Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University

Courses

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We offer 590 courses by distance learning. These courses are offered in several formats, including print-based, web-based and online.


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Courses - E
Title Name Delivery
ECED 1200

 Practicum 1 - Developing Relationships with Children (0,2,10P)(L)

Credits: 4
This is an innovative field practice course designed to allow students to apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to become an effective educator of young children. Students have repeated opportunities to practice observation and documentation techniques, prepare the learning environment, develop relationships with children, and guide behavior with the mentorship of early childhood educators and a practicum instructor. Students integrate theoretical knowledge, use reflective practice and demonstrate professional conduct.
Corequisite: ECED 1320, ECED 1350

Campus
ECED 1300

 Practicum 2 - Program Planning for Young Children (0,2,10P)(L)

Credits: 4
Building on the goals of ECED 1200: Practicum 1, students integrate their knowledge and skills while participating as a team member in child care programs. Students take on additional responsibilities related to curriculum planning, managing a program, and responsibility for documentation with the mentorship of an early childhood educator and a practicum instructor. Students introduce a project to a group of young children, observe and record children's learning, and make the learning visible to the children, families, educators, and community.

Campus
ECED 1320

 Child Guidance (4,0,0)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to demonstrate the positive influential effects of developmentally appropriate practice and a positive environment on children's behaviour. Students are instructed in how to support children's social and emotional development through an examination of the significance of play, interpreting children's behaviour, and individualizing interactions with children. To practice direct and indirect guidance strategies, students focus on the development of meaningful relationships and positive self-esteem for young children.
Corequisites: ECED 1200, ECED 1350 if admitted to the Early Childhood Education program

Campus
ECED 1330

 Child Health (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Holistic health and wellness principles to support children's development is the focus of this course. An emphasis is placed on strategies to promote children's understanding of good health and nutritional habits. Students explore the health and safety of children by examining health related agencies, health regulations, and children with exceptionalities. Additional topics include personal wellness, childhood illness, and hospitalization.

Campus
ECED 1340

 Communication (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Effective interdependent relationships are essential to the work of early childhood educators. Self-awareness, and an ongoing commitment to become a competent communicator are fundamental to the development of positive relationships. An emphasis on personal reflection offers students the opportunity to learn and use interpersonal communication skills effectively. Students examine the qualities of ethical, constructive, and respectful communication.

Campus
ECED 1350

 Introduction to Program Planning (4,0,0)(L)

Credits: 3
An exploration of art media and authentic materials develops student's competence and creativity prior to implementing activities with children. Emphasis is on the preparation of the learning environment, both physical and social, routines, and the role of the educator to develop, implement, evaluate, and document appropriate educational experiences for children. The British Columbia Early Learning Framework and pedagogical narrations are introduced.
Corequisite: ECED 1200, ECED 1320

Campus
ECED 1360

 Curriculum Development (4,0,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Students examine the principles to develop, implement and evaluate a play-based program with key concepts in language and literacy and music and movement across the curriculum. Students learn theory and gain practical knowledge to plan activities in which young children can explore sound, movement, music, books, stories, drama, and beginning literacy, within the context of the whole program for children.
Corequisite: ECED 1300

Campus
ECED 1440

 Interpersonal Relations - Helping Interactions (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Building upon the knowledge and skills acquired in ECED 1340: Communications, students examine the essentials of professional interdependent relationships. Topics include leadership, effective communication, and problem-solving skills. Students practice assertive communication, intercultural awareness, and team building.

Campus
ECED 2200

 Practicum 3 - Demonstration Practicum (0,2,16P)(L)

Credits: 5
This is an advanced practicum course designed to give students opportunities to apply their skills and knowledge of the role of the educator in a community child care program under the supervision of a practicum instructor and a designated sponsor educator. Students take on a leadership role to design and implement curriculum, in addition to having more opportunities for reflection and the practice of ethical decision-making. Students introduce a project to a group of young children, observe and record children's learning, and make the learning visible to the children, families, educators, and community.
Corequisite: ECED 2350

Campus
ECED 2300

 Practicum 4 - Programming for Individual Children (0,2,16P)(L)

Credits: 5
While continuing to pursue the goals of practicum 1, 2, & 3, (professional principles, observation and recording techniques, preparation of the learning environment, developing and maintaining relationships with children, guiding children and program planning), this course concentrates on the development of program plans for individual children within group settings.
Corequisite: ECED 2310, ECED 2550

Campus
ECED 2310

 Child Growth and Development - Individual Differences (2,2,0)(L)

Credits: 3
This course combines theory and ongoing research with examples of practical application. The purpose is to develop an understanding of the individual differences in intellectual, physical and social emotional development of children.
Corequisite: ECED 2300, ECED 2550

Campus
ECED 2350

 Advanced Program Development (4,0,0)(L)

Credits: 3
This course surveys the historical foundations of Early Childhood Education through an examination of the theories and practices of important philosophers and educators. A discussion of philosophy and play lays the groundwork for students to examine values and beliefs with the purpose of articulating a personal philosophy to guide their practice. In-depth projects, reflective practice, and a variety of curriculum models are essential to this course.
Corequisite: ECED 2200

Campus
ECED 2400

 Practicum 5 - Infant and Toddler Care (0,2,35p)(L)

Credits: 4
This course will allow the student to put into practice all the goals of practica 1, 2, 3 & 4 (professional principles, observation and recording techniques, preparation of the learning environment, developing and maintaining relationships with children, guiding children and program planning), with infants and toddlers.
Corequisite: ECED 2450, ECED 2410

Campus
ECED 2410

 Development and Care of Infants and Toddlers (2,1,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Development of infants and toddlers are looked at with a particular emphasis on physical care, emotional needs, health and nutritional needs of children under three.
Corequisite: ECED 2400, ECED 2450

Campus
ECED 2440

 Interpersonal Relations - Working with Families (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
A strong, reciprocal and respectful relationship between families and educators is a critical component of quality early childhood education programs. The impact of personal experiences on professional interactions are examined within the context of understanding diverse family structures and contemporary issues. Interpersonal communication strategies for building relationships, problem-solving, and conflict resolution with families are explored, and a variety of strategies to share information with families are reviewed.

Campus
ECED 2450

 Program Development for Infants and Toddlers (2,1,0)(L)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on the development of enriching programs and environments for children under three years of age that will provide for the maximum development of the whole child.
Corequisite: ECED 2400, ECED 2410

Campus
ECED 2490

 Administration of Early Childhood Education Programs (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the aspects involved in the administration and supervision of early childhood programs. Topics include organizational structure, policies, procedures, and budget preparation, licensing regulations, staff relations, personnel management, and leadership. Students apply course content to design a comprehensive educational program for young children.

Campus
ECED 2550

 Programming for Individual Children (2,1,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Students will gain knowledge about the supported child care program in British Columbia; observation and assessment techniques; report writing; developing, implementing and evaluating individualized education plans; case conferencing with a variety of community professionals; and increased awareness of the range of support services for children.
Corequisite: ECED 2300, ECED 2310

Campus
ECED 3300

 Field Experience: Programming for Individual Children (0,2,16P)(L)

Credits: 5
Field experience provides opportunities for both planned and spontaneous programming for children who require extra support due to a variety of exceptionalities. An in-depth investigation of inclusive practice is the guiding factors throughout the experience. Students demonstrate advanced skill acquisition, professional practice, reflective skills and integration of theory into practice, with expectations for increased complexity over each week in practicum.
Corequisite: ECED 3550

Campus
ECED 3310

 Child Growth and Development - Individual Differences (2,2,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Contemporary theory and research are combined to critically examine the complexities of developmental differences in individual children. Practical applications of developmental theory in providing for the social, emotional, physical and intellectual needs of young children are explored. Students develop an inclusive and respectful understanding of the individual differences between children. Furthermore, students explore a multi-disciplinary approach in the exemplary care and education of children. Strategies of support families are investigated.

Campus
ECED 3350

 Programming for Individual Children (2,1,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Students are exposed to the Canadian perspective of inclusion and the supported child care development program in British Columbia. Individual educational plans are discussed from a theoretical perspective, with an emphasis on development, implementation, and evaluation. In addition, observation and assessment techniques, report writing, and case conferencing with a variety of community professionals are explored. Finally, a range of local, provincial and national support services are researched and disseminated.
Corequisite: ECED 3300, ECED 3310

Campus
ECED 3400

 Infant and Toddler Field Experience (0,2,35)(L)

Credits: 4
Field experience implements opportunities for planned and spontaneous programming and to foster respectful interactions with infants and toddlers. Students reflect upon previous experiences, assimilate new knowledge, theory and research, and apply it to their practice with infants and toddlers. Students demonstrate advanced professional competencies, knowledge and reflective skills. Students formulate an action based research question related to the sensorial and/or social environment to support their program planning. Students use pedagogical narrations to disseminate research outcomes with children, families, educators and class members.
Corequisite: ECED 3410, 3450

Campus
ECED 3410

 Development and Care of Infants and Toddlers (3,0,0)(L)

Credits: 3
The development of infants and toddlers is examined with a particular emphasis on best practices related to physical care, emotional needs, health, and nutrition. Through critical reflection upon foundational and contemporary research, students explore pan-Canadian and cross cultural perspectives of infant and toddler care and development. Students are familiarized with local and provincial agencies that support child development.
Corequisite: ECED 3400, 3450

Campus
ECED 3450

 Program Development for Infants and Toddlers (3,0,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Best practices for infants and toddlers in group care that are enriching, developmentally appropriate, and based on the principles of caregiving are the focus of study. Students have the opportunity to critically reflect on research related to philosophy and pedagogy of infant and toddler care and education. The educator's role in establishing a welcoming physical environment, active learning, warm supportive child-adult interactions, schedules and caregiving routines that meet the needs of infants and toddlers, educator and parent partnerships, and pedagogical narrations are explored.
Corequisite: ECED 3410 and ECED 3400

Campus
ECON 0120

 Basic Concepts and Principles of Economics

Credits: 3

Campus
ECON 1220

 Introduction to Basic Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop a basic understanding of economic principles, which allows for and encourages informed discussion of media-covered issues. Topics include contrasting macroeconomics and microeconomics; gross domestic product; economic growth and business cycles; unemployment and inflation; aggregate supply and demand; scarcity, opportunity costs, and trade; law of supply and demand; accounting versus economic profits; money and exchange rates; government choices, markets, efficiency, and equity; monopoly and competition; externalities, public goods, and free riders; and globalization and trade policy.
Note: Students do not receive credit for ECON 1220 unless it has been completed prior to earning a grade of "C-" or better in either ECON 1900 or ECON 1950.

Campus
ECON 1221

 Introduction to Basic Economics

Credits: 3
Students develop a basic understanding of economic principles in order to discuss issues at the level covered by the media. The course topics include an introduction to microeconomics; the importance of government; an introduction to macroeconomics; macro policies and trade; industrial organization and products costs; and market structures, including perfect and imperfect competition.
More information about this course

Distance
ECON 1900

 Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the interactions between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include a definition of economics; demand and supply analysis; consumer theory; production and cost; market structure including perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly; market efficiency and market failure; resource markets; and international trade.

Campus
ECON 1901

 Principles of Microeconomics

Credits: 3
This course, which is paired with ECON 1951 (previously ECON 201), demonstrates the basic principles of economics and, at the same time, provides practice in applying economic analysis to current Canadian problems. Microeconomics focuses on individual economic units-consumers and business organizations. It examines how purchase decisions by consumers and production decisions by producers determine prices and quantities sold. Similarly, it shows how decisions by employers and workers interact to determine wages and employment. These principles are applied to a wide variety of economic issues and problems, including price and rent controls, exchange rates and international trade, energy pricing, collective bargaining, poverty, and income inequality.This course was previously known as ECON 200.
More information about this course

Distance
ECON 1950

 Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine economic behaviour at the aggregate level, and the measurement and determination of national income. Topics include an introduction to economics; measuring macroeconomic variables including gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation; the Keynesian model; aggregate demand and supply; money and banking; the money market; fiscal policy; monetary policy and the central bank; exchange rates and the balance of payments; and economic growth.

Campus
ECON 1951

 Principles of Macroeconomics

Credits: 3
Students examine how the economy behaves at the aggregate level and how national income is measured and determined. Topics include an overview of macroeconomics; measuring gross domestic product, inflation and unemployment; demand including the multiplier process; supply, business cycles, long-term growth; money, banking and monetary policy; inflation; interest rates; stagflation; deficits and fiscal policy; exchange rates and balance of payments; exchange rate policy; purchasing power and interest rate parity.
More information about this course

Distance
ECON 2220

 Economics for Tourism, Recreation and Leisure (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine tourism, recreation and leisure from an economic perspective and take the viewpoint of both the demand side and the supply side of the economy. Topics include organizations and markets, market structure and pricing, the role of the external economic environment, cost-benefit analysis for projects, the economic impact of the tourism sector on development, the global impacts on the tourism, recreation and leisure sectors, and the economic assessment of environmental impacts of tourism and sustainability.

Campus
ECON 2320

 Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to statistics with an emphasis on its applications in business and economics. Topics include descriptive statistics and numerical measures; an introduction to probability; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling and sampling distributions; interval estimations; and testing hypotheses and statistical inferences.

Campus
ECON 2330

 Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students study advanced statistical techniques and methods and their applications in business and economics. Topics include inferences about population variance, including hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; analysis of variance and experimental designs; simple and multiple regressions; time series analysis and forecasting; statistical quality control; and decision analysis. Students are required to apply statistical techniques using Excel and/or Minitab.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ECON 2330, ECON 3330, STAT 2410, and STAT 3060

Campus
ECON 2331

 Economic and Business Statistics 2

Credits: 3
Students learn advanced statistical techniques and methods and their application in business and economics. Topics include probability theory; sampling methods and estimation; hypothesis testing; the analysis of variance; regression analysis and correlation; index numbers, time-series analysis, and forecasting.
More information about this course

Distance
ECON 2430

 Global and Canadian Economic Issues (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine a variety of economic issues facing the Canadian and world economies. The topics discussed each semester vary and may include economic crisis, environmental challenges, 'big' business and multinational corporations, globalization, free trade, health care, education, poverty, and the economics of crime.

Campus
ECON 2630

 Issues in Aboriginal Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students investigate issues related to Aboriginal self-governance and economic development. Topics include the economic rationale for implementing aboriginal rights and titles; the economic explanation for income differences between First Nations and non-First Nations; the First Nations public sector; market failures and successes of First Nations; approaches to First Nations economic development; and government policy initiatives to improve First Nations economies, including a third order of government for aboriginal peoples.

Campus
ECON 2631

 Issues in Aboriginal Economics

Credits: 3
Students investigate issues relating to Aboriginal self-governance and economic development. Topics include an introduction to Canadian Aboriginal peoples and their communities; the public sector in Canada and the public sectorof First Nations; an overview of First Nations Economies; an introduction to urban and regional economics; how markets operate and the implication of market failures; and economic development on First Nations lands.
More information about this course

Distance
ECON 2900

 Intermediate Microeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine at a more advanced level how individuals and firms interact in various types of markets. Topics include consumer and producer behaviour; partial equilibrium analysis for perfectly competitive markets; and aspects of monopoly and imperfectly competitive markets. This course prepares students for advanced courses in economics.

Campus
ECON 2950

 Intermediate Macroeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students complete an advanced, in-depth examination of economic behaviour at the aggregate level. Topics include the determination and distribution of output in the long run; the classical dichotomy and neutrality of money; the measurement, problems, and determinants of unemployment and inflation in the long run; and the role of capital accumulation, population growth, and technology in growth theory.

Campus
ECON 2990

 ***Selected Topics in Economics (3,1,0) or (6,2,0)

Credits: 3 to 6
The subject matter in this course varies from semester to semester depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Courses are taught by visiting professors to instill their unique perspectives or by regular faculty to address emerging topics in a discipline, share research or teaching interests, or test potential new courses.

Campus
ECON 3040

 Managerial Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on the application of economic models and rational choice to business decision making. Topics include an introduction to managerial economics, demand analysis and estimates, production and cost analysis, technological change and industrial innovation, pricing strategies in imperfectly competitive markets, game theory and competitive strategies, government and business, and forecasting.

Campus
ECON 3041

 Managerial Economics

Credits: 3
Students focus on the application of economic models and rationale choice to business decision making. Topics include an overview of managerial economics; demand and supply; costs of production and the organization of the firm; market structure and pricing and output decisions; game theory and pricing strategies; and the economics of information and the role of government in the marketplace.
More information about this course

Distance
ECON 3090

 Managing Personal Economic Wealth (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn to attain their financial goals and achieve financial independence through effective planning. Topics include an overview of a financial plan; planning with personal financial statements; the effects of taxation on financial decision making; banking services; assessing, managing, and securing credit; personal loans; leasing versus buying; buying and financing a home; portfolio management basics; investing in stocks, bonds, and mutual funds; and retirement planning.
Note: Credit for this course cannot be applied towards the BBA

Campus
ECON 3100

 Canadian Financial Markets (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to money, banking, and the Canadian financial system. Topics include an overview of financial markets, interest rates and the structure of interest rates, the efficiency of financial markets, financial regulation, banks and other financial institutions, financial institutions risk management, the role of the central bank, the money supply, and monetary policy.

Campus
ECON 3200

 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the mathematical methods and tools most commonly used in analyzing economic problems. Topics include a review of set theory, functions, and limits; linear models and matrix algebra; application of single and multivariable calculus; unconstrained and constrained optimization; integration and difference and differential equations; application of dynamic analysis; and linear and non-linear programing.

Campus
ECON 3330

 Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Building on ECON 2330: Economics and Business Statistics 1, students examine advanced statistical techniques and methods and their applications in business and economics. Topics include inferences about population variance, including hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; analysis of variance and experimental designs; simple and multiple regressions; time series analysis and forecasting; statistical quality control; and decision analysis. Students are required to apply statistical techniques using Excel and/or Minitab.

Campus
ECON 3410

 Economics of Climate Change (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students investigate the climatic changes resulting from global warming and the policy actions being taken to address these problems. Topics include an overview of the science and economics of climate change; the impact of climate change on growth and economic development; the economics of stabilization including efficiency, externalities, public goods, and environmental policy instruments; inter-temporal decisions and uncertainties about the impacts of climate change; the policy responses to mitigation and adaption and their cost; international collective action and its challenges; and prominent climate policy approaches, such as the United Nations Framework Convention and the Kyoto Protocol.

Campus
ECON 3500

 Public Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the rationale for government intervention in a market economy, the assessment of public policy, and the impact of government expenditures and taxation on the economy and the citizenry. Topics include government activities, externalities, public goods, social security, fiscal deficits and public debt, principles of taxation, incidence and effects of taxation, and optimal taxation.

Campus
ECON 3550

 International Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students analyze the movement of capital, goods, and services across international boundaries and assess their financial impact. With advances in transportation and communication, greater outsourcing, and increased globalization, trade, and foreign direct investment, the corresponding capital movements are becoming much more important to the global economy. Topics include the theories of absolute and comparative advantage; modern theories of trade, including factor-proportions; tariff and non-tariff barriers; current and capital accounts; exchange rate determination; balance of payments and exchange rate policy; evolution of the international monetary system; and trade and economic development.

Campus
ECON 3600

 Labour Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students analyze how individuals, families, firms, and governments operate within a contemporary labour market, and the impact of labour market institutions and government policy. Topics include an overview of the labour market; labour demand and elasticities; the effect of quasi-fixed labour costs on demand; labour supply and the decision to work; labour supply and household production; compensating wage differentials and labour markets; education and training; worker mobility; pay and productivity; gender, race, and inequality in earnings; and unions and the labour market.

Campus
ECON 3610

 The Economics of Gender (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students use economic theory and analysis in an attempt to explain why gender differences lead to different outcomes in education, career choices, family roles, and earnings. A comparison is made of the economic status of women relative to men throughout the world, with special emphasis on similarities and differences between Canada and other economically advanced nations. Topics include marriage and family; the economics of fertility; women at work; women's earnings, occupation, and education; the gender gap in earnings; women's employment and earnings; family policy; and women in developing countries.

Campus
ECON 3650

 Government and Business (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students utilize neoclassical and institutional economic theory to examine government intervention in the economy. Topics include competition and economic efficiency; market failure; institutional theory; private sector governance structures; the role of the state; public sector governance structures, including competition policy, price and entry regulation, prevention of anti-competitive practices, and public enterprise and ownership; and government failure.
Note: Students may not receive credit for both ECON 3650 and POLI 3650

Campus
ECON 3670

 Economic Analysis of Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore and analyze legal issues from an economic perspective; economists focus primarily on whether particular legal doctrines, concepts, and processes are efficient. Topics include an introduction to the law, legal institutions, and procedures, as well as economic theory relating to property law, contracts, torts, criminal law, and general legal processes.

Campus
ECON 3690

 Community Economic Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students investigate methods for effectively using local community resources to enhance economic opportunities while improving social conditions in a sustainable way. Topics include the theoretical basis for community economic development (CED), analytical techniques used to assess communities, environmental sustainability objectives for community development, competing strategies of community development, financing development strategies, and CED activity in Canada and other nations.

Campus
ECON 3700

 Benefit-Cost Analysis and the Economics of Project Evaluation (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine projects that are commonly evaluated using benefit-cost analysis, and the appropriate methods for determining their cost effectiveness. Topics include project evaluation techniques; measuring welfare change; correcting for market distortions using shadow wages and prices; finding the appropriate discount rate; making valid valuations that incorporate inflation and appropriate planning horizon, scrap, and spillover and secondary effects; public enterprise pricing rules; valuing intangibles; and incorporating risk and uncertainty. Case studies of projects are analyzed from a variety of areas, such as natural resources, the environment, human resources, public service, and transportation.

Campus
ECON 3710

 Environmental Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students apply the tools of microeconomic analysis to environmental issues. Topics include property rights and efficient resource use, market failure, the over-utilization of common pool resources, the Coase Theorem, non-market valuation techniques, government policies designed to cost-effectively control pollution, and real-world strategies for controlling pollution.

Campus
ECON 3730

 Forestry Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the concepts and analytical techniques used in forestry economics and their application to forest management, conservation, and policy analysis. Topics include techniques for analyzing forestry investments; timber demand, supply, and pricing; valuation of non-marketed goods and services, such as recreation and wildlife habitat; land allocation and multiple use; forest management issues, such as planting, thinning, and optimal age of crop rotation; and regulatory issues, including allowable annual cut regulations, property rights, tenure, and taxes.

Campus
ECON 3740

 Land Use (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on land use issues with particular emphasis on government policies relating to the preservation and conservation of agricultural lands. Topics include rent theory; welfare measurement; property rights and externalities; project evaluation using cost-benefit and multiple accounts analysis; the economics of soil conservation; efficiency and equity in land use planning, including zoning changes; government land preservation and conservation policies, and agricultural subsidies; water use in agriculture; forest management; and multiple uses of public lands.

Campus
ECON 3840

 Economic Analysis of Health (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students apply microeconomic tools to an analysis of the health care system, while being introduced to the major issues in health economics and the ongoing debate over health care policy. Topics include the economic determinants of health, the market for medical care, the market for health insurance, the role of the government in health care, and health care reform.

Campus
ECON 3900

 Intermediate Microeconomics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students continue to study intermediate topics in partial and general equilibrium analysis. Topics include consumer choice under different scenarios, factor markets, game theory, imperfect competition, general equilibrium analysis and welfare economics, public goods, and externalities.

Campus
ECON 3950

 Intermediate Macroeconomics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students continue to study short-run macroeconomic theory and its applications to contemporary policy issues. Topics include an overview of macroeconomics; macroeconomic data; the open economy; economic fluctuations; aggregate demand, including investment savings-liquidity preference money supply (IS-LM) curves; aggregate supply, including the Phillips curve; economic stabilization and the effectiveness of fiscal and monetary policy; and money supply and demand.

Campus
ECON 3990

 ***Selected Topics in Economics (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

Credits: 6
The subject matter in this course varies from semester to semester depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Courses are taught by visiting professors to instill their unique perspectives or by regular faculty to address emerging topics in a discipline, share research or teaching interests, or test potential new courses. The added variety in the curriculum greatly enhances the student learning experience.

Campus
ECON 4100

 International Financial Markets (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine international financial markets and institutions and their critical role in the global economy. Topics include the elements that constitute a global financial institution; types of financial institutions and markets; global market structure differences; recent market failures, their causes, and solutions; and global financial regulation and reform.

Campus
ECON 4320

 Econometrics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to econometric models and the application of classical regression techniques to estimate socio-economic relationships. Topics include an introduction to econometrics; simple linear regression; interval estimation and hypothesis testing; predictions, goodness of fit, and modeling issues; multiple regression; non-linear relationships; heteroscedasticity; dynamic models, autocorrelation, and forecasting; simultaneous equations; and qualitative dependent variables. General econometric computer software is used to reinforce course concepts.

Campus
ECON 4330

 Forecasting in Business and Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students apply a variety of forecasting methods to solve problems in business and economics. Topics include qualitative forecasting methods; the forecasting process, data considerations, and model selection; moving averages and exponential smoothing; multiple regression and time series decomposition; Box-Jenkins methodology to fit autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ARCH); time-varying volatility and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) and vector autoregressive models; combining forecasting results; and implementing forecasting.

Campus
ECON 4560

 International Macroeconomics and Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the determination of exchange rates in an open economy and policies that governments may adopt to influence their movement. Topics include balance of payments; foreign exchange markets; interaction of the money, interest rates and exchange rates; exchange rates in the long run, including purchasing power and interest rate parity; exchange rates in the short run; fixed exchange rates and foreign exchange intervention; history of the international monetary system; macroeconomic policy under floating exchange rates; and performance of global capital markets and policy issues.

Campus
ECON 4660

 Industrial Organization (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the performance and operation of imperfectly competitive markets, as well as the behavior of firms in these markets. They attempt to answer big questions, such as why are firms and markets organized the way theyare; how does the behavior of firms affect the structure and performance of markets; and how does the organization of markets determine how firms behave and how markets perform. Topics include theories of the firm; market structure models; strategic interaction among firms; business practices such as mergers and acquisitions, price discrimination, advertising, innovation, vertical restraints, and cartels; and new developments in industrial organization, including network issues and auction markets.

Campus
ECON 4720

 Sustainable Economic Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine theories and issues, internal and external challenges, and alternative policy options relating to sustainable economic development. Topics include a comparative analysis of the leading theories of economic growth, development, and sustainability; lack of economic growth, poverty, and income distribution; consequences of population growth and technological change; employment and migration, human capital, agriculture, and rural development; international trade and commercial policy, foreign investment, and aid; and global integration, economic transition, and environmental degradation.

Campus
ECON 4960

 Directed Studies in Economics (0,3,0) or (0,3,0)(0,3,0)

Credits: 6
Individuals or groups of students engage in independent study, research, or practice related to a topic in economics under faculty supervision. The supervisor(s) determines the appropriate curriculum, evaluation methods, and credit assignment in consultation with the student(s) and subject to the approval of the department chairperson(s) and dean.

Campus
ECON 4990

 ***Selected Topics in Economics (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

Credits: 6
The subject matter in this course varies from semester to semester depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Courses are taught by visiting professors to instill their unique perspectives or by regular faculty to address emerging topics in a discipline, share research or teaching interests, or test potential new courses. The added variety in the curriculum greatly enhances the student learning experience.

Campus
EDAR 4200

 Teacher Action Research (6,0,0)

Credits: 6
From class lectures and discussions over two semesters, teacher candidates have the opportunity to develop and conduct a small research project in an area of interest that they develop on practicum through consultation with their instructor, faculty mentor, teacher mentor and principal. Findings from teacher candidates' action research studies are presented at a public poster presentation at the end of the program.

Campus
EDCO 3100

 Communications 1 (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop skills for effective communication with students, parents, colleagues, and other school-related persons. This course will include a retreat at McQueen Lake, the environmental education centre operated by the Kamloops/Thompson School district. Students will learn effective communication skills, including an introduction to conflict resolution and teaching social skills, through role-playing and discussion. Science exploration (e.g., Project Wild group activities) and physical activity (e.g., nature walks) will be integral parts of learning about effective communication.

Campus
EDCO 4200

 Communications 2 (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
The course provides an overview of the historical background of First Nations education in Canada and British Columbia. Teacher candidates examine various aspects of First Nations content in current curriculum and appropriate roles for non-First Nations teachers in the classroom and curriculum development projects. The course emphasizes effective teaching and counselling practices for First Nations children, including developing relationships with parents and extended family members. Presentations and discussion are based on articles and videos provided by faculty, presentations from other First Nations educators, First Nations community members, and student research and experience.

Campus
EDCP 0300

 Education and Career Preparation (5,0,0)

Credits: 3
Education and Career Planning 0300 is an ABE Fundamentals course focusing on preparing adult learners with the life and employment skills required for successful employment. The students will be prepared to pursue various occupational and educational goals and to make effective decisions about their long and short term goals. There are eight diverse components to this program. They include communications skills, career exploration skills, study skills and time management, interpersonal skills and cooperation, personal skills, living skills, job preparation, and setting an educational plan. Students will participate in a series of experiential modules.

Campus
EDCP 0400

 Education and Career Preparation (5,0,0)

Credits: 3
Education and Career Preparation 0400 is an ABE Intermediate course focusing on preparing adult learners with the life and employment skills required for successful employment. The students will be prepared to pursue various occupational and educational goals and to make effective decisions about their long and short term goals. There are eight diverse components to this program. They include communications skills, career exploration skills, study skills and time management, interpersonal skills and cooperation, personal skills, living skills, job preparation, and setting an educational plan. Students will participate in a series of experiential modules.
Note: This course is taught by the University and Employment Preparation

Campus
EDCP 1020

 Occupational Work Experience (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
This one credit career exploration course is designed to enhance students' understanding of their personal career goals and develop a plan for achieving them. In the classroom and through work experience, students will investigate essential employability skills required for that career and the relationship of those skills to the educational choices they have made. Integration of course work, occupational history, work experience and employability skills will be emphasized.
Note: This course is part of Foundations for Success.

Campus
EDCP 2030

 Career Success Strategies (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
This one credit course provides a detailed introduction to career success strategies and provides opportunities for students to apply these to their individual career development planning.
Note: This course is part of Foundations for Success

Campus
EDCP 3030

 Graduate Job Search Skills (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
This one credit course is designed to support and provide graduating students a broad understanding of Employability Skills and Career Search Strategies. EDCP 3030 will teach these students the fundamentals of developing and utilizing the tools needed to make the transition from an academic environment to the current workforce.
Note: This course is part of Foundations for Success.

Campus
EDCS 1540

 Interpersonal Communications and Helping Relationships (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Self awareness is a foundation for the development of competent education assistant and community support workers. By focussing on personal development, students learn and use interpersonal communication skills effectively, while knowledge and skills are introduced that increase effectiveness in helping relationships with client populations. Topics include group dynamics, assertive behaviour, and conflict management.

Campus
EDCS 1580

 Introduction to Human Service Professional Practice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to professional human service practice. Topics include professional values, ethics, conduct, and strategies for self care. Specific to the field of education assistant and community support, students learn about their professional roles in school and community environments.

Campus
EDCS 1590

 Practical Skills for Community and School Support Workers (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Education Assistant and Community Support students are introduced to the practical aspects of supporting individuals with disabilities in classroom, community, and home settings. Students participate in three learning modules during the semester that examine a variety of health care, educational, and social supports, and which vary according to local need. This course is designed to provide instruction for students working in small community and rural settings. Students must complete two of their three modules in Augmentative Communication 1 and Basic Health Care 1.

Campus
EDCS 1640

 Foundations of Education Assistant and Community Support Work (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the theory and perspectives related to supporting individuals with exceptionalities and their families. Students learn about historical movements, inclusive practices, and strategies for teaching. Specific exceptionalities, their characteristics, and etiology are also discussed.

Campus
EDCS 1650

 Understanding Behaviour: Learning for Independence (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to nonaversive intervention strategies for dealing with problem behaviour. Students will learn the role of team approach, individual program planning and ethics in the development of a behaviour support plan. An educative approach to behaviour change is emphasized.

Campus
EDCS 1660

 Health Care Principles (3,0,1)

Credits: 3
This course overviews the theory and application of preventive health care planning and personal care principles. Areas of study include body mechanics, basic anatomy and physiology of body systems, nutrition, recognition of illness, referral procedures to health care services and issues related to basic pharmacology. Ethical and legal concepts of human service work in relation to health care practice will be discussed.

Campus
EDCS 1680

 Field Work (0,2,14P)

Credits: 4
This course requires students to be in the field two days per week and to attend weekly two hour practicum seminars. At this time such topics as team work, time management, advocacy, sexuality and family support for individuals with challenges will be discussed, in addition to practicum related issues/concerns. There will be a two week block fieldwork experience at the end of this course.

Campus
EDCS 1750

 Alternative and Augmentative Communication (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to a range of communication strategies used in working with children and adults who have limited or not verbal skills. Technological supports for communication will be introduced.

Campus
EDDL 5101

 Educational Technology in the Curriculum

Credits: 3
This online, applied course is designed to provide educators with knowledge, skills and experience in implementing educational technology into a pedagogically sound learning environment. Education Technology in the Curriculum is intended to be a general launching point for your own exploration and learning about information technology (IT). Because the world of IT is complex, and especially so in education, it is challenging to design a course of study that is right for all students. You, and every other student, bring with you a unique set of experiences and interests that enhance your learning and determine your individual learning needs.
More information about this course

Distance
EDDL 5111

 Introduction to Distributed Learning

Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide educators (Teacher Candidates, In-service Teachers, Faculty members and trainers) with an introduction to the skills required to teach in a distributed learning environment. Participants will explore the realm of distributed learning through: discussion about learning theory and pedagogy in online environments; consideration and application of technological tools to enhance the learning environment; and examination and design of assessment strategies. This course is designed to provide educators (Teacher Candidates, In-service Teachers, Faculty members and trainers) with an introduction to the skills required to teach in a distributed learning environment. Participants will explore the realm of distributed learning through: discussion about learning theory and pedagogy in online environments; consideration and application of technological tools to enhance the learning environment; and examination and design of assessment strategies.
More information about this course

Distance
EDDL 5131

 Multimedia in the Curriculum

Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce educators, and thus their students, to computer and web-based multimedia tools such as text, video, audio and digital photographs and graphics. There will be an emphasis not only on how to use the tools, but also on sound pedagogical practice to promote teaching and learning. Students in this course will learn how to identify, select, plan for, create, and integrate multimedia into instruction and have their students do the same in activities such as reports, digital storytelling, and portfolios.
More information about this course

Distance
EDDL 5141

 Online Teaching and Learning

Credits: 3
This course provides educators with knowledge, skills and experience in implementing educational technology into a pedagogically sound learning environment. EDDL 5141 is designed to provide instructors with a basic introduction to the theory and practice of online teaching and learning and to develop the skills and strategies needed to facilitate courses in an online environment. Participants will reflect on their experiences as online learners to help develop their own philosophy of online teaching and learning. Using their philosophy, they will plan and conduct an online learning activity that they will facilitate for their fellow participants. Emphasis will be placed on student engagement and motivation, creating collaborative and interactive experiences and gaining practical experience.
More information about this course

Distance
EDDL 5151

 Managing Your Technology Classroom

Credits: 3
Participants will explore a variety of methodologies, tools and technologies to enhance teaching and learning in their specific educational context. They will engage in critical discourse about the use of information technology in a number of different educational settings, evaluate the resources available to them, and develop strategies to make the most effective use of those resources for themselves and their students.
More information about this course

Distance
EDEF 3100

 History of Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This foundations course focuses on the complex dynamics between school and society. Teacher candidates examine the relationship between schools and society over time, gaining insight into individuals and groups that determine what kinds of schools should exist and what should happen to them. Issues of gender, race, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, social class, and location inform and enlighten investigations. Readings; lectures; presentations; discussion; group work; review of television, film, and video materials; and guest speakers inform the learning.

Campus
EDEF 3200

 Theoretical Frameworks of Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This foundations course further develops the concepts explored in EDEF 3100: History of Education, encouraging teacher candidates to examine their educational beliefs and practices while deepening their insights and understanding of the social context of school. Teacher candidates learn the language and concepts of education, develop the ability to reflect critically on its central ideas and alternate frameworks, and refine their communication as professionals. Discussions of contemporary and educational issues include topics such as what it means to be a professional and schooling in the 21st century. Readings; lectures; presentations; discussion; group work; review of television, film, and video materials; and guest speakers inform the learning.

Campus
EDEF 4150

 Social Foundations of Educaton: Gender And Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an exploration of the rethinking of educational practice and research that has been prompted by feminist theories, with a focus on schooling. Participants examine the gendered experiences of people in educational organizations as students, teachers, and administrators, and discuss differences by age, race and ethnicity, social class, religion, and sexual orientation.

Campus
EDEF 4160

 Education in Rural or Small Schools and Communities in British Columbia (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Rural and small schools are a dominant feature in British Columbia's educational history, but they have generally been lost or forgotten in today's educational vision. Fifteen percent of the province's school children attend rural or small schools; many of these schools are so remote and isolated that there is no road access, and some of these schools have fewer than 10 students spread across many grades. This course examines rural and small schools in terms of the communities they serve, with particular attention to the teacher's role in the school and community.

Campus
EDEF 4200

 School Organization (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
Teacher candidates examine a number of organizations that affect their working lives as teachers and develop a perspective about issues in British Columbia education that results in the expression of their own personal philosophy of teaching. Class sessions consist of presentations and lectures followed by a discussion or question and response period. Presentations are made by representatives from a number of stakeholder groups, including the Kamloops Thompson Teachers' Association, School District #73 (Kamloops/Thompson) senior administration, and the Teacher Regulation Branch for the British Columbia Ministry of Education. Teacher candidates are guided in the preparation of resumes and interview techniques.

Campus
EDFN 4200

 Aboriginal Culture and Learning (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The course begins with an overview of the history of Aboriginal Education in British Columbia and Canada. The course focuses on effective teaching and learning practices for Aboriginal students including developing relationships with parents and extended family members. Teacher candidates examine how to enrich the regular school curriculum by adding Aboriginal content and including the cultural background of their Aboriginal students. The class format is presentation and discussion based on articles and videos provided by faculty, presentations from other Aboriginal educators, community members, and teacher candidates. Field experiences typically include visits to local band-operated schools, the Secwepemc Museum, the Kamloops Residential School and the Interior Indian Friendship Centre.

Campus
EDGM 1140

 Management Communications

Credits: 3

Campus
EDHC 4100

 Health and Career Education (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This course enables participants to help elementary students acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that help them to make good personal decisions and manage their lives more effectively. Participants focus on the emotional and social development of students from Kindergarten to Grade 7.

Campus
EDHR 1210

 Human Resource Management and Performance

Credits: 3
In today's demanding business climate, managers are having to utilize their human resources more effectively to gain competitive advant. This unit examines role of HRM in organizations, and the links between HRM and organizational performance. It is recommended as an intro to all other units in the HRM programs.

Campus
EDIE 3100

 Child Development and Teaching (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course presents an overview of child development as it relates to teaching. It will begin with a survey of the main models and theories of child development and then consider relevant implications for teaching. Students will review research that examines child development and teaching, especially research that reviews effective teaching practice with children who are at different developmental levels, and children from diverse cultural backgrounds.

Campus
EDIE 4100

 Special Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This special education course is designed to introduce students to the area of teaching children with special needs within the regular classroom. The course will begin with a consideration of the historical perspective on teaching children with special needs and will include information on relevant provincial legislation. Course topics include designing individual education plans and effective methods for teaching children with special needs in school settings.

Campus
EDIE 4150

 Inclusive Education: Specific Learning Disabilities (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the controversial field of specific learning disabilities (LD). The course will begin with a historical perspective on learning disabilities and an overview of relevant theoretical frameworks and models of learning disabilities. We will examine current legislation in British Columbia and its relationship to the school district, school, and classroom levels. Two key topics will be (a) screening, assessment, and identification practices, and (b) intervention strategies and how they affect classroom practice.

Campus
EDIT 4150

 Information Technology Across the Curriculum (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides teachers with information about how to use 21st century technology across the curriculum. The skillful integration of 21st century technologies can enable more equitable learning opportunities for all. Digital technologies, access to information, globalization, and equity are changing the world. Participants learn how to critically evaluate the pedagogical benefits of various educational technology tools in the classroom setting.

Campus
EDIT 4700

 Introduction to Distributed Learning (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Participants explore the realm of distributed learning through discussion about learning theory and pedagogy in online environments, consider and apply technological tools to enhance the learning environment, and examine and design assessment strategies. This online seminar models the development of learning communities. Participants are directed to readings about current issues and discuss them online. This course is informally structured, and participants are encouraged to explore areas of their own interest that apply to their practice.

Campus
EDLL 3100

 Language and Literacy 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces key concepts related to language and literacy learning and teaching in the elementary language arts classroom and across the curriculum. Students are provided an overview of the knowledge required to make sound curriculum decisions to implement an effective language and literacy program. This course is the first component of two interdependent courses that focus on methods to teach language and literacy in elementary school, with an emphasis on the reading process, the skills central to reading acquisition and reading achievement, individual differences in reading development, and effective reading instruction methods. The course is linked with the initial school practicum.

Campus
EDLL 3160

 Literacy Across the Content Areas (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
Approaches for supporting secondary students in literacy are explored. Teacher candidates develop pedagogical approaches and strategies consistent with the nature of content literacy. Content literacy instruction is needed for students to meet the reading comprehension, academic vocabulary, critical thinking, and academic writing demands they face across the curriculum to effectively acquire and demonstrate knowledge and learning. This course teaches which communication competencies secondary school students need to succeed at school, work and daily life. Teacher candidates develop solid understanding of the cognitive, linguistic, and literacy demands of academic text and design lessons that promote comprehension and critical and innovative thinking across the curriculum.

Campus
EDLL 3200

 Language and Literacy 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course continues the study of the elementary language arts curriculum and teaches the theory and practical knowledge required to implement a language arts program. The emphasis is on writing in relationship to the other language modes and across the curriculum. Students examine the skills children in elementary school need to be successful writers, effective ways of promoting the development of these skills, and effective writing assessment techniques. Students are expected to engage in all aspects of the writing process.

Campus
EDLL 3900

 Total Physical Response: Methods for Teaching Secwepmectsin (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The Total Physical Response (TPR) method is introduced as a method for teaching aboriginal languages. Research that analyzes the TPR method is studied in the context of current language theory in second language acquisition. Students have the opportunity to practice the TPR approach, learning instructional strategies and familiarizing themselves with learning resources. Effective classroom management, and evaluation and assessment are also examined.

Campus
EDLL 3910

 Introduction the Secwepemc Language 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the Secwepemc language and to help them develop vocabulary, grammar, and oral sentence construction. The focus is on oral language production and comprehension. This course is appropriate for individuals who have little or no background in the Secwepemc language.

Campus
EDLL 3920

 Innovative Language Teaching Practices For Aboriginal Language Classrooms (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed for Aboriginal language teachers looking for ways to implement new teaching approaches in their classrooms. This course provides a brief survey of innovative language teaching methods and approaches that have been successfully used in a variety of Aboriginal language programs.

Campus
EDLL 4150

 Children's Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the sources of children's literature and its major genres, including traditional literature, fantasy, realistic and historical fiction, poetry, and information books. This course is geared towards teaching children; children's reading needs and interests, and current issues and trends are examined. Teacher candidates explore strategies for involving children with literature across the elementary curriculum.

Campus
EDLL 4160

 Supporting Learners With Language and Literacy Difficulties (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Teacher candidates examine individualized assessment, diagnosis, and instructional planning for students with literacy difficulties.

Campus
EDMA 3100

 Mathematics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Teacher candidates develop a basic understanding of teaching mathematics in elementary schools. The course provides methods in teaching problem solving, numeracy, the use of manipulatives, early number sense, patterns, assessment, and operations with numbers. Participants also examine the use of literature and games in a math program and undergo a comprehensive study of the British Columbia mathematics curriculum. A variety of resources are provided to teacher candidates to experience the methods used to provide a rich elementary mathematics program.

Campus
EDMA 3200

 Mathematics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course builds on EDMA 3100: Mathematics I. Students are introduced to topics that include place value, geometric thinking, spatial sense, measurement, statistics and probability, and assessment. The course is linked to the practicum (EDPR 3200) that teacher candidates take in the same semester to allow them to have an opportunity to apply the methods they have studied.

Campus
EDMT 1340

 Organizational Design and Training

Credits: 3
The term, reengineering - the name given to the mngt practice of fundamentally changing the organization & mngt of work - has attracted attention of many mgrs as a way of improving organizational performance. This unit examines how shifts towards horizontal work process from vertical impact on training & employee development

Campus
EDPE 3100

 Physical Education Methods (2,0,2)

Credits: 3
The aim of this course is to provide a foundation of principles, learning opportunities and teaching, and critical thinking strategies in physical education that can be applied to whole classrooms of elementary students. Emphasis is on applying the various concepts of movement (games, dance, gymnastics, alternate-environment activities, and individual and dual activities) when planning to teach physical education. Teacher candidates participate in classroom, gymnasium, and outdoor activities that provide tangible links with scheduled practica and encourage putting theory into practice.

Campus
EDPE 4150

 Elementary Physical Education: Instruction (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for teacher candidates, who have completed EDPE 3100, to extend the skills and knowledge gained through previous course work and during practica, and to further develop their ability to teach elementary physical education. Opportunities are also provided for teacher candidates to reinforce previous learning and to develop greater skill in teaching activities from the five movement categories.

Campus
EDPR 1800

 First Nations Language Teaching Practicum 1 (32 hours)

Credits: 1
This course provides students with an orientation to public and Band-operated schools, and the opportunity to link the theory-based courses of their first year Developmental Standard Term Certificate experience with language teaching experiences in the classroom. This course is the first of four organized language teaching practicum experiences.

Campus
EDPR 2800

 First Nations Language Teaching Practicum 2 (48 hours)

Credits: 2
This course provides students with expanded opportunities to link the theory-based courses of their first and second years with further teaching experiences in the classroom. This course is the second of four organized language teaching practicum experiences.

Campus
EDPR 3100

 Practicum 1 (24 hours)

Credits: 1
This is the first of four organized school practica experiences, consisting of seven full days in schools within the Kamloops area. The purpose of this course is to provide teacher candidates with an orientation to elementary schools and the opportunity to link their on-campus courses with teaching experiences in the classroom. Teacher candidates are placed in pairs in classrooms where they have the opportunity to observe classroom procedures and teach four language arts lessons. Teacher candidates also complete journal reflections and have the opportunity to observe in a variety of school settings. Faculty mentors from the university support each teacher candidate throughout the practicum.

Campus
EDPR 3200

 Practicum 2 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This two-week (10 school days) practicum occurs in the final two weeks of Year 1, Term 2. Teacher candidates are placed in pairs in a school within the Kamloops area. The teaching and learning foci for this practicum are mathematics, science, and social studies, although not exclusively. Teacher candidates complete journal reflections and have the opportunity to observe in a variety of classroom settings. Following the practicum, teacher candidates attend two call-back days on campus, which include an opportunity to debrief the practicum, hear from guest presenters, and receive important information for the next practicum. Faculty mentors from the university support each teacher candidate throughout the practicum.

Campus
EDPR 3800

 First Nations Language Teaching Practicum 3 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This course provides students with opportunities to observe classroom and school start-up procedures at the beginning of the school year. This course is the third of four organized language teaching practicum experiences.

Campus
EDPR 3900

 First Nations Language Teaching Practicum 4 (100 hours)

Credits: 3
This course provides students with extended opportunities to expand, refine, and confirm their First Nations language teaching abilities. This course is the final and most important organized language teaching practicum experience.

Campus
EDPR 4100

 Practicum 3 (90 hours)

Credits: 3
At the beginning of Year 2, Term 3, teacher candidates undertake this three-week practicum, which serves as an orientation for teacher candidates and teacher mentors. Teacher candidates and mentors are paired for the 10-week extended EDPR 4200: Practicum 4 in Year 2, Term 4. Teacher candidates are involved in observational and instructional activities related to the September start-up of classrooms in elementary schools throughout interior school districts, including SD 27, SD 53, SD 58, SD 73, SD 74, and SD 83.

Campus
EDPR 4200

 Practicum 4 (300 hours)

Credits: 5
During Term 2 of Year 2, teacher candidates undertake a 10-week (300 hour) practicum that serves as the major school experience. Teacher candidates normally return to the same placement as they had in EDPR 4100: Practicum 3. Teacher candidates gradually increase their teaching load and sustain a minimum 80% load for five consecutive weeks. Upon successful completion, teacher candidates are able to apply for teacher certification in British Columbia.

Campus
EDPR 4250

 Education Practicum

Credits: 4 to 10
Students participate in a teaching practicum designed to meet the British Columbia College of Teachers (BCCT) requirements for certification to teach in British Columbia. (Specific practicum length is determined by BCCT).

Campus
EDPY 3100

 Child Development and Teaching (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course presents an overview of child development as it relates to teaching. It will begin with a survey of the main models and theories of child development and then consider relevant implications for teaching. Students will review research that examines child development and teaching, especially research that reviews effective teaching practice with children who are at different developmental levels, and children from diverse cultural backgrounds.

Campus
EDPY 4100

 Special Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This special education course is designed to introduce students to the area of teaching children with special needs within the regular classroom. The course will begin with a consideration of the historical perspective on teaching children with special needs and will include information on relevant provincial legislation. Course topics include designing individual education plans and effective methods for teaching children with special needs in school settings.

Campus
EDPY 4150

 Special Education: Specific Learning Disabilities (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the controversial field of specific learning disabilities (LD). The course will begin with a historical perspective on learning disabilities and an overview of relevant theoretical frameworks and models of learning disabilities. We will examine current legislation in British Columbia and its relationship to the school district, school, and classroom levels. Two key topics will be (a) screening, assessment, and identification practices, and (b) intervention strategies and how they affect classroom practice.

Campus
EDPY 4200

 Assistive Technologies in Special Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on the role that technology can play in compensating for, or remediating, learning challenges associated with cognitive impairments, communication disorders, and physical disabilities.

Campus
EDPY 4210

 Assessment of Learning Difficulties (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the principles and practices of assessing children with learning difficulties. The emphases is on the assessment of literacy, mathematics, social and emotional behavior, and ability. Course discussions consider relevant interventions; however, the focus is on assessment. A variety of forms of assessment are considered, including standardized testing, criterion-referenced assessment, portfolio assessment, and dynamic assessment.

Campus
EDPY 4220

 Field Experience in Special Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students gain experience in specific special education settings via rotation among district programs (District Developmental and Behaviour Programs, Chris Rose Centre for Autism, Child Development Centre), district specialists (a teacher of deaf and hard of hearing students, a teacher of the visually impaired students), and resource and learning assistance programs.

Campus
EDPY 4230

 Selected Topics in Special Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will be offered during the Spring or Summer session and the topic will vary depending on the expertise of the faculty available to teach the course.

Campus
EDPY 4300

 Adapting and Modifying Programs (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to strategies for adapting and modifying educational programs for children with special needs. Topics include determining if children need adapted or modified programs, and generating and revising individual education programs.

Campus
EDPY 4310

 Learning Disabilities (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided an overview of teaching children with learning disabilities. Students experience methods and programs for teaching children with learning disabilities and learn about the legalities of special education.

Campus
EDPY 4320

 Behaviour Management for Children in Regular Classrooms (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to instructional and environmental strategies for teaching children with behaviour problems in regular classrooms. Topics include methods to change behaviour in regular classroom settings, interviewing students, and working with families.

Campus
EDPY 4340

 Differentiation in Mathematics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on teaching children with disabilities in mathematics. Course content includes assessing children with disabilities in mathematics, designing remedial mathematics programs, and reviewing research on effective teaching methods and programs.

Campus
EDPY 4360

 Programming for Children With Behaviour Disorders (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This special education course introduces students to the area of programming for children and adolescents with behaviour disorders. Course topics include designing individual education plans and using effective methods for teaching children with behaviour disorders in school settings, especially resource rooms. "

Campus
EDPY 4380

 Methodologies and Interventions for Beginning Reading and Writing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The primary objective of the course is to prepare teachers to design and implement programs and interventions to teach children having difficulty with beginning reading and writing.

Campus
EDPY 4390

 Fluency and Reading Comprehension (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The primary objective of the course is to prepare teachers to design and implement programs to teach intermediate-aged children (Grades 4 to 7) who are having difficulty with fluency and reading comprehension. Students complete informal reading assessments in order to develop appropriate programming.

Campus
EDPY 4400

 Methodologies and Interventions for Writing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will prepare teachers to design and implement programs to teach children having difficulty with all aspects of writing including output, mechanics and meaning.

Campus
EDPY 4410

 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
Students are provided with an overview of teaching children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Participants become familiar with methods and programs for teaching children with FASD and learn about federal and provincial initiatives.

Campus
EDPY 4420

 Attention Deficity/Hyperactivity Disorder (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
Students are provided with an overview of teaching children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Participants learn about assessment, teaching methods, and programs for teaching children with ADHD.

Campus
EDPY 4430

 Structuring School Discipline (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
This course is based on Control Theory and the Restitution program, focusing on developing a school discipline program which utilizes internal motivation and belief-based self-discipline. Using the Restitution program, participants learn to create school conditions which support student problem solving and self-regulation.

Campus
EDPY 4440

 Autism Spectrum Disorder (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
Students examine the principles and practices of working with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The key components of the course include early signs and diagnosis; characteristics of persons living with ASD, including myths about autism; discussions of the various treatment approaches and methods; and best practices for teachers working with children with ASD in their classrooms.

Campus
EDPY 4450

 Leadership in Special Education (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
This course is designed for individuals who are currently employed as Learning Assistance or Resource Room teachers. Students learn aspects of program and team management.

Campus
EDPY 4460

 Functional Behaviour Assessment (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
This course provides training in the Functional Behaviour Assessment (FBA) process. Participants learn the theory of multi-modal behaviour analysis and the components necessary to conduct a complete FBA.

Campus
EDPY 4470

 Universal Design for Differentiated Instruction (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to principles of universal design and differentiated instruction, as well as strategies for adjusting instruction to meet diverse learning needs. Participants learn the fundamentals of developing inclusive and individual instructional plans and monitoring procedures. Topics include adapting and modifying educational programs for children with special needs, response to instruction, and informal assessment.

Campus
EDPY 4480

 Learning Disabilities in the General Education Classroom (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided with an overview of the field of learning disabilities and research-based instruction for the general education classroom. Participants develop skills in informal assessment and planning for children with learning disabilities.

Campus
EDPY 4500

 Directed Studies - Inclusive and Special Education (1,0,0) or (2,0,0) or (3,0,0)

Credits: 1 to 3
This course will provide the opportunity for self-directed, mentored study in an area of special education. Students will examine, in-depth, a topic or issue of professional interest.

Campus
EDPY 4800

 Introduction to Special Education and Children with Learning Difficulties (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce teachers to the field of special education and for teachers who will work with children with special learning needs in special education settings. Students will become aware of informal assessment and data collection methods, plus Level "A" assessment tools, in order to develop basic remedial program plans.

Campus
EDPY 4810

 Advanced Assessment of Learning Difficulties (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to prepare students to administer and interpret assessments in educational settings. Students completing this course, and EDPY 4830, will acquire the assessment skills necessary for working within the special education field, such as in a learning assistance centre.

Campus
EDPY 4820

 Advanced Adaptations and Modifications (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides specialist teachers with an advanced working knowledge of adaptations and modifications as they pertain to educational programs for students with special needs. Topics include current practices in adapting and modifying processes to determine changes necessary to a student's program and types of individualized education plans.

Campus
EDPY 4830

 Assessment and Learning Practicum (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of EDPY 4810: Advanced Assessment of Learning Difficulties. Students apply their skills and knowledge while conducting an assessment on a school-aged child. Participants are expected to assess a child, interpret results with guidance, prepare a report, and share the report with parents and a school-based team. Students are expected to select an appropriate intervention and work with the child for a minimum of four sessions.

Campus
EDPY 4840

 Programming for Children with Behaviour Disorders (3,0.0)

Credits: 3
This special education course is designed to increase the competencies of students in the area of programming for children and adolescents with behaviour disorders. Students are prepared for a field placement in a resource room or alternate program that addresses the educational needs of children with behavioural difficulties. Course topics include assessing student needs, designing appropriate individual education plans, communicating with colleagues and parents, and using effective methods for teaching children with behaviour disorders in a variety of school settings.

Campus
EDSC 3200

 Science Methods (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce students to current principles and strategies applied to teaching science in elementary schools from Kindergarten to Grade 7. The three strands of the B.C. Science IRP, Life, Physical Earth, and Space Science, provide the base for exploring scientific content in terms of how children learn science. Weekly classes include hands-on labs, presentations, website explorations, article reviews, current events, and field trips. This course and its assignments are designed to give students the opportunity to explore the nature of science and learn how to teach science to children.

Campus
EDSC 4150

 Environmental Education (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to examine aspects of environmental education appropriate for K - 7 students. Through the concept of Active Living and use of the outdoors as the principal classroom, the elements of living/lifestyles in all subject areas will be addressed. The course also emphasizes teaching students how to make informed decisions and take constructive actions regarding the earth and its inhabitants. Field trips involving activities suitable for elementary-aged students are an integral part of this course.

Campus
EDSC 4160

 Problem Solving in Science and Mathematics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Science and mathematics learning is recognized as more than a collection of isolated skills and concepts to be mastered. Rather, science and mathematics promote experiences where students actively participate in the learning and doing of these subjects. Hence, problem solving is central to and permeates all aspects of science and mathematics. To become effective problem solvers and problem posers, children require experiences with various types of problems arising from a variety of real situations. A problem-posing framework will be used to explore ways in which teachers can provide opportunities to assist children to reason systematically and carefully, and to develop their understanding of science and mathematics.

Campus
EDSL 4200

 Second Language with Focus on French (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This course introduces the instructional and assessment strategies that are effective in promoting the learning of a second language by elementary students. It emphasizes the development of a proficiency-based curriculum and concurrent development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. The course acquaints education teacher candidates with the teaching techniques, procedures, and instructional resources used to teach second languages to children, focusing on French. Teacher candidates interested in teaching other languages will be encouraged to adapt strategies to their own specific language and will learn to adapt assignments to their target language.

Campus
EDSM 3100

 Introduction to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Approaches for supporting middle school and junior level secondary students' engagement and learning in mathematics and science are introduced. Teacher candidates develop pedagogical approaches and strategies consistent with constructivist philosophy and the nature of science and math. Teacher candidates design lesson and unit plans that build math or science inquiry skills; promote critical and innovative thinking; connect with authentic math, science and technology contexts; and, are consistent with British Columbia Ministry of Education curriculum. EDSM 3100 prepares teacher candidates for the first practicum EDTE 3410.

Campus
EDSM 4200

 STEM Specialty (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) (6,0,0)

Credits: 6
This course builds on EDSM 3100. Approaches for supporting senior secondary students' engagement and learning in a science specialty (biology, chemistry, physics) or a mathematics specialty are explored. Teacher candidates extend their application of pedagogical approaches and strategies consistent with constructivist philosophy and the nature of science or math for the senior secondary student. Teacher candidates design lesson and unit plans that build inquiry skills; promote critical and innovative thinking; connect with authentic science, math and technology contexts; and, are consistent with British Columbia Ministry of Education curriculum. The course prepares teacher candidates for the second two-week practicum (EDTE 3420) and the long practicum (EDTE 3430, 3440, 3450) where they teach in their specialty area.

Campus
EDSO 3200

 Social Studies Methods (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The overarching purpose of this course is to introduce various rationales, goals, and strands needed to develop a coherent social studies program. Social Studies is presented as a dynamic, multi-disciplinary curriculum for creating informed, adaptable, responsive, and responsible educated citizens. Approaches and strategies are explored that focus on developing an understanding of the various Social Studies disciplines and the characteristics and evolution of the interrelated global systems, as well as promoting critical thinking, social responsibility, and a global perspective. EDSO 3200 is linked to the 2-week practicum that students take in the same semester (EDPR 3200), and so students will have the opportunity to teach several of the social studies lessons they will have developed.

Campus
EDSO 4150

 Global Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course explores, in theory and practice, how global education in schools can facilitate critical understanding and skills for building more peaceful futures in local, national, international, and global contexts. Students will critically examine six key issues of planetary crises: militarization, structural violence, human rights, cultural solidarity, environmental care, and personal peace. Strategies and pedagogies for global education will be explored.

Campus
EDTE 3010

 Woodworking 1 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course deals with basic woodworking theory, techniques and procedures; including safety, hand tool processes, power tool processes, and procedures involving stationary power equipment. The materials and fundamental techniques used in wood products manufacturing are introduced. Special emphasis is on the hands-on skills and safety procedures required to teach a course using power equipment. Students complete exercises, assignments and projects suitable to junior level secondary grades. Students with a directly related trade qualification are not permitted to take this course for credit.

Campus
EDTE 3020

 Metalworking 1 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course deals with basic metal working theory, techniques and procedures; including safety, hand tool processes, machine tool processes, materials, and fundamental processes used in metal related manufacturing. Students complete exercises, assignments and projects suitable to junior level secondary grades. Students with a directly related trade qualification are not permitted to take this course for credit.

Campus
EDTE 3030

 Power Mechanics 1 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course deals with basic mechanical theory, techniques and procedures that are suitable to a power mechanics class at the secondary school level. Topics include safety, hand tools, maintenance, disassembly, reassembly and basic repairs. Students complete exercises, assignments and projects suitable to secondary level coursework. Students with a directly related trade qualification are not permitted to take this course for credit.

Campus
EDTE 3040

 Design and Drafting 1 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course deals with the basics of drafting and design theory, techniques and procedures. Sketches, mechanical architectural and detail drawings will be explored. Students will move quickly from the fundamentals of manual paper and pencil based drawings to Computer Aided Design (CAD) technology. The generic fundamentals of CAD software will be emphasized with the intention that students will be able to use and teach any of the CAD software programs that may be owned by various secondary schools. Exercises, assignments and projects will be completed that are suitable to secondary level coursework. Students with directly related qualifications will not be allowed to take this course for credit.

Campus
EDTE 3050

 Electricity and Electronics 1 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course deals with basic electrical and electronics theory, techniques and procedures. Topics include safety, hand tools and equipment, materials, and the fundamental processes used in wiring and circuitry. Students complete exercises, assignments and projects suitable to secondary level coursework. Students with directly related qualifications are not permitted to take this course for credit.

Campus
EDTE 3100

 Principles of Trades and Technology Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the role of trades and technical education in the high school. The students' future role in carrying out the purposes and mission of Trades and Technology Education is explored. The course introduces the basic principles, methods and techniques of instruction suitable for secondary teaching. Learning theory and learning styles, lesson preparation, lesson types, instructional techniques, learning environments, and classroom management techniques are introduced. This course is designed to provide practical knowledge of instructional techniques that can be directly applied in the classroom. Emphasis is placed on actual practice ofinstructional skills.

Campus
EDTE 3110

 Learning, Curriculum and Assessment (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course emphasizes continuous improvement of teaching and learning through planning and feedback facilitated by the professional development process. Course topics include developing and implementing course outlines, identifying types of learning, determining appropriate instructional techniques and learning activities, determining and evaluating appropriate assessment and testing methods, and creating an effective learning environment.

Campus
EDTE 3120

 Adolescent Learning and Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is intended to provide an understanding of adolescent learning and development. Modern theories in developmental, educational and cognitive psychology, as well as social and physical development will be explored. Emphasis will be on the theories that are relevant to adolescents in the school environment in order to help educators plan and implement appropriate lessons, activities, lectures, assignments, and teaching strategies.

Campus
EDTE 3130

 Legal Issues in Secondary School (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines legal issues and current laws relating to education. Topics include past, current, and emerging legal issues, teacher and institutional liability, students' rights and teachers' rights and responsibilities. Case studies from the education system will be examined. Special emphasis is placed on the issues relating to safely managing the learning environment and safe work practices.

Campus
EDTE 3140

 Organizing and Managing Technology Learning Facilities (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This course provides instruction in the planning, organization, and management of several types of shop or mathematics and science related education facilities. The scope of this course encompasses the preparation for instruction in a shop or laboratory which includes a complete plan of organization, safety, and management showing the necessary equipment, materials, and supplies. Methods of purchasing, budgeting, financial control, inventory procedures, and problems related to a shop or laboratory learning environment management are included. Participants are introduced to software to organize and track equipment, materials, supplies, budgets and expenditures.

Campus
EDTE 3150

 Inclusive Education and Behaviour Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines current issues and best practices for serving secondary students of different cultural, ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds as well as students with special needs. The course focuses on behavioural issues at the classroom and individual student level. Appropriate student behaviour is discussed with a particular emphasis on techniques for preventing, diagnosing, and handling student discipline problems in a context which might include students with special educational needs and students from diverse cultural backgrounds. The course includes behaviour management strategies and methodologies that are specific to technical, mathematics and science education courses and environments. The characteristics and causes of disruptive behaviour and appropriate techniques for intervention are discussed. Discussion of current motivational theories and how these theories can be applied to motivating vulnerable students are also included.

Campus
EDTE 3180

 History of Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
An examination of selected topics in the history of Canadian and British Columbian education and of the relationships between historical development and current educational policy. Particular emphasis on the development of technical education in Canada and British Columbia, with a component that highlights growth of secondary education.

Campus
EDTE 3190

 Philosophy of Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the comparative and critical study of the philosophical frameworks related to education and schooling (e.g. realism, pragmatism, behaviourism, existentialism) and their representative thinkers. This course is designed to help students examine the diverse educational views that have affected, and are affecting, schooling in Canada and British Columbia. Participants will reflect on their developing educational philosophy through readings, discussions and lectures.

Campus
EDTE 3200

 Sociology of Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the study of classroom, school, and schooling as social systems and the cultural function of educational institutions with particular emphasis on the secondary school. Concepts such as social organization, stratification, mobility, role, and values are applied. This course is designed to help students examine the impact of varying social perspectives on schooling in Canada and British Columbia.

Campus
EDTE 3410

 Practicum 1 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This is an introductory practicum experience in secondary schools. Students experience a variety of short-term teaching responsibilities with close guidance from a qualified and experienced technical education teacher in a classroom and shop setting or from a qualified and experienced teacher in the mathematics and/or science classroom. The teacher candidate may participate in different classrooms with different teachers. Students are placed in pairs for this practicum.

Campus
EDTE 3420

 Practicum 2 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This practicum experience has an emphasis on teaching, and learning in teacher candidate's own area of technical/trade or mathematics/science expertise. Participants assume teaching responsibilities including planning, classroom management, evaluation and related activities while being closely supervised by a qualified and experienced technical or mathematics/science education teacher. Students are placed in pairs for this practicum.

Campus
EDTE 3430

 Practicum 3 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
For trades and technical teacher candidates, the emphasis is on teaching outside of their individual trade area of expertise. For science and mathematics teacher candidates, the emphasis is on teaching in their area of expertise. Participants assume teaching responsibilities in secondary courses while being closely supervised by a qualified and experienced secondary education teacher. Students are placed individually for this practicum.

Campus
EDTE 3440

 Practicum 4 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
For trades and technical teacher candidates, the emphasis is on teaching outside of their individual trade area of expertise. For science and mathematics teacher candidates, the emphasis is on teaching in their area of expertise. Participants assume teaching responsibilities in secondary courses while being closely supervised by a qualified and experienced secondary education teacher. Students are placed individually for this practicum.

Campus
EDTE 3450

 Practicum 5 (90 hours)

Credits: 3
This practicum experience takes place in the winter semester. The emphasis is on working with the range of students and specific learning needs found within a secondary education environment. Participants assume teaching responsibilities, focusing on instructional and classroom management adaptations for the diverse needs of learners. Teacher candidates are closely supervised by a qualified and experienced secondary education teacher and are placed individually for this practicum. During this time, teacher candidates work with school staff, counsellors and other professionals who may be working with specific students.

Campus
EDTE 4010

 Woodworking 2 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course adds to the woodworking knowledge and skills learned in EDTE 3010. In addition to the related safety, processes and procedures, instructional techniques suitable for teaching secondary school classes will also be included. Students will complete the exercises and projects both as a learner and also from the perspective of their future teaching role. Students with a directly related trade qualification will not be allowed to take this course for credit.

Campus
EDTE 4020

 Metalworking 2 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course deals with basic metal working theory, techniques and procedures; including safety, hand tool processes, machine tool processes, materials, and fundamental processes used in metal related manufacturing. Exercises, assignments and projects will be completed that are suitable to junior level secondary grades. Students with a directly related trade qualification will not be allowed to take this course for credit.

Campus
EDTE 4030

 Power Mechanics 2 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course deals with basic electrical and electronics theory, techniques and procedures. Topics include safety, hand tools and equipment, materials, and the fundamental processes used in wiring and circuitry. Exercises, assignments and projects will be completed that are suitable to secondary level coursework. Students with directly related qualifications will not be allowed to take this course for credit.

Campus
EDTE 4040

 Design and Drafting 2 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course continues the development of drafting and design techniques, primarily by the use of Computer Aided Design (CAD) software. Students will practice fundamental skills and drawing standards for various industries. Additional technology will be introduced including 3D surface creation and solids modelling. Related graphics software will be explored. Emphasis will be on developing appropriate and interesting lessons and assignments that are suitable to secondary grades of 8 through 12. Students with directly related qualifications will not be allowed to take this course for credit.

Campus
EDTE 4050

 Electricity and Electronics 2 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course adds to the knowledge and skills learned in EDTE 3050. In addition to the related safety, processes and procedures, instructional techniques suitable for teaching grade 8 to 10 secondary school classes are included. Students complete the exercises and projects both as a learner and from the perspective of their future teaching role.

Campus
EDTE 4110

 Professional Growth and Development (3,1,0)

Credits: 4
This course is designed to allow students to analyse, synthesize and reflect on their experiences as students in this program. Students create a professional portfolio which documents their professional and personal growth as secondary education teachers. Through consideration of their experiences prior to enrolling and how they have grown throughout the program students create a professional development plan for their next year. This plan identifies strengths and areas for improvement in their preparation as a secondary education teacher. Job search techniques, beginning school year approaches, professional organizations, mentoring and the supervision of beginning teachers is included.

Campus
EDTL 1510

 First Nations Language Teaching Methodology 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will introduce students to the major language teaching methodologies. These methodologies will be examined through the use of structured observations, multimedia presentations and/or microteaching assignments.

Campus
EDTL 3100

 Teaching and Learning 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will focus on preparing lesson plans for teaching small groups of children. The course will be integrated with the EDLL 3100 (Language and Literacy 1) and EDPR 3100 (Practicum 1), and this will allow for direct links between course topics and classroom practice. Students will have opportunities to implement teaching practices presented in EDTL 3100 with small groups of children as part of EDPR 3100, with the curriculum content being determined by the EDLL 3100 course. For example, students could prepare a lesson plan on teaching new vocabulary in a cooperative group format, teach the lesson in EDPR 3100, and then make effective revisions to their teaching based on this experience. The method to teach vocabulary would be generated in EDLL 3100, and planning the lesson (including preparing a lesson plan that includes teaching essential group social skills) would be covered in EDTL 3100.

Campus
EDTL 3200

 Teaching and Learning 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will focus on preparing unit plans for teaching whole classrooms of children. The course will be integrated with the EDSC (Science), EDSO 3200 (Social Studies), EDMA 3200 (Mathematics 2), and EDPR 3200 (Practicum 2) courses. This will allow for direct links between course topics and classroom practice. Students will have opportunities to implement teacher practices presented in Teaching and Learning II with whole classrooms of children as part of EDPR 3200, with the curriculum content being determined by the EDSC 3200, EDMA 3200, and EDSO 3200 courses. For example, students could prepare a unit on ancient Egypt that includes cultural aspects of pyramids, perspective drawing of pyramids, and geometry. Students could teach more than one lesson in EDPR 3200 and then make effective revisions based on their reflections.

Campus
EDTL 4100

 Teaching and Learning 3 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is intended to teach students to design collaborative units and to incorporate language and literacy components across curricular areas. Students will be introduced to the basic concepts of cross-curricular integration and they will demonstrate understanding of these concepts by developing integrated projects. These projects will form part of a unit to be designed and implemented in the final practicum EDPR 4200 in Year 2 Winter Semester.

Campus
EDUC 4000

 Directed Studies in Education

Credits: 3
This course will provide the opportunity for self-directed, mentored study in an area of elementary education. Students will examine, in-depth, a topic or issue of professional interest. Outcomes may include a project, research paper, literature review, or program evaluation.

Campus
EDUC 4409

 Literacy Strategies for Suporting Struggling Learners I

Credits: 3
For UVic courses, you will be required to purchase texts and materials separately. Details will be sent to you after your registration is processed.Literacy Strategies for Supporting Struggling Learners I (previously known as part of EDUC 443) The focus of this course is on assessment and instructional issues, practices and strategies for students who struggle with reading and writing. A practical component of this course involves administering and interpreting an informal reading assessment to a student who struggles with literacy and planning an appropriate instructional intervention.
Note: This course was formerly part of EDCI 446 and formerly numbered UVIC ED-B 442.Equipment: Computer with Internet and an email account are required. For more information refer to www.uvcs.uvic.ca/aspnet/Course/Detail/?code=EDDE441.
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Distance
EDUC 4429

 Literacy Strategies for Supporting Struggling Learners II

Credits: 3
For UVic courses, you will be required to purchase texts and materials separately. Details will be sent to you after your registration is processed.Literacy Strategies for Supporting Struggling Learners II.This course builds on the course content of EDUC 4409/UVIC EDCI 441. It further explores assessment and instructional practices for elementary, middle and high school students who experience difficulties with reading and writing. A practical component involves creating and delivering a series of intervention lessons to a student who experiences challenges with literacy learning.
Note: This was formerly part of EDUC 4439/UVIC EDCI 446.Equipment: Computer with Internet and email account are required. For more information refer to www.uvcs.uvic.ca/aspnet/Course/Detail/?code=EDDE442.
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Distance
EDUC 4479

 Principles of Teaching English to Second Language Learners

Credits: 3
The course was called EDUC 452.This course provides a survey of principles and theories for, and the teaching of English to second language learners. The examination of curriculum and methodology for use with ESL learners in the elementary and secondary schools.
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Distance
EDUC 4489

 Organization and Procedures for Instruction of English to Second Language Learners

Credits: 3
The course was called EDUC 458.This course examines current models for the organization and instruction of ESL students at the elementary and secondary levels. The integration of language and content instruction within the regular classroom is emphasized.
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Distance
EDUC 5000

 Learning about Learning (39 hours)

Credits: 3
This course aims to support students exploring their own perspectives on learning as well as taking a look at contemporary theories of learning developed by academics in the education field. At the same time the course is designed to support students in becoming more effective advanced academic learners in the field of Education.

Campus
EDUC 5010

 Research Methods (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will serve as an introduction to research methods. Students will examine a variety of methods for conducting quantitative and qualitative research. Students will also be apprised of procedures for securing Ethics Committee approval for conducting research.

Campus
EDUC 5011

 Research Methods

Credits: 3
This course will serve as an overview to research methods typically used in educational research. It will familiarize students with a range of research methods which will allow students to be critical consumers of research and apply appropriate methods to examine a range of research questions. Students will learn to design research proposals, conduct a literature review, examine a variety of research methods, and learn procedures for securing research ethics approval.
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EDUC 5020

 Philosophy and History of Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Ideas about what education is, what purposes it should serve, and how it should be structured are closely entwined with ideas of what a society is and how it functions. This course provides an introduction to key educational philosophers, and considers their impacts on the history of education and childhood.

Campus
EDUC 5021

 Philosophy and History of Education

Credits: 3
What education is, what purposes it should serve, and how it should be structured is closely entwined with ideas of what a society is and how it functions. This course provides an introduction to key educational philosophers and considers their impact on the history of education.
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Distance
EDUC 5030

 Curriculum, Teaching and Learning (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will familiarize students with a variety of theoretical perspectives on curriculum design/development, implementation, and evaluation. Curriculum, teaching, and learning will be applied to a variety of educational contexts and situations.

Campus
EDUC 5040

 Diversity: Constructing Social Realities (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines the social construction of inequalities based on class, gender, race, and sexuality and the operation of these inequalities within educational institutions. The course surveys the influence of social inequalities on student experiences and student success within the educational system.

Campus
EDUC 5041

 Diversity: Constructing Social Realities

Credits: 3
Students investigate fundamental questions about the relationship between education and society. Inequalities based on class, gender, race, and sexual orientation and how they are socially constructed in contemporary society areconsidered, in addition to how they operate in educational environments. Students identify the effects of identity constructs such as race, class, gender, and sexual orientation on the educational experiences of students and how these constructs shape student access, achievement, and attainment. Students are challenged with the following questions: How do schools reproduce, reinforce, and challenge social inequalities? How do educational materials embrace inclusive approaches within the broader contexts of multiculturalism, globalization and cosmopolitanism?How can educators promote inclusive education that values diversity and equity?
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Distance
EDUC 5060

 Directed Seminar (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Targeted to provide the opportunity for self-directed, mentored scholarship, this course focuses on advanced examination of topics that are of professional interest to the student.

Campus
EDUC 5070

 Research Project: Design (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Research design is integral to professional and scholarly inquiry. This course prepares students for post-graduate research through surveying a variety of designs, methods, and questions, and by exposing students to critical approaches to research design assessment.

Campus
EDUC 5180

 Research Project (6,0,0)

Credits: 6
As a culminating course for students in the project stream of the M.Ed., students will engage in a research project of study. Students will work one-on-one with their supervisor. A reflective paper summarizing the research project as well as a summative presentation of their project to a community of inquiry, including peer colleagues and instructors, will round out the course.

Campus
EDUC 5210

 Educational Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will examine the management of fiscal and human resources that contribute to effective leadership in educational settings.

Campus
EDUC 5220

 Cultural Diversity in Educational Leadership (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Targeted to provide the opportunity for collaboration with a number of entities within higher education and the public schools, this course focuses on issues associated with First Nations education and with educational issues around other ethnicities and diversities prevalent in British Columbia schools.

Campus
EDUC 5230

 The Application of Educational Leadership (0,1,5)

Credits: 6
Targeted to provide the opportunity for a mentored field experience, this course focuses on integrating the knowledge and skills from previous courses into a capstone experience. In collaboration with the mentoring school district, students will engage in applying educational leadership in an internship experience. A seminar component will be included.

Campus
EDUC 5280

 Capstone Seminar (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
This capstone course will provide students with the opportunity to write a major synthesis paper on their learning in the M.Ed. While the precise topic of the paper will be determined by the student in consulation with his/her supervisor, the student will benefit from interaction with peers in this course. Topics covered will include models and examples of sythesis papers, peer review, and presentations. This course will include both face-to-face and on-line delivery.

Campus
EDUC 5281

 Capstone Seminar

Credits: 3
This capstone course will provide students with the opportunity to write a major synthesis paper on their learning in the M.Ed. While the precise topic of the paper will be determined by the student in consultation with his/her supervisor, the student will benefit from interaction with peers in this course. This course will include both face-to-face and on-line delivery.
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Distance
EDUC 5400

 Principles and Processes of Educational Leadership (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to examine the current theories and belief systems that contribute to evolving concepts of leadership, particularly leadership in educational settings. A variety of pedagogical approaches will be used to examine processes that develop relationships, encourage team building, facilitate conflict resolution, and encourage innovation, change and organizational performance. Participants will become familiar with various styles of leadership such as charismatic, transformational, transactional, and collegial, and will be encouraged to examine and challenge their own practices in field settings. Students will investigate current models of supervision and performance assessment and assess the models in the context of differing leadership styles. Participants will develop a repertoire of leadership styles and skills that will be applicable in a variety of educational settings.

Campus
EDUC 5401

 Principles and Processes of Educational Leadership

Credits: 3
This course is designed to examine the current theories and belief systems that contribute to evolving concepts of leadership, particularly leadership in educational settings. A variety of pedagogical approaches will be used to examine processes that develop relationships, encourage team building, facilitate conflict resolution, and encourage innovation, change and organizational performance. Participants will become familiar with various styles of leadership such as charismatic, transformational, transactional, and collegial, and will be encouraged to examine and challenge their own practices in field settings. Students will investigate current models of supervision and performance assessment and assess the models in the context of differing leadership styles. Participants will develop a repertoire of leadership styles and skills that will be applicable in a variety of educational settings.
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EDUC 5420

 Legal Issues in Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines educational governance, policy and laws with an emphasis on their effects on students, teachers, administrators, and parents. Course themes include student and parent rights, labour law, child protection, collective bargaining, and the governance of schools in BC, Canada and internationally.

Campus
EDUC 5421

 Legal Issues in Education

Credits: 3
This course examines educational governance, policy and laws with an emphasis on their effects on students, teachers, administrators, and parents. Course themes include student and parent rights, labour law, child protection, collective bargaining, and the governance of schools in B.C., Canada and internationally.
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EDUC 5440

 Understanding and Managing Conflict (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Understanding and managing conflict is core to many educational roles, for example, teacher, principal, district leaders, counselors, and curriculum consultants. It also is central to leadership in other sectors such as health care, social services, the military, and more. This course will examine these topics: types and causes of conflict, cultural components of conflict, effects of conflict, conflict management, and conflict vis-a-vis organizational change.

Campus
EDUC 5460

 Educational Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will examine the management of fiscal and human resources that contribute to effective leadership in educational settings.

Campus
EDUC 5461

 Educational Management

Credits: 3
This course will examine the management of fiscal and human resources that contribute to effective leadership in educational settings.
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EDUC 5500

 Introduction to Counselling Skills (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Targeted to provide the opportunity to explore the helping professions and the skills needed to communicate effectively with diverse populations.

Campus
EDUC 5510

 Theories in Counselling (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course consists of a study of the major counselling approaches and a study of some of the issues faced by counsellors and by individuals who are considering becoming counsellors.

Campus
EDUC 5520

 Assessment and Evaluation (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a study of group and individual assessment used in elementary and secondary schools.

Campus
EDUC 5521

 Assessment and Evaluation in Counselling

Credits: 3
This course is a study of group and individual assessments used in schools and agencies.
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EDUC 5550

 Introduction to Secondary School Counselling (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
A study of counselling as related to secondary school practice. Emphasis is on the secondary school counsellor's role and functions.

Campus
EDUC 5551

 Introduction to Secondary School Counselling

Credits: 3
A study of counselling as related to secondary school practice. Emphasis is on the secondary school counsellor's roleand functions.
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Distance
EDUC 5560

 Career Counselling and Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a study of career counselling development and theory. The theoretical emphasis is on the development aspects of career decision making from childhood through adulthood.

Campus
EDUC 5580

 Field Experience/Practicum in School Counselling (0,1,5P)(0,1,5P)

Credits: 6
Targeted to provide the opportunity for a mentored field experience, this course focuses on integrating the knowledge and skills from previous courses into a capstone experience. In collaboration with a mentoring school district, students will be engaged in school counselling roles and responsibilities. A seminar component will be included.

Campus
EDUC 5600

 Research Institute: Language, Culture and Community (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will consist of academic study associated with full participation in The Research Institute: Language, Culture and Community at TRU. The institute will include paper presentations based on research addressing a range of educational issues. The main goal of the institute is to facilitate the grounding of educational practice in sound theory and research.
Note: This course can be taken more than once as the content changes every time the course is offered

Campus
EDUC 5990

 ***Special Topics in Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Special topics courses are offered on a temporary basis and are not part of the regular course offerings. This course utilizes the special expertise of a faculty member or a visiting professor to go beyond the usual curriculum and enrich the program of study. Contact the program advisor for information on current offerings.
Note: EDUC 5990 Special Topics in Education can be taken up to 4 times providing the course title includes a different topic each time

Campus
EDUC 5998

 Thesis (0,3,0)(0,3,0)

Credits: 6
This course is one of the exit options for the culmination of the M.Ed. Program. Students conduct a research study, write a thesis and prepare and defend it in front of a thesis examination committee, in a public forum. Students complete this course independently, under the guidance of their supervisor(s) and thesis committee members.

Campus
EDVP 4100

 Drama (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
Teacher candidates are introduced to the theory and practice of drama in the elementary classroom. Participants focus on experiencing various drama forms and conventions, analyzing them as ways of learning, and applying them to specific curricular and classroom needs. .

Campus
EDVP 4110

 Music (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This is an introductory course in music education designed to give students a basis for teaching music in elementary classroom settings. The understanding of musical concepts and the demonstration of skills will be fostered through singing, listening and appreciating, playing instruments, creative expression, and critical reading of the music education literature.

Campus
EDVP 4120

 Visual Arts (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This course is designed to facilitate the fundamental experience and understanding of the role and value of art education, as well as to explore key issues in this domain. Lessons are concerned with basic concepts related to children's artistic production, perceiving and responding to art, and teacher planning for art instruction. Studio activities are interactive and meant to develop strategies and confidence for teacher candidates to deliver and introduce selected art materials, as well as to convey appropriate techniques to facilitate positive art learning for elementary-aged students.

Campus
EDVP 4150

 Music Curriculum and Instruction: Elementary (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course includes theoretical and practical components designed to develop skills, concepts, and attitudes in music education. In addition to extending theory and practice applications for the classroom, students focus on composition and creativity.

Campus
EDVP 4160

 The Arts and Media Literacy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Critical engagement with various media teaches us how to 'read the world'; from these interactions, we construct the texts with which we explore and communicate our own identity. Students explore the multiple ways in which the artistic languages of visual art, music, drama, and written words represent and communicate meaning-making, literacy, and personal expression within school and broader life contexts.

Campus
EDVP 4170

 Music As Language, Language As Music: Intertextual Dialogues (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This interdisciplinary course looks at the languages of words, music, gesture and image as vehicles for artistic expression, social commentary and cultural communication.

Campus
ELEI 2000

 Industrial Electrician Apprentice Level 1

Credits: 0
Industrial Electrical Level 1 Apprenticeship Theory for the Industry Electrician Apprenticeship Program. Industrial electricians typically install, test, troubleshoot and repair industrial electrical equipment and associated electrical and electronic controls. They are employed by electrical contractors and maintenance departments of factories, plants, mines, shipyards and other industrial establishments.

Campus
ELEI 3000

 Industrial Electrician Apprentice Level 2

Credits: 0
Industrial Electrical Level 2 Apprenticeship Theory for the Industry Electrician Apprenticeship Program. Industrial electricians typically install, test, troubleshoot and repair industrial electrical equipment and associated electrical and electronic controls. They are employed by electrical contractors and maintenance departments of factories, plants, mines, shipyards and other industrial establishments.

Campus
ELEI 4000

 Industrial Electrician Apprentice Level 3

Credits: 0
Industrial Electrical Level 3 Apprenticeship Theory for the Industry Electrician Apprenticeship Program. Industrial electricians typically install, test, troubleshoot and repair industrial electrical equipment and associated electrical and electronic controls. They are employed by electrical contractors and maintenance departments of factories, plants, mines, shipyards and other industrial establishments.

Campus
ELEI 5000

 Industrial Electrician Apprentice Level 4

Credits: 0
Industrial Electrical Level 4 Apprenticeship Theory for the Industry Electrician Apprenticeship Program. Industrial electricians typically install, test, troubleshoot and repair industrial electrical equipment and associated electrical and electronic controls. They are employed by electrical contractors and maintenance departments of factories, plants, mines, shipyards and other industrial establishments.

Campus
ELEL 1900

 Electrical Trade Sampler (120 hours)

Credits: 0
This course is a sampler of the electrical trade based on the Electrical Foundation Program outline from the Industry Training Authority of BC. Students will gain familiarity with the safe use of hand tools, portable power tools and other equipment regularly used by electricians, as well as gaining familiarity with many of the materials used in the Trade. The emphasis of this course is on developing practical, hands-on electrical skills.

Campus
ELEL 2000

 Electrician Apprentice Level 1

Credits: 0
Electrician means a person who installs, constructs, alters, repairs, maintains, commissions, tests, services, calibrates and operates related electrical and electronic systems in any premise, place, building or structure.

Campus
ELEL 3000

 Electrician Apprentice Level 2

Credits: 0
Electrician means a person who installs, constructs, alters, repairs, maintains, commissions, tests, services, calibrates and operates related electrical and electronic systems in any premise, place, building or structure.

Campus
ELEL 4000

 Electrician Apprentice Level 3

Credits: 0
Electrician means a person who installs, constructs, alters, repairs, maintains, commissions, tests, services, calibrates and operates related electrical and electronic systems in any premise, place, building or structure.

Campus
ELEL 5000

 Electrician Apprentice Level 4

Credits: 0
Electrician means a person who installs, constructs, alters, repairs, maintains, commissions, tests, services, calibrates and operates related electrical and electronic systems in any premise, place, building or structure.

Campus
ELTE 1010

 Electrical Trade Entry/Theory

Credits: 0
Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on lab experience in the following topics: electrical safety fundamentals; DC circuits; electromagnetism; meters and test equipment; electrical prints and drawings; AC motor controls; electrical code and wiring; and industrial power electronics.

Campus
ELTE 1110

 Electrical Trade Entry/Practical

Credits: 0
Students gain experience in hands-on shop training in residential, commercial and industrial equipment installation and wiring methods.

Campus
ENGL 0300

 Fundamentals of English (8,0,0)

Credits: 4
ABE - Fundamentals: This course combines reading and writing to provide students with a greater ability to cope in work and educational situations. Students will practice reading and writing skills, and develop basic grammer.
Note: This course is taught by the University and Employment Preparation

Campus
ENGL 0400

 Basic Language Skills (6,0,0)

Credits: 4
ABE - Intermediate: This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and strategies to enter higher level courses. It is based on the following core skills: vocabulary development, reading, writing and study skills.
Note: This course is taught by the University Preparation Department

Campus
ENGL 0401

 Reading and Writing English

Credits: 0
This course is designed to develop skills as a writer by practicing the stages of writing from rough draft, grammar and sentence structure, revising the draft, editing, and final draft. The course covers both narrative and expository writing, with an emphasis on the expository form for both academic and business purposes. (Grade 10 equivalency)
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ENGL 0500

 Developing Writing Skills (6,0,0)

Credits: 4
ABE - Advanced: A basic writing skills course which covers mechanics, sentence structure, grammar and composition. The major modes of writing (description, narration, and exposition) are covered.
Note: This course is taught by the University Preparation Department

Campus
ENGL 0501

 Advanced English Skills

Credits: 0
Students review and practice the skills necessary for writing effectual sentences, paragraphs, and short essays. By the end of the course, students are able to write effective application letters and short critical essays about literary selections. (Grade 11 equivalency). Please see the "Detailed Course Description-Delivery Method" to determine which version (print, online) of the course you wish to take.
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ENGL 0600

 Literature and Composition (6,0,0)

Credits: 4
ABE - Provincial: ENGL 0600 is a Provincial Level (Grade 12 equivalency) course which prepares students for the demands of compositions required in academic courses. It provides for further development of writing and thinking skills begun in earlier levels. Students work with a variety of rhetorical models for essay development. Also included is a critical analysis of selected works of prose and poetry.
Note: This course is taught by the University Preparation Department

Campus
ENGL 0601

 Introduction to Literature

Credits: 0
This course introduces Canadian writers and the different forms of fiction. Students learn to think critically about literature. Grade 12 English equivalency.
Note: Students should obtain an English Language and Writing Assessment form and have their skills assessed to make sure they start with the course best-suited to their needs. The form is available on the TRU-OL website and from Student Services.
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ENGL 0620

 Aboriginal Literature and Composition (6,0,0)

Credits: 4
ABE - Provincial: ENGL 0620 is a Provincial Level (Grade 12 equivalency) course which prepares students for the demands of compositions required in academic courses. It is an alternate course to ABE - Provincial and, as such, can be taken in the place of ENGL 0600. It provides for further development of writing and thinking skills begun in earlier levels. Students work with a variety of rhetorical models for essay development. It will include activities that are delivered in a way that maximizes the learning potential of Aboriginal learners (including learners' circles with talking sticks, oral presentations, and elders' presentations) and that helps ease entry of Aboriginal students into a university setting. Also, it includes a critical analysis of selected works of prose and poetry, many of which will be written by Aboriginal authors or which will cover topics relevant to Aboriginal issues.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ENGL 0600 and ENGL 0620

Campus
ENGL 0641

 Survey of British Literature

Credits: 0
ENGL 0641 is the equivalent of academic Grade 12 English. It presents a traditional survey of English Literature, from its earliest beginnings to the second half of the twentieth century.
Note: Students should obtain an English Language and Writing Assessment form and have their skills assessed to make sure they start with the course best-suited to their needs. The form is available on the TRU-OL website and fromStudent Services.
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Distance
ENGL 0661

 Written Communication

Credits: 0
This course provides an introduction to writing clear, positive messages and to understanding basic writing strategies. It is designed to help you to be more proficient at the kind of writing you need to do-at home, at school,and in the workplace. This course will show you some typical techniques for effective writing and will give you practice in writing various sorts of e-mail messages, memos, letters, college essays, and workplace reports.
Note: Students should obtain an English Language and Writing Assessment form and have their skills assessed to make sure they start with the course best-suited to their needs. The form is available on the TRU-OL website and from Student Services.
More information about this course

Distance
ENGL 1001

 Literature and Composition I

Credits: 3
This course introduces short stories and the novel through examples of the genres drawn primarily from the twentieth century. The course is not a chronological or historical survey of literature. Instead, it examines the general characteristics of fiction by focusing on short stories and a novel. This course also provides a review of basic grammar, punctuation, and instruction in composing critical essays. ENGL 1011 (Literature and Composition II) is the continuation of ENGL 1001 and focuses on drama and poetry.------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------K
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ENGL 1011

 Literature and Composition II

Credits: 3
This course is the second part of first-year English and introduces you to poetry and drama. In the first half, the course briefly considers the major features of poetry and then looks closely at how a poem is organized, how thematic patterns emerge, how the work of a specific poet can be characterized according to style, and how specific subjects can be treated in different ways. You will be studying a selection of modern and contemporary poems. In the second half of the course, you will study three plays, each of which introduces an important form of drama. Topics for consideration include dramatic structure, tragedy, comedy, characterization, theme, and expressionist theatre.
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ENGL 1021

 Composition and Indigenous Literature in Canada I

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to an exciting range of Indigenous Canadian literature and orature, including autobiographies, speeches, essays, short stories and storytelling. Students will also have the opportunity to listen to audio CDs of interviews and readings by many of the authors studied in the course and to view a video of a storytelling performance and an interview with a contemporary Indigenous multimedia artist.
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ENGL 1031

 Composition and Indigenous Literature in Canada II

Credits: 3
This course is comparable to the second half of other first-year university English courses. Course requirements include reading: novels, a novel excerpt, one-act and full-length plays, and a wide range of poems. The six instructional units in this course cover a broad and exciting range and depth of literature written in English by Canadian Indigenous writers, beginning in the twentieth century. Students will develop an appreciation for both the significance of oral storytelling to contemporary Aboriginal writers as well as the diverse contributions of these writers to contemporary literature. Students will identify, analyze and discuss many literary conventions related to fiction, drama and poetry. In addition, students will receive further experience in composition and in writing critical essays, including a formal research paper.
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ENGL 1061

 Written Communication

Credits: 3
This course provides an introduction to writing clear, positive messages and to understanding basic writing strategies. It is designed to help you to be more proficient at the kind of writing you need to do - at home, at school, and in the workplace. This course will show you some typical techniques for effective writing and will give you practice in writing various sorts of e-mail messages, memos, letters, college essays, and workplace reports. Advanced standing may be approved by; CHA, CIM.This course was previously known as ENGL 106.
More information about this course

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ENGL 1071

 Business Communication

Credits: 3
Your success in the world of work depends to a large extent on your ability to communicate. This course will provide you with practice in occupational writing, both correspondence and reports. The first half of the course deals with correspondence, with particular emphasis on employment letters, customer relations and sales messages. The remaining units focus on report preparation, with practice in writing descriptions, instructions, progress reports and proposals.The material is interesting, and the exercises are relevant to most administrative, supervisory and managerial positions. The approach to study should make your work really enjoyable. If you are motivated and can commit yourself to doing a good job of the course, you will derive a great deal of benefit from it.This course was previously known as ENGL 107.
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ENGL 1100

 Introduction to University Writing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the practices of reading and writing in scholarly contexts. Students will read and analyze scholarly journal articles from a variety of disciplines. They will also develop their abilities to compose in the genres and sub-genres of scholarly writing, including incorporating research and documentation in a grammatically correct style.

Campus
ENGL 1101

 Composition

Credits: 3
The aim of this course is to prepare students to communicate and create new knowledge in the many different spheres - academic and business; personal and community - of life and work. The course is designed to help students gain control over the conventions of writing through readings, extensive writing practice, guided self-evaluation and feedback from the course tutor. Topics include effective writing processes, academic writing format and style, rhetorical methods of organization, critical reading skills and integrating and documenting research sources. Students will also learn to find guidelines for writing and apply grammatically correct and academically appropriate sentence structure, style, diction and tone.
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ENGL 1110

 Introduction to Fiction (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the literary forms of the short story and the novel based on a particular theme chosen by the professor. Through lecture, class discussion, and written assignments, students develop their ability to explore, appreciate, and make connections among works selected from a wide range of classic and contemporary forms of storytelling.

Campus
ENGL 1120

 Introduction to Poetry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to literary forms of poetry based on a particular theme chosen by the professor. Through lecture, class discussion, and written assignments, students develop their ability to explore, appreciate, and make connections among poems selected from a wide range of classic and contemporary forms.

Campus
ENGL 1140

 Introduction to Drama (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to literary forms of drama based on a particular theme chosen by the professor. Through lecture, class discussion, and written assignments, students develop their ability to explore, appreciate, and make connections among plays selected from a wide range of classic and contemporary forms.

Campus
ENGL 1150

 Introduction to Creative Writing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the field of creative writing by focusing on three of the following genres - poetry, fiction, drama and creative non-fiction. By reading and analyzing contemporary work, students determine how these texts are constructed. Students work on developing images, voice, character, setting, and narrative through a series of exercises, and gain an understanding of specific concepts and terminology used by creative writers.

Campus
ENGL 1210

 Introduction to Drama and Poetry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to literary forms of poetry and drama based on a particular theme chosen by the professor. Through lecture, class discussion, and written assignments, students develop their ability to explore, appreciate, and make connections among poems and plays selected from a wide range of classic and contemporary forms.

Campus
ENGL 2010

 Writing and Critical Thinking: The Personal in Academic Discourse (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The subject of this course includes reading and writing, with a focus on the literacy narratives genre. Students read and interpret a selection of literacy narratives by scholars as well as scholarly articles that explore the role of the personal in academic discourse. Students gain extensive practice in thinking critically and writing about their own literacy experiences.

Campus
ENGL 2020

 Writing and Critical Thinking: Research (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The subject of this course is academic writing, with a focus on the research genres, including critical summaries, research proposals and research papers. Students analyze and gain extensive practice in research writing, while also considering various stylistic strategies.

Campus
ENGL 2040

 Canadian Drama: From Page to Stage and Screen (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Through a focus on modern and contemporary plays, this course introduces students to various theatrical techniques and dramatic modes. Works by such playwrights as Tremblay, Ryga, Highway, Clements, and Lepage may be among those studied. Whenever possible, texts are studied in conjunction with local theatrical productions.

Campus
ENGL 2060

 Creative Writing - Fiction (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course consists of lectures and workshops on writing literary fiction. Through lectures, readings and tests, students identify and critique the use of fictional techniques in contemporary fiction. Assignments require students to apply their knowledge of fiction and skills by writing original creative work.

Campus
ENGL 2070

 Creative Writing - Drama (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course consists of lectures and workshops on writing stage plays. Lectures and assignments focus on the techniques and requirements of contemporary play writing.

Campus
ENGL 2080

 Creative Writing - Poetry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course consists of lectures and workshops on writing poetry, with an emphasis on the study and practice of basic poetry writing techniques. Through lectures, readings and assignments, students identify and apply various stylistic elements of contemporary poetry writing.

Campus
ENGL 2110

 Literary Landmarks in English to 1700 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course explores the development of the English language, key genres, influential authors, and important literary movements that emerged from approximately 700 C.E. to the late 1600s. Representative genres include the epic, romance, sonnet, and comedy. As students explore these genres in their historical and cultural contexts, we consider the far-reaching influence of Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton as well as the contributions of other writers of the period. Topics may include the nature of a 'literary landmark,' the continuity and diversity of literary images and genres, the emergence of women's writing, and the role of literature and the imagination in nation building. This course is required for English Majors and Minors.

Campus
ENGL 2111

 English Literature from Chaucer to Milton

Credits: 3
This course is a brief, selective survey of English literature from Chaucer to the late seventeenth century. The reading list is drawn from a list that includes Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales, Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra, and Milton's Paradise Lost (selections) as well as some of the works of such Elizabethan and Jacobean poets as Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Jonson.
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ENGL 2120

 Reading Literature: Essential Skills (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is recommended for all English Majors, but anyone hoping to develop advanced reading and writing skills will find this course interesting as well as useful for developing practical tools for success in writing and literature courses. Students learn greater appreciation for the language of literature. The course emphasizes close readings as well as analysis of the historical, political, and cultural dimensions of works from three genres: poetry, drama, and fiction. Critical approaches to literature are briefly introduced. Course availability: This course is offered every year.
Note: This course is recommended for English majors

Campus
ENGL 2140

 Biblical and Classical Backgrounds of English Literature 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The course introduces students to Classical literature (mainly Greek) and the Bible (Old Testament: Hebrew Scriptures)& texts that are relevant and significant to subsequent culture, and especially for written works in English. Students also read and discuss additional representative works in English that have been influenced by the Bible and by Classical literature.

Campus
ENGL 2150

 Women and Literature: Voice, Identity and Difference (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore women's voices, past and present, in fiction and non-fiction. The focus is on issues related to women's self-expression, paying attention to the formation of identity, and taking into account elements of difference such as social class, ethnicity, and culture. Students gain an appreciation of the creative approaches women have used to voice their life experiences and their visions. Through lecture, class discussion, and written assignments, students develop their ability to think critically and write about literature.

Campus
ENGL 2160

 Introduction to American Literature 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine major writers and works in American literature up to 1900. Students analyze and discuss nineteenth-century works that explore the development of American literary identity, including poetry, nonfiction, and prose fiction.

Campus
ENGL 2170

 Contesting Time, Space and Genre in Canadian Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course investigates Canadian literature, in relation to changing concepts of national identity, and as expressed through Canadian attitudes toward our history and geography. Students consider literary work across a wide range of historical periods, spaces, and genres, with a special thematic emphasis on one of the following in any given calendar year: history in Canadian literature, country vs. city life in Canada, or re/writing the Canadian landscape. Please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department for the current thematic offering.

Campus
ENGL 2180

 Studies in Poetry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students improve their ability to respond to and interpret poetry. Representative poems are examined to gain an understanding of the relationship between language, structure and experience.

Campus
ENGL 2190

 Studies in Drama (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to modern drama, from the beginnings of Western modernist theatre through to the postmodern writing and productions of the later twentieth century. Plays are examined as both text and performance, and students gain insight into different literary techniques of the playwright, drama forms, traditions, and subversions. The various components of the play's narrative are also explored, and the dramas are contextualized in order for students to better understand their development and meaning. Students are introduced to aspects of drama theory as they develop the academic skills of critical reading and interpretation needed to navigate and transform the studied texts. Filmed versions of the texts are also used as support material.

Campus
ENGL 2200

 ***Studies in Literature 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The content of this course changes each year; please contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 2210

 Survey of English Literature, 18th and 19th Century (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines selected major authors of the Augustan, Romantic and Victorian periods in English literature. Authors may include Dryden, Pope, Swift, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Shelley, Tennyson and Arnold, and representative novelists.

Campus
ENGL 2211

 English Literature of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

Credits: 3
This course examines some of the key writings of major authors in English literature from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries (continuation of ENGL 2111). The reading list is drawn from a list that includes Pope, Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Keats, Emily Bronte, Arnold, Tennyson, and Browning. Attention is also given to the political, philosophical, social, and religious atmospheres of what we now call the Neo-Classical, the Romantic, and the Victoria periods of English literature.
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ENGL 2240

 Biblical and Classical Backgrounds of English Literature 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to Classical literature (mainly Roman) and the Bible (New Testament) - texts that are relevant and important for subsequent culture and especially for writing in English. Representative works in English that have been influenced by the Bible and by Classical literature are also read and discussed.

Campus
ENGL 2250

 Women and Literature: Women's Bodies/Women's Roles (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students read a diverse range of fiction and non-fiction about the experiences connected to inhabiting a female body and the roles women have assumed over time with varying degrees of acceptance or resistance. Through lecture, class discussion, and written assignments, students deepen their understanding of women's ideas on these matters as well as develop their ability to think critically and write about literature.

Campus
ENGL 2260

 Introduction to American Literature 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine major writers and works in American literature after 1900. The course may include poetry, nonfiction, prose fiction, and drama, with a focus on the rise of American modernism.

Campus
ENGL 2270

 Subversion and Social Justice in Canadian Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the ways in which Canadian poets, dramatists and fiction writers have been in the forefront of movements for social change, expressing new visions of responsible government, economic fairness, and social equity. The course investigates Canadian literature and expressions of subversion and social justice via special thematic emphasis on one of the following in any given calendar year: protest literature in Canada and satire; and Canadian literature and creativity; and citizenship in Canada. Since the content of this course changes each year, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 2400

 ***Studies in Literature 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The content of this course changes each year. Please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 2410

 Aboriginal Canadian Literature: Humour and Storytelling (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the tradition of storytelling in Indigenous cultures and focus on modern and contemporary poetry, drama, short stories, novels, and essays.

Campus
ENGL 3020

 Travel Media (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course studies novels, journals, blogs, films, and guidebooks in order to understand and produce texts in the complex matrix called "travel media." It examines many examples of travel media, both commercial and personal in order to understand how it has developed and currently works. These examples are considered from many perspectives such as the figure of "the Other," colonialism, the flaneur, postmodernism, and even visual and document design. The course considers the strategies of design that constitute the various genres of travel media, from logs, vlogs, and multimedia, to guides, and even stories.

Campus
ENGL 3080

 Advanced Composition 1 - Personal Expression (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on the rhetoric of personal expression, especially description and narration. Students are introduced to the concept of how multiple literacies variously compete and interact in the world around us; in practical terms, the course explores how a focus on personal expression can be used to improve writing skills at an advanced level.

Campus
ENGL 3090

 Advanced Composition 2 - Writing in the Disciplines (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on practices of reading and writing in scholarly contexts. The conditions students encounter as readers at university, and the expectations they must meet as writers at university are addressed. The course begins with a theoretical discussion of style and then offers students the opportunity to examine examples of academic writing, and to compose their own scholarly argument.

Campus
ENGL 3140

 ***Studies in Fiction (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course includes special topics involving thematic, generic, or formal approaches to fiction. Students may take this course more than once, provided the content is different each time. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 3150

 Studies in Non-Fiction (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students discuss the development and theory of a non-fiction genre, including autobiography, biography, creative non-fiction, memoir, or travel narrative. This course may be taken more than once, provided the content is different each time. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 3160

 ***Studies in Literature and the Other Arts (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students analyze the strategies writers and artists in other media use to deal with common themes, and examine problems in formal and stylistic relationships between literature and other arts. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 3170

 Science Fiction (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on the main trends in science fiction since 1960, including works by Dick, Ballard, Le Guin, Gibson, and others.

Campus
ENGL 3180

 Children's Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine works of children's literature from the last three centuries (including selected fairy tales, novels, stories, poems, and picture books) in order to explore changing perceptions of childhood over time. Students consider how literature aimed at children was used to differentiate children from adults (as well as to challenge such a distinction), to entertain, and to socialize children on issues relevant to their lives in a rapidly changing world. The course also explores connections between children's literature and adult cultural traditions, and demonstrates the importance of the hybrid (or simultaneous child and adult) audiences suggested by many of these works.

Campus
ENGL 3190

 ***Studies in the Intellectual Backgrounds of Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course covers special topics in the history of ideas, with particular reference to ideas that illuminate or are embodied in literature. Students may take this course more than once provided the content is different each time. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 3200

 History of the English Language (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
This course surveys the development of the English language from the West Germanic to the present; students gain an understanding of phonology, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary.

Campus
ENGL 3300

 Reading Literature and Literary Theory: Advanced Skills (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an opportunity for extended practice in literary criticism -- that is, in reading works closely and responding to them through interpretation and evaluation. Students examine a limited number of texts through a variety of critical theories such as formalism, reader response, psychological, New Historicist, feminist, deconstruction and cultural criticism. Students gain an understanding of the theories and of the degree to which each approach 'opens up' a text.

Campus
ENGL 3320

 Modern Critical Theories (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course surveys major modern theories, and provides students with an opportunity to apply them to literary texts.

Campus
ENGL 3330

 *** Special Topics in Creative Writing (1,2,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers the advanced study and practice of one or more of the following topics: literature for a young audience, and genre writing (for example, mystery, horror, or fantasy). Through readings and workshops, students define their own projects and produce a substantial portfolio of original work. Students may take this course more than once, provided the content is different each time. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 3340

 Writing Speculative Fiction (1,2,0)

Credits: 3
This advanced course in writing speculative fiction includes work on projects in science fiction, post-apocalyptic fiction, and prehistoric fiction, and progresses through discussion, lectures, and workshops. Assignments, discussions, readings and workshops focus on learning and implementing a variety of fictional methods within these genres. Students explore the intersections of the known and unknown worlds through the tools of literary fiction.

Campus
ENGL 3350

 ***Studies in Major Authors (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course probes the works of no more than two significant writers. Specific topics are announced each year. Students may take this course more than once, provided the content is different each time. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 3360

 Advanced Short Fiction Writing (1,2,0)

Credits: 3
Through readings, discussion, lectures, and workshops, this course provides an opportunity for advanced practice in writing fictional short stories, between 1,000 and 10,000 words in length. Students produce a substantial portfolio of original work.

Campus
ENGL 3370

 Novel Writing (1,2,0)

Credits: 3
Through readings, discussion, lectures, and workshops, this course provides an opportunity for practice in planning and writing a novel. Students define their own projects and produce the first 30 pages of a novel as well as a substantial synopsis of the whole work.

Campus
ENGL 3380

 Advanced Poetry Writing (1,2,0)

Credits: 3
Through readings, discussion, lectures, and workshops, this course provides an opportunity for practice in planning and writing poetry. Assignments and workshops focus on learning, implementing, and revising a variety of poetic forms and styles. Students learn about a variety of poetic schools and traditions.

Campus
ENGL 3390

 Advanced Drama Writing (1,2,0)

Credits: 3
Through readings, discussion, lectures, and workshops, this course provides an opportunity for advanced practice in writing stage plays. Students are expected to write a one-act play of 20-40 pages.

Campus
ENGL 3550

 Chaucer (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides a detailed study of Chaucer's major works.

Campus
ENGL 3650

 Shakespeare (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
This course consists of lectures on various aspects of Shakespeare's art, and includes a detailed study of twelve plays.

Campus
ENGL 3660

 Studies in Shakespeare (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore Shakespeare and his work. This course may be taken more than once provided the content is different each time. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 3710

 Poetry of the Early Seventeenth Century (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the two main traditions of English verse in this 'golden age of poetry': the metaphysical and neo-classical. Of the metaphysical poets, Donne and Herbert receive most attention, while Jonson and Herrick are most representative of the neo-classical tradition. Interesting variations within each mode are also considered. The emergence of women's writing in this context is important, especially in the works of Lanyer, Wroth, and Philips. Students consider such topics as the politics of desire, representing the sacred, the ideology of landscape, the emergence of the subject, and the usefulness of such terms as 'metaphysical,' and 'neo-classical.' Emphasis is placed on the thoughtful reading of poems in their cultural context for the purpose of appreciating each poet's literary art.

Campus
ENGL 3730

 ***Topics in Seventeenth-Century Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course explores special themes, forms, and authors (excluding Milton) of seventeenth century literature. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 3740

 Milton's Paradise Lost (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides students with the opportunity to gain an in-depth appreciation of Milton's Paradise Lost, one of the most influential poems in the English language. As well as reading the poem closely and considering such topics as Milton's epic style, the gendering of Adam and Eve, the relationship between individual liberty and authority, the characterization of Satan, and Milton's use of symbolic forms and images, we place the poem in the context of Milton's life and his participation in the Civil War. Above all, Milton's achievement in the art of poetry is emphasized since this is what influenced such diverse writers as Blake and Pope, Eliot and Melville, Byron and Bronte, Pullman and Lewis and led him to have such an important impact on literary tradition.

Campus
ENGL 3750

 Milton (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
This course is an in-depth examination of the works, and their contexts, of seventeenth century English poet, John Milton.

Campus
ENGL 3810

 Poetry of the Age of Dryden and Pope (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore poetry from the Restoration to the middle of the eighteenth century. Representative authors include Rochester, Finch, and Addison, in addition to Dryden and Pope.

Campus
ENGL 3820

 Poetry of the Middle and Late Eighteenth Century (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore poetry from the time of Johnson to the beginnings of Romanticism. Representative authors include Johnson, Collins, Smart, and Cowper.

Campus
ENGL 3840

 The English Novel in the Eighteenth Century (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the beginnings of the novel and its development, from Defoe to Jane Austen.

Campus
ENGL 3850

 Restoration and Early Eighteenth Century Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers a survey of Restoration and early eighteenth century English literature and its backgrounds. Students examine poetry, drama and prose. The course is organized chronologically, to emphasize literary developments.

Campus
ENGL 3860

 Mid and Late Eighteenth Century Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers a survey of literature from the middle to the end of the eighteenth century. Students explore poetry, drama and prose, as well as backgrounds to the works studied. The course is organized chronologically, to emphasize literary developments.

Campus
ENGL 3890

 Studies in Eighteenth Century Thought and Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This single-term or full-year course studies systems of thought, or other cultural elements, as they contribute to the interpretation and evaluation of literature. Students may take this course more than once, provided the content is different each time. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 3910

 Romantic Poetry (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, the Shelleys, and Keats.

Campus
ENGL 3940

 The Victorian Novel (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Developments in the novel from Dickens to Thomas Hardy.

Campus
ENGL 4000

 Early Modern British Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Development in British Literature, including the genres of novel, poetry, drama, and biography, from 1880 to the 1920s.

Campus
ENGL 4040

 The Modern British Novel (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Developments in the novel up to the Second World War.

Campus
ENGL 4130

 Contemporary British Drama (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course surveys British drama from the 1950s, with Beckett's absurdist work and John Osbourne's hyper-realism, to the 1980s and 1990s' feminist cultural critiques by Caryl Churchill and Pam Gems.

Campus
ENGL 4140

 The Contemporary British Novel (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the novel, from the Second World War to the present.

Campus
ENGL 4150

 ***Studies in Women's Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Major themes in Women's literature or theory.

Campus
ENGL 4160

 Topics in Modern Irish Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines topics in Irish literature (in English) since the Irish Literary Renaissance. Students may take this course more than once, provided the content is different each time. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 4200

 Canadian Literature (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
A study of the literature in English with some attention to major French-Canadian works in translation. **This course is going to be semesterized. Consult English and Modern Languages department for details.

Campus
ENGL 4240

 Nineteenth Century Canadian Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will survey major authors and trends in Canadian literature written before 1900. Some pre-nineteenth century work will be included, but the course will focus on the nineteenth century.

Campus
ENGL 4241

 Modern British Fiction

Credits: 3
This course provides a survey of modern British fiction from its development early in the twentieth century, to its current achievements and trends. The course focuses on the work of six representative novelists and examines the way these writers perceive the world around them and how they construct their fiction. A close critical reading of six novels allows students to understand each work on its own terms, to place it in the context of each writer's full body of work, and, finally, to see in it reflections of the major themes of modern British fiction.
More information about this course

Distance
ENGL 4250

 Contemporary Canadian Poetry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on English Canadian poetry written between mid-twentieth century and the present. In addition to examining and analyzing representative poems, students are expected to consider questions of both a 'national poetry' and the poetic genre itself. Students explore the following questions: What constitutes the Canadian-ness of Canadian poetry? What poetic techniques characterize innovative expression in these poems? Can common themes and poetic techniques be ascribed to these poems? Throughout the semester, students are encouraged to consider individual poems and the work of individual poets in this larger context.

Campus
ENGL 4260

 ***Studies in Canadian Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course presents special topics and approaches to Canadian literature. Literary periods, authors and material vary depending on the research interests of the instructor. Recent examples include Humour and Satire, British Columbia Literature, and Canadian Writing from the Edge of Genre. Students may take this course more than once, provided the content is different each time. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 4321

 Modern Canadian Fiction

Credits: 3
Like all literature courses, this course aims to make students feel at home among good writers and their writing; in particular it is meant to encourage a lifetime of enjoying Canadian fiction and criticism. Students learn to recognize the stylistic fashions that distinguish the periods of Canadian writing since the 1920s. By exploring novels and short stories published between 1920 and the present, the course acquaints students with major Canadian authors, the record of Canadian life that their works have laid down, their penetrations of a wider human experience, and the questions of literary judgment that they raise, notably the question of realism. The chosen texts address questions not only about writing, but also about Canadian concerns of regionalism, mythology and identity, and multiculturalism.
More information about this course

Distance
ENGL 4340

 American Fiction to 1900 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on the writings of Irving, Poe, Hawthorne and Melville.

Campus
ENGL 4341

 Modern Canadian Theatre

Credits: 3
This is a survey course in Canadian drama from 1967 to 1992, a very rich twenty-five-year period that saw Canadian playwriting, performance, and production grow from obscurity to a lively, thriving component of Canadian literature and culture, as well as an international export. This course is designed to introduce students to contemporary drama and theatre in Canada through the study of twelve plays.
More information about this course

Distance
ENGL 4350

 American Fiction in the First Half of The Twentieth Century (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine major works and movements between 1900 and 1950, including naturalism, realism, and modernism.

Campus
ENGL 4351

 Modern American Fiction

Credits: 3
Literature is one way of making sense of the world. This course looks at some of the ways modern American writers have made sense, or tried to make sense, of the rapidly changing twentieth century. Although there's a world of difference between, say, the disturbing introspection of Sylvia Plath's heroine and Vladimir Nabokov's rapturous villain, students learn to evaluate each work in its social and artistic context. Students examine how the positions we occupy-for example, our gender, class, or race-determine in part the kind of sense we make of the world, as both writers and readers.
More information about this course

Distance
ENGL 4360

 ***Studies in American Literature (3,0,0) or (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 12
This course involves special studies of individual periods of authors or themes in American literature. Students may take this course more than once, provided the content is different each time. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 4370

 American Fiction From Mid-Twentieth Century to the Present (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines major works and movements since 1950, including realism, neorealism, and postmodernism.

Campus
ENGL 4440

 Postcolonial Women's Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course studies literature, written in English, by women from African nations, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the Caribbean, and India. It includes work written from imperialist, colonial, and aboriginal perspectives. Students explore identity and gender politics through the analysis of texts by women from diverse nations and backgrounds.

Campus
ENGL 4450

 Commonwealth/Postcolonial Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course surveys 'colonial' and 'postcolonial' literature from Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Asia, Africa and the Caribbean, with an emphasis on modern fiction. Works are studied within their historical and cultural contexts, and students gain an understanding of issues including canon formation, generic conventions, language choices, ethnic and first nations identifications, and competing definitions of 'postcolonial.'

Campus
ENGL 4460

 ***Studies in Commonwealth/Postcolonial Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine major themes in postcolonial literature or theory. This course may be taken more than once, provided the content is different each time. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 4470

 Studies in Aboriginal Literature (North American) (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on the contemporary writing (in English) of Indigenous people in Canada and the United States. Students explore how aboriginal writers adapt oral strategies to writing and employ various techniques and devices to challenge and subvert colonial assumptions about genre, gender, class, and race.

Campus
ENGL 4510

 ***Studies in Literary Movements (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine such literary movements as Naturalism, Realism, Imagism, Impressionism, Vorticism, and Modernism. This course may be taken more than once, provided the content is different each time. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 4600

 American Poetry of the First Half of the Twentieth Century (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine major poets, themes, and movements between 1900 and 1950.

Campus
ENGL 4610

 American Poetry From the Mid-Twentieth Century to the Present (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine major poets, themes, and movements from 1950 to the present.

Campus
ENGL 4760

 Editing and Publishing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course engages students in editing and publishing, with a focus on Canadian literature and language. Students are introduced to the study and practice of publishing, by exploring the history of literary journal publication in Canada; gaining hands-on experience editing articles for a journal; writing critical reviews; and considering page design layout and printing. Students experience the publishing process, including manuscript review, manuscript editing, copy editing, layout, and publication. process of manuscript review, manuscript editing, copyediting, layout, and publication.

Campus
ENGL 4780

 Studies in Literature and Film (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course explores the sister arts of literature and film and offers an in-depth study of the relationships between cinematic form and literary genres, such as the novel, drama, and the short story. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 4790

 ***Studies in Genre (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore a specific genre such as romance, comedy, travel narrative, or detective fiction. This course may be taken more than once, provided the content is different each time. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 4970

 Directed Studies in Language and Linguistics

Credits: 6
Students investigate a specific topic in language linguistics as agreed upon by the faculty member and the student. Projects must comply with all required approval procedures. Students may take this course more than once, provided the content is different each time. Since the content of this course varies, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.

Campus
ENGL 4991

 Directed Studies

Credits: 3
This course is a requirement for completion of the Bachelor of Arts, English major, and may be taken for completion of the Post-baccalaureate Certificate in Liberal Arts. Students are required to review the literature, both original and interpretative, in their particular area of study, offer critical assessment of that literature and submit a major research paper based on the reading list prepared for the course.
More information about this course

Distance
ENSU 1000

 Leadership in Environmental Sustainability (0,1,0)

Credits: 1
This one credit course is designed to recognize knowledge gained from existing courses and actions undertaken by students that contribute towards environmental sustainability competency. Environmental sustainability experiences may be acknowledged through: documented projects; community or TRU volunteer work; extra-curricular knowledge sharing; participation in environmental or social organizations; research papers; art work; architectural design; and relevant assignments in courses as they relate to environmental issues.

Campus
ENTR 3710

 Marketing for Entrepreneurs (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore marketing in an entrepreneurial context within small and medium-sized enterprises (SME). They learn how to conduct a marketing audit of a SME and develop marketing plans to capitalize on the different ideas identified in order to grow the business in a competitive market. Topics include: marketing in an entrepreneurial context; finding and evaluating the right marketing opportunity; using marketing research to ensure entrepreneurial success; understanding customers and competitors; segmentation, targeting and positioning for entrepreneurial opportunities; developing new products and services; building and sustaining entrepreneurial brand; entrepreneurial pricing, channel development, supply chain management and promotion; and entrepreneurial marketing plans.

Campus
ENTR 3720

 Small Business Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students acquire the knowledge and skills needed to successfully manage the financial affairs of a small business. Topics include the importance effective finance management for a small business; accounting software systems; provincial and federal sales taxes, property taxes, and other forms of business taxation; employment standards; payroll accounting; registering as a proprietorship, partnership, or corporation; business licenses and name registration; insurance; financial statement analysis; pro forma financial statements; working capital management; sources of long-term financing including commercial loans, government lending programs, angel financing and venture capital; banking and advisory services; business valuations; and bankruptcy, reorganization and liquidation.

Campus
ENTR 4750

 New Venture Creation (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop the skills, values, and attitudes needed for success as an entrepreneur whether starting a new venture from scratch, joining or acquiring an existing business, or creating a new venture inside a larger organization. The primary activity is the development of a comprehensive business plan. Topics include small business entrepreneurs; the business plan; entry modes into small business; writing the business plan; target market, market research, and marketing plan; raising capital and the financial viability of new ventures; operational issues; legal structures and human resource issues; and risk management.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ENTR 4750 and TMGT 4120

Campus
ENTR 4751

 New Venture Creation

Credits: 3
Students develop the skills, values, and attitudes needed for success as an entrepreneur whether starting a new venture from scratch, joining or acquiring an existing business, or creating a new venture inside a larger organization. The primary activity is the development of a comprehensive business plan. Topics include an overview of entrepreneurship and small business in Canada; entrepreneurial mindset, characteristics, competences and ethics; creativity, idea generation and feasibility studies; business plans; part-time and full-time entrepreneurship; location and capacity planning; marketing research for new ventures; financing new ventures; creating a financial plan; legal structures and issues; new venture development team; risk analysis and management; and reviewing, identifying and evaluating educational technologies
More information about this course

Distance
ENTR 4760

 Small Business Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Building on New Venture Creation which takes a new small business from the planning stage to start-up, students examine how to successful operate an up-and-running venture. Topics include problem solving and creativity; communicating with people; developing merchandising plans; operations management; marketing management; electronic commerce; managing human resources; financial management; tax management; and managing growth.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ENTR 4760 and TMGT 4150

Campus
ENVR 3329

 Selection and Propagation of Native Plants

Credits: 3
This course, Selection and Propagation of Native Plants, (UVIC ER332) will introduce you to the principles of native plant selection and propagation within the context of meeting ecological restoration goals, but will be of value to anyone wanting to know more about working with indigenous plants. Topics include native plant propagation techniques; the role of artificial propagation in ecosystem rehabilitation and restoration; criteria for species selection; scientific and ethical principles for the collection of propagation materials; site stabilization; site preparation; out-planting; and bioengineering.
More information about this course

Distance
ENVR 5049

 Invasive Species and Novel Ecosystem

Credits: 0
This course examines the biology of invasions focusing on the life-history adaptations and dispersal strategies, which contribute to their success at both the individual and population levels. On completing the course, students will be able to identify common invasive species and know their distributions, life cycles, growth habits, reproductive characteristics and adaptation. Additionally, students will have an understanding of control options embracing preventative, cultural, biological and chemical control methods. Finally, the course will explore novel ecosystems that are created when invasive species insert themselves into the fabric of natural ecosystems and the problems they create with traditional approaches to ecosystem management, for example when an endangered species becomes dependent on an invasive species for its survival.
More information about this course

Distance
ENVS 3991

 Enviromental Studies: Sustainability

Credits: 3
This upper-level course is a Web seminar offering special topics in environmental studies for in-depth study. Students focus on topics that are important to Canadians: the impacts of population and pollution on global climatechange and the effects of exploiting our natural resources. Emphasis is placed on water, energy, and biodiversity and on the attempts to balance the impact of our activities with the environment's capacity to absorb them. This course issuitable for learners completing degrees in a number of discipline areas including science, engineering, humanities, social science, business or general studies.
More information about this course

Distance
ENVS 5000

 Environmental Sciences: Topics and Case Studies (3,3,0)

Credits: 4
Students explore the current ideologies of the ecological, sociological, and economical foundations of environmental science through case studies. A joint application of scientific and social contexts is used to examine the sustainable management of natural resources, with a strong spatial component at local, regional and global scales. Communication skills are developed to facilitate this cross-disciplinary understanding. Primary literature, group discussions, and independent and group review assignments encourage students to focus on current local, regional, and international environmental issues.

Campus
ENVS 5010

 Research Methods, Preparation and Presentation (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an overview of scientific methods, research preparation, and the written and oral communication styles used to present research. An emphasis is placed on graduate theses and peer-reviewed journal articles, in addition to popular science articles in magazines and newspapers.

Campus
ENVS 5020

 Advanced Topics in Ecology and Evolution (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course involves: reading and discussion; methodology and data analysis; and critical evaluation, presentation and debate of cutting edge research in ecology and evolution. An emphasis is placed on understanding the integrative approach to environmental science.

Campus
ENVS 5030

 Advanced Topics in Physical Sciences (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students undertake an investigation on a specific topic as agreed upon by the faculty member and the student. Permission of the supervisor required.

Campus
ENVS 5040

 Advanced Topics in Policy and Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course involves: reading and discussion; methodology and data analysis; and critical evaluation, presentation and debate of cutting edge research in policy and management. An emphasis is placed on understanding the integrative approach to environmental science.

Campus
ENVS 5100

 Environmental Science 1: History, Philosophy and Concepts (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Provides an introduction to the field of environmental science at the graduate level. Focus on history and philosophy of science in general, and environmental science in particular; guest lectures by faculty and researchers inside and outside of academia; examines the role of environmental science in society.

Campus
ENVS 5200

 Environmental Science 2: Conducting Science (3,0,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Focuses on the proposal, design, and conducting of scientific research, particularly in the field of environmental science; includes overview of analytical methods used in different disciplines.

Campus
ENVS 5300

 Environmental Sciences: Topics and Case Studies (1,1,0)

Credits: 2
This course uses the Environmental Science Seminar series as a foundation for exploring established and emerging topics in the field. In addition to scheduled class time, students must attend the seminars and meet with speakers to discuss their work. Students also become directly involved in the hosting of speakers.

Campus
ENVS 5400

 Environmental Science: Dissemination and Outreach (30 hours)

Credits: 2
Students design and deliver oral presentations and poster displays on their thesis research at the Master of Science research forum; students are also required to demonstrate that they have extended their work into the public forum through and variety of possible avenues.

Campus
ENVS 5480

 Directed Studies in Environmental Science (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
Students undertake an investigation on a specific topic as agreed upon by the faculty member and the student. Permission of the supervisor required.

Campus
ENVS 5990

 Master of Science Thesis (30 hours/week)

Credits: 18
An original and substantial research project conducted by each student in the Master of Science Program in Environmental Science, under the direction of a faculty supervisor and a thesis advisory committee. Students register in this course each semester that they are in the program until all requirements for the thesis have been met.

Campus
EPHY 1150

 Physics for Engineers 1 (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is similiar to PHYS 1150: Mechanics and Waves except that Engineering students do complete the laboratory portion. Students are introduced to and apply calculus to physical concepts. Topics include mechanics, simple harmonic motion, mechanical waves, sound, wave optics and geometric optics.

Campus
EPHY 1250

 Physics for Engineers 2 (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is similar to PHYS 1250: Thermodynamics, Electricity and Magnetism , however, students may complete laboratory work more specifically related to Engineering. Topics include thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, electricity and magnetism.

Campus
EPHY 1700

 Engineering Mechanics 1 (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This is an introductory course in engineering mechanics. The first part of the course deals with statics and the second part with dynamics of particles and systems of particles.

Campus
EPHY 1990

 Introduction to Engineering Measurements (2,3*,0)(L)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the measurement and control of physical quantities of interest in engineering and scientific applications. Issues and methods relevant to the real-time measurement and control of parameters such as force, displacement, acceleration, temperature, level, pressure, and flow are considered. Students apply the principles developed in the course during seminars, and in discussions of case studies that are relevant to various engineering or scientific disciplines.
Corequisite: MATH 1230 or 1240, and one of PHYS 1250 or EPHY 1250 Required Seminar: EPHY 1990S

Campus
EPHY 2150

 Circuit Analysis (4,0,3*)(L)

Credits: 3
Students examine and discuss the analysis of linear electrical circuits, network theorems, first and second order circuits, and transfer functions for electrical and computer engineering students.
Corequisite: MATH 2110
Note: Credit will not be given for both PHYS 2150 and EPHY 2150Required Lab: EPHY 2150L

Campus
EPHY 2200

 Electrical Properties of Materials (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an introduction to the fundamental properties of solids that govern the behavior of electronic and photonic devices. The mechanisms underpinning the electrical conductivity of conductors, semiconductors, and insulators, as well as their interactions with light are introduced and explained.
Corequisite: PHYS 2250 and MATH 2110Required Seminar: EPHY 2200S

Campus
EPHY 2250

 Intermediate Electromagnetism (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine and discuss vector algebra, electrostatics, magnetostatics, electric and magnetic fields in matter, and introductory electrodynamics for electrical and computer engineering.
Note: Credit will not be given for both PHYS 2250 and EPHY 2250

Campus
EPHY 2950

 Engineering Fundamentals (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to the concepts of conservation of energy, energy balance, heat, and modes of heat transfer (conduction, convection, radiation). Transient and multi-dimensional conduction, multi-mode systems, and problem solving using numerical methods are also investigated.

Campus
EPHY 2990

 Introduction to ECE Design (3,0,3)

Credits: 3
A project oriented course during which students work in teams to design, fabricate, and test products, devices, and systems relevant to Electrical and Computer Engineering. The course provides an opportunity for students to refine their skills in problem identification, development and evaluation of various technical solutions, estimation of their economic viabilities, and identification of possible ethical and legal constraints.

Campus
EPHY 3600

 Continuous-Time Signals and Systems (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to continuous-time signals and systems. The theoretical concepts developed in the course are applied to the analysis of dynamical systems relevant to the practice of engineering. Applications to control theory and circuit analysis are studied. Realistic problems are solved numerically.

Campus
ESAL 0120

 Basic Grammar (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn basic forms of English Grammar including simple and progressive verb tenses, parts of speech, prepositions, and an introduction to modals. Students practice these structures through communicative and functional activities.

Campus
ESAL 0130

 Basic Integrated Language Skills (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers integrated skills with an emphasis on improving English proficiency and understanding of Canadian culture. It includes continued practice in listening, speaking, pronunciation, vocabulary building, grammar, reading, writing and learning strategies. It also includes using computer technology and university and community resources.

Campus
ESAL 0140

 Integrated Oral Skills (16,0,0)

Credits: 8
" This course is designed to integrate basic English oral skills with academic study skills. Students practice listening, speaking, pronunciation, and vocabulary as well as North American learning strategies. These skills will be taught through a communicative approach.

Campus
ESAL 0150

 Basic Oral Communication (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Through listening comprehension and oral performances, students practice their communication skills. Students learn to comprehend the main ideas in short passages and listen for specific detail as well as engage in short conversations, report personal information, and express opinions.

Campus
ESAL 0160

 Integrated Written Skills (8,0,0)

Credits: 4
Students focus on basic reading and writing skills. The course places emphasis on introduction to simple vocabulary, sentence structure, punctuation, as well as reading comprehension. Concurrently, to facilitate cultural adaptation, students are introduced to common themes and issues in Canadian life through the course readings.

Campus
ESAL 0170

 Basic Reading Skills (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on reading strategies. Emphasis is on vocabulary growth and comprehension and expression of the main idea. Students develop study and reading skills such as pre-reading and reading rate strategies.

Campus
ESAL 0174

 Reading Enrichment Lab - Level 1 (0,0,3)

Credits: 1
This lab is a supplemental class designed to support the acquisition of reading in the English language at a high-beginner level. The purpose of the lab is to support ESAL 0170 which is a high-beginner reading course and to provide extra help for students, especially in vocabulary development, spelling and communication.
Corequisite: ESAL 0170

Campus
ESAL 0180

 Basic Writing Skills (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will focus on writing strategies. Emphasis will be on development of sentence structure and sentence variety to the paragraph level. Students will also be introduced to the paragraph form, including expression of the main idea in topic sentences.

Campus
ESAL 0184

 Writing Enrichment Lab - Level 1 (0,0,3)(L)

Credits: 1
This lab is a supplemental class designed to support the acquisition of writing in the English language at a high-beginner level. The purpose of the lab is to support ESAL 0180 which is a high-beginner writing class and to provide extra help for students with vocabulary development, spelling, sentence structure, and rhetorical styles.
Corequisite: ESAL 0180

Campus
ESAL 0220

 Pre-Intermediate Grammar (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is intended to assist students in improving and practicing their spoken English and written grammar. Students study past, present and future verb tenses in the simple, progressive and perfect forms. Students also study phrasal verbs, comparatives, prepositions, modals, determiners, articles, and agreement. .

Campus
ESAL 0230

 Pre-Intermediate Integrated Language Skills (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course integrates language skills with an emphasis on improving English proficiency and understanding of Canadian culture. It includes continued practice in listening, speaking, pronunciation, vocabulary building, grammar, reading, writing and learning strategies. Students also use computer technology, and university and community resources.

Campus
ESAL 0250

 Pre-Intermediate Oral Skills (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students improve their communication skills by developing their listening and speaking skills.

Campus
ESAL 0270

 Pre-Intermediate Reading Skills (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This reading course continues to strengthen basic skills of vocabulary development and comprehension with a variety of written material of gradually increasing difficulty. The objective is to progress from mechanical to more meaningful reading.

Campus
ESAL 0274

 Reading Enrichment Lab - Level 2 (0,0,3)(L)

Credits: 1
" This lab is a supplemental class designed to support the acquisition of reading in the English language at a pre-intermediate level. The purpose of this lab is to support ESAL 0270: Pre-Intermediate Reading Skills, and to provide extra support for students, especially in vocabulary development, spelling and communication.
Corequisite: ESAL 0270 "

Campus
ESAL 0280

 Pre-Intermediate Writing Skills (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This introductory composition course for second language students focuses on recognizing and practicing grammatical structures and sentence patterns, within the familiar thematic context of shared personal and cultural experience. Pre-writing and revision strategies are introduced.

Campus
ESAL 0284

 Writing Enrichment Lab - Level 2 (0,0,3)(L)

Credits: 1
This lab is a supplemental class designed to support the acquisition of writing in the English language at a pre-intermediate level. The purpose of the lab is to support ESAL 0280 which is a pre-intermediate writing class and to provide extra help for students with vocabulary development, spelling, sentence structure, and rhetorical styles.
Corequisite: ESAL 0280

Campus
ESAL 0320

 Intermediate Grammar 1 (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Within the relevant academic contexts, a variety of difficult structures in English grammar are examined and practiced both orally and in written work. Structures include the tense aspect system; phrasal verbs; modal meanings, and the use of prepositions.

Campus
ESAL 0340

 Intermediate Grammar 2 (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Within the relevant academic contexts, a variety of increasingly difficult structures in English grammar are examined and practiced for a better understanding of their uses. Structures include articles, count and non-count nouns and expressions of quantity, subject-verb agreement, the passive voice, gerunds and infinitives, and conditional sentences.

Campus
ESAL 0350

 Intermediate Oral Communication (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
" This course is designed to enable students to refine conversational skills for the purpose of participating in academic discussions. This course focuses on acquiring strategies for effective oral communication. Students participate in group discussions, give oral presentations and practice their listening skills.

Campus
ESAL 0370

 Intermediate Reading and Study Skills (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students continue to develop their vocabulary and build comprehension with a variety of reading selections of increasing difficulty. Reading materials include those selected by students and provide the basis for discussion, writing activities, study skill practice, and testing.

Campus
ESAL 0374

 Reading Enrichment Lab - Level 3 (0,0,3)(L)

Credits: 1
This lab is a supplemental class designed to support the acquisition of reading in the English language at an intermediate level. The purpose of this lab is to support ESAL 0370: Intermediate Reading and Study Skills, and to provide extra support for students, especially in vocabulary development, spelling, and communication.
Corequisite: ESAL 0370

Campus
ESAL 0380

 Intermediate Composition (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This writing course focuses on academic paragraph writing. Various forms and purposes for paragraph writing are analyzed and practiced. Sentence skills are reviewed and essay writing is introduced.

Campus
ESAL 0384

 Writing Enrichment Lab - Level 3 (0,0,3)(L)

Credits: 1
This lab is a supplemental class designed to support the acquisition of writing in the English language at an intermediate level. The purpose of this lab is to support ESAL 0380: Intermediate Composition, and to provide extra support for students with vocabulary development, spelling, sentence structure, and rhetorical styles.
Corequisite: ESAL 0380

Campus
ESAL 0420

 Advanced Grammar (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to support advanced academic writing, by developing and refining the grammar and editing skills necessary to detect and remedy common ESL writing problems. While the focus is on accuracy, this course also includes logical analysis of the components of a composition, and editing for improved clarity and effectiveness.

Campus
ESAL 0450

 Advanced Oral Communication (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students practice strategies for speaking clear and appropriate English in a variety of academic situations. Attention to fluency, pronunciation, and intonation is emphasized.

Campus
ESAL 0470

 Advanced Reading and Study Skills (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course includes a wide range of fictional and nonfictional reading. Emphasis is on the analysis and evaluation of form and content as well as on pre-reading strategies and vocabulary development. Study skills include note-taking, paraphrasing, and summarizing.

Campus
ESAL 0480

 Advanced Composition (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course reviews the paragraph as a component of the English essay. Emphasis is on the planning, development, and revision of multi-paragraph compositions. Students focus on specific problems with their writing and practice editing.

Campus
ESAL 0570

 Academic Reading Skills (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to prepare students for reading university level material effectively and efficiently. Specific approaches to reading are taught for factual and fictional writing. Emphasis is on the short story.
Note: ESAL 0450 may also be taken as a corequisite.

Campus
ESAL 0580

 Academic Writing (6,0,0)

Credits: 4
This course focuses on the process of writing. However, integral to the writing process are the skills of reading and listening, actively and critically. Collaboration and teamwork are important components of this course, as well. These skills enhance writing ability and also contribute generally to success in both education and employment. Students are expected to read, research, discuss, and work co-operatively, as part of the composition process.
Corequisite: ESAL 0420

Campus
ESAL 0640

 Preparation for the TOEFL iBT - Level 1 (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Designed for high-beginner students, this course assists Level 1 students in their preparation for standardized tests of English as a Second Language. Students study the format of standardized tests of English as a Second Language and develop strategies for answering commonly asked questions. Students are also encouraged to draw upon the skills they are learning in their other courses.

Campus
ESAL 0740

 Preparation for TOEFL iBT - Level 2 (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Designed for pre-intermediate students, this course assists Level 2 students in their preparation for standardized tests of English as a Second Language. Students study the format of standardized tests of English as a Second Language and develop strategies for answering commonly asked questions. Students are also encouraged to draw upon the skills they are learning in their other courses.

Campus
ESAL 0820

 Intermediate Listening (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided opportunities to practice their listening skills in the performance of a variety of increasingly challenging tasks. Students acquire strategies to improve their comprehension of the varieties of English encountered in social and academic environments.

Campus
ESAL 0840

 Preparation for TOEFL iBT - Level 3 (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Designed for intermediate students, this course assists Level 3 students in their preparation for standardized tests of English as a Second Language. Students study the format of standardized tests of English as a Second Language and develop strategies for answering commonly asked questions. Students are also encouraged to draw upon the skills they are learning in other courses.

Campus
ESAL 0860

 Intermediate Vocabulary for Academic English (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
An elective designed for intermediate students, this course is useful for any intermediate student taking or planning to take academic courses. Students are introduced to specific words that are useful in a wide range of academic disciplines. Both the active and passive use of vocabulary is emphasized.

Campus
ESAL 0880

 Intermediate Pronunciation (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
For intermediate learners of English, this course is designed to improve the comprehension of spoken English, and intelligibility when speaking English. It helps students develop auditory sensitivity and improve accuracy, fluency, and confidence in their oral production of English. Phonological features are examined in isolation and in the context of meaningful passages.

Campus
ESAL 0920

 Advanced Listening Skills (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course builds on previously developed listening skills. The course focuses on the listening skills required to process an academic lecture. Students identify the ideas and organization of lecture material, discussions, and debate, using specific listening skills. The information students hear is used for note-taking and other related activities.

Campus
ESAL 0940

 Preparation for the TOEFL (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Designed for high-intermediate to advanced students, students are assisted in their preparation for standardized tests of English as a Second Language. Students study the format of standardized tests of English as a Second Language and develop strategies for answering commonly asked questions. Students also are encouraged to draw upon the skills they are learning in other courses.

Campus
ESAL 0950

 Advanced English for Business Communication (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is intended to prepare ESL students who are planning to enter or who are currently enrolled in a business related course. This course offers the opportunity to work on all four basic communicative skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) while using the vocabulary and specialized requirements of business communications. Students develop and apply advanced technological skills as well.

Campus
ESAL 0960

 Advanced Vocabulary for Academic English (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
An elective designed for advanced students, this course is useful for any student for whom the vocabulary of academic English presents a challenge. This course introduces and reinforces strategies for becoming independent learners of vocabulary, and also teaches specific words useful in academic study. Vocabulary is linked with general knowledge to provide context as well as to add interest. While passive vocabulary (word recognition) is emphasized, the course also facilitates active use of new vocabulary.

Campus
ESAL 0980

 Advanced Pronunciation (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
For high-intermediate to advanced learners of English, this course is designed to improve the comprehension of spoken English, and intelligibility when speaking English. Students develop skills to assist them in predicting, producing, and perceiving the pronunciation of words and phrases. Students at the university level whose goals demand above-average oral skills and a wide range of active vocabulary will find this course particularly relevant and valuable.

Campus
ESAL 0990

 Special Topics in Language Study (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an in-depth exploration of aspects of the English languge and surrounding culture. The specific content and focus is determined in the semester prior to its being offered. (Information is available from the Department Chair or International Student Advisor.)

Campus
ESTR 0010

 Workplace Communication (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This is a course in interpersonal communication. Students will learn the importance of communication in the work environment. Students will be given the opportunity to learn to use communication skills effectively. Listening, speaking and comprehension skills will be taught and practiced. Students will learn assertiveness skills, anger management skills and how to accept feedback constructively.

Campus
ESTR 0020

 Workplace Employability (5,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course begins by describing those skills needed by an effective and reliable employee. The following topics are covered in detail: grooming and hygiene, honesty, job relationships, punctuality, following directions, motivation and productivity. The emphasis is on maintaining those skills needed to keep a job. Students will be evaluated on their ability to demonstrate these skills.

Campus
ESTR 0060

 Health and Safety (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
In this course, students will learn about health and safety as it relates being safe and successful in the workplace. Topics include nutrition, wellness, back safety, fire safety, and Workplace Hazardous Materials Information Systems. Students will learn in an interactive setting aimed to allow the concepts covered in class to be integrated into their present lifestyle.

Campus
ESTR 0070

 Job Search and Maintenance (5,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course will present skills needed in order to conduct a job search and prepare for job interviews. Students will learn networking skills; prepare job applications, a resume, cover and thank you letters. The students will be made aware of self advocacy skills and be connected to any local agencies that would be able to assist them in their job search.

Campus
ESTR 0080

 Workplace English and Written Communications (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on the reading and writing skills needed in a workplace environment. The content of the course is individualized to met the needs of the student and is also related to their area of occupational skills training (kitchen, retail or automotive). Materials that offer the student the opportunity to locate relevant information, understand and read the information and complete applicable writing tasks are provided.

Campus
ESTR 0090

 Workplace Mathematics (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on the math skills needed in the workplace environment. The content of the course is individualized to meet the needs of the student and is also related to their area of occupational skills training (kitchen, retail or automotive worker). Topics in measurement, fractions, percent and money are included.

Campus
ESTR 0100

 Practical Experience 3 (0,0,20)

Credits: 3
Students in the general educational stream of the Educational Skills Training Program are required to complete their program with a four-week practicum in an organization in their field of interest. Students will be required to work perform the duties of an entry-level employee. Work experience opportunities are negotiated for each student to suit their needs and the employers.

Campus
ESTR 0110

 Practical Experience 2 (0,0,20)

Credits: 5
Students complete the Educational Skills Training Program with a six-week practicum in a business related to their field of training (Kitchen, Retail or Automotive). Students will be required to work at least 20 hours per week and perform the functions of an entry-level employee. Students are expected to demonstrate the skills learned in the program. Students must successfully complete the practicum in order to graduate from the program.

Campus
ESTR 0120

 Self and Community Awareness (5,0,0)

Credits: 3
In this course students explore their values and goals with regards to workplace success. Students are led through a variety of self assessments and self discovery tools to determine the field to which they are best suited. Students are also exposed to a variety of occupational fields in the form of vocational tours of Kamloops businesses. Students will begin an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) that outlines their future plans. Completion of the IEP will be required in the Career Awareness course.

Campus
ESTR 0130

 Workplace Academics 1 (5,0,0)

Credits: 3
This is an individualized course where students improve their skills both in literacy and math as it relates to the workplace. Some of the topics include: reading and following directions, work vocabulary, taking messages, using a calculator and money skills. Students are evaluated on the ability to demonstrate skills and show improvement in each of these topics.

Campus
ESTR 0140

 Workplace Academics 2 (5,0,0)

Credits: 3
This is a continuation of Workplace Academics 1. Students will increase their competencies in both math and reading/writing skills. The instruction in this course is individualized so that students will be challenged at their level of competence. Some of the topics include: measurement using the metric system, finding and reading information and writing simple messages and letters.

Campus
ESTR 0150

 Career Awareness (5,0,1)

Credits: 3
This course examines different occupations and issues related to the work environment. The student decides which occupations they want to consider and completes a job and self assessment process to determine what skills and knowledge each occupation requires and matches their skills, knowledge and abilities to those required in different jobs. In order to complete the course, a vocational plan outlining the students immediate and one to five year goal is required (Individual Employment Plan).

Campus
ESTR 0160

 Introduction to the Workplace, Practical Experience (0,0,20)

Credits: 5
Students will choose an entry level placement that will be matched with their interest and ability. The placement will be 4 weeks in length with the maximum of 20 hours per week determined by arrangement with the employer. Students will learn skills necessary for successful employment and will be monitored by the Work Experience Coordinator.

Campus
ESTR 0210

 Kitchen Theory 1 (3,0,3)

Credits: 3
Food theory concepts will be taught in a classroom setting and a smaller kitchen lab will be used to practice basic kitchen skills in a safe environment. Safety and Sanitary Procedures will be emphasized.

Campus
ESTR 0220

 Kitchen Experience 1 (0,0,6)

Credits: 2
In this course students will begin to learn those skills needed to work in a commercial kitchen. Students will learn kitchen clean-up, sanitation, basic food preparation, and use of kitchen equipment and machines. Safety will be stressed. Students will work in the CAC cafeteria where they will learn to follow directions, organize work and work as a team member.

Campus
ESTR 0230

 Automotive Theory 1 (3,0,3)

Credits: 3
In this course students will be trained in Safety Procedures required in the Automotive Service Industry. This will help students to recognize and avoid dangerous situations. Students will be taught the use of basic hand tools and will make a tool that they can add to their toolbox. Basic Automobile Systems will be covered in this course to familiarize students with the workings of a car. These skills and information will help them fulfill their employment goals in this field.

Campus
ESTR 0240

 Automotive Experience 1 (0,0,6)

Credits: 2
In this course students will be trained in Safety Procedures in an automotive shop. This is essential for students to recognize dangerous situations and how to avoid them. Students will be trained in the use of basic hand tools, in the making of a tool that will be able to be kept for latter use. The basic automobile systems covered in the theory course will be demonstrated on a vehicle to familiarize students, to help remove the fear of the unknown. Tire service and oil changes and detailing will be a major part of the shop time.

Campus
ESTR 0250

 Retail Theory 1 (3,0,3)

Credits: 3
In this course, students will be exposed to the skills needed to work successfully in a retail environment. These skills include teamwork and customer relations' skills. Students will also learn a variety of organizational skills including time management, numeric filing and alphabetic filing. Money skills will also be covered, including counting money accurately and counting back change.

Campus
ESTR 0260

 Retail Experience 1 (0,0,6)

Credits: 2
This course reinforces the theory component with hands-on experience in a real time environment. Students will be given experience in general clean-up, shelving, merchandising and inventory control. Students will demonstrate appropriate communication skills, teamwork and time management.

Campus
ESTR 0310

 Kitchen Theory 2 (3,0,3)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of the fall semester. Students will build on learned food theory concepts and test their knowledge in the kitchen lab. Food groups will be presented and students will prepare recipes. Accurate measurement, organization and following directions will be stressed. Students will prepare to write Food Safe Test.

Campus
ESTR 0320

 Kitchen Experience 2 (0,0,6)

Credits: 2
Students in this course will continue in the CAC kitchen where they will become aware of the daily operation of a commercial kitchen and develop the necessary speed to perform routine commercial kitchen tasks.

Campus
ESTR 0330

 Automotive Theory 2 (3,0,3)

Credits: 3
In this course students will be trained in more detail the different systems that make up the automobile. The use of air impact tools will be introduced to gain skill and speed that shops require. Shop maintenance will be covered to help students fit into the shop environment.

Campus
ESTR 0340

 Automotive Experience 2 (0,0,6)

Credits: 2
In this course, students review Safety Procedures in an automotive shop. This will help students to recognize dangerous situations and what to do. Students will be trained in the use of basic hand tools, and the use of air impact wrenches. The Automobile Systems covered in the theory course will be studied in more detail then demonstrated on a vehicle. Tire service and oil changes and detailing is still a major part of the shop time, but more time is spent on minor tasks that are included in the maintenance of an automobile.

Campus
ESTR 0350

 Retail Theory 2 (3,0,3)

Credits: 3
In this course students will continue to learn those skills needed to work in a retail environment. Telephone skills and sales techniques will be taught in this part of the course. Students will continue working on money skills including cash register reports, and calculating sales tax, markups and markdowns.

Campus
ESTR 0360

 Retail Experience 2 (0,0,6)

Credits: 2
This course is a continuation of the fall semester. Students will be given the opportunity to improve the quality and speed of their duties. Students will be given more experience in inventory control, merchandising, including using a Point of Sale System (POS) and pre-inventory preparation.

Campus
ESTR 0370

 Advanced Topics in Job Selection and Job Search (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is intended for those students who have completed the core courses of the ESTR program and are continuing in one of the occupational skills training areas. Students will learn to research and evaluate a business in terms of it relating to the students personal interests, skills and chances of long-term success. Students will also review and enhance their job search skills including their resume, interview techniques, and following up after interviews and after a temporary lay off.

Campus
ESTR 0380

 Advanced Topics in Workplace Success (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is intended for those students who have completed the core courses of the ESTR program and are continuing in one of the occupational skills training areas. Emphasis on topics that will enhance an individual's ability to keep a job and plan for long term career success will be emphasized. Students will learn what today's employers expect of their employees and how to behave to be able to meet these demands successfully.

Campus
EVNT 1100

 The World of Events (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the exciting world of events with a global snapshot of the modern events sector. Students gain insight into various genres and types of events, current trends, technology, management challenges, and best practices in delivering meaningful and memorable events.

Campus
EVNT 2070

 Staging Special Events (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the skills and terminology of the technical aspects of staging festivals, special events, concerts and conventions. Students are exposed to some of the fundamentals of staging including conception, design, delivery, logistics, lighting, and sound systems through a hands-on experience of staging an actual event.

Campus
EVNT 2100

 Conference Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop the knowledge and understanding necessary to plan, organize, manage and evaluate events primarily associated with meetings, conferences, and incentive travel. Students engage in objective setting, team building and program planning. Course topics include management functions such as transportation arrangements, selection of speakers, audio-visual arrangements, and risk management issues in the convention sector.

Campus
EVNT 2170

 Fundraising for Non-Profit Organizations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn the basic skills needed to conduct a fundraising campaign on behalf of a non-profit organization. In addition to discussions about the origins and evolution of philanthropy, students are exposed to various campaign models, public relations strategies and techniques for motivating volunteers.

Campus
EVNT 2190

 Destination Marketing Organizations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Using a convention and visitors bureau as a model, students learn the role that destination marketing organizations play in attracting all types of tourists to a city, region or country. In addition to learning about key market segments and how to attract them, students consider how destination marketing organizations are structured and funded.

Campus
EVNT 2240

 Sports Event Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The intent of this course is to provide the learner with an overview of the sports tourism industry and to provide them with some of the basic tools needed to successfully plan a sporting event. Learners will be introduced to the sports event and sport tourism industries and be given the opportunity to explore such topics as risk management for sporting events, volunteer management and event sponsorship.

Campus
EVNT 2250

 Sports Event Marketing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce students to some of the skills necessary to effectively market a sporting event. Students will learn how to develop a plan to go after relevant markets including attendees, competitors and sponsors. In addition, students will be exposed to such business concepts as product development, market opportunities and marketing plans.

Campus
EVNT 2260

 Managing Festivals and Events (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers the basic skills needed for a business-like approach to planning and managing a well run, high quality special event. The focus of the course is on increasing organizational effectiveness and developing sound managerial strategies. Students explore practical subjects such as fundraising and sponsorship, managing volunteers, strategic planning, risk management, and post-event evaluation.

Campus
EVNT 2500

 Field Experience (0,2,3P)

Credits: 3
This course offers 2nd-year students the opportunity to connect academic course work with practical application by participating in a multi-day field experience where they have interaction and exposure to many facets of the events industry. Prior to engaging in the field experience, students participate in seminars to develop a deeper understanding of the aspects of the selected tours and visits , as well as to plan their travel itinerary within a budget. Upon return, students complete reflective oral and written assignments.
Note: This course has an activity fee attached

Campus
EVNT 3800

 Event Logistics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This is the first of two interconnected courses (together with EVNT 4800) that engages the student in a practical and applied manner in the staging of a large-scale special event. The course is organized around the core competencies required of an event professional such as programming, staging, volunteer management, on-site logistics, registration, hospitality and crowd safety. Emphasis is on real-time, real-world experience and learning outcomes, as students work collectively as a team to run an event property.

Campus
EVNT 4800

 Managing the Event Experience (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
In this capstone course for the concentration in Festivals and Events in the Bachelor of Tourism Management, students will perform the role of event managers by providing the creative direction, strategic planning, and general oversight for a large-scale special event property . Students will take full responsibility for the successful implementation and realization of their event vision, including completing an extensive evaluation of the outcomes of the event.

Campus
EXPL 3000

 Live Learn Lead: Global Engagement (0,1,4)

Credits: 3
This field school course is designed using an experiential model to integrate leadership and global volunteerism within a blended learning experience. Through face-to-face seminars, discussions and reflective activities, combined with an intensive team volunteer experience abroad - in collaboration with a partner non-government organization (NGO) - students have the opportunity of developing global competencies and leadership skills needed to address global challenges in an ever-changing world. Through guided reflection students gain: a global cultural awareness and sensitivity; experiential learning and leadership competencies; a stronger understanding of NGO operations; and potential careers in international development.

Campus
EXST 5000

 Graduating Colloquium in Experience Studies (0,2,0)

Credits: 2
This course, delivered in concentrated mode, is the final requirement for the Master of Tourism in Experience Studies degree. It brings students together to share experiences, methodologies, results, and other issues regarding each student's independent project or thesis. Students will share outcomes of their international experiences at partner institutions (if applicable) and their field investigations, and will formally present the results of their previously prepared project paper or thesis in a student conference internal to the program. Challenges, issues, opportunities, and learning outcomes will be shared and discussed during the colloquium. Proceedings will be disseminated.

Campus
EXST 5010

 Introduction to Experience Studies (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
The course provides the theoretical foundation for studying tourism experiences with implications for observing, understanding, creating, and evaluating those experiences. The ???tourist experience" is a subject with more than 40 years of academic discourse. More recently, it has been conceptualized under the umbrella of the ???experience economy"???an extension of the service economy now dominant in western society. The course examines early to contemporary conceptualizations of tourist experiences in the academic literature. Students will critically evaluate their own understanding of tourist experiences, identify opportunities to further develop knowledge production on tourist experiences, and learn to apply knowledge toward creating and managing experiences for the benefit of individual tourists and the communities they visit, to advance tourism's role in building a sustainable world.

Campus
EXST 5020

 Creativity, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship in Experience Making (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to help students understand how innovation, creativity, and entrepreneurial thinking are successfully nurtured and managed in a variety of settings of relevance to experience studies. The course engages various theoretical foundations and practical applications to build an understanding of the elements that lead to successful innovation and creativity of individuals, groups, and organizations, toward the design and provision of distinctive and fulfilling experiences.

Campus
EXST 5030

 Theoretical and Critical Approaches to Experience Studies (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
This interdisciplinary course draws upon conceptual and critical strains across academic thought to consider both the notion of experience as a phenomenon and the individual and social consequences of this phenomenon's current significance in the contemporary cultural moment. Students first explore consciousness and its attendant shaping of human beings as meaning-makers and as narratively oriented creatures, with lives characterized by anticipation, encounter, and memory. The course then addresses a variety of topics germane to understanding experience in the contemporary moment; examples include affect, flow, identity, authenticity, moral agency, consumerism, enchantment, cultural politics, desire, play, nostalgia, and explorations of the production and consumption of imaginaries of culture and place.

Campus
EXST 5040

 Experience Creation & Provision: Designing, Leading, Implementing & Communicating Experience (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines the provision of service products and operations with a particular focus on experiences. The experience product holds an important position in the fast growing experience economy, requiring firms marketing these intangible products to overcome unique challenges. The intent of the course is to provide students with the concepts, tools, and strategic focus to effectively manage the participant experience and to investigate how experiences are designed, delivered, and evaluated. Students will be encouraged to employ innovative approaches in the application of the knowledge they acquire to authentic settings. Internal and external communication and promotion issues will also be addressed with special emphasis on issues of audience analysis, persuasion, and design.

Campus
EXST 5050

 Investigation and Analysis: Philosophy and Practice for Experience Studies (0,6,0)

Credits: 4
This course covers four key topics: social research philosophy, quantitative methods, qualitative methods, and research logistics. The first section of the course introduces students to key paradigms in social research and explores what is at stake between them. The second portion covers quantitative methods, with an emphasis on survey design and analysis (featuring bivariate and multivariate parametric and nonparametric testing). The third portion covers qualitative methods, with an emphasis on interviewing, observation, textual analysis, and arts-based approaches. The final component of the course prepares students for handling the logistics of a research project, such as formulating a research question, reviewing the literature, seeking ethics approval, and communicating research outcomes. The course is meant to prepare students for either the project or thesis in experience studies.

Campus
EXST 5060

 Selected Topics in Experience Studies (0,1,0) or (0,2,0) or (0,3,0)

Credits: 1 to 3
Students explore various topics related to experience studies. Course topics vary to ensure a timely coverage of issues, events, and trends.

Campus
EXST 5100

 Directed Studies in Experience Studies (0,1,0) or (0,2,0) or (0,3,0)

Credits: 1 to 3
In this independent study course, students investigate a specific topic of interest in experience studies. Course content is mutually determined by the instructor and the student.

Campus
EXST 5110

 Specialization Shell 1 (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
Students work with a TRU instructor to customize an existing undergraduate course to meet learning outcomes with appropriate graduate-level rigour, building toward the student's customized three-course specialization in the Master of Tourism in Experience Studies program.

Campus
EXST 5120

 Specialization Shell 2 (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
Students work with a TRU instructor to customize an existing undergraduate course to meet learning outcomes with appropriate graduate-level rigour, building toward the student's customized three-course specialization in the Master of Tourism in Experience Studies program.

Campus
EXST 5130

 Specialization Shell 3 (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
Students work with a TRU instructor to customize an existing undergraduate course to meet learning outcomes with appropriate graduate-level rigour, building toward the student's customized three-course specialization in the Master of Tourism in Experience Studies program.

Campus
EXST 5210

 Project in Experience Studies

Credits: 3 to 6
Students undertake an applied independent research project of relevance to experience design or delivery in the tourism and leisure field.

Campus
EXST 5220

 Thesis in Experience Studies

Credits: 3 to 9
Students undertake an independent research project of relevance to experience studies, generating original theoretical contributions that advance the body of literature in this field.

Campus