice. By examining a range of theories appropriate to professional practice, the link between theory and practice is established. Participants integrate theories into their practice framework and investigate the suitability of various theories in practice with individuals, families, groups, and communities.

Campus
HUMS 2500

 Special Topics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine selected current issues in child and youth care and human service practice.

Campus
HUMS 2530

 Interpersonal Communication and the Helping Relationship (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Participants develop the values, language, contextual speech, and skills required for the development of professional helping relationships. Utilizing critical reflection, participants examine relationship development with members of diverse populations, conduct relationship building activities for their peers, and learn the process of giving and receiving professional feedback and supervision.

Campus
HUMS 2600

 Human Service Diploma Practicum (0,2,8P)

Credits: 4
This course is the practicum of the Human Service Diploma program offered through Thompson Rivers University. It involves a supervised practicum at an agency, which delivers community-based services to children and youth, families and others in the community. If there are people who want to work more specifically in a Child and Youth Care context, placements will be sought in child and youth specific agencies. Included are weekly practicum seminars on campus during the semester.

Campus
HUMS 3530

 Guided Communication (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will build on the self awareness and communication skills developed in HUMS 2530. Specific skills used in problem solving and facilitating change will be explored and practiced. This course will also concentrate on the development of personal and professional skills that can be used by a human service practitioner in helping children, youth and their families.

Campus
HUMS 3570

 Law and Social Services (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Participants explore the law as an expression of social policy, and the processes by which laws are developed, enacted, and changed. This course provides an introduction to family law and the family courts, and human rights with special reference to how laws affect children and social services. The organization of legal services, and the legal accountability and liabilities of human service workers and others in the social service field, are presented. Note: Students may receive credit for only one of the following: SOCW 3570, CYCA 3570, HUMS 3570
Note: Students may receive credit for only one of the following: SOCW 3570, CYCA 3570, HUMS 3570 Prerequisite: Admission to the Human Service Diploma program

Campus