Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University

Courses

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On-Campus

There are a number of ways to register for on-campus courses at TRU which are determined by your program of study.

Open Learning

We offer 590 courses by distance learning. These courses are offered in several formats, including print-based, web-based and online.


Continuing Studies

Community U provides individuals and organizations with formal and non-formal opportunities to pursue personal and professional goals life-long.

Trades and Technology

Apprenticeship, foundation and continuing studies courses are offered in construction, mechanical trades, professional driving and more.

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Courses - F
Title Name Delivery
FILM 1120

 Fundamentals of Camera Operation (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are instructed on the basic operation of cameras as they are used in the studio and on location. Camera fundamentals are explored through lectures, demonstrations, and screenings, in addition to practical work with the camera and editing equipment.

Campus
FILM 1180

 Introduction to Cinematic and Interactive Narrative (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines the ways that narrative forms are used across both linear and non-linear modes of expression. Students explore the nature and styles of narrative as well as the difference between time-based and space-based narratives. The impact of interactive interfaces on narrative is also considered.

Campus
FILM 2100

 Introduction to Film Studies 1890-1938 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine significant trends and events in film history, between 1890-1938, by exploring film genres, film theory, national cinemas, Hollywood and cultural socialization, and film criticism.

Campus
FILM 2200

 Introduction to Film Studies 1938 - Present (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course explores significant trends and events throughout the history of film. Students are introduced to the early, exuberant period of film, and then shift focus to study the evolution of the medium; in particular, the relationship between Hollywood and world filmmaking trends. Texts by film theorists, film critics and filmmakers are accompanied by screenings of classic and contemporary films.

Campus
FILM 3250

 Quebec Cinema in Translation (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course will provide an introduction to issues and theories relevant to Quebec cinema and will focus on the representation of Quebec culture and society in major films from 1960 to the present. All films will be subtitled or dubbed in English. No prior knowledge of French is required.

Campus
FILM 3850

 Film Theory (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
FILM 3850 explores the study of cinema by examining a number of theoretical approaches that have contributed to the understanding of film studies. Film theory, by its very nature, is polemic and this course will examine a variety of theoretical arguments, both historical and contemporary, that have been put forth by film scholars. Such theoretical frameworks include film spectatorship, ethnography, psychoanalytic analysis, ideology, feminism, film music and narrative, and postmodernism.

Campus
FILM 4050

 Film Noir (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
FILM 4050 examines the evolution of this often celebrated, but also contested body of films. The Film Noir canon has been defined by its highly visual style. Film historian Andrew Spicer (2002) comments: Film Noir designates a cycle of films that share a similar iconography, visual style (and) narrative strategies...their iconography or repeated visual patterning consists of images of the dark, night-time city, and streets damp with rain. The films are dominated thematically by existential and Freudian images of weak and hesitant males and predatory femmes fatales.

Campus
FILM 4100

 The American Frontier in Film, Television and Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
FILM 4100 examines the cinematic, television, and literary West as a reflection of the realities and unrealities of the American Frontier.

Campus
FILM 4140

 Films of the Cold War (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines selected films that have become symbolic of the fear and paranoia associated with the Cold War.

Campus
FNCE 2120

 Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop a basic understanding of business finance, which deals with how organizations effectively manage their operating and fixed assets and fund them with an optimal mix of debt and equity financing. Topics include the role of the financial manager; goals of the firm; financial statement analysis; time value of money; stock and bond valuation; risk and return, including the capital asset pricing model; interest rates; capital budgeting; weighted cost of capital; and capital structure.
Note: Students may not receive credit for both FNCE 2120 and FNCE 3120

Campus
FNCE 2121

 Financial Management

Credits: 3
Students develop a basic understanding of business finance which deals with how organizations effectively manage their operating and fixed assets and fund them with an optimal mix of debt and equity financing. Topics include financial statement analysis; financial forecasting; working capital management and short-term borrowing; valuing financial assets; cost of capital; capital budgeting and risk; capital markets and sources of long-term financing; dividend policy; and foreign exchange.
More information about this course

Distance
FNCE 3120

 Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop a basic understanding of business finance, which deals with how organizations effectively manage their operating and fixed assets and fund them with an optimal mix of debt and equity financing. Topics include the role of the financial manager; goals of the firm; financial statement analysis; the time value of money; stock and bond valuation; risk and return, including the capital asset pricing model; interest rates; capital budgeting; weighted cost of capital; and capital structure.
Note: This course should be taken by students in the Minor in Management only. Students may not receive credit for both FNCE 3120 and FNCE 2120.

Campus
FNCE 3140

 Financial Statement Analysis (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn to read complex financial statements of major corporations and analyze their performance using financial ratios and other tools. Emphasis is place on the quality of financial reporting and identifying the warning signs of manipulation. Topics include a review of financial statement analysis; profitability analysis, including revenue recognition, discontinue operations, comprehensive income, earnings per share, special items, accounting changes, and earnings management; liquidity analysis, including working capital, cash flow statements, and contingencies; long-term asset analysis, including accounting for long-term investments, consolidations, fixed assets and fair value accounting, intangibles, and goodwill; long-term debt paying ability analysis, including future income taxes, executive compensation, pensions and other post-employment benefits, long-term liabilities, hybrid securities, and hedging using derivatives; and market valuation.

Campus
FNCE 3150

 Investments 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine basic investing and portfolio management from a global perspective. Topics include an introduction to risk and return, diversification, and asset allocation; types of securities; buying and selling securities; mutual funds; the stock market and common stock valuation; stock price behavior, market efficiency, and behavioral finance; interest rates, bond prices, and yields; return, risk, and the security market line; performance evaluation; and risk management, including options and futures.

Campus
FNCE 3151

 Investments 1

Credits: 3
Students examine basic investing and portfolio management from a global perspective. Topics include risk and return; diversification and assets allocation; types of securities; buying and selling securities; stock valuation; price behavior and market efficiency; behavioural finance and the psychology of investing; interest rates; bond prices and yields; portfolio management; return, risk and the security market line; performance evaluation and risk management; options and futures; fixed income, including corporate and government bonds and mortgage-backed securities; and international portfolio management.
More information about this course

Distance
FNCE 3170

 Investments 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Building on FNCE 3150: Investments 1, students explore investing at a more advanced level, focusing primarily on fixed income alternatives. Topics include an introduction to fixed income investments, bond price volatility, factors affecting bond yields and the term structure of interest rates, treasury and federal agency securities, municipal securities, residential mortgage loans, agency mortgage pass-through securities, agency collateralized mortgage obligations and stripped mortgage-backed securities, credit default swaps, and an overview of real estate finance.

Campus
FNCE 3171

 Investments 2

Credits: 3
Building on FNCE 3151: Investments I, students explore investing at an advanced level, focusing primarily on fixed income alternatives. Topics include measuring yield and bond price volatility; duration and interest rates; treasury and local government securities; residential mortgage loans; price and yield behaviour of pass-through securities; collateralized mortgage obligations and stripped mortgage backed securities; asset-backed securities; bonds with embedded options; fixed income portfolio management; liability-driven strategies and performance evaluation; and derivative contracts and strategies.
More information about this course

Distance
FNCE 3180

 Risk Management and Financial Engineering (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn to value the main types of derivative securities and how to effectively utilize them in risk management, asset speculation, and financial engineering. Topics include an introduction to the forward and futures markets, mechanics of futures and forward markets, determination of futures and forward prices, interest rates, swaps, mechanics of options markets, trading strategies involving options, valuing options using the Black-Scholes model, credit derivatives, and energy and commodity derivatives.

Campus
FNCE 3190

 Personal Financial Services (3,0,0) 3 credits

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the operation of the financial services industry, the products and services available, and how they are effectively marketed to satisfy the needs of consumers. Topics include an overview of the financial services industry; career progression as a financial representative; branch operations and online banking; types of bank accounts and foreign exchange services; types of consumer credit including residential mortgages, credit cards, vehicle loans and leasing, personal loans, home equity loans, lines of credit, student loans, and Registered Retirement Saving Plan loans; mortgage lending; credit assessment and calculating the cost of borrowing; responsible use of credit and personal bankruptcy; overview of business financial services; personal, need and financial assessment of clients; marketing financial services; and customer service.

Campus
FNCE 4110

 Advanced Financial Management for Accountants (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Building on either FNCE 2120: Financial Management or FNCE 3120: Finance, students majoring in accounting further develop the knowledge and skills in business finance required for admission to the Chartered Professional Accountant program. Topics include dividend policy; advanced capital budgeting; maturity matching of assets and liabilities; short- and long-term financial planning; working capital management; sources of long-term financing; business valuation; mergers and acquisitions and corporate restructuring; bankruptcy, liquidation, and reorganization; and risk management.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for FNCE 4110 and either FNCE 4120 or FNCE 4130

Campus
FNCE 4120

 Business Valuation and Restructuring (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn to value a business using commonly applied industry techniques and examine how to best restructure a company to cope with financial distress or to optimize operational or stock market performance. Topics include advanced cost of capital; business valuation techniques, such as income approaches, market multiples, and asset-based approaches; mergers and acquisitions; financial distress, bankruptcy, reorganization, and liquidations; divestitures, spin-offs, split-offs, split-ups, and tracking shares; and private equity, including angel, venture, and mezzanine financing, and investing in troubled firms.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for FNCE 4110 and FNCE 4120

Campus
FNCE 4130

 Advanced Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Building on either FNCE 2120: Financial Management or FNCE 3120: Finance, students further develop their knowledge and skills in business finance. Topics include corporate governance and executive compensation, matching the maturities of assets and liabilities, pro forma financial statements, capital budgeting, incorporating risk in capital budgeting decisions, sustainable growth, sources of permanent financing, working capital management, capital structure and debt policy, and dividend policy.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for FNCE 4110 and FNCE 4130

Campus
FNCE 4140

 Personal Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students acquire skills to identify, structure, and resolve financial planning problems. Multiple analytical tools and tax planning strategies are used in addressing various financial planning issues. Topics include an overview of a financial plan; applying time of money concepts; planning with personal financial instruments; banking services and money management; assessing, managing, and securing credit; personal loans; purchasing and financing a home; auto and homeowner's insurance; health and life insurance; investing fundamentals; investing in stocks, bonds, and mutual funds; retirement planning; and estate planning.

Campus
FNCE 4150

 Personal Wealth Management (3,0,0) 3 credits

Credits: 3
Students learn to analyze the financial and insurance needs of potential clients and how to develop a plan that protects them from risk and helps achieve their financial objectives. Topics include government sponsored benefit plans; personal insurance products; deferred income plans; budgeting and personal financial statements; investment policy statement; investment products; investment strategies; investment income and tax planning; family law; wealth transfer including wills, trusts, and estates; professional ethics; and developing a comprehensive financial plan.

Campus
FNCE 4160

 Portfolio Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn to design and implement an investment policy statement for an individual or institutional investor that establishes their financial objectives, risk tolerances, constraints, and investment and monitoring policies. Topics include setting investment objectives and policies, ethical standards and fiduciary duties, diversification and asset allocation, capital markets and market efficiency, equity portfolio management, fixed-income portfolio management, alternative investments portfolio management, evaluating portfolio performance, and monitoring and rebalancing portfolios.

Campus
FNCE 4180

 International Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the international aspects of corporate finance and investing. Topics include the international monetary system, balance of payments, the market for foreign exchange, international parity relationships and forecasting foreign exchange rates, international banking and money markets, international bond and equity market, futures and options on foreign exchanges, interest rate and currency swaps, international portfolio investment, and management of exposure.

Campus
FNCE 4190

 Financial Institutions Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the different financial intermediaries in our economy, the financial risks they are exposed to, and how these risks are measured and managed. Topics include the types of financial institutions including deposit-taking institutions, insurance companies, securities firms, investment banks, mutual funds, hedge funds, pension funds, and finance companies; regulation of the financial industry; measuring risk including interest rate risk, market risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, off-balance sheet risk, foreign exchange risk, sovereign risk, and technology and other operational risks; managing risk through the use of derivatives, loan sales and securitization; and managing risk through deposit insurance and other liability guarantees and capital adequacy standards.

Campus
FNLG 1000

 Introduction to First Nations Language 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will introduce students to the First Nations language. Emphasis will be placed on developing listening and speaking skills, conversational ability, and knowledge of grammatical structures. Little or no prior knowledge of the language is the expected entry level for this course.
Corequisite: FNLG 1010 recommended

Campus
FNLG 1010

 First Nations Language Immersion 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to immerse learners in the First Nations language to develop language proficiency. DSTC students will be required to actively participate in First Nations language immersion.
Corequisite: FNLG 1000

Campus
FNLG 1100

 Introduction to First Nations Language 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will build the student's abilities developed in FNLG 1000 to gain a greater understanding of the grammatical structures and language analysis methodologies while continuing to expand their vocabulary of the First Nations language.
Corequisite: FNLG 1110 recommended

Campus
FNLG 1110

 First Nations Language Immersion 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will permit students to build on their abilities developed in FNLG 1010 and FNLG 1100 to gain a greater understanding of the grammatical structures, while continuing to expand their vocabulary of the First Nations language.
Corequisite: FNLG 1100

Campus
FNLG 2000

 First Nations Language Structure and Analysis 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will allow students to build on their abilities developed in Year 1 to gain an enhanced understanding of the grammatical structures and language analysis methodologies while continuing to expand their vocabulary of the First nations language.
Corequisite: FNLG 2010 is recommended

Campus
FNLG 2010

 First Nations Language Immersion 3 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will, through continued Immersion, permit students to build on their abilities developed in Year 1 to gain an enhanced understanding of grammatical structures, while continuing to expand their vocabulary of the First Nations language.
Corequisite: FNLG 2000

Campus
FNLG 2100

 First Nations Language Structure and Analysis 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will permit students to continue to build on their abilities developed in FNLG 2010 to gain an enhanced understanding of the grammatical structures and language analysis methodologies while continuing to expand their vocabulary of the First Nations language.
Corequisite: FNLG 2110 is recommended

Campus
FNLG 2110

 First Nations Language Immersion 4 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will provide additional opportunities for students to be immersed in the First Nations language, gaining greater proficiency in language usage and fluency.
Corequisite: FNLG 2100

Campus
FNLG 3000

 First Nations Language Immersion 5 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will build on previous First Nations language courses to enable students to gain greater proficiency, conversational ability, literary skills, and an advanced knowledge of oral traditions.

Campus
FNLG 3100

 First Nations Language Immersion 6 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will provide opportunities for students to continue to be immersed in the First Nations language, gaining greater fluency, conversational ability, literary skills, and an advanced knowledge of oral traditions.

Campus
FNST 2200

 First Nations Oral Traditions (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided opportunities to enhance their understanding and exposure to First Nations oral traditions from a continued study of language through speaking and song. Students examine traditional and contemporary orality of the First Nations language.

Campus
FNST 2300

 First Nations Language and World View (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on the First Nations world view and its relationship to language, and develop an understanding of what a world view is and what beliefs and belief systems make up a world view.

Campus
FREN 0201

 French I

Credits: 0
This basic introductory course emphasizes spoken French through the use of DVD's, CD's, phone conversations with the tutor, and visual illustrations. The course is a useful tool for developing or refreshing basic French skills and ishelpful as a prerequisite to FREN 1001.
More information about this course

Distance
FREN 0211

 French II

Credits: 0
This basic introductory course is a continuation of the work of FREN 0201 and emphasizes spoken French through the use of DVD's, CD's, phone conversations with the tutor and visual illustrations. The course is a useful tool for developing or refreshing basic French skills.
More information about this course

Distance
FREN 1000

 Introductory French 1 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course enables beginners to develop cultural knowledge and communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing in modern standard French. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR A1 level of proficiency.
Note: Students who have completed French in Grade 11 or equivalent within the last two years may not take this course for credit unless approved by Modern LanguagesRequired Lab: FREN 1000L

Campus
FREN 1001

 Introduction to French I

Credits: 3
Based on the highly praised multimedia program French in Action, this course is designed for students with little knowledge of the language to begin their study of French at the university level. The course covers basic French structures, vocabulary and idiomatic expressions, and patterns of pronunciation. Throughout the course, both written and oral communicative skills are emphasized. Additional materials highlight French in the Canadian context. Several assignments are completed by telephone.
More information about this course

Distance
FREN 1010

 Introductory French 2 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
Building on the skills acquired in FREN 1000: Introductory French 1, the focus of this beginners' course is on the development of communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing as well as on the culture of the French speaking world. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR A1 level of proficiency.
Note: Students who have completed French in Grade 11 or equivalent within the last two years may not take this course for credit unless approved by Modern LanguagesRequired Lab: FREN 1010L

Campus
FREN 1011

 Introduction to French II

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of the work of FREN 1001 and is based on the highly praised multimedia program French in Action. The course enables students to increase their speaking and writing abilities in a range of everyday situations. Several assignments are completed by telephone.
More information about this course

Distance
FREN 1040

 French for Teachers (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to build teacher confidence in modeling spoken French and making sense of authentic materials in the 5-7 classroom. Focus is on immediate classroom needs in pronunciation, reading skills, vocabulary building, and culture.
Note: Although designed primarily for prospective or current educators, this course is open to any students who have not taken French beyond the Grade 11 level. It does not count towards the Bachelor of Arts language requirement. Students may take FREN 1050 to gain the level required to proceed to FREN 1100.Required Lab: FREN 1040L

Campus
FREN 1050

 Accelerated Beginners French (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is designed for learners of French who have basic CEFR A1 skills but have not formally studied French for several years. It is offered in the winter semester only. Enrollment is subject to Modern Languages approval. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR A1+ level of proficiency.
Note: This course counts towards the Bachelor of Arts language requirement. Upon completion of FREN 1050, students are ready to enter FREN 1100.Required Lab: FREN 1050L

Campus
FREN 1100

 Intermediate French 1 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
Students further develop their communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing, and explore language from a variety of different areas, registers, and periods. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to demonstrate a low CEFR A2 level of proficiency.

Campus
FREN 1110

 1st Year University French 1 (3,0,1)(L) For Students with French 12 or FREN 1200

Credits: 3
This course is designed to consolidate students' French reception, interaction and production skills. Students are also introduced to aspects of 20th-century French and French-Canadian literature. Class discussion plays a major role in this course. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR A2+ level of proficiency.
Note: Students with Grade 12 immersion French may not take this course for credit unless approved by Modern LanguagesRequired Lab: FREN 1110L

Campus
FREN 1200

 Intermediate French 2 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
Students solidify their previous skills in French and extend their knowledge by studying increasingly advanced language structures. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to demonstrate an intermediate CEFR A2 level of proficiency.

Campus
FREN 1210

 1st Year University French 2 (3,0,1)(L) For Students with French 12 or FREN 1200

Credits: 3
Students are prepared for using their language skills to interact with native speakers in most daily situations. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR A2+-B1 level of proficiency.
Note: Students with Grade 12 immersion French may not take this course for credit unless approved by Modern LanguagesRequired Lab: FREN 1210L

Campus
FREN 2050

 Oral French Practice 1 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course, conducted in French, is designed to enhance oral communicative skills. Students review grammar, while an expansion of the vocabulary is emphasized. A variety of activities are aimed at enabling students to progress to a superior level of fluency. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR B1+ - B2 level of proficiency.

Campus
FREN 2060

 Oral French Practice 2 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of FREN 2050: Oral French Practice 1. Upon successful completion, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR B2 level of proficiency.

Campus
FREN 2110

 Studies in French Language and Composition 1 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
Students focus on composition and oral practice based on literary passages and contemporary readings from the Francophone world. This course is conducted in French. Upon successful completion, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR B1+ - B2 level of proficiency.

Campus
FREN 2120

 French Literature 1 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course, conducted in French, surveys significant authors and works from the Moyen Age through the 17th century. Class discussion plays a major role in this course.

Campus
FREN 2210

 Studies in French Language and Composition 2 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
Students hone their composition skills through the close study of literary texts. The course is conducted in French. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR B2-B2+ level of proficiency.

Campus
FREN 2220

 French Literature 2 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of FREN 2120: French Literature 1. Students continue to survey significant French authors and works. Class discussion plays a major role in this course, and the course is conducted in French.

Campus
FREN 3250

 Quebec Cinema in Translation (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to issues and theories relevant to Quebec cinema while focusing on the representation of Quebec culture and society in major films from 1960 to the present. All films are subtitled or dubbed in English, and the course is taught in English.
Note: This course is cross-listed with CNST 3250 and FILM 3250Required Seminar: FREN 3250S

Campus
FREN 3260

 Quebec Literature in Translation (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided an overview of issues and theories relevant to Quebec fiction, while focussing on a chronological study of works from the major literary movements in Quebec, including the roman du terroir, the quiet revolution, feminist writing, immigrant literature and the contemporary novel of the 1990s and beyond. Works are read in translation. The course is taught in English.
Note: This course is cross-listed with CNST 3260 and ENGL 3260

Campus
FREN 3520

 Studies in French Language and Style (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
Students focus on advanced composition, syntax, versification, translation and oral practice. The course is conducted in French. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR C1-C1+ level of proficiency.

Campus
FREN 4150

 Selected Topics in French and Francophone Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore selected topics in French and Francophone literatures. Course content varies from year to year and may be offered as directed studies. This course is conducted in French. Students may take this course up to four times, with different course titles, for a total of 12 credits.

Campus
FREN 4160

 French-Canadian Literature (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
Students read and discuss representative French-Canadian works from the 19th century to the present. This course may be offered as a directed studies course.

Campus
FREN 4520

 Advanced Studies in French (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
This course is a continuation of French 3520: Studies in French Language and Style as well as a new step forward. Students examine the language at an advanced level, from both a descriptive and a practical point of view, with a focus on the relationship between grammatical structures and stylistic effects. Topics include sentence structures and their variants, stylistic aspects of vocabulary, patterns of emphasis, and levels of language from literary tones to colloquial speech. Students also consider the practice and techniques of advanced translation from English to French.

Campus
FRST 2040

 Forest and Environmental Climatology (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This is a Science Laboratory course designed for Forestry and Environmental Science students. It includes basic principles and processes of climatology; energy and plant water balance concepts; vertical and horizontal air movements; weather systems; microclimates; and the interrelationships among plants, soils, climates, and the biosphere.
Note: Same as GEOG 2040Required Lab: FRST 2040L

Campus
FRST 2210

 Forestry Mensuration (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course teaches forest inventory methods, growth and yield prediction, sampling techniques, and the applications of multiple linear regression statistical analysis. It includes methods of conducting regeneration and residue surveys, and an introduction to multiple resource inventories.

Campus
FRST 3050

 Silviculture 1 (3,0,2)

Credits: 3
Silviculture is concerned with the art and science of controlling the establishment, growth, composition, health and quality of stands of trees in forests. The objective is to meet the diverse needs and values of landowners and society on a sustainable basis. Silviculture 1 is the first of a two-part series in the study of silviculture concepts and principles. Silviculture 1 and 2 have been designed to parallel, but are not identical to, Forestry 3050 and 3060 as currently offered by the Faculty of Forestry at the University of British Columbia and each conforms to the ABCPF Silviculture Academic Standards. This course will be offered in a distance format.

Campus
FRST 3060

 Silviculture 2 (3,0,2)

Credits: 3
Silviculture 2 deals with stand tending silviculture practices from free growing through to final harvest of a stand. These include thinning, fertilization, pruning, and silviculture systems and their relationship to timber quality, structural biodiversity, habitat and stand growth and yield and allowable cuts at the forest level. Decision making in crop planning, stand dynamics, operational problems and relevant history policy and regulatory issues and underlining science theory are also covered.

Campus
FRST 3070

 Forest Harvesting (3,0,2)

Credits: 3
The field of forest harvesting addresses the engineering, economic, and environmental factors associated with transportation and harvesting systems used in integrated forest resource management. These include forest road design and location, geotechnical engineering, forest road drainage; planning, locating and scheduling the harvest; and an international perspective on logging systems and their application to meet silvicultural objectives. Forest harvesting is a specialized field within forestry, and professional competence within this field (especially road location and design) requires significant course work and an extended field internship, in addition to the minimum standards identified here for the general forester. This course will be offered in a distance format.

Campus
FRST 3073

 Forest Harvesting

Credits: 3
Students consider the engineering, economic, and environmental factors associated with transportation and harvesting systems used in integrated forest resource management. These include forest road design and location; geotechnical engineering, and drainage; harvest planning, locating, and scheduling; and an international perspective on logging systems and their application in meeting silvicultural objectives.
More information about this course

Distance