Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University
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On-Campus

There are a number of ways to register for on-campus courses at TRU which are determined by your program of study.

Open Learning

We offer 590 courses by distance learning. These courses are offered in several formats, including print-based, web-based and online.


Continuing Studies

Community U provides individuals and organizations with formal and non-formal opportunities to pursue personal and professional goals life-long.

Trades and Technology

Apprenticeship, foundation and continuing studies courses are offered in construction, mechanical trades, professional driving and more.

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Courses - L
Title Name Delivery
LAWF 3010

 Constitutional Law (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 5
Students are introduced to the basic elements of Canadian constitutional law. Topics include the nature of constitutions and constitutional processes; principles of constitutional interpretation; constitutional amendment; and Federal/Provincial distribution of legislative powers including the federal general power, natural resources and public property, provincial property and civil rights, trade and commerce, provincial taxation, transportation, communications, and criminal law. Students also examine the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms including principles of limitations, remedies, interpretation, application, fundamental freedoms, democratic and language rights, mobility rights, legal rights, equality rights, and Aboriginal rights.

Campus
LAWF 3020

 Legal Perspectives (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an introduction to legal and judicial reasoning. Students examine various legal theories including natural law, positivist, realist, liberal, feminist and other legal perspectives.

Campus
LAWF 3030

 Contracts (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 5
Students undertake a legal and policy analysis of the basic principles and fundamental concepts of the law of contracts as they relate to commercial and consumer transactions. Students explore the following: the formation of contracts including offer, acceptance and consideration; estoppel; privity; terms of contract, including exemption clauses; standard form contracts; bailment; mistake, misrepresentation and unconscionability; termination, including the doctrine of frustration; breach and remedies for breach; and dispute resolution processes. Emphasis is placed not only on knowledge of rules and principles, their historical derivation, rationale, efficacy and social validity, but also upon the creative use of contracts to both avoid and resolve disputes.

Campus
LAWF 3040

 Legislation, Administration and Policy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the fundamentals of the legislative process: policy development, legislative drafting, public bill process, and statutory interpretation. The interaction of law and policy in the development of legislation, statutory interpretation and the work of administrative tribunals are discussed, along with the fundamentals of the administrative process: subordinate legislation, administrative institutions, forms of dispute resolution, delegation, discretion, process and judicial review. Students make substantive law connections with other first year courses. The functions of the lawyer within these processes are examined, including issues of professional responsibility. Emphasis is placed on skill development in oral advocacy and drafting both legislation and private law documents.

Campus
LAWF 3050

 Property (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 5
This course is an examination of the fundamental concepts of property law and the types of property interest recognized by Anglo-Canadian law. Topics include the historical evolution of property concepts; the basic concepts of possession, ownership and title; estates and other interests in land such as joint and concurrent ownership, easements, covenants, licenses, mortgages, future interests and perpetuities; the landlord and tenant relationship; the land titles system of registration of title to land; the social constraints upon property use and disposition; and property rights of aboriginal peoples.

Campus
LAWF 3060

 Fundamental Legal Skills (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the following: legal method, systems and institutions; sources of law; legal analysis, including case analysis and problem-solving skills; court systems; precedent, stare decisis; legal writing and communication, including memoranda and facta; oral advocacy, including mooting; research databases and legal research skills.

Campus
LAWF 3070

 Torts (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 5
Students analyze and critique the law of torts, primarily the law of negligence, with personal injury as the main focus, although other torts are also introduced. Topics include the nature of tort law and its process; an anatomy of the law of negligence, including the nature and extent of liability, defenses, remedies, and the assessment of damages; intentional torts; economic torts; strict liability; bailment; the impact of private insurance on the tort system; alternative forms of compensation.

Campus
LAWF 3080

 Crime: Law and Procedure (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 5
This course provides an anatomy of criminal conduct and its legal treatment, utilizing a limited range of criminal offences. Students examine the designation of human conduct as criminal and consider the social, cultural and political forces involved. Other topics include: the development of the criminal process in English common law, its translation to Canada and embodiment in the Criminal Code; the substantive elements of a criminal offence, including both physical and mental elements; the common law and code defences; procedural, tactical, ethical and evidential problems associated with criminal prosecution at both the pre-trial and trial stages; the sentencing process; and the position at law of the victim.

Campus
LAWF 3090

 Dispute Resolution 1: Interviewing and Counselling (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
This course is an introduction to dispute resolution. Topics include conflict analysis; an overview of dispute resolution processes; fact-finding through client interviewing; client-centred counselling; ethical issues.

Campus
LAWF 3440

 Intellectual Property Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Itellectual property, including the law of patents, copyrights, and trade-marks.

Campus
LAWF 3450

 International Trade Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students analyze the public law framework for international trade, with an emphasis on the World Trade Organization and North American Free Trade Agreement. Topics include national treatment; most-favoured nation treatment; anti-dumping and countervail actions; and dispute resolution.

Campus
LAWF 3500

 Insurance Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to various types of insurance (e.g. fire, life, sickness and accident, motor vehicle, and liability). Topics include the nature and formation of the insurance contract; the role of insurance agents; insurable interest; misrepresentation and non-disclosure; and the rights of third parties against the insurer.

Campus
LAWF 3510

 Jurisprudence (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a critical inquiry into the nature and functions of law and justice, including natural law, legal positivism, sociological jurisprudence, legal realism, and contemporary theorists.

Campus
LAWF 3520

 Tax Policy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore principles of tax policy (efficiency, equity, and simplicity) and applications related to income, sales, and payroll taxes. Topics include the economic and distributive effects of taxes, auditing and legal compliance, and political economy.

Campus
LAWF 3570

 Advanced Criminal Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Examination of selected substantive areas of criminal law. Topics may include double jeopardy, police entrapment, conspiracy, corporate crime, theft, impaired driving and breathalyzer offences, plea negotiations, ethical issues, mistake of law as a defence, and juveniles and the criminal process.

Campus
LAWF 3600

 Conflict of Laws (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a discourse of the doctrines and rules governing legal disputes cutting across provincial or national boundaries. Topics include jurisdiction; distinctions between substantive and procedural rules; the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgements; domicile; proof of foreign law; and the choice of law rules relating to private law (torts, contracts, property, succession and family law).

Campus
LAWF 3610

 Real Estate Transactions (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an examination of estate transactions. Topics include the purchase and sale of property; mortgaging and other ways to finance land transactions; commercial leasing arrangements; and the Land Titles Act as it relates to land development.

Campus
LAWF 3620

 Bankruptcy and Restructuring Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Topics in this course include receivership, consumer and commercial arrangements, and bankruptcy under the Bankruptcy Act and the Company Creditors Arrangements Act.

Campus
LAWF 3630

 Advanced Public Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine selected issues in constitutional law at the advanced level. Topics may include constitutional amendment, comparative approaches to rights, comparative federalism, the role of international law in constitutional litigation, the role of social movements, and strategic litigation in securing constitutional rights.

Campus
LAWF 3640

 Secured Transactions (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
In this course, students consider in detail the modern law of secured transactions and the financing of personal property, with a focus on British Columbia's Personal Property Security Act.

Campus
LAWF 3650

 Unjust Enrichment (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students assess unjust enrichment as an independent source of legal obligation. Topics include elements of the right of action and defences; restitution as the remedy, with particular emphasis on personal versus proprietary restitution; and disgorgement of wrongful gain, distinguished from restitution using breach of fiduciary obligation as the primary example.

Campus
LAWF 3660

 Health Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students evaluate the regulation, structure, and financing of the health care system. Topics include licensing and regulation of health care professionals (including medical malpractice claims as a form of regulation); regulation of biomedical research; approval processes for drugs, complementary therapies, and medical devices; resource allocation and access to health care; market considerations; privatization and deregulation of health care; and consent and confidentiality.

Campus
LAWF 3670

 Corporate Tax (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the provisions of the Income Tax Act applicable to corporations and their stakeholders. Topics include the classification of corporations for tax purposes; the taxation of corporate income; the taxation of corporate distributions; and the taxation of various types of corporate reorganizations.

Campus
LAWF 3680

 Immigration and Refugee Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the basic principles, policies, and procedures governing immigration and refugee law. Topics include refugee law and status; selection and admission of immigrants; inadmissible and 16 non-removable classes; exceptions and the minister's permits; and appeals and judicial review in the Federal Court including Charter issues.

Campus
LAWF 3690

 Law and Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the practical and theoretical implications arising from the application of economic reasoning to law. Topics include the economic method of legal analysis and the scope of its application, and the major critical responses in both traditional legal fields of economic influence (such as tort, contract and corporate law), and more novel areas (such as family and criminal law).

Campus
LAWF 3700

 Public Lands and Natural Resources Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will provide an opportunity for students to consider in detail the protection, exploitation, and management of Crown-owned lands and renewable and non-renewable natural resources (other than oil and gas, and including forestry, range land, minerals, wildlife, fisheries, wilderness, recreational, and heritage). Students discuss the nature of public ownership, public and private values, economic approaches, and inter-jurisdictional management.

Campus
LAWF 3710

 Remedies (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students assess judicial remedies at common law and equity for tort and breach of contract, including personal injury and property damage. Themes include compensating loss, disgorging gain, and punishing civil wrong; prohibiting and compelling defendant behaviour; loss-based, gain- based, and punitive damages; and injunctions and specific performance.

Campus
LAWF 3720

 Trusts (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the concept of the trust, its development in equity, and its relationship to other legal concepts. Topics include various types of trusts; constituting, administering and terminating the trust; trustee duties and powers; variation of trusts; breach of trust; and the doctrine of tracing.
Corequisite: Contracts, Torts, Unjust Enrichment

Campus
LAWF 3730

 Human Rights Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a survey of national and provincial human rights laws and practice as distinct from the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and an introduction to the main international and transnational human rights instruments and standards.

Campus
LAWF 3740

 International Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the elements of public international law, including sources, the role of customary law, the law of treaties, recognition, state responsibility, and the roles and powers of international organizations.

Campus
LAWF 3750

 Canadian Legal History (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The focus of this course is to consider migration and European law in the colonial context and its impact in pre-Confederation Canada (settled and conquered colonies); the role of trading companies, particularly the Hudson's Bay Company; the impact of the United States both before and after Confederation; Confederation and the development of Canadian legal culture and law. Jurisdictions may include British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, and Nova Scotia.

Campus
LAWF 3760

 Directed Research (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students complete a supervised research project involving the in-depth examination of a legal problem or area of concern not normally covered in a substantive or procedural course and which provides the basis for an article, research paper, brief, memorial, or draft legislation. Admission to this course depends on the availability of supervising faculty. THIS COURSE MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT

Campus
LAWF 3770

 ***Selected Topics 1 (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
Students focus on a variety of subject areas, either doctrinal or theoretical. THIS COURSE MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT

Campus
LAWF 3780

 ***Selected Topics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on a variety of subject areas, either doctrinal or theoretical. THIS COURSE MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT

Campus
LAWF 3790

 ***Selected Topics 3 (4,0,0)

Credits: 4
Students focus on a variety of subject areas, either doctrinal or theoretical. THIS COURSE MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT.

Campus
LAWF 3800

 Business Associations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a detailed survey of the common forms of business organization, including the law of agency, partnerships, limited partnerships, and societies and corporations, with a focus on the corporation and the rights and responsibilities of shareholders and directors.

Campus
LAWF 3810

 Criminal Process (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a survey and critical examination of the core aspects of criminal process law. Students focus on legislation relating to jurisdiction and modes of trial including obligations of and options available to prosecution and accused. Other topics include arrest, search and seizure, investigative detention, and right to counsel and silence, all within the context of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Campus
LAWF 3820

 Family Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an analysis of the legal principles affecting the rights and responsibilities of the members of the family. Topics include constitutional issues, marriage, marriage contracts, common law marriage, child neglect and abuse, custody and access, guardianship, adoption, separation, divorce, nullity, spousal and child maintenance, and matrimonial property. Emphasis is placed on the process of family law and the appropriate role for lawyers and judges.

Campus
LAWF 3830

 Basic Tax Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students study the basic language and concepts of taxation and learn to identify taxation issues. Topics include the unit of taxation; the meaning and taxation of income; taxation of benefits; the type and scope of deductions available for business income; and the taxation of capital gains including gains (and losses) on taxpayer assets.

Campus
LAWF 3840

 Environmental Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students critically examine legal theories, concepts, principles, and processes relevant to environmental protection. Topics include ecological and ethical dimensions; jurisdictional issues; common law rights and remedies; environmental assessment; public participation; contaminated sites; enforcement and compliance; economic approaches; endangered species and protected spaces; land use planning; and environmental dispute resolution.

Campus
LAWF 3850

 Employment Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the law governing non-unionized workplaces in Canada. Topics include constitutional jurisdiction; defining the employment relationship and employer/employee status; the employment contract; implied rights and obligations; termination; reasonable notice of dismissal; constructive dismissal; cause for summary dismissal; human rights; and employment standards legislation.

Campus
LAWF 3860

 Labour Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students analyze the law governing unionized workplaces in Canada. Topics include freedom of association; the status of participants; union organization and certification; unfair labour practices; collective bargaining; the collective agreement and arbitration; industrial conflict; the duty of fair representation; and interaction between the labour law regime and the common-law of employment.

Campus
LAWF 3870

 Wills and Estates (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the preparation, execution, interpretation, and administration of wills; testamentary capacity; alteration, revocation and republication of wills; intestate succession; dependant's relief; and estate administration.

Campus
LAWF 3880

 Sale of Goods (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the sale and supply of goods, including the provincial Sale of Goods Act, consumer protection issues, and the Vienna International Sales Convention.

Campus
LAWF 3890

 Aboriginal Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the law governing the relationship between indigenous peoples and settler society. Topics include recognition of Aboriginal laws and custom; self-determination and other applicable principles of international law; self-government; common law recognition of Aboriginal title; treaties; the fiduciary duty of the Crown; constitutional entrenchment of Aboriginal and treaty rights; application of provincial laws; the Indian Act; land surrenders; and exemptions from seizure and taxation.

Campus
LAWF 3900

 Administrative Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the general structure of administrative decision-making in Canada: how public administrators obtain power and how that power is exercised both at the level of individual adjudication and at the level of the establishment of public policy. This course also provides an introduction to the checks which courts place on the exercise of administrative power. Students discuss the procedures that courts require of administrative agencies and public officials as well as the substantive grounds on which courts may review the decisions of administrative agencies and public officials.

Campus
LAWF 3910

 Civil Procedure (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a detailed examination of issues which arise in the progress of a civil action from first meeting the client through to judgment in the Supreme Court of British Columbia. The British Columbia Rules of Court are set in the context of the values underlying them. What sort of civil litigation system do we want? What sort of system do we in fact have? Particular attention is paid to the linkages between the apparently discrete components of the process as set out in the Rules, linkages at the levels of both the underlying values and the actual practice. The use of procedures under the Rules to anticipate and resolve evidence problems that might arise at trial is emphasized. Interprovincial and international aspects of the civil litigation process are also considered.

Campus
LAWF 3920

 Evidence (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an examination of the fundamental concepts of evidence law, including the traditional rules as compared to the emerging principled approach, and such core and primary topics as the adversary system; relevance and discretionary exclusion; privilege; burdens of proof; character evidence; judicial notice; competence and compellability; examination of witnesses; hearsay; and opinion evidence.

Campus
LAWF 3930

 Ethical Lawyering (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to issues of legal ethics and professional responsibility. Students become competent at ethical reasoning in the context of legal practice. To achieve this goal, the course covers selected topics in the 'law of lawyering' (for example, the Law Society of British Columbia's Code of Professional Conduct), but also addresses the general question of what it means to be an ethical lawyer. Students are expected to develop their awareness of the various moral values underlying the legal system, and to practice how to weigh and apply those values, and the law of lawyering, to ethical problems. Selected topics relating to the regulation of lawyers' ethics are also addressed.

Campus
LAWF 3940

 Dispute Resolution 2: Negotiation and Mediation (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an overview of the spectrum of the consensual dispute resolution process, including negotiation, collaborative lawyering, mediation, and judicial dispute resolution (JDR). Interest-based bargaining and mediation are emphasized.

Campus
LAWF 3950

 Advanced Legal Research (3,0,0)

Credits: 2
This course builds on legal research instruction in the first year of the program and affords further opportunities to learn and practice research skills. Students are provided with instruction in research methodology, citation, print and electronic research/databases, covering case law, statute law, texts, periodicals and web-based materials.

Campus
LAWF 3960

 Dispute Resolution 3: Adjudication (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an overview of the binding, third-party decision-making processes of dispute resolution, and their commonalities and differences. Students focus on two of the following three adjudication processes: arbitrations, administrative hearings, and trials.

Campus
LAWF 3970

 Sports Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This survey course examines the legal dimensions of amateur and professional sport. The course has an international perspective looking at Canadian, US, and UK case law. Topics include the governance and regulation of sport, tort law, contract law, and intellectual property rights. Particular topics include negligence and sports violence; the relationship between athlete, agent and employer/engager; sponsorship and ambush marketing; and doping.

Campus
LAWF 3980

 Sports Law 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This survey course examines particular legal dimensions of professional sport. Like Sports Law 1, this survey course has an international perspective looking at Canadian, US and UK law. Sports Law 2 focuses on the governance and regulation of professional sports, including contract law, intellectual property rights and ambush marketing, anti-trust law, criminal law, gender equity, and doping. Sports Law 1 is not a prerequisite for Sports Law 2, and both courses can be taken by interested students.

Campus
LAWF 3990

 Canadian Journal of Comparative and Contemporary Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Law Journal is a course whereby five upper level Law students manage all aspects of editing the "Canadian Journal of Comparative and Contemporary Law." Students will coordinate the peer-review, select submissions for inclusion in the journal, and edit these for substance and style. Other journal related tasks will be assigned to students by the faculty editors in chief on an ad hoc basis. Editors will also contribute to the journal in the form of Comments and Notes.

Campus
LAWF 4000

 Court of Appeal Moots (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The development of appellate advocacy and other lawyering skills in the context of preparation for and participation in the BC Court of Appeal Moot, in the areas of criminal law; civil law (contract, property or tort law); and constitutional law.

Campus
LAWF 4010

 Kawaskimhon National Aboriginal Moot (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop lawyering skills such as advocacy and consensus building, in the context of a non-competitive moot, and conducted in a circle arrangement. Students use a moot problem based on selected contemporary issues in Aboriginal-Government relations.

Campus
LEAD 3511

 Occupational Health & Safety Legislation and Standards

Credits: 3
This course sets the foundation for occupational health and safety in Canada, within an industrial context. By clearly establishing the rights and responsibilities of the various workplace parties within the workplace, students will be able to interpret and apply statute and best practices to the workplace in a manner that will provide for consensus and understanding on the shop floor and due diligence from all levels of supervision and management.
More information about this course

Distance
LEAD 4901

 Strategic Thinking for Leadership

Credits: 3
LEAD 4901: Strategic Thinking for Leadership is a capstone 4th level course that brings together all of your leadership course work and experience to date. The course will focus on both strategic leadership and strategicmanagement, including critical thinking, through the development and assessment of a strategic plan. You will also consider your organizational context and create a personal development plan to work on throughout the course. Thiscourse will help you to fine tune your strategic thinking skills to enable you to achieve superior results as leaders within an organization.
More information about this course

Distance
LEFA 1010

 Frameworks for Exploring Diversity (3,2,2)

Credits: 4
This is the first course in the Learning Facilitators' Certificate program. It introduces participants to a broad range of topics and issues in the education of students with diverse characteristics and learning needs, and establishes the foundational skills for distance learning in the community-based components of the program. Each participant completes an initial self-assessment to identify current strengths as well as capacities and areas of competence they will focus on throughout the Learning Facilitators' Certificate program. University mentors assist individual participants to set goals, develop plans and complete learning tasks that address the Program Capacities and Areas of Competence. Each participant creates a baseline portfolio summarizing personal and educational history, attributes as an educator and learner, learning goals, and learning plan for the following semester.

Campus
LEFA 1020

 Supporting Individual Learners (3,2,10)

Credits: 5
This course deals with how a support worker might be involved in assisting an individual student with previously identified learning needs. Participants complete readings, a web-based Content Module, and focused learning tasks that address specific goals related to the program expectations and the specific educational outcomes/objectives of this course. Participants are expected to make connections between their work on these assignments and their workplace responsibilities, and to apply what they learn by developing and implementing strategies for supporting a specific student or small group in their educational settings. At the end of semester, each participant prepares a portfolio submission containing evidence of learning, along with a self-evaluation referenced to the program expectations (see Capacities and Self-assessment on the program website, http://www.educ.sfu.ca/fp/sdl). The participant's mentor responds to the portfolio, has an evaluation conference with the participant, and reviews the individual's learning goals and action plan for the following semester.

Campus
LEFA 1030

 Distance Learning Practicum - Understanding and Planning for Specific Learning Needs (3,0,4)

Credits: 3
In this semster, participants are expected to extend their knowledge and skills by investigating the learning needs of a variety of students in their workplace contexts, building on what was learned in the previous semester. Studies of individual differences are guided by an approved learning plan developed in consultation with a program mentor. Practicum activities focus on creating and implementing appropriate plans to support diverse learning needs within the scope of the individual's workplace responsibilities. This course encourages consideration of cultural factors in supporting individual learners, particularly those of Aboriginal heritage. The circle of courage framework developed by Bendtro, Brokenleg and Va Bockern is introduced as a template for assessing student learning needs and planning appropriate learning activities.

Campus
LEFA 1040

 Developing a Community of Inquiry (0,2,0)

Credits: 2
Participants engage in discussion groups, facilitated by program mentors, with a focus on exchanging perspectives and sharing insights arising from their individual focused inquiries. Participants are expected to demonstrate thoughtful participation and a spirit of inquiry, and to critically examine their beliefs and practices in dialogue with others.
Corequisite: LEFA 1030

Campus
LEFA 2010

 Community and Cultural Dimensions of Learning (4,2,2)

Credits: 4
This course focuses on more complex issues and topics in educating students with diverse learning needs, including community and cultural dimensions of education, issues of diversity and inclusion, and tools and strategies for communication, collaboration and problem-solving. During this summer institute, participants also review their portfolios for the past year, update their self-assessment related to the program expectations (see Capacities and Self-Assessment on the program website at http://www.educ.sfu.ca/fp/sdl), and present some aspect of their learning from the previous year to colleagues at the institute. By the end of the institute, each participant completes a learning plan outlining their work for the coming year.

Campus
LEFA 2030

 Distance Learning Practicum - The Assessment-Instruction Cycle (2,2,12)

Credits: 5
This course emphasizes the relationships among assessment, interpretation, evaluation, intervention and instruction. A field study, conducted in the participant's workplace, provides the context for demonstration of learning and growth in capacity to support students with diverse needs, with particular emphasis on the use of inclusive and culturally appropriate educational practices. Participants are expected to refer to information from readings and professional resources identified in the field study plan they have developed in consultation with a mentor, and to explain why the approaches they have selected are considered educationally sound. At the end of the field study semester, each participant presents evidence of learning and growth in a working portfolio to be reviewed by the mentor.
Corequisite: An appropriate practicum setting (i.e., a workplace assignment that involves supporting children or adult learners in an educational setting such as: a public, independent or federally-funded school, Head Start, pre-school, daycare, or infant development centre, adult education centre, etc.).

Campus
LEFA 2040

 Developing Networks of Support for Student Learning (2,0,6)

Credits: 3
This field study course builds on the previous semester's learning activities. Participants continue to incorporate strategies for effective instruction into their field of study activities, with emphasis on involving parents and community in the education process. Participants are expected to extend and deepen their competence as educational practitioners, to work collaboratively with other educators in supporting student learning, and to make connections among school, home and community that enhance the quality of learning for all.
Corequisite: LEFA 2050. An appropriate practicum setting (i.e., a workplace assignment that involves supporting children or adult learners in an educational setting such as: a public, independent or federally-funded school; Head Start, pre-school, daycare, or infant development centre; adult education centre, etc.).

Campus
LEFA 2050

 Investigating Issues in Aboriginal Education (0,2,0)

Credits: 2
Facilitated discussions are designed to broaden and deepen participants' perspectives on issues in Aboriginal education, and to make connections between situations encountered in local communities and broader systemic issues. Participants form study groups to investigate a chosen topic, summarize appropriate readings and research, and present an analysis of their issue to the cohort seminar group.
Corequisite: LEFA 2040

Campus
LEFA 2060

 Reflections on Supporting Diverse Learners (1,1,0)

Credits: 2
During this final course in the Learning Facilitators' Certificate program, participants reflect on and synthesize what they have learned over the previous two years, in preparation for a final comprehensive portfolio conference and festival of learning. Each participant prepares a comprehensive portfolio that represents their learning journey, including evidence of growth and a self-evaluation related to the program expectations (see Capacities and Self-assessment on the program website at http://www.educ.sfu.ca/fp/sdl). Participants attend a two-day festival of learning, where they make individual or small-group presentations to colleagues and invited guests on what they learned from their field study work. Comprehensive portfolios are evaluated in individual conferences between participants and mentors.

Campus
LEGA 1010

 Introduction to the Canadian Legal System (30 hours)

Credits: 0
The primary purpose of this course is to provide students with a general understanding and a working knowledge of the Canadian legal system.

Campus
LEGA 1020

 Legal Office Procedures (45 Hours)

Credits: 0
Students are introduced to the legal profession, including the functions and duties of the legal administrative assistant in British Columbia. Topics include legal terminology, legal office procedures, precedents, preparation of correspondence and basic legal documents, legal record keeping and billing, citations, and references to Acts.

Campus
LEGA 1030

 Litigation Procedures 1 (60 hours)

Credits: 0
Students are introduced to the functions and duties of a legal administrative assistant working in civil litigation in British Columbia. Topics include terminology and rules relating to preparing and handling legal correspondence and documents in civil litigation actions and matters in the Supreme Court of BC. Students are also familiarized with the legal concepts related to the functioning of the courts and the professional legal environment. This is a hands-on course in which students integrate keyboard, computer, transcription, and document formatting with a knowledge of civil law. Students handle legal documents and procedures, from the initiation of a lawsuit through to the completion of pleadings and the possibility of obtaining default judgment.

Campus
LEGA 1040

 Litigation Procedures 2 (60 hours)

Credits: 0
Students build on the skills and knowledge learned from Litigation Procedures I. Topics include terminology and rules relating to preparing and handling legal correspondence and documents in civil litigation actions and matters in the Supreme Court of BC. This course continues to introduce the legal concepts necessary to provide a basic understanding of the functioning of the courts and the professional environment that students are entering. This is a hands-on course in which students integrate keyboard, computer, transcription, and document formatting with a knowledge of civil law. As the second of two Litigation Procedures courses, this course focuses on documents and procedures from the discovery process to preparation and attendance at trial and post-trial procedures, including bills of costs and enforcement procedures. Students also learn to prepare for Chambers hearings.

Campus
LEGA 1050

 Family Litigation Procedures (60 hours)

Credits: 0
Students are introduced to the role and responsibilities of a legal administrative assistant employed in the field of family law in British Columbia. Students gain knowledge and practical experience in topics such as statutes and rules, divorce and family courts, marriage in BC, pre-nuptial and separation agreements, undefended and defended divorce actions, chambers applications, annulment, and applications to Provincial Court. This is a hands-on course in which students integrate their keyboard, computer, and document formatting skills within the context of family law.

Campus
LEGA 1060

 Corporate Procedures 1 (60 hours)

Credits: 0
Students are introduced to the role and responsibilities of a legal administrative assistant working in the field of corporate law. Through an overview of the various forms of business organizations, with a focus on corporation, this course includes incorporation procedures, post-incorporation procedures, and annual maintenance requirements of a private (non-reporting) British Columbia company.

Campus
LEGA 1070

 Corporate Procedures 2 (30 hours)

Credits: 0
This course is a continuation of the material covered in LEGA 1060: Corporate Procedures I, which introduces students to the role and responsibilities of a legal administrative assistant working in the field of corporate law. Students focus on corporate structure and completion of filing forms as related to sole proprietorships, partnerships, limited partnerships, societies, cooperatives, non-reporting companies, and extra-provincial non-reporting companies. Students are also introduced to securities and to BC OnLine (an Internet access to government services and information about companies in British Columbia).

Campus
LEGA 1080

 Conveyancing Procedures 1 (60 hours)

Credits: 0
This course provides an introduction to the role and responsibilities of a legal administrative assistant employed in the field of conveyancing in British Columbia. Students gain knowledge and practical experience in topics such as systems of land registration, land title searches, contracts of purchase and sale, methods to convey interests in land, statements of adjustments, and the execution and registration of electronic documents filed in the Land Title Office. Students focus on the purchaser's procedures for a simple conveyance not involving financing. Upon completion of this course, students progress to Conveyancing Procedures II which emphasizes procedures for financed purchaser conveyances, vendor sales, and mortgage loans.

Campus
LEGA 1090

 Conveyancing Procedures 2 (60 hours)

Credits: 0
Students are introduced to the role and responsibilities of a legal administrative assistant employed in the field of conveyancing in British Columbia. This course is a continuation of the material covered in LEGA 1080: Conveyancing Procedures I. Students gain knowledge and practical experience in topics such as methods to convey interests in land involving purchaser financing, strata property considerations, builders' liens, acting for the vendor, acting for mortgage lenders, additional adjustments for statements of adjustments, authorities to pay, the execution and registration of electronic documents filed in the Land Title Office, acting for both the purchaser and mortgagee, and documents for the transfer of manufactured homes.

Campus
LEGA 1100

 Wills and Estates (60 hours)

Credits: 0
This course provides an introduction to the role and responsibilities of a Legal Administrative Assistant employed in the field of wills and estates in British Columbia. Students gain knowledge and practical experience in preparation of wills and codicils, and the documents necessary to apply for grants of Letters Probate and Letters of Administration (with and without a will), Administration Bonds, transferring assets from the deceased, and winding up estates. Students prepare documents acceptable to the Probate Registry for filing, followed by transmission and distribution of estates. This is a hands-on course in which students integrate keyboard, computer, document formatting, and transcription skills within the context of estate law.

Campus
LING 2010

 Introduction to Linguistics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
An introduction to phonetics, phonology and morphology. Students learn the basic physiology of the vocal tract, use of the International Phonetic Alphabet, sound patterning, and word formation. Data from a wide variety of languages are used for illustrative purposes. Students are not expected to have prior knowledge of these languages, though some knowledge of at least one second language is an asset.

Campus
LING 2020

 Introduction to Linguistics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
An introduction to syntax, semantics, and language issues. Students are introduced to the science of sentence structure and meaning and then explore one or more topics such as Language acquisition, history, etc. Data from a wide variety of languages are used for illustrative purposes. Students are not expected to have prior knowledge of these languages, though basic knowledge of at least one second language is an asset.

Campus