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Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University
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On-Campus

There are a number of ways to register for on-campus courses at TRU which are determined by your program of study.

Open Learning

We offer 590 courses by distance learning. These courses are offered in several formats, including print-based, web-based and online.


Continuing Studies

Community U provides individuals and organizations with formal and non-formal opportunities to pursue personal and professional goals life-long.

Trades and Technology

Apprenticeship, foundation and continuing studies courses are offered in construction, mechanical trades, professional driving and more.

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Courses - P
Title Name Delivery
PHED 1000

 Biomechanics: The Analysis of Performance in Individual Sports (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an examination of the role of analysis in developing effective biomechanically correct individual sport performance. Skill analysis, error detection, error correction, and the application of sport science principles are included with an introduction to the appreciation of movement patterns in sport. Required Seminar: PHED 1000S

Campus
PHED 1100

 Basketball (1,2,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on industrial and coaching techniques associated with the sport. The development of fundamental individual and team skills are an integral part of the course. Offensive and defensive skills and strategies are also central to the course. Each student is provided an opportunity to learn how to instruct and coach other students in the skills, as well as learn the specific skills related to basketball.

Campus
PHED 1120

 Outdoor Activities (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to a variety of outdoor pursuits like cross country skiing, kayaking, hiking, survival and snowshoeing. Due to the varying levels of risk associated with outdoor activities, participants are required to sign the Department of Physical Educations' informed consent.
Note: Students are responsible for providing their own transportation, equipment, and additional costs associated with the activities

Campus
PHED 1140

 Aquatics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course emphasizes the knowledge and skills associated with aquatic activity. Water safety, principles of buoyancy and water activities, stroke analysis and development are a major focus for the semester. Students are provided an opportunity to work toward a number of senior swimming levels.
Note: It is recommended that students enrolling in this course be able to swim 200 meters

Campus
PHED 1160

 Soccer (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on instructional and coaching techniques associated with soccer. The development of fundamental individual and team skills are an integral part of the course. Offensive and defensive skills and strategies are central to the course. Each student is provided an opportunity to learn how to instruct/coach other students in the skills as well as learn the specific skills related to soccer.

Campus
PHED 1190

 Volleyball (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on instructional and coaching techniques associated with volleyball. The development of fundamental individual and team skills are an integral part of the course. Offensive and defensive skills and strategies are central to the course. Each student is provided an opportunity to learn how to instruct/coach other students in the skills as well as learn the specific skills related to volleyball.

Campus
PHED 1230

 Conditioning (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are instructed in the basic principles for health and skill-related fitness. The course provides a basic understanding of the physiological basis for conditioning programs applicable to competitive sport. A discussion of fitness assessment is also a focus in this course.

Campus
PHED 1240

 Golf (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on instructional and coaching techniques associated with the sport. The development and analysis of fundamental individual skills is an integral part of the course. Each student is provided an opportunity to learn how to instruct and coach other students in the skills, as well as learn the specific skills related to golf.
Note: Students are responsible for their own transportation and equipment and extra costs are associated with this course

Campus
PHED 1280

 Games, Contests and Relays (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Individual, pairs, teams and group activities are taught in this course. Each student is required to invent and teach an activity, with the focus on teaching, and consider strategies to make incremental and rule changes for each. This course is an excellent preparation for students wishing to become teachers and recreationalists.

Campus
PHED 2000

 Analysis of Performance of Team Activities & Sports From Pedagogical & Coaching Perspectives (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course includes an examination and introduction of the structure, analysis and instruction of team activities, games and performance. Selected team sports are used as models of analysis. Topics include the study of the common elements in team sports, pedagogical theories on instruction of games, and an examination of analysis methods and procedures. Required Seminar: PHED 2000S

Campus
PHED 2110

 An Introduction to the Study of Sport (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines the nature and development of sport through an analysis of historical, academic and popular literature.

Campus
PHED 2130

 Sport in Canadian Society (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers a historical and theoretical analysis of sport in Canadian Society. Students develop an awareness of the role played by physical education and sport in society, and examine the societal changes that influence sport development.

Campus
PHED 2140

 Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students discuss psychological theories and research related to sport and health-related physical activity. Topics include socialization for participation, motivation, stress, psychological limits, aggression, competition and co-operation, audience effects, leadership, role of the coach and group cohesion, ethical behaviours, motivation, and aspirations.

Campus
PHED 2150

 Exercise Physiology (2,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the basic components of physiology as they apply to health, fitness and exercise. An examination of the acute and chronic effects of physical activity on the functions of the human body (metabolic, cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular) through lecture and laboratory experiences is emphasized.

Campus
PHED 2210

 The Dynamics of Motor Skill Acquisition (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an introduction to the examination of motor skill acquisition and the variables which influence the learning and performance of motor skills. Theoretical models on motor learning are introduced and discussed from a pedagogical perspective.

Campus
PHED 2840

 Physical Growth and Motor Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students will examine the physical growth and motor development throughout the lifespan, with particular reference to the effects of physical activity on growth, development and health. Developmental differences in motor ability will be studied.

Campus
PHED 3000

 Service and Learning Project (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides Physical Education Teacher Candidates with an orientation to physical education in elementary schools, and an opportunity to link on-campus instruction with teaching experiences in the school setting.

Campus
PHED 3450

 Contemporary Issues in Health and Physical Activity (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course helps identify and address contemporary lifestyles, associated behaviours, and major health concerns in present-day society. Techniques and strategies used to make positive lifestyle changes are studied and discussed in addition to the responsibility of the consumer.

Campus
PHED 3650

 Coaching Pre-Adolescent Students (1,2,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides practical and theoretical experience in dealing with pre-adolescent students in the school sports setting. The course incorporates 1 hour per week of classroom teaching with 2 hours per week of practical coaching in elementary schools, or similar sport settings.
Corequisite: PHED 3840

Campus
PHED 3660

 Advanced Movement Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore human movement from a broad range of perspectives. Educational gymnastics, dance, movement, and games are analyzed from a multi-disciplinary approach with regard to instruction to school-aged children.

Campus
PHED 3840

 Physical Growth and Motor Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the physical growth and motor development throughout the lifespan, with particular reference to the effects of physical activity on growth, development and health. Developmental differences in motor ability are studied.

Campus
PHED 4350

 Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The emphasis of this course is on exercise prescription and testing, for the healthy adult population and for special populations or persons with a disability. Students' laboratory work is focused primarily on the exercise testing aspect of the course.

Campus
PHIL 1010

 Introduction to Philosophy: Great Thinkers: Ancient to Enlightenment (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a general introduction to philosophy using a historical approach. The course covers the period from before Socrates up to and including the French Revolution. Students discuss major philosophers including Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, Hume and Wollstonecraft. Major topics and questions explored in this course include: What is the good life? Does God exist? What is the relationship between mind and body? How is knowledge possible? What is the nature of reality? Are women equal to men in abilities and rights?

Campus
PHIL 1011

 Introduction to Epistemology and Metaphysics

Credits: 3
This course engages students in careful study of epistemology (theories of knowledge) and metaphysics (theories of reality). What is the difference between knowledge and belief? How should we distinguish between reality and illusion? These are two of the central questions explored, using tools and theories or models developed by philosophers seeking answers to them. Students use the tools of the basic principles of good argumentation and critical analysis. For an introduction to the models that philosophers use to explore questions about knowledge and reality, the course turns to the writings of Bertrand Russell and Paul Edwards. The course also invites students to consider questions in the philosophy of religion by examining The Euthyphro, one of Plato's best-known dialogues, and his view of the relationship between God and goodness.
More information about this course

Distance
PHIL 1020

 Introduction to Philosophy: Great Thinkers: Enlightenment to Modern (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a general introduction to philosophy which spans the Enlightenment to present day time period. The major philosophers discussed in this course include Kant, Marx, Darwin, Mill, Nietzsche and Sartre. The major topics explored include: Is there progress in history? What are the origins of our moral ideas? What rights do individuals have? Does life have meaning?

Campus
PHIL 1021

 Introduction to Ethics, Political Philosophy, and Aesthetics

Credits: 3
Students are engaged in careful study of ethics (theories of right and wrong), political philosophy (theories of justifiable social organization), and aesthetics (theories of beauty, specifically Philosophy of Art). What is the difference between what is pleasurable and what is good? Is democracy always best? How should we distinguish between works of art and works of craft? Students explore these types of questions using tools developed by philosophers including Canadian philosopher Wil Waluchow's introductory text, Plato's dialogues, and readings in the Philosophy of Art.
More information about this course

Distance
PHIL 1100

 Introduction to Philosophy: Problem and Themes (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a general introduction to philosophy. Questions that are typically discussed include: What is morality? Is there a God? Is there life after death? What can we know and how can we know it? What is the nature of reality? Is there free will? Are there fundamental rights? What constitutes a 'good life'? What is the nature of society? What form of government should we have? What is the relation of the mind to the body? What is art? Is censorship a good idea? Readings are taken from classic and/or modern texts.
Note: Students may take a maximum of two of PHIL 1010, PHIL 1020 or PHIL 1100

Campus
PHIL 1110

 Introduction to Critical Thinking (2,1,0) or (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course enables students to distinguish between good and poor reasoning. Students are introduced to logical analysis, which entails an examination of the meaning of logical terms and an investigation of their contribution to the arguments in which they occur. Considerable attention is given to representing the logical structure of arguments and deciding their validity or invalidity. Required Seminar: PHIL 1110S

Campus
PHIL 1111

 Introduction to Critical Thinking

Credits: 3
This course helps students distinguish between good and bad reasoning. The student is introduced to logical analysis, which entails an examination of the meaning of logical terms and an investigation of their contribution to the arguments in which they occur. Considerable attention will be given to representing the logical structure of arguments and deciding their validity or invalidity.
More information about this course

Distance
PHIL 2010

 Introduction to Ethics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Ethics is the philosophical examination of 'the good life', or the kind of life that is most worth living. It is also the study of the values by which we live, and the values of others. Students explore questions of right and wrong (morality), consider the place of morality in life as a whole, and whether life has meaning. In particular, students discuss the nature and origin of morality, and to what extent being moral is necessary to living a good life.

Campus
PHIL 2100

 Introduction to Ancient Philosophy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the most important philosophers of the Western ancient world, including Plato and Aristotle, as well as Epicureanism and Stoicism.

Campus
PHIL 2140

 Foundations of Philosophy: Knowledge, Certainty and Skepticism (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the nature, source and limits of human knowledge. Topics include whether we could be systematically wrong about everything; the influence of will on belief; the difference between knowledge and mere opinion; and the relation between knowledge, justice and power.

Campus
PHIL 2150

 Substance, Change, and Identity (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students consider intriguing questions about what makes up reality and how reality works. Students explore topics that include matter and substance; change and causation; free will and determination; mind and body; being and consciousness; and the nature of time and space.

Campus
PHIL 2160

 Technology and the Environment (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine what 'technology' is, the relationships and differences between technology and nature, and the role that technology plays in current environmental issues. The course raises the question of whether technology can help us find solutions to environmental crises, or if those problems are a direct result of seeing the world from a technological point of view.

Campus
PHIL 2210

 Contemporary Moral Issues (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine contemporary moral issues, such as abortion; euthanasia; capital punishment; environmental ethics; business ethics; pornography and censorship; treatment of the mentally ill; patients' rights; and the ethics of warfare. Classical theories of ethics are examined and applied to contemporary problems. Required Seminar: PHIL 2210S

Campus
PHIL 2220

 Elementary Formal Logic (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to contemporary symbolic or formal logic. Students explore the fundamentals of good reasoning by learning sentence and predicate logic. Students translate English sentences into logical notation, and use truth tables and derivations to demonstrate the validity of arguments. Required Seminar: PHIL 2220S

Campus
PHIL 2240

 Philosophy of Technology and Society (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The focus of this course is on the philosophical implications of the impact of computers, technology, and the information age on the modern world. Students examine the ethical, metaphysical, epistemological, social, scientific and political intersections of human engagement with technology. Topics may include privacy, intellectual property, encryption, spying, access to information, social media (texting, Facebook, Twitter, etc), and censorship.

Campus
PHIL 2290

 Philosophy of Emotions (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines the role emotions play in our lives and critically examines some traditional beliefs about emotion from the standpoints of philosophy, psychology and sociology. The issues and topics considered in this course include the relation of emotions to reason, the role of feeling in moral judgment, and the relation of emotions to action. Students also consider specific emotions, such as love and anger, as well as looking at emotions from a biological view, as either adaptive responses, or forms of escape.

Campus
PHIL 2310

 Health Care Ethics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines the ethical role of the health care provider within the Canadian health care system. Students critically assess a selection of ethically problematic situations that routinely challenge health care providers. The topical issues considered in this course include the relationship among health care providers; care of the elderly; genetic counselling; resource allocation; care of those diagnosed mentally ill; and the ethics of transplantation. These issues are taken up in light of our exploration of moral theory, common ethical principles, and methodologies arising from interdisciplinary bioethics.

Campus
PHIL 2380

 Philosophy and Pop Culture (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students critically examine various aspects in ethics, metaphysics, epistemology and sociopolitical philosophy using popular cultural elements, including film, television, books, and comics.

Campus
PHIL 2390

 Philosophy of Rock Music (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore issues in the philosophy of art through the medium of rock music. Rock music is discussed from the standpoints of aesthetics, philosophy, sociology and musicology. Students consider the social and artistic value of rock music, the distinctive features of rock music, and the history of rock music.

Campus
PHIL 2400

 Understanding Scientific Reasoning (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a philosophical introduction to evaluating hypotheses, scientific reasoning, and experimental tests. Students consider theoretical hypotheses, statistical and causal hypotheses, the nature of decisions, and the value of scientific reasoning for everyday life.
Note: 2nd year standing recommended

Campus
PHIL 2900

 ***Topics in Philosophy 2 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore a special topic in Philosophy such as an in-depth analysis of an issue, school of thought, or a specific philosopher. Special topics courses may also be an opportunity for students to engage with evolving current issues.The specific topic(s) will be decided by the instructor and approved by the Department. Required Seminar: PHIL 2900S

Campus
PHIL 3010

 Ethics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Continuing from PHIL 2010 and PHIL 2210, this course is the advanced study of moral theory. Presented for analysis are meta-ethical theories concerning why we are moral beings, and several theories about how we decide what is right and wrong. In deciding good from bad, a number of theories have been established, all of which have something worthwhile to offer. Students investigate theories and philosophers which may include Mill, Kant, contractarianism, feminist ethics of care, relativism, and Aristotelian virtue ethics.

Campus
PHIL 3140

 The Rationalists: Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course encompasses the development of Continental European philosophy during the 17th century. Students focus on the writings of Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz, and the influence of religion and science on the philosophical thought of the period.

Campus
PHIL 3150

 The Empiricists: Locke, Berkeley, and Hume (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore British philosophy in the 17th and 18th centuries, with an emphasis on the writings of Locke, Berkeley and Hume.

Campus
PHIL 3160

 Modern European Philosophy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine many of the significant and formative ideas in nineteenth and twentieth century European philosophy. Areas of emphasis change from year to year and may include existentialism, phenomenology, Marxism, psychoanalysis, critical theory, deconstruction, and post-modernism. Authors studied may include Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Lévi-Strauss, Sartre, Lacan, Levinas, Adorno, Marcuse, Gadamer, Habermas, Foucault, Althusser, Deleuze, Derrida, Baudrillard, and Lyotard.

Campus
PHIL 3170

 ***Topics in Continental Philosophy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an in-depth study of a major philosopher, school, or work within the Continental tradition, and serves to complement PHIL 3160: Modern European Philosophy. Topics change from year to year, and typically include thinkers such as Simone de Beauvoir, Luce Irigaray, G.W.F. Hegel, Martin Heidegger, Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze. The related schools and tendencies would include structuralism, deconstruction, feminism, the Frankfurt School and Phenomenology.

Campus
PHIL 3210

 Feminist Philosophy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
A wide range of feminist philosophical thought is examined in this course. Students discuss the feminist approach to philosophical questions, which can differ dramatically from the traditional philosophical approach. Topics may include gender role socialization, sex, gender equality, work and pay, radical feminism, maternal thinking, historical feminist movements, pornography, care, 3rd-wave feminism, mainstreaming pornography, and men's role in feminism.

Campus
PHIL 3220

 Logic (3,0,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Continuing from PHIL 2220, students focus on a system of deduction for predicate logic. Students consider the relation between artificial and natural language, completeness, incompleteness and decidability, and the philosophical problems that arise from the study of reasoning.
Note: PHIL 2220 is strongly recommended

Campus
PHIL 3300

 Moral and Political Philosophy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Continuing from PHIL 2010 and PHIL 2210, students focus on rights and duties, political philosophy, and theories of legal and political obligation. Legal reasoning as it applies to society and the state captures another axis of analysis in this course. Topics may include seminal decisions by the Supreme Court of Canada; punishment; deterrence versus retributivism; justification of law making; majority rule versus minority rights; and human rights.

Campus
PHIL 3390

 Philosophy of Art (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on the arts and their relation to society. Topics may include art and perception, art and reality, imagination, expression, censorship, and the role of art in human life.

Campus
PHIL 3490

 Philosophy of Religion (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course looks at religious issues from a philosophical perspective. Is there life after death, and what difference does it make whether or not there is one? What reasons can be found for believing (or not believing) that there is a God? Is the existence of God compatible with the existence of evil in the world? What is the relation of faith to knowledge? Are mystical experiences a source of knowledge about the divine? The purpose of the course is not to answer these questions, but to critically assess the arguments put forward in trying to answer them.

Campus
PHIL 3500

 Metaphysics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Continuing from PHIL 2150, this course is the study of the nature of physical reality, substance, primary and secondary qualities, identity over time, change, causation, free will, and time.
Note: Students who have taken PHIL 3400 may not receive credit for PHIL 3500

Campus
PHIL 3600

 Knowledge, Power and Credibility (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an in-depth philosophical study of knowledge. Students explore contemporary theories of knowledge and justification, and investigate the prospects of mainstream theories against the challenges and alternatives. Topics include the evolution of knowledge; feminist challenges to mainstream theories of knowledge; First Nations approaches to knowledge, the politics of credibility; knowledge and injustice, and the role of bias, emotion, and memory in knowledge.

Campus
PHIL 3750

 Philosophy and Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine themes that are common to literature and philosophy in order to explore philosophical questions and problems. The topics and areas of emphasis change from year to year.

Campus
PHIL 3900

 ***Topics in Philosophy 3 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore a special topic in Philosophy such as an in-depth analysis of an issue, school of thought, or a specific philosopher. Special topics courses may also be an opportunity for students to engage with evolving current issues. The specific topic(s) will be decided by the instructor and approved by the Department. Required Seminar: PHIL 3900S

Campus
PHIL 4160

 ***Topics in Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers an intensive study of Kant; a major nineteenth century philosopher such as Hegel, Mill or Nietzsche; or of a school of thought, such as German idealism. Topics vary from year to year.

Campus
PHIL 4180

 ***Topics in Twentieth-Century Philosophy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers an intensive study of a major twentieth-century philosopher, such as Husserl, Russell, Wittgenstein, Heidegger, Sartre, or Foucault; or of a school such as phenomenology, logical positivism, or structuralism.

Campus
PHIL 4190

 Philosophy of History (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course studies the major philosophical theories of history, from Kant to the present day. Students consider historical progress, freedom and determinism, the role of the individual in history, the problem of understanding past events, the role of social structures, and using history to critique the present.

Campus
PHIL 4300

 Philosophy of Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course includes various topics in law from the basic 'What is law?' to specific issues in law, such as 'What are rights?' Of primary importance to the philosophy of law are the relations between legal rules and the rules of ethics and custom; the difference between law and mere coercion; the social and ethical foundation of law and legitimacy; the limits of law and the state; citizens' rights against the state and one another; and the norms of our legal system.

Campus
PHIL 4330

 Biomedical Ethics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students investigate various ethical issues related to the health sciences, especially in medicine, and consider these issues concretely and in relation to general ethical theory. The topics discussed in this course include abortion, death and euthanasia, genetic engineering, behaviour modification, treatment of the insane, right to treatment, experimentation on human beings and animals, and the relationship between professionals and their patients, subjects or clients. A background in philosophy is not required.

Campus
PHIL 4350

 Environmental Ethics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers a study of moral issues arising in the context of human relationships to nature and to non-human living things. Principal topics include the issue of what constitutes moral standing, animal rights, obligations to future generations, the moral dimensions of problems of pollution, the extraction, production and use of hazardous materials, the depletion of natural resources, and the treatment of non-living things.

Campus
PHIL 4390

 Philosophy of Sex and Love (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students philosophically examine the factors involved in human romantic relationships; sex and love are analysed both together and separately. In such a dynamic and complicated field of study it is necessary to focus on some guiding topics such as, but not limited to, the nature of love, why we couple, polygamy, marriage, prostitution, perversion, and pornography. Students approach these topics from an ontological, social and moral perspective.

Campus
PHIL 4400

 Philosophy of Science (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students investigate philosophical questions central to all sciences. These questions include the nature of scientific knowledge and laws; hypotheses and explanation; principles, theories, and models; the difference between science and pseudoscience; and why science is so successful.

Campus
PHIL 4510

 Persons, Minds and Bodies (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore consciousness and its relation to the body; personal identity andsurvival; knowledge of other minds; and psychological events and behaviour.

Campus
PHIL 4910

 ***Selected Topics in Philosophy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers a focussed and detailed study of a specific topic or movement in philosophy, or a particular philosopher. The focus of the course changes from year to year, and the course topic subtitle is updated at each offering. A student may take this course twice providing the topic of study is different.

Campus
PHIL 4920

 ***Selected Topics in Ethics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an in-depth critical investigation of a particular ethical issue (such as abortion, capital punishment, or war), a particular ethical school (such as Deontology, Virtue Ethics, Utilitarianism) or a particular ethicist (such as Sedgwick, J.S. Mill, Feinberg). Topics may change from year to year.

Campus
PHYS 0120

 Physics 12

Credits: 4

Campus
PHYS 0500

 Introduction to Physics 1 (5,0,2)(L)

Credits: 4
ABE - Advanced: This course is suitable for students with little or no physics background. Physics 0500 examines the basic principles upon which the discipline of physics is founded. In doing so, it provides students with a new perspective from which to view the world around them and with a solid content basis for future courses in physics should this be the objective. The course is oriented toward developing experimental and problem solving skills.
Note: This course is taught by the University Preparation Department Required Lab: PHYS 0500L

Campus
PHYS 0501

 Introductory Physics


This advanced-level university preparation course is equivalent to Grade 11 physics. Topics include measurement, kinematics, dynamics, heat and relativity, waves, electricity, and nuclear physics.
More information about this course

Distance
PHYS 0600

 Introduction to Physics 2 (5,0,2)(L)

Credits: 4
ABE - Provincial: This course is an indepth study of the principles of scientific measurement, vectors, two-dimensional kinematics and dynamics, electrostatics, electromagnetism, vibrations and waves and optics. Physics 0600 is a Provincial level (grade 12 equivalency) physics course. It will prepare students for university, trades and technology programs which require Physics 12 as a prerequisite. The course is primarily theoretical and places an emphasis on the mathematical analysis of physical phenomena and the development of problem solving and experimental skills.
Note: This course is taught by the University Preparation Department Required Lab: PHYS 0600L

Campus
PHYS 0601

 Senior Physics


This course is designed to meet the curriculum requirements for ABE 'Provincial Level' physics, and any additional secondary school Physics 12 requirements. The principal topics are kinematics in one and two dimensions; dynamics; energy, momentum, and equilibrium; electricity; magnetism; and quantum physics. Approximately one-third of the course work consists of lab investigations using extensive DVD materials.
More information about this course

Distance
PHYS 1010

 Physics for Future Leaders (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore key concepts in physics, focusing on understanding rather than mathematics. Physics is introduced in the context of current events. Topics vary but may include terrorism and explosions, energy and the environment, earthquakes and tsunamis, radioactivity and medicine, satellites and gravity. Additional topics are discussed according to student interest and may include quantum physics and teleportation, relativity, and cosmology.

Campus
PHYS 1011

 Physics for Future Leaders

Credits: 3
Physics for Future Leaders focuses on key concepts in physics, emphasizing understanding rather than mathematics. Physics is introduced in the context of current events. Topics include terrorism and explosions, energy and conservation, earthquakes and tsunamis, nuclear power, radioactivity and medicine, satellites , gravity, quantum physics and relativity.
More information about this course

Distance
PHYS 1020

 Energy: Physical, Environmental and Social Impact (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Our use of energy affects everything from human health to the global climate. The objective of this course is to provide students with a qualitative understanding of the physical concepts surrounding the production, the storage, the conversion, and the consumption of various forms of energy in our modern society. As in PHYS 1010: Physics for Future Leaders, there is an emphasis on the understanding of the physical concepts rather than the mathematics. Topics include energy consumption, the Hubbert model, thermodynamics, environmental effects of fossil-fuels, climate change and human activity, the greenhouse effect, production of electricity, nuclear power and nuclear waste, renewable and green energy sources, fuel cells, and transportation issues.

Campus
PHYS 1100

 Fundamentals of Physics 1 (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
An algebra-based introduction to physics intended for students with some secondary school physics background. Students develop a basic understanding of several fields of physics through conceptualization, problem-solving and laboratory exercises. Topics include mechanics, fluid mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics.
Corequisite: MATH 1130 or 1140 or 1150 Required Lab: PHYS 1100L

Campus
PHYS 1103

 General Physics I

Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to mechanics, heat, wave motion, and vibration at a first-year university level. PHYS 1105: Physics Laboratory I is usually offered once per year, in the summertime, in Kamloops, British Columbia.
More information about this course

Distance
PHYS 1105

 Physics Laboratory I

Credits: 1
In this five-day lab course, students perform experiments illustrating the principles learned in PHYS 1103.
More information about this course

Distance
PHYS 1130

 Introductory Physics 1 (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is an introductory-level survey for students with little or no background in Physics. Topics covered are mechanics, vibration, heat, optics, and fluids.
Note: PHYS 1130 can be taken to partially fulfill the science requirements in the Bachelor of Arts Program Required Lab: PHYS 1130L

Campus
PHYS 1150

 Mechanics and Waves (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is intended for students with a good secondary school background in physics. Calculus will be introduced and used in the course. Topics covered include a short review of mechanics, simple harmonic motion, mechanical waves, sound, wave optics and geometric optics.
Corequisite: MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1150 or recommended - PHYS 1150/1250 recommended for students planning to major in physics or chemistry, and is strongly recommended for students planning to transfer into Engineering after a year of Science
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of PHYS 1150 or EPHY 1150

Campus
PHYS 1200

 Fundamentals of Physics 2 (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of PHYS 1100: Fundamentals of Physics 1. Topics include electricity and magnetism, optics, and selected topics from nuclear and modern physics.
Corequisite: MATH 1230 or 1240 or 1250 Required Lab: PHYS 1200L

Campus
PHYS 1203

 General Physics II

Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics at a first-year university level. PHYS 1205, the laboratory component of PHYS 1203, is usually offered once per year in the summertime in Kamloops BC.
More information about this course

Distance
PHYS 1205

 Physics Laboratory II

Credits: 1
In this five-day lab course, students perform experiments illustrating the principles learned in PHYS 1203.
More information about this course

Distance
PHYS 1250

 Thermodynamics, Electricity and Magnetism (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of PHYS 1150: Mechanics and Waves. Topics include thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, electricity and magnetism.
Corequisite: MATH 1230, MATH 1240 or MATH 1250
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of EPHY 1250 or PHYS 1250 Required Lab: PHYS 1250L

Campus
PHYS 1510

 Applied Physics 1 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
Students are given a basic introduction to the following concepts: linear and circular motion, force, friction, equilibrium, energy, momentum, simple machines, pin-jointed structures, and DC circuit analysis. Students develop an understanding of how these ideas are used in the design of structures.

Campus
PHYS 1580

 Physics for Respiratory Therapists (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
Students explore the basic physical concepts of fluid mechanics, the properties of fluids, and applied electricity. An emphasis is placed on laboratory work, particularly in the use of electrical and electronic measuring devices.

Campus
PHYS 1610

 Applied Physics 2 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
Continuing from PHYS 1510: Applied Physics 1, the following topics are discussed: strength of materials, fluid statics and dynamics, thermal energy and heat transfer, vibrations and wave motion, and optics. This course furthers the understanding of physical properties and their influence on design.

Campus
PHYS 2000

 Relativity and Quanta (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to special relativity and quantum physics. Topics include Lorentz transformations, dynamics and conservation laws, the experimental evidence for quantization, and a qualitative discussion of the concepts of quantum mechanics and their application to simple systems of atoms and nuclei. This course is equivalent to CHEM 2000.
Note: Credit will not be given for both CHEM 2000 and PHYS 2000 Required Seminar: PHYS 2000S

Campus
PHYS 2150

 Circuit Analysis (3,1,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is an analysis of linear electrical circuits, network theorems, first and second order circuits, and transfer functions.

Campus
PHYS 2200

 Mechanics (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This is an intermediate-level course on Newtonian mechanics. Topics include the statics of particles and rigid bodies, friction, moments of inertia and distributed forces, dynamics of particles in inertial and non-inertial frames of reference, systems of particles, kinetics and dynamics of rigid bodies, rotational motion, and simple harmonic motion.

Campus
PHYS 2250

 Intermediate Electromagnetism (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This course provides an extension to the topics covered in PHYS 1200/1250 and examines the basic principles of electromagnetism using a sophisticated mathematical approach. Topics include vector algebra, electrostatics, magnetostatics, electric and magnetic fields in matter, as well as an introduction to electrodynamics. Topics are presented and examined using lectures and laboratory experiments.

Campus
PHYS 3080

 Optics (3,0,3)

Credits: 3
Students are presented with the basic principles of optics. Topics include geometric optics and wave optics (interference, diffraction, and Fourier optics) as well as polarization and modern applications. Laboratory work involves selected experiments in optics.

Campus
PHYS 3090

 Analog Electronics (0,2,3)(L)

Credits: 3
In this laboratory course students are introduced to the theory of operation of diodes, bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors, and operational amplifiers. The topics of feedback, gain, input and output impedances, as well as frequency response are also covered. Students learn to design, assemble, and test analog circuits including power supplies, amplifiers, filters, and mixers. The software LabView is used to acquire and analyze experimental data.

Campus
PHYS 3100

 Digital Electronics (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to Boolean algebra and logic gates; the analysis and the design of combinational and sequential digital circuits; and the architecture and programming of microcontrollers. Students design, assemble, and test digital logic circuits using discrete gates, FPGAs, and microcontrollers.

Campus
PHYS 3120

 Introduction to Mathematical Physics (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is divided into three parts. Students begin by examining methods for solving ordinary differential equations. Power series methods are applied to obtain solutions near ordinary points and regular singular points, and the real Laplace transform is discussed. Next, students discuss Sturm-Liouville boundary-value problems, Fourier series, and other series of eigenfunctions, including Fourier-Bessel series. Students are then introduced to boundary-value problems involving partial differential equations. Emphasis is placed on the heat equation, the wave equation and Laplace's equation, with applications in Physics. The method of separation of variables is used.
Note: This course is the same as MATH 3160. Credit will be only given for one of PHYS 3120 and MATH 3160 Required Seminar: PHYS 3120S

Campus
PHYS 3140

 Fluids (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the key concepts and equations used to describe fluids. Starting with a description of rarefied fluids using kinetic theory, simple gas transport properties are derived. Euler's and Bernoulli's equations are examined under static and steady flow conditions. Students derive and examine the Navier-Stokes equation and the equation of continuity under conditions of, steady flow and one-dimensional approximation. Equations to describe the flow of viscous fluids, flow in pipes, flow over immersed bodies, and open channel flow are also introduced. Finally, students explore properties of water waves such as the dispersion relation, capillary and gravity waves.
Corequisite: MATH 2240

Campus
PHYS 3150

 Physics of Materials (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore introductory concepts in the description of solids. Topics include bonding, crystal structure, defects, strength of materials, heat capacity, lattice vibrations and phonons, electrical properties, band theory, and semiconductors.
Corequisite: MATH 2110

Campus
PHYS 3160

 Classical and Statistical Thermodynamics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the principles of elementary classical thermodynamics, kinetic theory, and statistical mechanics. These theories are applied to a variety of physical processes and systems, such as ideal and real gases, heat engines, and quantum systems.

Campus
PHYS 3200

 Advanced Mechanics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers an extension to the concepts studied in PHYS 2200: Mechanics. Topics include Newtonian mechanics, oscillations, central forces, motion in noninertial frames, Hamilton's principle and Lagrange's equations, systems of particles, and dynamics of rigid bodies.

Campus
PHYS 3250

 Advanced Electromagnetism (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop a working knowledge of electrodynamics, which requires a solid grounding in vector calculus, partial differential equations, and an in-depth understanding of Maxwell's equations. Topics include a review of vector calculus; Laplace's equation; potential theory; electrostatics and magnetostatics in matter; electrodynamics; special relativity; and electromagnetism.

Campus
PHYS 3300

 Biophysics (3,0,3*)(L)

Credits: 3
Students apply the basic principles of physics to the actions, body design and physical limitations of animals, mainly vertebrates. Topics include physical concepts of forces, materials structure, fluid mechanics, light and sound, and electricity and magnetism. These topics are applied to biological aspects such as strength of bodies, movement through air and water, and organismal behaviour. This course is offered in the Winter semester of odd-numbered years.

Campus
PHYS 3400

 Principles and Applications of Quantum Mechanics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students build on the basic concepts of quantum physics examined in PHYS 2000: Relativity and Quanta, and develop a formulation of quantum mechanics, initially using the wave-mechanical approach, and then formally using the state-vector approach. Finally, this theory is applied to one-electron atoms, and other quantum systems.

Campus
PHYS 3500

 Selected Topics in Physics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore current topics in Physics. The course content varies from year to year, and may include topics such as nanotechnology, superconductivity, photonics, semiconductor physics, and optoelectronics.

Campus
PHYS 4140

 Radioactivity and Nuclear Physics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
In this survey course, students study basic concepts of nuclear physics, with applications in power, medicine, geology, industry, archaeology and cosmology.

Campus
PHYS 4400

 Principles and Applications of Quantum Mechanics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of PHYS 3400: Principles and Applications of Quantum Mechanics 2. Students start with a review of angular momentum and spin, and the hydrogen atom. Students then examine standard techniques that find wide applications in the study of quantum phenomena. These techniques include the perturbation theories, the variation principle, and the WKB and adiabatic approximations. These are subsequently applied to problems related to the fine structure of hydrogen, the Zeeman effect, molecules, tunnelling, radiation, and scattering.

Campus
PHYS 4480

 Directed Studies in Physics (L)

Credits: 3
Students investigate a specific topic involving experimental work as agreed upon by the student and her or his faculty supervisor and co-supervisor. This course provides experience with research techniques and the presentation of results.

Campus
PHYS 4500

 Advanced Physics Laboratory (0,2,3)(L)

Credits: 3
In this course, students work with experimental apparatus over an extended period of time to complete rigorous data analysis and present their findings. Laboratory work provides opportunities in several areas of physics including condensed matter physics, optics, signal conditioning, astronomy and image processing, nuclear physics, and acoustics. Students use sophisticated equipment such as a transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope, thin film evaporator, and low temperature cryostats.

Campus
PLUM 1000

 Plumbing Apprentice Level 1


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on lab experience in the following topics: safe work practices, proper use of tools and equipment, organizing work, and preparing and assembling plumbing components.

Campus
PLUM 1010

 Trade Entry Plumbing - Foundation


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on lab experience in the following topics: safe work practices, proper use of tools and equipment, organizing work, and preparing and assembling plumbing components.

Campus
PLUM 1900

 Plumbing Trade Sampler (120 hours)


This course is a sampler of the plumbing trade based on the Plumbing/Piping Foundation Program outline from the Industry Training Authority of BC. Students will gain familiarity with the safe use of hand tools, portable power tools and other equipment regularly used by plumbers/pipefitters, as well as gaining familiarity with many of the construction materials used in the Trade. The emphasis of this course is on developing practical, hands-on plumbing/piping skills.

Campus
PLUM 2000

 Plumbing Apprentice Level 2


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on lab experience in the following topics: using measuring and leveling tools, reading drawings and specifications, installing sanitary and storm drainage systems, installing fixtures and appliances, installing hydronic heating and cooling, and installing specialized medical gas and compressed air systems.

Campus
PLUM 3000

 Plumbing Apprentice Level 3


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on lab experience in the following topics: reading drawings and specifications, installing water services and distribution, installing fixtures and appliances, installing fire protection systems, and installing natural gas and propane systems.

Campus
PLUM 4000

 Plumbing Apprentice Level 4


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on lab experience in the following topics: planning a project, installing sanitary and storm drainage systems, installing private sewage systems, installing potable water distribution systems, maintaining and repairing hydronic systems, installing irrigation systems, installing venting and air supplies, installing service controls and safeguards, and using gas codes, regulations, and standards.

Campus
PNUR 1300

 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology (48 hours)

Credits: 3
This course provides an overview of the structure and function of ten body systems, and encourages various health promotion strategies that work towards optimum functioning of these systems.

Campus
PNUR 1420

 Professional Practice 1 (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This theory course provides an introduction to the profession of practical nursing. Legislation that informs PN practice within British Columbia will be introduced. The history of nursing and specifically, the evolution of Practical Nursing within the Canadian Health Care system will be discussed. The philosophy and foundational concepts of this PN Program curriculum are explored.

Campus
PNUR 1430

 Professional Practice 2 (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This course examines the legislation influencing PN practice with clients experiencing chronic illness and those in residential care settings. Specific professional issues such as responsibility, accountability, ethical practice and leadership relevant to the PN role in residential care are explored. Critical thinking and decision making specific to the care of clients with chronic health challenges and inter-professional practice will also addressed.

Campus
PNUR 1520

 Integrated Nursing Practice 1 (3,0,7)(L)

Credits: 3
This course emphasizes the art and science of nursing, focusing on the development of basic nursing care and assessment. Learners will apply nursing knowledge through the practice of clinical decision making, nursing assessment skills, and nursing interventions aimed at the promotion of health, independence, and comfort. A variety of approaches (e.g., simulation) will be used to assist learners to integrate theory from other Semester 1 courses.

Campus
PNUR 1530

 Integrated Nursing Practice 2 (4,0,10)(L)

Credits: 4
This practical course builds on the foundation of Semester 1 and emphasizes the development of clinical decision making, nursing assessments and interventions to promote the health of older adults. Classroom, laboratory, simulation, and other practice experiences will help students to integrate theory from Semester 1 and 2 courses to provide safe, competent and ethical nursing care for older adults.

Campus
PNUR 1570

 Consolidated Practice Experience 1 (0,0,6P)

Credits: 3
This first clinical experience provides the learners with an opportunity to integrate theory from semester 1 coursework into practice. Learners will work in various settings with a focus on the healthy client. Learning the role of a Practical nurse, personal care skills, organization of care, focused assessment, beginning medication administration and professional communication are emphasized in this course.

Campus
PNUR 1580

 Consolidated Practice Experience 2 (0,0,8P)

Credits: 3
This clinical experience provides students with the opportunity to integrate theory from Semester 1 and 2 courses into practice. Students will work with older adult clients with chronic illness in residential care settings. Medication administration, nursing care, organization, comprehensive health assessment, wound care and leadership are emphasized in this course.

Campus
PNUR 1600

 Professional Communications 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides learners with the foundational knowledge for caring and professional communication in nursing. It uses an experiential and self-reflective approach to develop self-awareness and interpersonal communication skills in the context of safe, competent and collaborative nursing practice. Communication theory, the nurse-client relationship, therapeutic communication, cross-cultural communication, effective teamwork and learning and teaching concepts are covered.

Campus
PNUR 1610

 Professional Communications 2 (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This course provides the learner an opportunity to develop professional communication skills with the older adult, including end of life care. Interprofessional communication is further developed.

Campus
PNUR 1700

 Variations in Health 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This introductory course provides the learner with the foundations of disease and illness across the lifespan. Learners will gain an understanding of pathophysiological alterations of body systems. Nursing management of disease and illness across the lifespan with an emphasis on interventions and treatment is also discussed. Cultural diversity in healing practices will be explored as well as the incorporation of evidenced informed practice.

Campus
PNUR 1710

 Variations in Health 2 (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on pathophysiology as it relates to the ageing process and selected chronic illnesses. The main focus is on the care of older adults experiencing a health challenge. Cultural diversity in healing practices will be explored as well as evidence informed research and practice.

Campus
PNUR 1750

 Health Promotion 1 (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This introductory course will increase the learners understanding of health promotion within the Canadian context. This includes health enhancement, health protection, disease prevention, health restoration/recovery, care and support. Knowlege of growth and development, health inequities and determinants of health will support the Practical Nurse to provide culturally appropriate and holistic care.

Campus
PNUR 1760

 Health Promotion 2 (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This course focuses on health promotion as it relates to the aging process. Health promotion activities are aimed at supporting clients in maintaining their health. The concepts of health promotion, physical and mental wellness, and continued independence are examined.

Campus
PNUR 1800

 Pharmacology 1 (2,0,0)(L)

Credits: 2
This introductory course examines the principles of pharmacology required to administer medications in a safe and professional manner. Medication administration requires the application of the nursing process for clinical decision-making. The routes of medication administration introduced include medications used to treat constipation, eye and ear disorders and the Integumentary system. Complementary, Indigenous and alternative remedies, and polypharmacy across the lifespan are explored.

Campus
PNUR 1810

 Pharmacology 2 (2,0,0)(L)

Credits: 2
This course addresses pharmacology and will increase the learners understanding of pharmacology and medication administration across the lifespan. Medications used to treat diseases related to specific body systems are the main focus of the course. Also included are the topics of substance abuse and addiction.

Campus
PNUR 2420

 Professional Practice 3 (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This course integrates the concepts from previous professional practice courses and introduces the learner to practice in the community (maternal/child and mental health). The role of the practical nurse as leader is emphasized in interactions with clients, families, groups and other healthcare providers.

Campus
PNUR 2430

 Professional Practice 4 (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This course is intended to prepare the learner for the role of the practical nurse in caring for clients with acute presentation of illness. Legislation influencing PN practice, specific professional practice issues and ethical practice pertinent to PN practice in acute care environments will be explored. Practice issues that occur across the lifespan will be considered. Collaborative practice with other health care team members and specifically the working partnership with RN's in the acute care setting will be explored.

Campus
PNUR 2520

 Integrated Nursing Practice 3 (3,0,6)(L)

Credits: 3
This practical course builds on the theory and practice from Semester 1 and 2. Through a variety of approaches (e.g. simulation), learners will continue to develop knowledge and practice comprehensive nursing assessment, planning for, and interventions for clients experiencing multiple health challenges.

Campus
PNUR 2530

 Integrated Nursing Practice 4 (4,0,10)(L)

Credits: 4
This practical course emphasizes the development of nursing skills aimed at promoting health and healing with individuals experiencing acute health challenges across the lifespan. Classroom, laboratory, simulation, and integrated practice experiences will help learners build on theory and practice from Semester 1, 2 and 3 to integrate new knowledge and skills relevant to the acute care setting.

Campus
PNUR 2560

 Transition to Preceptorship (2,0,0)(L)

Credits: 2
Transition to Preceptorship will prepare the learner for the final practice experience. A combination of instructor led simulation experiences and self-directed learning will provide the learner with increased competence and confidence to practice in their chosen area for Preceptorship (i.e. medical, surgical, complex care).

Campus
PNUR 2570

 Consolidated Practice Experience 3 (0,0,4P)

Credits: 2
This practice experience will introduce the learners to community care settings and an opportunity to apply and adapt knowledge gained in Semesters 1, 2, and 3, within a continuum of care for clients across the lifespan. Learners may gain experience through simulation and in a variety of community and residential care agencies and settings.

Campus
PNUR 2580

 Consolidated Practice Experience 4 (0,0,13P)

Credits: 4
This practice experience provides learners with the opportunity to integrate theory from all courses into the role of the Practical Nurse in the acute care setting and other practice areas as appropriate. Learners will focus on clients with exacerbations of chronic illness and/or acute illness across the lifespan and will consolidate knowledge and skills such as: post operative care, surgical wound management, intravenous therapy, focused assessment, and clinical decision-making in acute care settings.

Campus
PNUR 2590

 Preceptorship (0,0,12P)

Credits: 4
This final practice experience provides an opportunity for learners to demonstrate integration and consolidation of knowledge, skills and abilities within the realities of the workplace and become practice ready. The final practice experience (FPE) will follow a preceptorship model which is an individualized, faculty monitored practice experience. In a preceptorship model, the learner is under the immedidate supervision of a single, fully qualified individual, and monitored by faculty.

Campus
PNUR 2600

 Professional Communications 3 (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This course focuses on specific professional communication skills used with clients across the lifespan who have mental illness or developmental disabilities. In addition, communication with children will be addressed.

Campus
PNUR 2610

 Professional Communications 4 (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
The focus of this course is on the advancement of professional communication within the acute care setting across the lifespan. The practice of collaboration with health care team members and clients will be further developed.

Campus
PNUR 2700

 Variations in Health 3 (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on the continuum of care and the development of knowledge related to health challenges managed in the community setting. Pathophysiology and nursing care of clients requiring home health care, rehabilitation, and supportive services in the community will be explored. Cultural diversity in healing approaches will be explored as well as the incorporation of evidence informed research and practice.

Campus
PNUR 2710

 Variations in Health 4 (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on pathophysiology as it relates to acute disease and illness of clients across the lifespan, specifically the care of the client experiencing acute illness including nursing interventions and treatment options. Implications of the acute exacerbation of chronic illness will be addressed. Cultural diversity in healing practices will be explored as well as evidence informed research and practice.

Campus
PNUR 2750

 Health Promotion 3 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is focused on health promotion as it relates to the continuum of care across the lifespan. Health promotion in the context of mental illness, physical and developmental disabilities, and maternal/child health is highlighted. Normal growth and development from conception to middle adulthood is addressed.

Campus
PNUR 2760

 Health Promotion 4 (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This course focuses on health promotion for the client experiencing an acute exacerbation of chronic illness or an acute episode of illness. Relevant health promoting strategies during hospitalization may improve or help maintain their health status after discharge. Learners will focus on preparing clients for discharge, through teaching and learning of health promotion strategies.

Campus
POLI 1110

 The Government and Politics of Canada (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the main processes, structures and institutions of Canadian politics and government, including the Constitution, social cleavages, the Prime Minister and cabinet, parliament, political parties and ideologies, federalism and the structure of power.

Campus
POLI 1111

 Canadian Government and Politics

Credits: 3
This course is an investigation into the Canadian system of government and the central questions in this country's political life. Students learn about our constitutional arrangements, the structure and processes of our national government and the relationship between politics and society. Students examine the future of democracy as analyzed through the political effects of globalization, concentrated economic power and the ideology of limited government.
More information about this course

Distance
POLI 1210

 Contemporary Ideologies (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an examination of the major systems of political ideas which have shaped the modern world, including liberalism, conservatism, socialism, communism, anarchism, fascism and nationalism. Students analyze these ideologies from the perspective of their historical and philosophical antecedents, contemporary relevance, and place in the Canadian political experience.

Campus
POLI 2140

 Resistance and Revolution (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the discipline of political science by intensively studying one political phenomenon: the revolution. The course begins with a discussion of the nature of social scientific inquiry, and proceeds to an examination of the characteristics of revolutions, and various theories which attempt to explain their occurrence.

Campus
POLI 2150

 Comparative Politics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to furnish students with the tools and concepts of political analysis related to the functioning of several political systems. The selection of political systems to be studied may vary from year to year.

Campus
POLI 2220

 Political Philosophy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine important themes of the western political tradition through an analysis of selected political philosophers, such as Plato, More, Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau and Marx. The encounter with these theorists initiates discussion of such concepts as authority, justice, freedom, equality and political participation.

Campus
POLI 2230

 Canadian Government 2: Public Administration and Public Policy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on the structure of government and the output side of the political system. Topics include the analysis of the structure of government in Canada, the executive, the evolution of policy-making structures and styles, the contemporary policy-making process, and the Canadian bureaucracy.

Campus
POLI 2250

 Law and Politics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers an introduction to law, politics and the judiciary, with particular emphasis on the role of the judiciary in relation to selected issues in political science. The principal focus in this course is on the Canadian legal system, and comparison to other legal systems.

Campus
POLI 2600

 International Politics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an analysis of the relations between states. Topics discussed in this course may include the evolution of international systems, East-West and North-South issues, the techniques of wielding international influence (through diplomacy, propaganda, foreign aid, subversion, and war), and the sources and nature of international conflict and cooperation.

Campus
POLI 2900

 ***Topics in Politics 2 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore topics in politics that introduce global, international, and comparative themes and issues. As determined by faculty and approved by the department, the focus of the course will be drawn from a wide range of topics, such as global governance and international organizations, political development, public policy and public administration, security, human rights, corporate responsibility, political conflict, refugees, global warming, international law, international theory, state-craft, and more. Required Seminar: POLI 2900S

Campus
POLI 3010

 Canadian Political Parties (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the organization and operation of party politics, and the systems of party competition in Canada. National-level politics are emphasized.

Campus
POLI 3030

 Federalism in Canada (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the theory and practice of federalism, including cultural duality, social stresses, problems of flexibility, the Constitution, and role of the courts.

Campus
POLI 3070

 The European Orient: Balkans, Russia and Eastern Europe (3,0,0) or (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
In this course, participants follow a specialized survey of the cultures shaping Central and Eastern Europe including Russia. Topics include the interplay between peasant and national culture, and between ethnic and political identity.
Note: Different cultural areas or regions may be selected in subsequent offerings of the course. This course is identical to ANTH 3030.

Campus
POLI 3100

 Local Government in Canada (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to local government in Canada and the contemporary issues facing municipalities. The themes discussed in this course include local government powers and responsibilities, community planning, fiscal and investment issues, and elections and community participation.

Campus
POLI 3200

 American Government and Politics (3,0,0) or (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
Students examine the social context of American politics, voting behaviour, legislature process, executive powers, executive-legislative relations, judicial behaviour, and problems of policy.

Campus
POLI 3210

 Western Europe Political Thought: From Cicero to Machievelli (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the evolution of European political thought and its practical applications from Ancient Rome to the Renaissance. This course includes an exploration of the major foundational theories and their influence on the creation of institutional structures, and the governmental apparatuses and ideologies designed to uphold them.
Note: This course is identical to HIST 3210

Campus
POLI 3420

 Modern Political Theory: Analysis of a Selected Theorist (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers a detailed examination of an acknowledged masterpiece of modern political theory. The text and attendant literature selection varies from year to year.

Campus
POLI 3440

 Social and Political Thought (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine major concepts in political philosophy such as justice, equality, rights, obligation, and liberty in the context of both classical and contemporary political thought.

Campus
POLI 3460

 Democratic Theory (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an examination of both classical and contemporary theories of democracy including representative democratic theory, participatory democratic theory and their relationship to 20th century concepts of democracy.

Campus
POLI 3500

 The Politics of Mexico (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the contemporary political, social and economic problems that confront Mexico, with an emphasis on democratization, human rights, economic restructuring, free trade, political parties, reformist and revolutionary movements.

Campus
POLI 3520

 Politics of Developing Nations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the problems of economic development, social change and democratization in the Developing World from a political perspective. The themes discussed in this course include colonialism, decolonization, relations between developed - developing nations, and political theories of development.

Campus
POLI 3530

 The Concentration Camp: Global History and Politics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The Concentration Camp is an institution of the Twentieth Century. This course will give an overview of historical precedents for the concentration camp, such as the ghetto, and then will examine the history and politics of the concentration camp, from the Spanish-American and Anglo-Boer Wars near the turn of the century (the first times the term, "concentration camp", was used), to the more notorious examples of Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. Other examples, such as camps in Canada and the USA, China, parts of Africa, and even the "War on Terror" will be examined in detail. Why have modern states - across the ideological spectrum - made use of the concentration camps against real and preveived enemies?
Note: Same course as HIST 3530

Campus
POLI 3610

 Canadian Foreign Policy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the study of Canadian foreign policy, and focus on competing perspectives on Canadian foreign policy, the evolution and formation of Canadian foreign policy, and Canada's role in the globe as a middle power.

Campus
POLI 3640

 Politics of the Middle East (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to the evolution and operation of Middle East political systems and issues. Students explore a number of major themes and issues that are relevant to the politics of the region specifically, and international relations in general. These issues include Islamism, colonialism, politics of oil, gender and democratization.

Campus
POLI 3650

 Government and Business (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students analyze government intervention in the face of mergers, bigness, and monopoly power, and consider possible government intervention in the face of unacceptable firm behaviour.
Note: This course is identical to ECON 3650. Students may not receive credit for both ECON 3650 and POLI 3650. ECON/POLI 3650 may be used to fulfill the pre-BBA elective requirement or the BBA Environmental requirement, but not both. Required Seminar: POLI 3650S

Campus
POLI 3900

 ***Topics in Politics 3 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore topics in politics that introduce global, international, and comparative themes and issues. As determined by faculty and approved by the department, the focus of the course will be drawn from a wide range of topics, such as global governance and international organizations, political development, public policy and public administration, security, human rights, corporate responsibility, political conflict, refugees, global warming, international law, international theory, state-craft, and more. Required Seminar: POLI 3900S

Campus
POLI 3990

 Globalization and Its Discontents: The Politics of Economic Change (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines three economic institutions that are central to understanding the processes referred to as "globalization": the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Trade Organization. The course develops a framework of the key concepts in discussions of globalization before exploring the political origins and current social consequences of these organizations and examining related issues of global governance, corporate accountability, and global justice.

Campus
POLI 3991

 Globalization and Its Discontents: The Politics of Economic Change

Credits: 3
This Web seminar course examines three economic institutions that are central to understanding the processes referred to as "globalization": the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organization. The course develops a framework of the key concepts in discussions of globalization before exploring the political origins and current social consequences of these organizations, and examining related issues of global governance, corporate accountability and global justice.
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POLI 4010

 Canadian Provincial and Regional Politics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine political parties, processes, and institutions in the provincial political systems, and the regional arrangement between provinces.

Campus
POLI 4020

 Politics of the Canadian Constitutions (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This seminar examines the creation and amendment of Canadian Constitutions; political aspects of the judicial system; and political consequences of our decisions.

Campus
POLI 4030

 Field School in East/Central Europe (3,0,0)

Credits: 6
This course offers an introduction to the societies and cultures of East/Central Europe by way of a month-long field trip. The itinerary includes rural and urban locations in several countries that lend themselves to an ethnographic examination of the ethnic relations, religions, economies, and politics shaping the buffer zone between the European East and West.
Note: This course is equivalent to ANTH 4030 and SOCI 4030

Campus
POLI 4050

 ***Topics in Canadian Politics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This seminar course offers an in-depth examination of the important issues in Canadian politics.

Campus
POLI 4060

 ***Topics in Latin American Politics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine contemporary political, social, and economic problems that confront Latin America. Demilitarization, democratization, human rights, economic restructuring, and free trade are emphasized.

Campus
POLI 4110

 Humanitarian Intervention: A Canadian Perspective (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine a shift in Canada's foreign policy that has taken Canada from being a peacekeeper to a peacemaker. International law, the massacre of civilians, the establishment of an international criminal court, and Canada's role in the "war on terrorism" are among the issues studied.

Campus
POLI 4710

 Communism and the Environment (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will focus on the history and politics of communism and the environment. As such, it will explore environmental issues and policies in the Soviet Union, China and Cuba. Students will examine other related issues, such as the writings of Marx, Engels, Lenin, and others; ideology, political philosophy and the environment; and the role of communism and socialism in environmental movements, today. Students will also be asked to compare environmental practices in communist countries with those of capitalist countries.
Note: Same course as HIST 4710

Campus
POLI 4900

 ***Topics in Politics 4 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore topics in politics that introduce global, international, and comparative themes and issues. As determined by faculty and approved by the department, the focus of the course will be drawn from a wide range of topics, such as global governance and international organizations, political development, public policy and public administration, security, human rights, corporate responsibility, political conflict, refugees, global warming, international law, international theory, state-craft, and more. Required Seminar: POLI 4900S

Campus
POLY 3011

 Sleep and Sleep Disorders

Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce students who are pursuing careers in sleep medicine and polysomnography to the structure and function of the allied health profession of polysomnographer. This course also serves as an adjunct to other health professionals, such as respiratory therapists and registered nurses, who would like to have a better understanding of sleep and sleep disorders.
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POLY 3021

 Polysomnography Instrumentation

Credits: 3
This course introduces instrumentation and electrical principles and practices that the polysomnographer must understand. While electrical safety and ancillary equipment encountered in sleep laboratories are covered, the student will also cover the internal workings and calibration of the polygraph. Amplifiers and filters will be emphasized along with basic tracings and some of the artifacts that may appear and influence ones interpretation of the sleep study. Also, the international "10-20" system of electrode placement will be introduced.
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POLY 3031

 Principles of Polysomnography

Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide the most current information on the technical and clinical aspects of polysomnography, as well as the methodology used by the polysomnographic technologist in the sleep laboratory. This course includes patient interaction and describes the capture of bioelectric activity, overnight recording techniques, the interpretation of data, and data presentation for the compilation of a final report.
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POLY 3041

 Polysomnography Program Clinical Component

Credits: 3
This clinical course is designed to provide a broad clinical experience. This will include the development of caseload, technical and diagnostic skills. Upon completion, students should be proficient with the necessary educational and technical skills to allow them to practice these in their own clinical environment.
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PSYC 0500

 Psychology (4,1,0)

Credits: 3
An introductory psychology course at the ABE Advanced level, with an emphasis on active learning, critical thinking, and student involvement in all major topical areas of psychology. This course may be used as credit toward the Adult Graduation Diploma.
Note: This course is taught by the University Preparation Department

Campus
PSYC 1110

 Introduction to Psychology 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore selected topics in contemporary psychology, including the history of psychology, methodology, heredity and learning, physiology and neuropsychology, consciousness, sensation and perception, learning, and memory.

Campus
PSYC 1111

 Introductory Psychology I

Credits: 3
This companion course to PSYC 1211 introduces students to the scientific study of human behaviour. Topics include an overview of psychological theories and research methods as well as current information on the brain and nervous system, sensation and perception, learning, problem solving, memory, emotion and motivation.
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PSYC 1210

 Introduction to Psychology 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore selected topics in contemporary psychology, including intelligence, development, personality, social psychology, emotion, motivation, and psychopathology.

Campus
PSYC 1211

 Introductory Psychology II

Credits: 3
This companion course to PSYC 1111 introduces students to the scientific study of human behaviour. Topics include an overview of psychological theories and research methods as well as current information on health and stress; psychological disorders and psychotherapy; and selected topics in social psychology, including attitudes, prejudice, conformity and group behaviour.
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PSYC 2040

 Introduction to Biological Psychology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students consider the relationship between psychological and biological processes. The anatomy of the brain and neutral activity as well as the endocrine system is examined as it relates to the sensory and motor abilities, learning and memory, language, motivation, states of consciousness and sexual behaviour. Research methods of studying the brain are also discussed.

Campus
PSYC 2050

 Drugs and Behaviour (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course surveys topics related to drugs and behaviour. Basic mechanisms of pharmacology and the nervous system are introduced in the context of psychoactive drugs. Students discuss the historical and cultural influences that have shaped the roles played by drugs and addiction in Canadian society. Impacts of drug use and abuse on society and the individual are emphasized.

Campus
PSYC 2100

 Analysis of Psychological Data (2,0,2)

Credits: 3
Students are provided with a conceptual and practical introduction to types of data analysis most commonly used in psychology. Topics include descriptive statistics, correlation, t-tests, chi-square, and ANOVA. This is a required course for students intending to major in Psychology and recommended for students intending to take Psychology courses numbered in the 3000's or 4000's.
Note: Students may normally receive credit for only one of the following: BIOL 3000, BUEC 2320, MATH 1200, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, SOCI 3710, STAT 1200, STAT 2000

Campus
PSYC 2101

 Statistics in the Social Sciences

Credits: 3
This course provides an overview of the basic descriptive and inferential statistical techniques used in the analysis of social science research data. Students become familiar with the organization and analysis of data, communicating research results, translating statistical jargon into meaningful English, and understanding basic theories underlying statistics, such as elementary probability theory.
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PSYC 2110

 Introduction to Research Methods (3,0,1)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the procedures and designs used in psychological research and the critical evaluation of research. Topics include the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to research, including non-experimental, experimental, and quasi-experimental designs; research ethics; measurement; validity of methods; control of extraneous influences; and the drawing of valid conclusions from empirical evidence. This is a required course for students majoring in psychology.

Campus
PSYC 2111

 Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the procedures and designs used in psychological research and the critical evaluation of research. Topics include the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to research, including non-experimental, experimental, and quasi-experimental designs; research ethics; measurement; validity of methods; control of extraneous influences; and the drawing of valid conclusions from empirical evidence.
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PSYC 2120

 Introduction to Personality (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the major theories of personality formation, including psychodynamic, cognitive, humanistic, and behavioural approaches. Students are provided an opportunity to relate this material to personal growth and development.

Campus
PSYC 2130

 Introduction to Developmental Psychology: Childhood and Adolescence (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the developmental process from conception to adolescence. Theoretical perspectives and research data are examined as they relate to physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of development.

Campus
PSYC 2131

 Introduction to Childhood and Adolescence

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to developmental psychology: the branch of psychology devoted to the study of human development and change. As change and development are an intrinsic part of the human experience, this course is designed to foster a lifetime interest in the process of human development, as students explore key issues, methods, theories and research findings in this field. The content of the course is organized chronologically-beginning at the point of conception and following the trajectory of human development through to the teen years. The interconnectedness of developmental processes is a major theme, and includes the interrelations between a child's physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development. The intricate relation between children and the contexts that support their development are also emphasized, such as family life, peers, and culture.
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PSYC 2160

 Introduction to Abnormal Psychology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Participants examine psychopathology from historical, contemporary and cross cultural perspectives. Students consider evolving models and issues including biological, psychological, and social behavioural approaches to assessment, causes, and treatment of a wide range of disordered behaviours.

Campus
PSYC 2161

 Abnormal Psychology

Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce students to the study of human behavioural disorders. Topics include behaviours ranging from functional to dysfunctional, the principles of psychological assessment, and professionals who might be involved in the assessment process and the methods they use. Psychological, biological, and sociocultural approaches to understanding human behaviour are reviewed and a wide variety of behavioural disorders are described. Case studies are presented and interpreted, and recommended treatments are discussed.
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PSYC 2210

 Introduction to Cognition (3,0,1)

Credits: 3
This course is a detailed introduction to empirical and theoretical aspects in the following core areas of psychology: human memory, perception, attention, language, and thinking.

Campus
PSYC 2220

 Introduction to Social Psychology (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the effects of social environment on human behaviour, attitudes, and personality. Specifically, the topics considered include theories and methods of social psychology, social perceptions, affiliation, attraction and love, aggression and violence, prejudice and discrimination, cooperation and altruism, attitude change, group behaviours, and conformity and social influence.

Campus
PSYC 2230

 Introduction to Developmental Psychology: Adulthood and Aging (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an inquiry into the developmental changes from adolescence onwards with an emphasis on adolescent adjustment, adult maturity and growth, middle age, retirement, old age, dying and death. Current research is examined as it relates to physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development.

Campus
PSYC 2300

 Human Sexuality (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the full range of sexual attitudes and behaviours as seen in contemporary society. Frank and open discussions in both lecture and small group format is stressed.

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PSYC 2311

 Psychology of Sex Differences

Credits: 3
This course examines the psychology of one of society's most important current interests - how and why females and males differ - in what ways are they more similar than we sometimes think. The development of gender roles affects nearly every aspect of life: family, education, work, sexuality, culture, emotional problems and the like. We examine different views of the biological and social influences on developing gender roles. This course was previously known as PSYC 231.
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PSYC 2321

 Sports Psychology

Credits: 3
This course examines the use of phychological knowledge to enhance the development of performance and satisfaction of athletes and others associated with sports. Topics include improving skills of athletes, motivating practice performance, increasing the effectiveness of coaches, and mental preparation for competition. This course was previously known as PSYC 232.
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PSYC 3000

 Behaviour Disorders (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
This course is a detailed scientific overview of abnormal behaviour, and includes discussions of history, definitions and characterizations, and an emphasis on etiology, maintenance and treatment of psychopathology. This course qualifies as a prerequisite for PSYC 3100.

Campus
PSYC 3020

 Infancy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine biological, social, and cognitive development from conception to the third year of life. The transition to parenthood and influences on parenting (including social policy) are a secondary focus. Content includes theoretical and methodological issues, research findings, and practical implications. Students are introduced to important primary sources as well as secondary texts.

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PSYC 3030

 Psychological Testing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an overview of the theory and practice of mental measurement, including test reliability and validity, its uses, administration, scoring, and interpretation.

Campus
PSYC 3060

 Principles of Animal Behaviour (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
Students examine animal behaviour from the perspective of evolutionary theory. Among the topics are an introduction to the theory of evolution and behavioural genetics; social systems as ecological adaptations; mating and parental strategies; learning, instincts, and evolution; and the evolution of human behaviour. Credit is given for only one of BIOL 3100 or PSYC 3060.

Campus
PSYC 3080

 Social Psychology (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
Students discuss theory and research in the areas of individual social behaviour; social motivation; social attitudes; group interaction; socialization; racial prejudice; and other related topics.

Campus
PSYC 3100

 Clinical Psychology (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
Students are provided a comprehensive overview of clinical psychology. The topics include the role of personality theory in clinical psychology, an overview of descriptive psychopathology, a consideration of issues in diagnosis and classification of disorders, an examination of the techniques used in assessment of intellectual and personality functioning, and a review of various approaches to therapeutic intervention. Areas of clinical psychology research are discussed, in addition to issues of professionalism, and models of training. Students are given a sense of what it means to be a "Clinical Psychologist" today, recent developments in clinical psychology, and future directions in the field.

Campus
PSYC 3110

 Clinical Psychology: Theories and Systems of Psychotherapy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided an overview of various psychotherapeutic approaches in the field of clinical psychology. The therapeutic systems and models examined in this course include psychoanalysis, Adlerian psychotherapy, analytic psychotherapy, client-centered therapy, rational emotive behaviour therapy, behaviour therapy, cognitive therapy, existential psychotherapy, Gestalt therapy, and multimodal therapy.

Campus
PSYC 3121

 Obesity and Eating Disorders

Credits: 3
This course examines the physiological and behavioural explanations of the causes of obesity and eating disorders; the financial, health, and psychological costs of obesity and eating disorders; the characteristics of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and selected atypical eating disorders; and methods of treatment and management. This course was previously known as PSYC 312.
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PSYC 3140

 Health Psychology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers a critical survey of the basic research findings and theory on the relation between psychological factors (including behaviour, emotion, cognitive, personality, and interpersonal relationships) and health. Topics include health-related behaviours such as smoking and drug use, the effects of stressful events on health, methods of coping with stress, the impact of chronic illness on the family, and social support systems.

Campus
PSYC 3150

 Childhood and Adolescence (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine biological, social, and cognitive development from the third year of life through to adolescence. The development of prosocial and antisocial behaviours are a special focus. Content includes theoretical and methodological issues, research findings, and practical implications. Students are introduced to important primary sources as well as secondary texts.

Campus
PSYC 3151

 Developmental Psychology of Children

Credits: 3
Students explore normal human development from conception to middle childhood. A major focus is on the various genetic, environmental, social, family and cultural factors that influence development in complex ways. The course has been designed to highlight cross-cultural research on development. Topics include major theoretical issues and research methods, prenatal development and birth, physical development throughout childhood, development of cognition and language, socialization (moral and sex-role development), and personality.
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PSYC 3200

 Theories of Personality 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine psychoanalytic and dispositional theories on the development of personality. Topics include research findings, applications, and limitations with respect to the two approaches.
Note: Students with PSYC 3050 may not take this course for credit

Campus
PSYC 3210

 Theories of Personality 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine environmental and representational theories on the development of personality. Topics include research findings, applications, and limitations with respect to the two approaches.
Note: Students with PSYC 3050 may not take this course for credit

Campus
PSYC 3220

 Adulthood and Aging (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course explores human development during adulthood through to old age. Students are provided a background in basic issues, theories, and psychological research regarding adulthood and the aging process.

Campus
PSYC 3230

 Principles of Conditioning (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the procedures and processes involved in Classical (Pavlovian) and Operant (instrumental) conditioning. A majority of the course material is comprised of research findings from animal studies.

Campus
PSYC 3240

 History and Systems of Psychology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided a broad overview of psychology's history, beginning with the ancient Persians, and progressing through to the mid-twentieth century. Key figures and thinkers are highlighted, and major philosophies and their founders discussed, all within the context of the political and social climate prevalent at the time.

Campus
PSYC 3250

 Community Psychology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This is a survey course designed to introduce students to various topics in community psychology. Topics include research methods and social change and intervention strategies within various community settings, such as the legal and justice system, the health care system, the mental health care system, and the educational system.

Campus
PSYC 3360

 The Psychology of Language 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students consider the fundamental psychological abilities underlying human language. Representative topics include animal versus human communication, language processing, lexical representation, and the principles of on-line conversation.

Campus
PSYC 3380

 Psychology of Emotion (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students discuss the theories and research on emotion from cognitive, behavioral, physiological, social, and evolutionary perspectives in the discipline of psychology. Students examine where emotions come from, their function, and meaning. Topics include development and communication of emotion, emotions and decision making, emotion regulation, and the relationship between emotion and psychological well-being.

Campus
PSYC 3390

 Human Neuropsychology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course uses clinical and experimental approaches to human neuropsychology as a basis for understanding brain-behaviour relationships in both typical and impaired functioning. Students discuss the impacts of brain disorders, including traumatic brain injury, dementia, and tumors. Students distinguish the structure and function of the human brain, with particular emphasis on the cerebral cortex; gain knowledge and understanding of how behaviour can be used to infer brain function; and think critically about key ideas and research findings in neuropsychology.

Campus
PSYC 3400

 Introduction to Psychology and the Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided an overview of the area of psychology and the law. Applications of psychological theories and research to the legal system are examined. Topics covered include the legal system, police investigations, jury decision-making, eyewitness identification and testimony, expert evidence, and sentencing.

Campus
PSYC 3410

 Forensic Psychology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the application of clinical psychology (assessment and intervention) to the field of forensics. Topics covered include fitness to stand trial; Not Criminally Responsible By Reason of Mental Disorder (NCRMD); psychopathy, risk assessment and the prediction of dangerousness; Dangerous Offender/Long Term Offender assessments; criminal profiling; parental capacity assessments; assessment and treatment of special populations; and professional responsibilities and ethical issues.

Campus
PSYC 3451

 Adolescent Development

Credits: 3
Continuing from PSYC 3151: Developmental Psychology of Children, students examine the adolescent years. In addition to the general theoretical issues and methods of studying development, the course presents the physical, cognitive, personality and social development during adolescence, in the contexts of family, peer group, school, work, and culture. Specific in-depth topics include identity, autonomy, sexuality, and moral development. Although students focus on normal development, there is discussion of behavioural and emotional problems such as delinquency, substance abuse, depression, suicide, and eating disorders. This course has been designed to highlight cross-cultural research.
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PSYC 3461

 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging

Credits: 3
Students are provided an accurate overview of the psychological changes that people experience as they grow older. This includes identifying specific types of psychological changes and examining the dynamic forces that underlie and produce change. Topics include research techniques, theoretical approaches, memory, intelligence, personality, social forces and psychopathology. The course surveys the adult lifespan: young and middle adulthood and old age.
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PSYC 3510

 Sensation and Perception 1 - Visual Processes (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course describes the basic research findings and models for visual sensation and perception. Topics include the perception of brightness, contrast, colour, objects, depth, size, and movement. in addition, students discuss the physiological mechanisms of the visual system.
Note: Students who have credits for PSYC 3130 may not receive additional credit for this course

Campus
PSYC 3520

 Sensation and Perception 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course describes the basic research findings and models for auditory, somatosensory, olfactory, and gustatory sensation and perception. Topics include the physics of sound, physiology of the auditory system, basic sound perception, auditory scene analysis, music perception, language perception, physiology of touch and pain, and the physiology of smell and taste.
Note: Students who have credits for PSYC 3130 may not receive additional credit for this course

Campus
PSYC 3540

 Cognition 1: Attention and Memory (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course describes the research findings and models of attention and memory, both past and present. Topics include basic attentional processes and models, short-term and working memory, long-term processes, semantic and episodic distinctions, physiology of memory, and false memory.
Note: Students who have credit for PSYC 3090 may not receive additional credit for this course

Campus
PSYC 3550

 Cognition 2: Language and Thought (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course presents the research findings and models for various aspects of language and thought. Topics include language processing, reasoning, decision-making, problem-solving, and the theoretical nature of consciousness.
Note: Students who have credits for PSYC 3090 may not receive credit for this course

Campus
PSYC 3560

 Psychopharmacology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a detailed introduction to psychoactive drugs at behavioural, neural and cellular levels of examination. Students learn to define and understand how drugs are processed by the body and how they interact with neurotransmitter systems. Students identify and discuss the major neurotransmitters; gain insight into the therapeutic use of psychotropic drugs to treat affective disorders, anxiety disorders, and schizophrenia; understand the properties of major classes of abused drugs (CNS depressants, stimulants, opiates, hallucinogens, etc.); and think critically about pharmaceuticals and the pharmaceutical industry.

Campus
PSYC 3570

 Physiology of Motivation and Emotion (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course presents the concepts of motivation and emotion, emphasizing neural and endocrine mechanisms. Students explore the contributions of human and animal research in understanding temperature regulation, hunger and thirst, sleep and biological rhythms, exploration and curiosity, reproductive and parental behaviour, substance abuse, aggression, stress, positive and negative emotions, and feelings. Interaction between physiology and external influences are emphasized, as well as causal and functional explanations. Students think critically about key ideas and research findings in motivation and emotion, and consider how they can be applied practically to issues experienced in their own lives.
Note: Students may not take this course if they have credit for the former PSYC 304-6 or PSYC 307-6

Campus
PSYC 3580

 Physiology of Learning and Memory (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides a detailed presentation of the different types of learning and memory, emphasizing neural mechanisms. Students discuss the interplay of human and animal research (including that with invertebrates) in understanding synaptic plasticity involving long-term potentiation and depression, perceptual learning, classical and instrumental conditioning, and relational learning. Learning disabilities, memory impairment, and recovery from brain injury are also considered.
Note: Students who have credits for PSYC 3040 may not receive additional credit for this course

Campus
PSYC 3610

 Integrated Methods and Analysis of Psychological Data (2,0,1)

Credits: 3
This course will provide an integrated presentation of design considerations and statistical methods. The focus of the course will be analysis of research designs with multiple independent variables and a single dependent variable, though the material covered will not be limited to these types of designs. Topics covered include reliability, validity, power, sampling, t-tests, correlation, regression, analysis of variance, nonparametric procedures, and sampling.
Corequisite Psychology 2110, with permission of the instructor.

Campus
PSYC 3611

 Social Psychology I

Credits: 3
This course introduces the field of social psychology, focussing on how we think about and interact with others. Topics covered are personal perception, social cognition, attitudes, prejudice, and interpersonal relations.
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PSYC 3621

 Social Psychology II

Credits: 3
This course aims to expand students' knowledge of human behaviour and thought in social context. Topics include self-concept, self-esteem, and gender identity - the elements of social identity; conformity, compliance, and obedience - processes that influence social behaviour; altruism; causes and control of aggression; and group performance, including group decision-making and leadership. Before completion of the course, students examine applications of social psychology principles in six areas: population control, health promotion, the environment, law, politics, and the workplace.
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PSYC 3991

 Psychology of Human Resilience

Credits: 3
This course focuses on the study of human resilience. Students examine research evidence on individual, family and community factors that have been found to promote resilience in at-risk children, adolescents and adults. Students explore the intense debates and controversies engendered by these findings and their application to prevention and intervention strategies. As a foundation for engaging with these issues, students first develop a framework that includes an introduction to psychology and the research methods used to study human resilience.
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PSYC 4100

 Advanced Research and Methodology (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided an opportunity to apply research methods and statistics to an advanced research project supervised by a faculty member.

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PSYC 4400

 Directed Studies in Psychology (3,0,0) or (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
Students are provided an opportunity to engage in a directed investigation of a problem, and are required to complete a written report of their findings.
Note: This course cannot be counted towards a major (i.e., towards minimum 30 credits)

Campus
PSYC 4990

 Honours Thesis in Psychology

Credits: 6
Central to this course is an original research project conducted by students in the Psychology Honours Program of the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, to be completed under the direction of a faculty member in the Department of Psychology. Students strengthen their research, writing and analytical skills in preparation for graduate or professional schools, many of which require an Honours degree. Students accepted into the Psychology Honours Program must register in this course for both the Fall and Winter semesters of their final academic year.

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PSYC 4991

 Directed Studies

Credits: 3
This course is a requirement for completion of the Bachelor of Arts, psychology major and may be taken to complete the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Liberal Arts. Students must review the literature, original and interpretative, in their particular area of study, offer critical assessment of that literature and submit a major research paper based on the reading list prepared for the course.
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