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Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University
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On-Campus

There are a number of ways to register for on-campus courses at TRU which are determined by your program of study.

Open Learning

We offer 590 courses by distance learning. These courses are offered in several formats, including print-based, web-based and online.


Continuing Studies

Community U provides individuals and organizations with formal and non-formal opportunities to pursue personal and professional goals life-long.

Trades and Technology

Apprenticeship, foundation and continuing studies courses are offered in construction, mechanical trades, professional driving and more.

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Courses - A
Title Name Delivery
ABTS 1100

 Word Processing 1 (45 hours)

Credits: 1
Students learn to apply the basic functions of a word processing program as well as the proper format of documents including letters and memoranda.

Campus
ABTS 1110

 Word Processing 2 (45 hours)

Credits: 1
Students are provided additional instruction and practice with letter styles, tables, charts and reports. Advanced features of word processing software such as merge, macros, outlines, and graphics, and styles are also demonstrated and applied.

Campus
ABTS 1120

 Desktop Publishing (40 hours)

Credits: 1
Students study desktop publishing functions, including the elements of page design and organizational tools, and the planning, drafting, and production process. They learn to apply word processing and desktop publishing software, as well as integration elements, to produce publications such as letterheads, flyers, brochures, business forms, and newsletters.

Campus
ABTS 1130

 Keyboarding 1 (45 hours)

Credits: 1
Students are provided with the necessary techniques to keyboard accurately at a minimum of 25 net word per minute.

Campus
ABTS 1140

 Keyboarding 2 (35 hours)

Credits: 1
Students further develop their keyboarding skills to reach a minimum speed of 50 net words per minute.

Campus
ABTS 1200

 Introduction to Computers (30 hours)

Credits: 1
Students learn to manipulate the Windows environment, use Windows Accessories, and manage files and folders using the computer and Windows Explorer programs. They are also introduced to the Internet, including email basics and advanced features, web browser basics, web navigation, and web research.

Campus
ABTS 1210

 Spreadsheets 1 (25 hours)

Credits: 1
Students develop a working knowledge of Microsoft Excel, by learning how to design, create, modify, and present professional-looking spreadsheets for use in today's workplace. Exercises include using formulas and built-in functions to solve mathematical problems, in addition to illustrating and presenting spreadsheet data in graphic form.

Campus
ABTS 1220

 Spreadsheets 2 (30 hours)

Credits: 1
Students acquire a higher-level of proficiency by using Microsoft Excel to create electronic spreadsheets, for advanced applications in today's workplace. Exercises include using advanced functions and formulas, performing calculations, filtering and formatting data, and developing a custom Excel application.

Campus
ABTS 1230

 Database (30 hours)

Credits: 1
Students are introduced to the Microsoft Access data management system, while they plan, design, and create a database to meet the information management needs of today's workplace. Terminology, database concepts, and features of relational databases are discussed and demonstrated as students use various commands and features to create tables, queries, forms, and reports. Students enter data, work with calculations, extract information, and generate and print reports.

Campus
ABTS 1240

 Presentation Software (20 hours)

Credits: 1
Students apply appropriate design concepts to present data and information in a colourful and well-organized format using PowerPoint Presentation Software. They are instructed in using design templates, applying various attributes and including a variety of objects to create, modify, save, and deliver presentations.

Campus
ABTS 1250

 Integrated Project (10 hours)

Credits: 1
Students extend their word processing, spreadsheet, database, desktop publishing, and presentation software knowledge in this capstone course by completing a variety of practical, integrated projects. Decision-making, prioritizing, and other administrative skills are also developed.

Campus
ABTS 1260

 Website Design and Maintenance (30 hours)

Credits: 1
Students acquire the skills needed to complete routine website maintenance and updates. Using a hands-on, practical approach, learners manipulate hypertext markup language (HTML), tags, tables, images, graphics, hyperlinks, special formatting, and forms using text and web authoring programs.

Campus
ABTS 1270

 Outlook (25 hours)

Credits: 1
Students are introduced Microsoft Outlook and receive hands-on training in the use of e-mail for online communications, calendar for managing important dates and appointments, and contacts for the creation and maintenance of an address database.

Campus
ABTS 1300

 Business English (65 hours)

Credits: 2
Students focus on the correct English usage in a business environment, and are provided a comprehensive review of grammar, punctuation, and style, as well as business spelling and vocabulary development. The course materials are presented in small, easily manageable learning segments.

Campus
ABTS 1310

 Business Communications (50 hours)

Credits: 2
Students learn how to plan, organize, and correctly write effective "reader friendly" business documents appropriate for use in today's global business environment. Students write business letters, memos, reports, and electronic messages.

Campus
ABTS 1410

 Computerized Accounting (69 hours)

Credits: 2
Students are introduced to the integrated computerized accounting system using Simply Accounting for Windows. Upon completion, students are able to establish company records; maintain daily transactions using the general ledger, accounts payable, accounts receivable, inventory, and payroll features; and create financial statements.
Corequisite: ABTS 1440

Campus
ABTS 1430

 Accounting 1 - Online Only (60 hours)

Credits: 1
Students are introduced to manual accounting, with an emphasis on fundamental accounting principles and their application in day-to-day business situations. This course is based on a service business organized as a sole proprietorship. Students practice basic bookkeeping and accounting skills including double-entry general journal entries, posting to the general ledger, preparing a trial balance, recording adjustments in a ten-column worksheet, producing period-end financial statements, closing the temporary accounts, maintaining petty cash, and preparing bank reconciliations.

Campus
ABTS 1440

 Accounting 2 (50 hours)

Credits: 2
Students are exposed to common accounting systems including sales, purchases, federal and provincial taxes, merchandise inventory, payroll, and annual reporting of remittances. They also introduced to subsidiary ledgers, specialized journals, combined journals, year-end procedures and worksheets. Financial statements are prepared in detail, including a classified balance sheet and an income statement for a merchandising business.

Campus
ABTS 1450

 Business Math and Calculators - Online Only (45 hours)


Following current trends in office technology, students are instructed in the touch method of calculator use, and common calculator features. An emphasis is placed on business problem-solving.

Campus
ABTS 1500

 Human Relations (30 hours)

Credits: 1
Students concentrate on developing the personal and professional development skills required in today's workplace. These skills include self-examination and assessment, development of effective communication skills, interpersonal skills, client relations, teamwork, problem solving, and an understanding of business ethics.

Campus
ABTS 1510

 Job Search (20 hours)

Credits: 1
Students are provided with techniques to develop successful job search strategies for today's competitive and changing job market. Topics include self-assessment, employability skill testing, job search strategies and research, using the Internet for job search and career planning, networking, resumes, employment-related communications, application forms, portfolios, and interviews.

Campus
ABTS 1520

 Practicum (40 hours)

Credits: 1
Students are provided with the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills to meet the expectations of an employer in a real work situation during a 2-week practicum. They observe and learn daily office routines, and assist the host employer by performing tasks as required.

Campus
ABTS 1530

 Administrative Procedures (40 hours)

Credits: 1
Students master essential organizational skills and develop efficient office practices in preparation for entry into the contemporary office. They acquire the ability to communicate effectively, think critically, apply problem-solving skills, and work effectively with other members of the office team. The rapid pace of change demands that office workers have the ability to develop new skills and understand new processes as jobs evolve.

Campus
ABTS 1540

 Records Management - Online Only (35 hours)


The amount of information created and used in an office environment has increased significantly in recent years. Records, which contain all of the daily information necessary to the operation of any business, need to be managed effectively and efficiently. Today, maintaining the integrity of the records system means that all office workers need to be aware of the importance of correct creation, storage, use, retrieval, protection, control, and disposition of records. Technology continues to change the role played by today's office worker. This course provides students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to face these challenges and new responsibilities in dealing with both manual and electronic files.

Campus
ABTS 1550

 Online Learner Success - Online Only (15 hours)


Online Learner Success (OLS) provides online learners with a working knowledge of the program called Desire 2 Learn (D2L). Assignments or activities in the course have been designed to demonstrate the use of various tools in the D2L program.

Campus
ACCT 1000

 Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop a basic understanding of financial accounting, which involves analyzing and recording a variety of financial transactions and preparing and evaluating financial reports. Topics financial statements; accounting events and entries; accounting adjustments; internal control and cash; accounts receivable; merchandising and inventory; long-term assets, liabilities; statement of cash flows; and financial statement analysis.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 1000, ACCT 1211, ACCT 1221, ACCT 2210, ACCT 2211, ACCT 1030, ACCT 1210, ACCT 1220, BBUS 2210 or BBUS 2211

Campus
ACCT 1211

 Accounting I

Credits: 3
Students develop the ability to record business transactions and prepare financial statements for a small business enterprise. Topics include accounting and the business environment; recording business transactions; adjusting entries; closing entries and completing the accounting cycle; merchandising accounting; accounting information systems; internal control and cash; receivables; property, plant and equipment; goodwill and intangible assets; and current liabilities and payroll accounting.
More information about this course

Distance
ACCT 1221

 Accounting 2

Credits: 3
Building on ACCT 1211: Accounting 1, students develop the ability to prepare and analyze increasingly complex financial statements. Topics include partnership accounting; corporate accounting; long-term liabilities; investments and international operations; the cash flow statement; and financial statement analysis.
More information about this course

Distance
ACCT 2210

 Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop the skills necessary to prepare and analyze the financial statements of a public corporation. Topics include the conceptual framework; accounting standards; the accounting cycle; financial statements; internal control, cash and bank reconciliations; short-term investments and receivables; inventory; long-term assets including intangibles; liabilities including bonds payable; shareholders' equity, dividends, and share repurchases; comprehensive income and the statement of shareholders' equity; statement of cash flows; and financial statement analysis.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 1000, ACCT 1030, ACCT 1210/1220, ACCT 1211/1221, ACCT 2211, BBUS 2210 or BBUS 2211

Campus
ACCT 2211

 Financial Accounting

Credits: 3
Students develop the ability to prepare and analyze the financial statements of public corporations. Topics include an overview of corporate financial reporting, transaction analysis, and accounting entries; double-entry accounting systems; merchandising and inventory; internal control, cash, and receivables; long-lived assets and current liabilities; financial reporting concepts and accounting for partnerships; corporations; long-term liabilities; cash flow statement; investments; and financial statements analysis.
More information about this course

Distance
ACCT 2250

 Management Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop the skills necessary to collect, analyze, and communicate quantitative and non-quantitative information to assist management in making more effective planning and control decisions. Topics include the role of managerial accounting; basic cost management concepts; job, process, hybrid and activity-based costing; cost behaviour and estimation; cost-volume-profit analysis; profit planning and activity-based budgeting; standard costing, flexible budgeting and variance analysis; cost management tools including the balanced scorecard, benchmarking and reengineering; and relevant costs for decision making such as make or buy, special orders, joint products and outsourcing.

Campus
ACCT 2251

 Management Accounting

Credits: 3
Students develop the ability to collect, analyze, and communicate quantitative and non-quantitative information to assist management in making more effective planning and control decisions. Topics include the changing role of management accounting and basic concepts; product costing and cost accumulation; process costing and hybrid product costing systems; activity-based costing and activity-based management; activity analysis, cost behavior and cost estimation; cost-volume profit analysis; absorption and variable costing; profit planning and activity-based budgets; standard costing and flexible budgeting; cost management tools; and decision making.
More information about this course

Distance
ACCT 2280

 Accounting Software Systems (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn to maintain the financial records of a small business using Sage 50 accounting and business management software. It enables detailed tracking, reporting and analysis of business transactions. Topics include general ledger; accounts payable; accounts receivable; payables and receivables setup; payroll journal and setup; inventory transactions; orders, quotes and deposits; currency and remittances; reconciliations and deposits; and comprehensive setup.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 2280, ACCT 2281, ACCT 1920 or ACCT 1921

Campus
ACCT 2281

 Accounting Software Systems

Credits: 3
Students learn to maintain the financial records of a small business using an accounting software package. Topics include an introduction; accounts payable; accounts receivable; payables and receivables setup; payroll journal and setup; inventory transactions; orders, quotes and deposits; currencies and remittances; project allocations; reconciliations and deposits; and comprehensive setup.
More information about this course

Distance
ACCT 3200

 Intermediate Financial Accounting 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn to prepare the income statement, statement of retained earnings, and asset side of the statement of financial position. Topics include the Canadian reporting environment; the conceptual framework; the income statement including irregular items and comprehensive income; overview of the statement of financial position and statement of cash flows; revenue recognition; cash and receivables; inventory; long-term and short-term investments; property plant and equipment including depreciation, impairment, and disposition; and intangible assets including impairment and goodwill. Instruction is based on International Financial Reporting Standards.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3200, ACCT ACCT 3201, BBUS 3200 or BBUS 3201

Campus
ACCT 3201

 Intermediate Financial Accounting I

Credits: 3
In this intermediate course, students build on the foundations established in an introductory accounting course such as BBUS 2211, ACCT 1211 or ACCT 1221. Students undertake an in-depth analysis of the asset side of the balance sheet. Key elements of this course are understanding the treatment in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) of cash, temporary investments, receivables, inventories, long-term investments, and capital assets. Also discussed are the accounting concepts underlying GAAP, with particular emphasis on the revenue recognition principle, as well as an introduction to some of the accounting issues underlying the form and content of the primary financial statements: the income statement, the statement of retained earnings, and the balance sheet. (CA, CGA, CMA, PMAC)
More information about this course

Distance
ACCT 3210

 Intermediate Financial Accounting 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Building on ACCT 3200: Intermediate Financial Accounting 1, students learn to prepare the current liabilities, long-term liabilities, and shareholders' equity sections of the statement of financial position and the cash flow statement. Topics include current liabilities and contingencies; long-term liabilities; advanced shareholders' equity; complex financial instruments and earnings per share; income taxes; pensions and other employee future benefits; leases; accounting changes and error analysis; statement of cash flows; and other measurement and disclosure issues. Instruction is based on International Financial Reporting Standards.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3210, ACCT 3211, BBUS 3210 or BBUS 3211

Campus
ACCT 3211

 Intermediate Financial Accounting 2

Credits: 3
Building on ACCT 3201: Intermediate Financial Accounting 1, students learn to prepare the current liabilities, long-term liabilities, and shareholders' equity sections of the statement of financial position and the cash flow statement. Topics include current liabilities and contingencies; long-term financial liabilities; shareholders' equity; complex financial instruments and earnings per share; income taxes; pension and other employee future benefits; leases; accounting changes and error analysis; the cash flow statement; and other measurement and disclosure issues.
More information about this course

Distance
ACCT 3220

 Income Taxation 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the conceptual structure of the Income Tax Act and the application of its rules to practical situations. Topics include an introduction to federal taxation; procedures and administration; income or loss from office, employment, business, or property; capital cost allowances and cumulative eligible capital; capital gains and losses; other income and deductions; and calculation of taxable income and tax payable for individuals.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3220, ACCT 3221, ACCT 3260, BBUS 3220, BBUS 3221 or BBUS 3260

Campus
ACCT 3221

 Income Taxation 1

Credits: 3
Students examine the conceptual structure of the Income Tax Act and the application of its rules to practical situations. Topics include the concept of income; employment income; business income; capital cost allowance and eligible capital property; income from property, income from other sources, and other deductions; capital gains and losses; taxable income and tax payable for individuals; taxable income and tax payable for corporations; and international taxation.
More information about this course

Distance
ACCT 3230

 Income Taxation 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Building on on ACCT 3220: Income Taxation 1, students examine the taxation of corporations, corporate distributions, and transactions between corporations and their shareholders. Topics include an in-depth coverage of taxable capital gains; deferred income plans; and the taxation of corporate entities, partnerships, trusts and corporate reorganizations.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3230, ACCT 3231, BBUS 3230, or BBUS 3231

Campus
ACCT 3231

 Income Taxation 2

Credits: 3
Building on 3221: Income Taxation 1, students examine the taxation of corporations, corporate distributions, and transactions between corporations and their shareholders. Topics include an in-depth coverage of taxable capital gains; deferred income plans; and the taxation of corporate entities, partnerships, trusts and corporate reorganizations.
More information about this course

Distance
ACCT 3250

 Intermediate Management Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Building on ACCT 2250: Management Accounting, students further develop their ability to use quantitative and non-quantitative information to make effective planning and control decisions. Topics include an in-depth study of the balanced scorecard and profitability analysis; interdepartmental cost allocation; cost allocation for joint products and byproducts; revenue and customer profitability analysis; process costing including spoilage, rework and scrap; cost management and the theory of constraints; capital budgeting; and transfer pricing and multinational management control systems.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3250, ACCT 3251, BBUS 3250 or BBUS 3251

Campus
ACCT 3251

 Intermediate Management Accounting

Credits: 3
Building on ACCT 2251: Management Accounting, students further develop their ability to use quantitative and non-quantitative information to make effective planning and control decisions. Topics include strategy, balanced scorecard, and profitability analysis; period cost application; cost allocation, including joint products and byproducts; revenue and customer profitability analysis; process costing and spoilage, rework, and scrap; cost management and quality, time, and the theory of constraints; capital budgeting; transfer pricing and multinational management control systems.
More information about this course

Distance
ACCT 3260

 Taxation for Decision Making (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students analyze the fundamental framework of the Canadian Income Taxation system and its effect on business decision making and financial planning. This course adopts a decision approach to taxation and focuses on the needs of non-accountants. Topics include an introduction to federal taxation; procedures and administration; income or loss from office, employment, business, or property; capital cost allowances and cumulative eligible capital; capital gains and losses; other income and deductions; and calculation of taxable income and tax payable for individuals.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3260, ACCT 3220, ACCT 3221, BBUS 3260 or BBUS 3221

Campus
ACCT 4200

 Advanced Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Building on ACCT 3210: Intermediate Financial Accounting 2, students examine a number of complex topics and their effect on financial reporting and disclosure. Topics include an introduction to international accounting and the development of accounting standards; temporary and long-term investments in debt and equity securities; business combinations; consolidation at acquisition; consolidation subsequent to acquisition; consolidation and intercompany profit in inventory and land; consolidation and intercompany company in depreciable assets; foreign currency transactions; translation and consolidation of international operations; and accounting for not-for-profit organizations including public sector reporting.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 4200, ACCT 4201, BBUS 4200 or BBUS 4201

Campus
ACCT 4201

 Advanced Financial Accounting

Credits: 3
Building on Intermediate Financial Accounting 1 and 2, students examine a number of complex topics and their effect on financial reporting and disclosure. Topics include an introduction to international accounting and the development of accounting standards; temporary and long-term investments in debt and equity securities; business combinations; consolidation at acquisition; consolidation subsequent to acquisition; consolidation and intercompany profit in inventory and land; consolidation and intercompany company in depreciable assets; foreign currency transactions; translation and consolidation of international operations; and accounting for not-for-profit organizations including public sector reporting.
More information about this course

Distance
ACCT 4230

 Assurance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students will learn to gather and evaluate audit evidence related to company financial statements. The goal is to provide assurance that the financial statements fairly present the financial performance and position of the organization being audited. Risk assessment techniques available to auditors and possible responses to those risks will be examined. Topics include an introduction to auditing and the public accounting profession; the audit process; professional relationships and legal liability; materiality and risk; audit evidence, evidence mix and audit strategy; the audit of internal controls, control risk and corporate governance; audit sampling; application of the audit process and auditor reporting.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 4230, ACCT 4231, BBUS 4230 or BBUS 4231

Campus
ACCT 4231

 Assurance

Credits: 3
Students will learn to gather and evaluate audit evidence related to company financial statements. The goal is to provide assurance that the financial statements fairly present the financial performance and position of the organization being audited. Risk assessment techniques available to auditors and possible responses to those risks will be examined. Topics include an introduction to auditing and the public accounting profession; the audit process; professional relationships and legal liability; materiality and risk; audit evidence, evidence mix and audit strategy; the audit of internal controls, control risk and corporate governance; audit sampling; application of the audit process and auditor reporting.
More information about this course

Distance
ACCT 4250

 Advanced Management Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Building on ACCT 3250: Intermediate Management Accounting, students explore the integrative and interdisciplinary role of management accounting and its contribution to the strategic management process and the provision of quantitative and non-quantitative information for planning, control, and decision making. Topics include management control systems; results controls, action, personnel and cultural controls; control system tightness; control system cost; designing and evaluating management control systems; financial responsibility centers including transfer pricing; planning, and budgeting; incentive systems; financial performance measures; the myopia problem; uncontrollable factors; corporate governance; and ethical issues.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 4250, ACCT 4251, BBUS 4250 or BBUS 4251

Campus
ACCT 4251

 Advanced Management Accounting

Credits: 3
Building on ACCT 3251: Intermediate Management Accounting, students explore the integrative and interdisciplinary role of management accounting and its contribution to the strategic management process. Students discuss the provision of quantitative and non-quantitative information for planning, control, and decision making. Topics include costing systems; allocating costs and revenues including support service costs, fixed costs, joint product costs, bundled product revenues, and customer profitability; management information systems; the importance of budgeting; the importance of variance analysis; capital budgeting and investment decision making; quality issues and supply chain strategies; transfer pricing; performance measurement; compensation issues; and strategic processes and balanced scorecards.
More information about this course

Distance
ADVG 1010

 The Adventure Tourism Industry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers an overview of the tourism industry and the adventure tourism sector. Upon completion of this course, students have a comprehensive understanding of the origins of tourism, the industry today, land management issues, future considerations, the guide's role, career paths, literature review, terminology, and definitions.

Campus
ADVG 1020

 Wilderness Travel (1,2,0)

Credits: 3
This course consists of a classroom theory component and two field modules in the fall term. Course content includes theoretical and practical aspects of wilderness travel and is an introduction to the organization of wilderness trips. Theory relates to clothing and equipment, navigation, environmental concerns, travel techniques, route plans and trip planning and field modules that includes navigation, route selection, group management, pacing, minimum impact camping and hazard awareness. This course is the prerequisite for most other introductory level ADVG courses.

Campus
ADVG 1050

 Guiding Leadership 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course explores the role of leadership as it applies to guiding in the adventure tourism industry. Topics include philosophic approach, qualifications profile, group dynamics, communication skills, leadership styles, problem solving, and decision-making.

Campus
ADVG 1110

 Emergency Situation, Search and Rescue Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course explores the guide's role in emergency situations and search and rescue management. Course content includes identifying hazards, hazard avoidance, managing hazards, emergency situation management, developing response plans, and the BC Provincial Emergency Program Search and Rescue Management Course.

Campus
ADVG 1190

 Standard Interpretive Guide Course (16 hours)

Credits: 1
This is the standard interpretative guide course offered by the Mountain Parks Heritage Interpretation Association (MPHIA). It is designed for mountain professionals who guide in the mountain national parks of Eastern British Columbia or Western Alberta.

Campus
ADVG 1276

 Business and Marketing for Adventure Operations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course focuses on business and marketing aspects of an adventure operation. Course participants will investigate corporate structures, budgeting, creating business growth, land access methods, business income and tax, and business management, along with marketing planning, promotion, advertising, and identification of preferred media strategies. Case studies specific to adventure sports will be used.

Campus
ADVG 1302

 Outdoor Travel Skills (30 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of wilderness travel and is an introduction to the organization of wilderness trips. Course content includes theory related to clothing and equipment selection, basic navigation concepts, environmental issues, route plans and trip planning. This course includes a field trip to practice the organization of a successful wilderness outing including navigation, minimum impact camping and hazard awareness.

Campus
ADVG 1330

 Backpacking (30 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is an introduction to multi-day wilderness travel both on and off trail. Personal and group preparation and hiking skills are foundational for a successful wilderness travel outing. Course content includes introductory equipment selection for multi-day trips, food selection and preparation, route selection, pre-trip planning, introductory group management, and minimum impact travel and camping best practices. This course includes a multi-day wilderness excursion.

Campus
ADVG 1340

 Introduction to Paddle Sports (30 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of paddle sports including: river kayaking, flat-water canoeing, kayak touring and sea kayaking. Course content includes theory related to equipment selection, basic stokes and maneuvers, self and assisted rescue, paddling communication and hazard recognition and safety. This course includes a field trip to practice the organization of a successful paddling outing.

Campus
ADVG 1350

 Canoe Skills (30 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is an introduction to flatwater canoe skills and serves as a foundation upon which further canoe skills may be built. Topics include an introduction and history of the canoe, canoe parts, paddle parts, basic canoe strokes and maneuvers, basic canoe rescue, and planning for a day-tripping canoe outing. This course follows the Paddle Canada 'Canoe Basics' or 'Introductory Lake Skills' curriculum.

Campus
ADVG 1360

 Introduction to Kayak Touring (30 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of lake kayak touring. Course content includes theory related to equipment selection, equipment packing, basic stokes and maneuvers, self and assisted rescue, paddling communication and hazard recognition and safety. This course includes a field trip to practice the organization of a successful paddling outing.

Campus
ADVG 1362

 Introduction to Sea Kayaking (30 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of Sea kayaking. Course content includes theory related to kayak equipment selection, basic stokes and maneuvers, self and assisted rescue, paddling communication, hazard recognition and safety. This course includes a field trip to practice the organization of a successful sea kayaking paddling outing.

Campus
ADVG 1370

 Whitwater Kayaking Skills 1 (30 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of whitewater kayaking. This course will take place in a pool, flat-water and moving water environments. Course content includes theory related to equipment selection, basic stokes and maneuvers, self and assisted rescue, paddling communication and hazard recognition and safety. This course includes a field trip to practice the organization of a successful moving water paddling outing.

Campus
ADVG 1372

 Whitewater Kayaking Skills 2 (30 hours)

Credits: 2
This course builds on the theoretical and practical skills and knowledge developed in Whitewater Kayak Skills 1. This course will take place in moving water and class 2 river environments. Course content includes: selecting thermal protections, personal protective equipment and kayak equipment for the river, intermediate stokes and maneuvers, developing a whitewater roll and more advanced assisted rescue techniques, scouting and navigating basic whitewater, hazard recognition and safety. This course includes a field trip to practice the organization of a successful class 2 paddling outing.

Campus
ADVG 1380

 Rock Climbing Skills 1 (30 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of rock climbing. Course content includes theory related to equipment selection, basic movement on rock skills, introduction to knots and hitches, climbing communication and hazard recognition and safety. This course includes a field trip to practice the organization of a successful climbing outing. This course is the prerequisite for other ADVG climbing skills courses.

Campus
ADVG 1400

 Avalanche Safety Training 1 (30 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is an introduction to factors affecting snow stability and avalanche phenomena and provides an entry-level decision making framework for travelers in a mountain winter environment. This includes an introduction to the Avalanche Terrain Exposure Scale, use of the Avaluator as a decision making tool, and practice with rescue equipment in a companion rescue scenario. This course is the prerequisite for ADVG 1410 Ski Touring Skills 1.

Campus
ADVG 1410

 Ski Touring Skills 1 (30 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is an introduction to ski touring and serves as a foundation upon which further ski touring skills may be built. Topics include ski touring equipment selection, clothing and thermo-regulation in a winter environment, basic terrain recognition, an introduction to group management, and basic snow shelter concepts, as well as an application of concepts and skills delivered in the ADVG 1400 Avalanche Safety Training course. This course includes a field trip to practice the organization of a successful winter ski touring outing.

Campus
ADVG 1510

 Flatwater Canoe Instructor (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This is the CRCA (Canadian Recreational Canoeing Association) Flatwater Instructor certification, and it prepares students for the Moving Water Instructor and Trip Leader courses. The Flatwater Instructor course is to provide a national certification of competence in the instruction and administration of the CRCA flatwater level courses.

Campus
ADVG 1530

 Kayak 1 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This is a flatwater and river kayaking skills course in which students explore kayak construction, equipment, rolls, strokes, and rescues.

Campus
ADVG 1550

 Skiing 1 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is an introduction to downhill ski techniques and equipment. Students participate on telemark and alpine equipment. The purpose is to develop strong downhill skiing techniques in order to reach a maximum efficiency level on variable snow conditions and to progress towards instructor level abilities. CANSI & CSIA teaching progression and techniques are utilized.

Campus
ADVG 1560

 Ski Tour 1 (70 hours)

Credits: 2
Students are introduced to backcountry ski touring on mountaineering or Nordic equipment. Course content includes backcountry ski equipment, accessory equipment, skiing back-country terrain, route finding, hazard evaluation, and winter camping skills.

Campus
ADVG 1570

 Rock Climbing 1 (50 hours)

Credits: 2
Students participate in a rock climbing personal skill development course designed to build a foundation in industry standard systems. Activities include gym climbing, outdoor top roping and sport climbing. Course content emphasizes hazard management, communication skills, technical movement skills, rope & equipment handling, knots and systems, fixed protection use, belay systems, anchors, and sport leading strategies. By the end of the course, students lead climb on bolted routes. Upon completion of the course, the student may be recommended for the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides (ACMG) Climbing gym instructor course and may participate in more advanced TRU rock climbing courses.

Campus
ADVG 1580

 Mountaineering 1 (70 hours)

Credits: 2
This is a mountaineering skill development course which includes mountaineering equipment, mountain safety, belays, anchors, mountaineering techniques, and crevasse rescue.

Campus
ADVG 1590

 Avalanche Safety for Ski Operations Level 1 (70 hours)

Credits: 2
This is the Canadian Avalanche Association Level 1 course which includes avalanche phenomena, terrain analysis, the mountain snowpack, stability and hazard evaluation, data collection, and avalanche rescue.

Campus
ADVG 1600

 SRT 3: Swiftwater Rescue Technician (60 hours)

Credits: 2
Students develop a comprehensive understanding of river rescue instruction as it pertains to canoes, kayaks, and rafts, hypothermia, and drowning. Students are able to perform rescues in moving water, create improvised rescue and rope system rescues, and participate in numerous rescue simulations.

Campus
ADVG 1900

 Expedition 1 (70 hours)

Credits: 2
Students participate in a self-directed expedition planned in conjunction with program instructors, focusing on areas where skill development is desired. This trip may be international in nature.

Campus
ADVG 2010

 The Natural Environment (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course studies the natural resource base upon which the adventure tourism industry depends; these include geographic features, mountain geomorphology, geology, fluviology, meteorology, ecology, flora and fauna species identification, nature interpretation and current environmental concerns.

Campus
ADVG 2030

 Advanced Wilderness First Aid (80 hours)

Credits: 3
This is an advanced wilderness emergency response course that provides detailed instruction in wilderness emergency response and pre-hospital care. Course content includes situation assessment, anatomy, physiology, airway management, respiratory emergencies, cardiac arrest, circulation emergencies, burns, eyes, ears, nose, and throat.

Campus
ADVG 2040

 The Business of Adventure Tourism (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
An in-depth study of adventure tourism as a business. The aspects of corporate structures, administration, budgeting, marketing, creating business growth, land access methods, business income and tac, issues and trends, business plans, and business management will be studied.

Campus
ADVG 2060

 Legal Liability and Risk Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
An in-depth look at the legal issues surrounding liability and risk management in adventure tourism. Includes the Canadian legal system, owner liability, guide liability, risk management and mitigation, insurance, legal releases and the development of risk management plans.

Campus
ADVG 2070

 Ocean Surfing 1 (50 hours)

Credits: 2
This is a five day ocean surfing development course intended to introduce ocean surfing skills, techniques and instruction in moderate ocean swell conditions.

Campus
ADVG 2080

 Canadian Association of Snowboarding Instructors (CASI) Snowboard Instructor Level 1 (40 hours)

Credits: 2
This is an entry-level program designed to introduce prospective snowboard instructors to the basic teaching and riding skills used at the beginner and novice levels of riding.

Campus
ADVG 2200

 Climbing Gym Instructor Level 1 (30 hours)

Credits: 1
This is an Association of Canadian Mountain Guides certification course. A Climbing Gym Instructor Level 1 can instruct sport climbing based top roping, and basic training and movement skills on climbing structures. The certification does not cover the skills required to instruct protection placement, anchor threads, rappelling, hazard management or other techniques required to safely climb outdoors.

Campus
ADVG 2210

 Climbing Gym Instructor Level 2 (30 hours)

Credits: 1
This is an Association of Canadian Mountain Guides certification course. A Climbing Gym Instructor Level 2 can instruct sport climbing based leading and intermediate movement courses on climbing structures. The certification does not cover the skills required to instruct protection placement, anchor threads, rappelling, hazard management or other techniques required to safely climb outdoors.

Campus
ADVG 2220

 Climbing Gym Instructor Level 3 (30 hours)

Credits: 1
This is an Association of Canadian Mountain Guides certification course. A Climbing Gym Instructor Level 3 can instruct sport climbing based leading and advanced movement courses on climbing structures. In addition, the Level 3 Instructor develops instructional courses and supervises larger climbing programs and instructional staff. The certification does not cover the skills required to instruct protection placement, anchor threads, rappelling, hazard management or other techniques required to safely climb outdoors.

Campus
ADVG 2230

 Guide Training Skiing - Mechanized (70 hours)

Credits: 2
This is the first of two training courses that prepare candidates for the Assistant Ski Guide exam. The course focuses on many of the technical skills required to safely lead ski groups in backcountry mechanized ski operations. Topics covered may include operational decision-making, downhill guiding, record keeping, rope systems (crevasse rescues, cliff rescue), transceiver searches, and snow observation skills. The course includes skills screening, in particular in the area of ski technique.

Campus
ADVG 2240

 Top Rope Climbing Instructor (50 hours)

Credits: 2
This is a Top Rope Climbing Instructor certification course for those who conduct top rope rock climbing and rappelling programs on simple and easily accessed outdoor terrain. The certification does not include multi-pitch rock climbing or the placement of protection for anchoring or leading.

Campus
ADVG 2260

 Ocean Surf 2 (30 hours)

Credits: 2
Students focus on the development of intermediate surf skills, including advanced paddling skills, enhanced wave judgment, proper positioning in the line up, and intermediate wave riding techniques. Additionally, students develop a deeper understanding about the effects wind, weather and swell have on surf conditions.

Campus
ADVG 2270

 Ocean Surf 3: Surf Instructor (45 hours)

Credits: 3
Students focus on developing their intermediate surfing skills, surf rescue, and the required surf instructional skills leading to Life Saving British Columbia's Bronze Cross and instructor qualifications, recognized by Parks Canada.

Campus
ADVG 2280

 Alpine Ski Instructor Level 3 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is the Level 3 Ski Instructor Certification of the Canadian Ski Instructors' Alliance. This course provides training in alpine ski instruction and will provide opportunities for professional ski improvement.

Campus
ADVG 2290

 Snowboard Instructor Level 2 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is the Level 2 Snowboard Instructor Certification of the Canadian Association of Snowboard Instructors. This course provides professional training in snowboard instruction and will provide opportunity for professional snowboarding improvement.

Campus
ADVG 2330

 Alpine Ski Instructor 2 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
The Level 2 Ski Instructor certification represents the second step for Canadian alpine ski instructors. It is continued on from the CSIA Level 1 course, but deals more in depth into modern teaching methods of outdoor sport, more in depth knowledge of ski technique, discussions on customer service, as well as teaching the growing population of seniors. This CSIA Level 2 course will provide certification to those candidates who are successful in achieving the required performance standard. This course provides professional training in alpine ski instruction, and ski technique.

Campus
ADVG 2430

 Assistant Hiking Guide (80 hours)

Credits: 3
This certification course evaluates candidates according to standards established by the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides. This course is intended for guides who lead clients on day-hikes and multi-day backpacking trips, on established trails and off-trail in wilderness operations. Course content includes navigation, route plans, group management, helicopter use, camping, interpretation, client and hazard management. Assistant hiking guides work with supervision from a hiking, alpine or mountain guide.

Campus
ADVG 2440

 Hiking Guide (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This certification course evaluates candidates according to standards established by the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides. This course is intended for guides who lead clients on day-hikes and multi-day backpacking trips, in all types of hiking terrain, and without supervision. Candidates are expected to demonstrate advanced skills in route finding, advanced navigation, hazard management, camp management, trip planning leadership, environmental ethics, and client care in a multi-day scenario.

Campus
ADVG 2450

 Alpine Ski Instructor 1 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This course represents the first level of instruction for Canadian alpine ski instructors. This CSIA (Canadian Ski Instructor Alliance) Level 1 course offers certification to those candidates who are successful in achieving the required performance standard. Students are provided professional training in alpine ski instruction, in addition to having an opportunity for personal ski improvement.

Campus
ADVG 2460

 Swiftwater Rope Rescue (60 hours)

Credits: 2
Students gain a comprehensive understanding of rope systems as applied to the moving water environment. The course is structured parallel to the Provincial Emergency Program Rope Rescue Team Member course, however, it is intended for participants from paddling backgrounds, and is required prior to entry into the Swiftwater Rescue Instructor course. Students become proficient at rope handling skills and principles and communication on the river. Students set up rescue anchors, belays for multi-person loads, lowering and raising systems, patient and stretcher ties and attachments, recovering vessels, and highline systems and telfers. Students alos participate in numerous rescue simulations.

Campus
ADVG 2470

 Freestyle Kayaking (50 hours)

Credits: 2
Students develop whitewater kayak playboating skills and practice the latest freestyle maneuvers and techniques developed in paddle sports.

Campus
ADVG 2490

 Kayak 2 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This white water skill development course is intended to prepare students for the Level 1 Flatwater instructor course through Canoe Kayak British Columbia.

Campus
ADVG 2510

 Moving Water Canoe Instructor (60 hours)

Credits: 2
Students are taught advanced moving water canoeing skills, required for the Canadian Recreational Canoe Association Moving Water Instructor Certificate. Course content includes river hydraulics, advanced strokes, and advanced paddling.

Campus
ADVG 2520

 Canoe Trip Leader (60 hours)

Credits: 2
Canoe tripping skills leading to the Canadian Recreational Canoe Association Trip Leader Certificate. Canoe tripping, trip planning, trip experience.

Campus
ADVG 2530

 Kayak 3 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
Upon completion of this course, students have developed advanced whitewater kayaking and leadership skills. Students participate in the Level 1 Flatwater Kayak Instructor Certification course through Canoe Kayak British Columbia, leading to the Assistant River Kayak.

Campus
ADVG 2540

 Senior River Kayak Instructor (60 hours)

Credits: 2
Students gain in-depth whitewater kayaking instructional skills. Students participate in the Level 2 and/or Level 3 Whitewater Kayak Instructor and Leader Certification Course through Canoe Kayak British Columbia.

Campus
ADVG 2550

 Telemark Ski Instructor Level 1 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This course offers instruction in nordic skiing, and leads to the CANSI Telemark Instructor Level 1 Certificate. Course content includes advanced Nordic downhill techniques and teaching skills.

Campus
ADVG 2570

 Ski Tour 2 (70 hours)

Credits: 2
Students are instructed in advanced backcountry skiing, route finding, evacuations, ski tour guiding, and methods for teaching backcountry skiing.

Campus
ADVG 2580

 Guide Training Skiing - Touring (70 hours)

Credits: 2
Continuing from ADVG 2230: Guide Training Skiing - Mechanized, this is the second of two training courses that prepare guide candidates for the Assistant Ski Guide Exam. This course introduces professional standards common to ski tour guiding including information gathering and hazard management; guiding and professionalism; trip planning and use of options; terrain use; uphill and downhill guiding techniques; client care; overnight travel; glacier travel techniques; and small and large group management. Participants are screened in advanced backcountry ski techniques.

Campus
ADVG 2590

 Guide Training - Rock (80 hours)

Credits: 3
This is the first course in the Rock Guide program and the recommended entry point for students intending to complete the Mountain Guide Certificate or Diploma. Course content includes a variety of technical guide applications common to rock, ski or alpine guiding, such as professionalism and guiding; equipment common to guides; preparation and planning a trip; climbing systems for guiding; descent systems; and improvised rescue systems.

Campus
ADVG 2610

 Apprentice Rock Guide (80 hours)

Credits: 3
This certification course evaluates candidates according to standards established by the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides. This course involves evaluating and coaching guiding techniques, while simulating a guide-client relationship on long, multi-pitch rock routes and sport-climbs, and requires a high level of rock climbing proficiency. Students also demonstrate field and classroom teaching techniques. This is the required course to work as an apprentice guide in rock terrain.

Campus
ADVG 2620

 Rope Rescue (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This is the B.C. Provincial Emergency Program Team Member course. Course content includes rope rescue systems, belays, lowers, raises, knot passing, rescue environments, and rescue simulations.

Campus
ADVG 2630

 Rope Rescue Team Leader (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This is the B.C. Provincial Emergency Program Rope Rescue Team Leader course. Course content includes advanced rope rescue techniques and rope rescue team leadership.

Campus
ADVG 2640

 Sea Kayaking 1 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
Upon completion of this course, students gain an understanding of sea kayaking techniques and the ocean environment, tides, ocean flora and fauna, sea kayak equipment, and ocean safety. Students perform rescues, navigate in a variety of ocean environments, and execute various guiding techniques.

Campus
ADVG 2650

 Sea Kayaking 2 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
Upon completion of this course, students perform advanced sea kayaking instruction, understand guiding leadership and leadership criteria, talk knowledgeably about ocean safety, execute complicated ocean rescues, and are able to plan an extended overnight trip. Students participate in the Association of Sea Kayak Guides Assistant Guide Exam.

Campus
ADVG 2652

 Sea Kayak 3 (30 hours)

Credits: 2
This course offers training and certification for Paddle Canada, Sea Kayak Level-1 Instructor. This will allow students to have greater industry opportunity and professional development with instructional sea kayaking. The Level-1 instructor is certified to conduct and certify Paddle Canada courses entitled Introduction to Kayak and Level-1 Skills. They may also assist on the following courses: Level-2 skills, Level-2 Instructor and Introduction to Kayaking Instructor.

Campus
ADVG 2660

 River Rafting 1 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
Upon completion of this course, students are able to safely operate paddle and oar-powered river rafts in Class 2 and 3 rapids. The skills and knowledge of legislated standards required for commerical guides in British Columbia are acquired during the course. Students become proficient in all three types of craft (paddle, oar and motor), allowing students to gain an overall perspective of the raft guiding industry.

Campus
ADVG 2690

 Elective Activity (60 hours)

Credits: 2
As approved by the Adventure Travel Guide Diploma Coordinator, students may receive credit for participation in additional adventure activity courses not taught within the Adventure Guide Diploma. Courses must be recognized training programs to receive consideration.

Campus
ADVG 2700

 Open Water Diver (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This is the entry level NASDS (National Association of Scuba Diving) Open Water Scuba Diving certification program. Enables the participant to go sport diving anywhere in the world.

Campus
ADVG 2710

 Advanced/Master Diver (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This course includes the NASDS (National Association of Scuba Diving Schools) Advanced Open Water and Master Dive certifications. Course content includes search and recovery, underwater navigation, night diving, deep diving, and five specialty dive modules.

Campus
ADVG 2720

 Dive Supervisor (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is the first of the NASDS (National Association of Scuba Diving Schools) professional diver programs. Upon completion of this course participants are qualified to organize dive outings for groups and conduct dive tours.

Campus
ADVG 2730

 Swiftwater Rescue Technician 4: Swiftwater Rescue Specialist (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This is the Swiftwater Rescue Technician 2 course which includes low and high angle rope applications; night SAR operations in river canyons; use of advanced techniques such as live bait rescues in steep creeks; and use of advanced equipment (including helicopters and self-bailing rafts).

Campus
ADVG 2750

 River Rafting 2 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
Students are provided the required river rafting instruction, leading up to the River Rafting Guide Examination. Course content includes rafting equipment, maintenance, paddle rafts, oar rafts, case studies, raft management, and guest management.

Campus
ADVG 2760

 Ice Climbing (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This course includes ice climbing techniques for both waterfall ice and mountaineering. Topics include systems for leading, anchors, and steep ice techniques.

Campus
ADVG 2770

 Adventure Sports Photography (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is intended as a digital photography course for guides, with an emphasis on photo composition and the application of photography to the context of guiding businesses. There is an increased demand for the use of quality photography within company brochures, magazine articles, trade shows and self-promotion within the adventure tourism industry. It is imperative that guides are able to understand what makes a quality photograph, how to take quality photographs, how to repair personal and guest equipment in the field, and how to use photographs for promotion purposes.

Campus
ADVG 2780

 Sea Kayak 3 (30 hours)

Credits: 2
Students will prepare and be examined for the Level 2, Sea Kayak Guides Alliance of BC, certification. This will allow students to lead in Class 2 waters, assist in Class 3 waters and demonstrate comfort in Class 4 waters.

Campus
ADVG 2790

 Ski Tour 3 (70 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is an advanced ski tour guiding course on nordic or randonée equipment, for students who do not meet the prerequisite requirements for the Guide Training for Skiers courses. Course content includes guiding ski tours; terrain assessment; snow stability assessment; route finding; track-setting; decision making; and hazard management.

Campus
ADVG 2800

 Rock Climbing 2 (70 hours)

Credits: 2
This is an introduction to multi-pitch gear climbing. It is designed to introduce competent rock climbers to industry-standard multi-pitch climbing and descending systems. Students participate in a non-threatening learning environment, flexible enough to meet the needs of a variety of individuals, and structured to provide a progression of skills and concepts that build on each other in a logical sequence. Upon completion of the course students may be recommended to enroll in the ACMG's Top Rope Instructor certification course.

Campus
ADVG 2810

 Mountaineering 2 (70 hours)

Credits: 2
This is a skill development course in alpine climbing techniques. Students travel in simple to moderate alpine terrain, conducting peaks ascents of semi-technical and technical routes. This course involves multi-pitch climbing on rock, snow, ice, and mixed terrain.

Campus
ADVG 2820

 Apprentice Ski Guide (80 hours)

Credits: 3
This certification course evaluates candidates according to standards established by the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides. The course involves evaluating and coaching guiding techniques, while simulating a guide-client relationship and managing winter and avalanche hazards, as well as route selection, information gathering, decision making, and uphill and downhill tracksetting. The course demands a high level of proficiency in backcountry skiing or snowboarding in mountainous and glaciated terrain. This course is an apprentice guide standard recognized by HeliCat Canada and the Backcountry Lodges of British Columbia Association.

Campus
ADVG 2830

 International Expedition Planning and Leadership (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is concerned with the planning and leadership of international adventure expeditions. Aspects of expedition planning include identification and research of international expeditions; planning timelines and implementation schedules; permit acquisition; sponsorship; socio-political considerations; leadership; training; legal implications; food and equipment acquisitions; cargo shipping; and local ground handling. Students also explore cultural considerations surrounding guiding and leading expeditions in an international setting. Topics include examining the impact of international expeditions on culture, minimizing the cultural impact of international expeditions, cultural considerations of foreign guiding, and stewardship and global citizenship.

Campus
ADVG 2840

 Coastal Sail Cruising 1 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
This course is an introduction to coastal sail cruising. Students explore interrelation of cruising with other aspects of coastal adventure tourism. The course is taught in accordance with the Canadian Yachting Association Basic Cruising Standard and is concerned with developing competent coastal sailing skills.

Campus
ADVG 2850

 Instructional Skills Workshop (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
The Instructional Skills Workshop (ISW) is a laboratory approach to the improvement of the teaching and learning process. Participants review basic ideas about teaching, check current practices, and within the safe environment of the workshop, try new strategies and techniques.

Campus
ADVG 2860

 Ski Guide (80 hours)

Credits: 3
This certification course evaluates candidates according to standards established by the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides. Candidates demonstrate the ability to gather information, choose appropriate terrain, and manage hazards in remote, glaciated mountain terrain. Topics also include client care, group management, and conduct of guides meetings. A high level of proficiency in backcountry skiing or snowboarding is required. This course is the 'lead guide' standard recognized by HeliCat Canada and the Backcountry Lodges of British Columbia Association.

Campus
ADVG 2870

 Rock Guide (80 hours)

Credits: 3
This certification course evaluates candidates to standards established by the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides. Candidates demonstrate a high level of rock climbing proficiency and applied guide techniques on long multi-pitch routes and sport-climbs. Additional topics include advanced, improvised, rescue techniques in high angle settings. This certification is the 'lead' guide standard for rock climbing operations.

Campus
ADVG 2880

 Apprentice Alpine Guide (100 hours)

Credits: 3
This certification course evaluates candidates to standards established by the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides. Candidates are assessed in alpine guiding techniques in a wide variety of mountain terrain and conditions, including client management on rock, snow and ice; advanced navigation; glacier travel; risk management; decision-making; and use of options. A high level of fitness is required. This course is the standard for working as an apprentice guide in mountaineering and climbing operations.

Campus
ADVG 2890

 Alpine Guide (100 hours)

Credits: 3
This certification course evaluates candidates according to standards established by the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides. Candidates demonstrate a high level of proficiency climbing on alpine rock, ice, snow and glaciers, as well as the ability to manage clients and hazards in a wide variety of alpine terrain. This certification is the 'lead' guide standard for mountaineering and climbing operations.

Campus
ADVG 2900

 Expedition 2 (60 hours)

Credits: 2
Students engage in a self-directed, 2-3 week expedition which must be a significant achievement, and may be international in nature.

Campus
ADVG 2930

 Rock Climbing 4 (70 hours)

Credits: 2
This is a preparation course for The Association of Canadian Mountain Guides - Guide Training Rock course. It is designed to introduce advanced rock climbers to professional guiding skills. Students are coached and instructed in order to attain entry-level guiding, standard rope management, technical systems, movement, and high angle rope rescue skills. Students receive feedback upon completion of the course as to their competency to proceed to the ADMG Guide Training Rock course.

Campus
ADVG 2940

 Mountaineering 3 (70 hours)

Credits: 2
This is a pre-course, to prepare candidates for entry in the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides - Guide Training Alpine course, designed to teach professional guiding skills to competent climbers and mountaineers. The course is meant to be taught in a non-threatening learning environment, flexible enough to meet the needs of a variety of individuals, and structured to provide a progression of skills and concepts that build on each other in a logical sequence.

Campus
ADVG 3110

 Adventure Activities (1,0,4)

Credits: 3
This course offers practical exposure to the planning and participation in a selection of adventure sports. Students are introduced to adventure sports by participating in activities such as whitewater kayaking, rock and ice climbing, sea kayaking and skiing; activities may change from year to year. Additional topics are discussed, such as trip preparation, and safety and leadership styles. While most of the group and technical equipment are provided, students are required to provide their own clothing and equipment, and participate in at least one weekend field trip and a number of evening instructional sessions. This course acts as a prerequisite to upper-level ADVG courses for students who may not have completed lower-level activity courses.

Campus
ADVG 3130

 Adventure Operations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to the planning of adventure activities and the operation of various types of adventure programs. Students gain practical knowledge by developing and planning an adventure activity, and discussing the principles of implementation. The course provides an overview of the day-to-day tasks, roles and responsibilities of operating adventure programs, and explores trends and issues that affect the management of adventure operations.

Campus
ADVG 3200

 Adventure Sport and Tourism (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Adventure sport and adventure tourism are terms used to describe a wide variety of activities - from bungee jumps to commercial ski trips to the South Pole. This course provides a survey of the adventure sport and adventure tourism industry; its philosophical foundations; adventure in contemporary society; the interrelationship of adventure in leisure, recreation, tourism, and extreme sports; and career paths.

Campus
ADVG 4010

 Business Applications for Eco and Adventure Tourism Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is the study of applied business concepts and practices pertaining to the management and marketing of eco and adventure tourism operations. The course examines tourism strategic management, business start-up considerations, product positioning, tourism opportunity studies, tourism consulting, innovative pricing methods, and product development.

Campus
ADVG 4020

 Legal Liability and Risk Management for Eco and Adventure Businesses (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is the study of risk management and law pertinent to the management and delivery of adventure tourism operations. The course examines legal liability concepts, waivers, case law, risk management practices, insurance and post-incident strategies.

Campus
ADVG 4030

 Contemporary Perspectives in the Eco and Adventure Industry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is the study of contemporary issues pertaining to the management of eco and adventure tourism. Although topics may vary depending upon current issues and trends, it is expected that the course will examine the effect of socio-political changes to tourism, the commodification of eco tourism, adventure racing, sexual exploitation in tourism, and the philosophical implications of search and rescue and technology to the eco and adventure experience.

Campus
ADVG 4040

 Programming Experiential Activities (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students study the design, development, and implementation of experiences for clients of eco and adventure tourism products. Students are involved in programming and delivery of adventure therapy products for youth at risk at a not-for-profit social service agency, consider eco and adventure experience sequencing, design corporate team building exercises, study program customization, and develop risk perception values.

Campus
ADVG 4050

 International Adventure Tourism Business (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is intended to provide an overview of international adventure tourism business development and management. Topics will include development theory, globalization, factors that affect international business development, colonialism and foreign aid, international tourism finance, global trade in services, the affect of women's rights on production and development, and numerous case studies.

Campus
ADVG 4070

 Directed Studies in Adventure (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to allow students the opportunity to investigate a specific field or topic in Nature-based or Adventure Tourism. Consultation with, and permission of, a Bachelor of Tourism Management faculty member and the Associate Dean is required. This means that the course is self-directed but the student must consult with and meet the requirements of a faculty member for the project.

Campus
ADVG 4080

 Graduating Seminar (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
This course teaches research methodology by involving students in a project of their choice. The course is in seminar format and each student designs and completes a project within the semester. Selected readings provide the foundation for student contribution to class discussion, and to the development of their project.

Campus
ADVG 4090

 Nature and Community Based Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore community-based adventure tourism, including policy, planning, and development. International tourism managers must understand sustainability; community development; how tourism is used to promote conservation; and how to involve local populations in the development decision-making process. While community-based tourism concepts are finding their way into North American tourism, this course concerns itself primarily with issues facing developing countries and lessons that may be brought to North American operations. Topics include tourism and community development; the creation of tourism opportunity and development strategies; the role of consultants and non-governmental organizations; sustainable tourism development; social impact assessment; community tourism assessment; pro-poor tourism development; achieving global competitiveness; community-based tourism for conservation; and the importance of including women in community development. Students examine numerous case studies and applications.

Campus
ADVG 4100

 Adventure Field School - International (0,0,12)

Credits: 6
This course is a 4-6 week field school to study adventure development, policy, planning, and operations in an international setting. Students use this field experience as a basis for the application of theoretical principles learned in the classroom to practical field work. The development and operation of international adventure and nature-based tourism requires extensive first-hand experience in an area. This course is intended to facilitate students' travel to an international region in order to study adventure and nature-based tourism product and business opportunities, and community development.

Campus
ADVG 4110

 Adventure Field School - International (0,0,6)

Credits: 3
This course is a three-credit 2-3 week field school to study adventure development, policy, planning and operations in an international setting. Students use this field experience as a basis for the application of theoretical principles learned in the classroom to practical field work. The development and operation of international adventure and nature-based tourism requires extensive first-hand experience in the local area. This course facilitates students' travel to an international region in order to study adventure and nature-based tourism product and business opportunities, and community development.

Campus
ADVG 4120

 Adventure Field School - Canada (90 hours)

Credits: 6
This is a six-credit, 4-6 week field school to study adventure development, policy, planning and operations in a Canadian setting. Students use this field experience as a basis for the application of theoretical principles learned in the classroom to practical field work. The development and operation of adventure and nature-based tourism requires extensive first-hand experience in an area. This course facilitates students' travel to a region within Canada in order to study adventure and nature-based tourism product and business opportunities, and community development.

Campus
ADVG 4130

 Adventure Field School - Canada (45 hours)

Credits: 3
This is a three-credit, 2-3 week field school to study adventure development, policy, planning, and operations in a Canadian setting. Students use this field experience as a basis for the application of theoretical principles learned in the classroom to practical field work. The development and operation of adventure and nature-based tourism requires extensive first-hand experience in an area. This course facilitates students' travel to a region within Canada in order to study adventure and nature-based tourism product and business opportunities, and community development.

Campus
ADVG 4140

 Community Capacity Building (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the socio-economic notion of nature-based activities and toursim as a mechanism for community development. While identifying and exploring possible community recreation and tourism opportunities, students analyze the benefits, costs (monetary and social), and facilitative models for ensuring community capacity building, towards sustainability and project buy-in.

Campus
ADVG 4160

 Tour Operations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the operation of tours to domestic and international destinations. The complexities, challenges and realities of planning, organizing, and operating tours with clients are discussed.

Campus
ADVG 4200

 Recreation and Tourism Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The theory and practice of managing natural resource based recreation and tourism. This course will consider natural resource based recreation and tourism from social, economic, business and resource management perspectives. It will provide an introduction to the foundations of recreation and tourism in modern society, including resource management impacts on recreation and tourism, principles of recreation systems planning, and administration and management of natural resource based recreation and tourism businesses. It includes extensive use of case studies and current issue topics.

Campus
ADVG 4210

 Adventure and Sport Marketing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on the unique marketing attributes of the adventure and sport product. The course offers an advanced and integrative approach to the study of adventure and sports marketing mix and promotion, and centres on marketing planning, identification of preferred media strategies, and the design of targeted marketing products.

Campus
ADVG 4220

 The Culture of Adventure (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Adventure activities have a long-standing culture that is important to understand in the context of contemporary use. As adventure activities become socialized within North America, its origins become an important context for its future development. Students explore adventure philosophy, history, literature, art, stories, mythology, values, mentors, evolution, and contemporary applications.

Campus
ADVG 4230

 Consulting in Adventure (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is the study of consulting in adventure. Topics will include the consulting process, the role of consultants, consulting opportunities, responding to requests for proposals, proposal scoring and rating systems, consulting skills, budgeting, pricing consulting services, and case studies. Students will be expected to carry out a consulting project of their own choosing as part of this course.

Campus
ADVG 4240

 Adventure Studies Field Research (1,0,11)

Credits: 3
Students conduct in-depth, hands-on field research, develop their findings, and incorporate them into their program of adventure study. The course is participatory in nature and is designed to stimulate inquiry and active learning. The process helps students to connect conceptual material to case study, learn field research techniques, collect and analyze field data, and develop holistic and critical thinking skills.

Campus
ADVG 4250

 Adventure Studies Practicum (1,0,9P)

Credits: 3
This course provides hands-on experience to enhance the student's academic studies. This is a work experience course that enables students to link theory and practice and consists of a work project undertaken for, or in collaboration with, an organization, most typically a business, association or community.

Campus
ADVG 4800

 Adventure Capstone Course (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This capstone course investigates contemporary adventure and sport issues, and aims to prepare students as future leaders in business and community development. Topics include ongoing personal and professional development, navigating through current industry trends, graduate school expectations, and vocational issues. Through readings and class discussions, students formulate a personal written philosophy, articulating their vision and mission as professionals in the field of adventure and sport.

Campus
AGSC 2100

 Introduction to Food Production Systems (3,2,0)

Credits: 3
This course is a study of the fundamental concepts and principles of food production systems. Students survey a range of agricultural systems using global, North American, Canadian, and B.C. examples. Students will learn how agriculture interacts with natural ecosystems and other land uses. Required field trips are an integral part of the course, and some weekend trips are mandatory.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both AGSC 2100 and AGSC 2200 Required Seminar: AGSC 2100S

Campus
AGSC 2200

 Food Systems at a Local Level and Beyond (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to agriculture and food systems, focusing on the local level but including information on global systems. Topics of discussion include agriculture, local food production, food security and food policy, sustainability, commercialization, and globalization. Case studies and projects are used to help students apply concepts learned during lecture, and to develop critical thinking, problem solving, communication, and conflict resolution skills.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both AGSC 2100 and AGSC 2200

Campus
ANES 0011

 Placement Exam


Registration in ANES 0011 allows students to write the placement exam for the Anesthesia Assistant program. Once registered, students have 30 weeks to write the exam.
More information about this course

Distance
ANES 4001

 Anesthesia Workstations

Credits: 3
Students explore current practices in the preparation, operation, and troubleshooting of anesthesia delivery workstations. Topics include the structure, function, and operating principles of workstation components as well as information on anesthetic pollution, equipment hazards, and checks and maintenance procedures for anesthesia workstations. Students analyze the uses of airway and adjunct equipment.
More information about this course

Distance
ANES 4003

 Airway Management

Credits: 3
Managing a patients' airway is an essential skill for an Anesthesia Assistant. Students explore the technology and application of airway management principles. Topics include airway equipment, airway assessment, and current airway management techniques. Additionally students will be assessed in surgical and nonsurgical approaches, and difficult airway management algorithms. Students successfully completing the course are well grounded in airway management theory and practice.
More information about this course

Distance
ANES 4005

 Anesthesia Adjunct Equipment

Credits: 3
Students review, examine and analyze all aspects of adjunct equipment used to administer anesthesia to patients. Activities for assessment include analyzing different monitoring devices, reviewing different tools and techniques for administering anesthesia safely, identifying complex situations and explaining how to manage them. Students focus on equipment in their workplace and compare and contrast with alternatives.
More information about this course

Distance
ANES 4011

 Hemodynamic Monitoring

Credits: 3
This course establishes the relationship between cardiopulmonary physiology and pathophysiology and the technical aspects of hemodynamic monitoring. Included in this course is the study of preoperative assessment and preparation of the patient, monitoring during anaesthesia, general anaesthesia techniques and postoperative care of the patient. Students will learn about the pharmacology, the physiology, and the anatomy relevant to the practice of both general and regional anaesthesia will be considered. On completion of this course, students should be able to understand the techniques and equipment involved in hemodynamic monitoring and their role in the assessment and treatment of cardiovascular and pulmonary disease.
More information about this course

Distance
ANES 4021

 Pharmacology and Principles of Clinical Anesthesia

Credits: 3
Students build upon their general knowledge of pharmacological principles and learn pharmacology in the context of clinical anesthesia. Both general and regional anesthesia is considered. Students explore the theory of current safe practice in pre-anesthetic care, preparation, induction, maintenance, and emergence from general anesthesia. The application of an anesthetic workstation and other technology used in the delivery of anesthesia is considered.
More information about this course

Distance
ANES 4031

 Clinical Anesthesia and Special Considerations

Credits: 3
Students explore the application of anesthesia in specific practice areas and contexts. General, regional, and specialty areas of anesthesia are considered with specific reference to obesity, neonatal and geriatric anesthesia, cardiac pathology, cardiovascular disease, endocrine diseases, thoracic surgery, neuromuscular disease, neurosurgery, trauma, and crisis management. Students analyze cases, develop anesthetic plans and evaluate considerations for specific patient subsets.
More information about this course

Distance
ANES 4061

 Anesthesia Professional Skills

Credits: 1
Students explore the standards that govern professional practice within the context of Anesthesia care teams as an Anesthesia Assistant (AA) and enhance their current understanding of professional practice by taking an in-depth look at the basic principles of professional and safety issues related to the position of Anesthesia Assistants. In addition, students have the opportunity to demonstrate professional skills needed for the AA work environment. Professionalism, communication, analysis and problem-solving, health and safety, and administration are examined in the AA context.
More information about this course

Distance
ANES 4071

 Research Skills for Anesthesia Assistants

Credits: 1
Students establish or advance their understanding of research through critical exploration of research design, data collection and analysis. The language of research, ethical principles and challenges, and the elements of the research process are examined. Students begin to critically review literature relevant to the field of anesthesia and determine how research findings are useful in informing their practice.
More information about this course

Distance
ANES 4101

 Anesthesia Practicum

Credits: 9
Students are exposed to a wide range of anesthesia cases and experiences. Students develop an understanding of clinical anesthesiology and demonstrate their clinical skills through their choice of anesthetic agents, managing airways, starting routine IVs, arterial line insertion, patient monitoring and operation of anesthetic machines.
More information about this course

Distance
ANHD 1010

 Veterinary Office Skills (45 hours)

Credits: 3
Students are instructed in the skills required for the successful performance of veterinary receptionist duties. These include veterinary terminology, use of veterinary software packages, clience service, veterinary office management, and inventory management. Students also consider the ethics of veterinary practice as it pertains to drug dispensing, veterinary-client-patient relationships and client-patient records.

Campus
ANHD 1100

 Anatomy and Physiology 1 (45 hours)

Credits: 3
This is the first of two anatomy and physiology courses dealing with domestic animals. The course emphasizes clinically relevant material for the Animal Health Technician student.

Campus
ANHD 1110

 Veterinary Parasitology (45 hours)

Credits: 3
This laboratory course focuses on parasitology for the animal health technologist. The theoretical and practical aspects of veterinary parasitology are emphasized. Students examine internal and external parasites of small and large animals. Topics include life cycles of parasites, diagnostics and identification, and general parasite prevention and treatment. Students are also acquainted with the handling and submission of various types of laboratory samples and introduced to basic microscopy.

Campus
ANHD 1120

 Animal Nursing 1 (45 hours)

Credits: 3
This is the first of three Animal Nursing courses concerned with small companion animals. Students focus on the day-to-day technical procedures and nursing care performed by an animal health technologist in a veterinary clinic.

Campus
ANHD 1130

 Animal Behaviour (45 hours)

Credits: 3
Animal behaviour is a growing field in veterinary medicine. Animal Health Technology Distance Education (AHTDE) students are provided with the skills required to confidently approach animal behaviour issues and strategies. Topics include training methods, behaviour problems, and animal temperament assessment. The course emphasizes the role of the animal health technologist in offering animal behaviour counseling in a small animal veterinary practice setting.

Campus
ANHD 1210

 Veterinary Microbiology (45 hours)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the information, terminology, and techniques that are the basis of veterinary microbiology. Topics include microbial anatomy and physiology; sterilization and disinfection; aseptic techniques; antimicrobial susceptibility testing; mycology; atypical prokaryotic pathogens; virology; and the basic theory and application of laboratory methods to identify common veterinary pathogens.

Campus
ANHD 1900

 Veterinary Clinical Studies 1 (300 hours)

Credits: 5
Veterinary Clinical Studies is a sequence of courses in the AHTDE program in which students are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of employed clinical work per week to obtain credit. Each course corresponds with one of the nine semesters in the AHTDE program.

Campus
ANHD 1910

 Veterinary Clinical Studies 2 (300 hours)

Credits: 5
Veterinary Clinical Studies is a sequence of courses in the AHTDE program in which students are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of employed clinical work per week to obtain credit. Each course corresponds with one of the nine semesters in the AHTDE program.

Campus
ANHD 1920

 Veterinary Clinical Studies 3 (300 hours)

Credits: 5
Veterinary Clinical Studies is a sequence of courses in the AHTDE program in which students are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of employed clinical work per week to obtain credit. Each course corresponds with one of the nine semesters in the AHTDE program.

Campus
ANHD 2100

 Anatomy and Physiology 2 (45 hours)

Credits: 3
Continuing from ANHD 1100: Anatomy and Physiology 1, students focus on internal body systems in domestic animals, in addition to avian anatomy and physiology.

Campus
ANHD 2110

 Veterinary Hematology (45 hours)

Credits: 3
In this laboratory course, students focus on veterinary hematology for the animal health technologist. The theoretical and practical aspects of veterinary hematology are discussed, while students are introduced to the life cycle and roles of blood cells, and the basics of coagulation. Topics include the preparation of blood films, the ability to perform complete blood counts, the analysis of blood cells (normal and abnormal), hematologic mathematical calculations, and the familiarization of the variety of available blood tests.

Campus
ANHD 2120

 Animal Nursing 2 (45 hours)

Credits: 3
Continuing from ANHD 1120: Animal Nursing 1, students focus on developing their advanced nursing skills, including surgical assistance.

Campus
ANHD 2130

 Radiology (45 hours)

Credits: 3
This course is a combination of theory and practical application that enables students to understand and apply the basic principles of veterinary radiography. Hands-on clinical work familiarizes students with the proper preparation and positioning of companion animals for routine radiological studies. The course also includes basic equine radiographic positioning, dental radiography, technical errors, basics of ultrasonography, formulating technique charts, and contrast radiography. The importance of radiographic safety is stressed throughout the course.

Campus
ANHD 2140

 Pharmacology and Laboratory Mathematics (45 hours)

Credits: 3
This course instructs students on the basic pharmacology and the commonly used classes of veterinary drugs. The laws and regulations that accompany the privilege of prescribing and dispensing drugs are considered. Students also discuss the major classes of drugs, with examples in each category, along with the mathematical principles and techniques used in their field of work. The emphasis is on accurately calculating dosages, including continuous intravenous infusion and dilution of solutions.

Campus
ANHD 2150

 Immunology and Animal Diseases (45 hours)

Credits: 3
Students begin with a study of the immunological basis of disease and progress to common disease syndromes encountered in companion and food producing animals. Topics include the immune response; inflammation; common immunological tests; the theory of vaccination and vaccination protocols; neonatal and geriatric considerations; the role of stress, nutrition and the environment in disease; and specific disease syndromes.

Campus
ANHD 2900

 Veterinary Clinical Studies 4 (300 hours)

Credits: 5
Veterinary Clinical Studies is a sequence of courses in the AHTDE program in which students are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of employed clinical work per week to obtain credit. Each course corresponds with one of the nine semesters in the AHTDE program.

Campus
ANHD 2910

 Veterinary Clinical Studies 5 (300 hours)

Credits: 5
Veterinary Clinical Studies is a sequence of courses in the Animal Health Technology Distance Education program in which students are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of employed clinical work per week to obtain credit. Each course corresponds with one of the nine semesters in the AHTDE program.

Campus
ANHD 2920

 Veterinary Clinical Studies 6 (300 hours)

Credits: 5
Veterinary Clinical Studies is a sequence of courses in the Animal Health Technology Distance Education program in which students are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of employed clinical work per week to obtain credit. Each course corresponds with one of the nine semesters in the AHTDE program.

Campus
ANHD 3110

 Veterinary Clinical Pathology (45 hours)

Credits: 3
This laboratory course focuses on clinical pathology for the animal health technologist, including the theoretical and practical aspects of veterinary clinical chemistry and urinalysis. Students are introduced to basic organ function as they relate to and affect clinical chemistry results, and how disease can be diagnosed in laboratory medicine. An emphasis is placed on ensuring quality control, and the steps and skills required to deliver accurate, timely results. Students use the appropriate skills and tools required to perform a complete in-house urinalysis.

Campus
ANHD 3120

 Intensive Care (45 hours)

Credits: 3
Students develop a familiarity with specialized anaesthetic protocols which may be prescribed for certain patients, in addition to the knowledge and skills required for the various procedures and equipment in trauma and emergency patient care units.

Campus
ANHD 3140

 Anaesthesia (45 hours)

Credits: 3
Students develop a familiarity and competence with the anaesthetic and analgesic agents and equipment utilized in veterinary medicine, and their use in various species.

Campus
ANHD 3150

 Laboratory and Exotic Animals (45 hours)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the housing and husbandry needs of common exotic pets and laboratory animal species. Students are also instructed in how to handle, sex, and restrain common species for clinical procedures. Discussion topics include animal research, the ethics of using animals for research, and animal welfare.

Campus
ANHD 3160

 Large Animal Science (45 hours)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to large animal husbandry, restraint, routine veterinary procedures, animal welfare and hospital management. Personal safety is emphasized.

Campus
ANHD 3170

 Animal Nursing 3 (45 hours)

Credits: 3
This is the third of three Animal Nursing courses concerned with small companion animals. Students focus on their technical nursing skills and small animal veterinary dentistry.

Campus
ANHD 3900

 Veterinary Clinical Studies 7 (300 hours)

Credits: 5
Veterinary Clinical Studies is a sequence of courses in the Animal Health Technology Distance Education program in which students are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of employed clinical work per week to obtain credit. Each course corresponds with one of the nine semesters in the AHTDE program.

Campus
ANHD 3910

 Veterinary Clinical Studies 8 (300 hours)

Credits: 5
Veterinary Clinical Studies is a sequence of courses in the Animal Health Technology Distance Education program in which students are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of employed clinical work per week to obtain credit. Each course corresponds with one of the nine semesters in the AHTDE program.

Campus
ANHD 3920

 Veterinary Clinical Studies 9 (300 hours)

Credits: 5
Veterinary Clinical Studies is a sequence of courses in the Animal Health Technology Distance Education program in which students are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of employed clinical work per week to obtain credit. Each course corresponds with one of the nine semesters in the AHTDE program.

Campus
ANHT 1010

 Laboratory Mathematics (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
Animal health technology students develop a practical understanding of the principles and techniques of mathematics and statistics with an emphasis on calculating dosages, intravenous infusions and dilution of solutions. An introduction to statistics is included to allow students to critically read journal articles and pharmaceutical claims and to facilitate research efforts.

Campus
ANHT 1090

 Animal Behaviour 1 (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
The first of four courses on applied animal behavior, this course introduces students to normal animal behavior. Students learn handling, management and training skills used by animal health technologists to apply to hospitalized animals and animals in the home. The basics of managing dogs and cats at the animal health technology program, enhancing animal well-being and introductory training methods are discussed, in addition to operant conditioning.

Campus
ANHT 1510

 Veterinary Terminology (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
Students analyze and define the components of veterinary terms. These skills enable students to determine the meaning of frequently used veterinary terms and to create new terms for specific applications.

Campus
ANHT 1520

 Animal Nursing 1 (2,0,1)(L)

Credits: 2
Students focus on the theory and practice related to basic handling and restraint of companion (small) animals and the components of a physical examination. Additional topics include blood collection techniques and medicating patients via enteral and parenteral routes.

Campus
ANHT 1530

 Introductory Veterinary Immunology (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
Students are offered the basic fundamentals of veterinary immunology, and focus on the technician's role in a clinical environment. A solid understanding of the biological mechanisms of the immune response, principles of vaccination and common serological assays is important in the daily clinical role of the technician as well as in the context of client communication and education.

Campus
ANHT 1540

 Veterinary Office Management (1,0,2)

Credits: 1
Students are introduced to the concepts of human relationships and how they influence the business of veterinary medicine. Topics include personality and communication styles, client communications, basic management principles, facilities, stress management, and finances. The computer portion of this course focuses on providing students with a good working knowledge of Microsoft Word and PowerPoint, as well as an introduction to the use of veterinary practice software.

Campus
ANHT 1560

 Pharmacology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This lecture course outlines the various classifications and use of drugs utilized in veterinary practice.

Campus
ANHT 1590

 Domestic Animal Anatomy and Physiology 1 (2,0,2)(L)

Credits: 2
Animal health technology students are introduced to the anatomy and physiology of domestic animals. Topics include anatomical terminology, cell and tissues, and the skeletal, muscular, nervous, integument and sensory systems. An emphasis is placed on clinically relevant material to prepare students for common procedures performed in veterinary practice. Students are provided with hands-on opportunities to locate and identify anatomical structures and reinforce theory.

Campus
ANHT 1620

 Animal Nursing 2 (1,0,1)(L)

Credits: 2
Students focus on the day-to-day procedures commonly performed by a technologist in a veterinary clinic. Procedures include urine collection, animal care, and eye and ear exams. Additional topics include nutrition and medical records.

Campus
ANHT 1670

 Dentistry for Animal Health Technicians (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
This course prepares students to perform dental prophylactic care in small animals, as well as assisting the veterinarian with extractions and endodontic procedures. Topics include dental anatomy; anatomical and directional terminology; dental charting; dental disorders including periodontal disease; dental prophylactic care; instrumentation; radiology; and dental nerve blocks.

Campus
ANHT 1690

 Domestic Animal Anatomy and Physiology 2 (2,0,2)(L)

Credits: 2
This course is a continuation of ANHT 1590: Domestic Animal Anatomy and Physiology 1, and is designed to give animal health technology students a continued understanding of the basic anatomy and physiology of common domestic animals. Topics include the gastrointestinal, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary and reproductive systems. Students are prepared, with clinically relevant material, for common procedures performed in veterinary practice. Students are provided with hands-on opportunities to locate and identify anatomical structures and reinforce theory.

Campus
ANHT 1720

 Veterinary Clinical Pathology 1 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
Students develop a solid theoretical and practical background in veterinary clinical haematology. This course introduces students to the use of manual haematological techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of veterinary disease. Hands-on opportunities are provided to perform the routine and special procedures typically carried out in a veterinary clinic. Students focus on accuracy, efficiency and correct interpretation of data.

Campus
ANHT 1730

 Veterinary Clinical Pathology 2 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of ANHT 1720: Veterinary Clinical Pathology 1, and introduces students to veterinary urinalysis and urinalysis techniques. In addition, students learn about the common clinical chemistry tests and understand the implications of abnormal results. Hands-on opportunities are provided to perform routine urinalysis and clinical chemistry techniques that are typical in a veterinary clinic. Students focus on accuracy, efficiency and correct interpretation of data.

Campus
ANHT 1800

 Parasitology (2,0,2)(L)

Credits: 2
Animal health technology students develop comprehensive understanding of the identification, life cycle and importance of common veterinary parasites and how to control these organisms. A primary objective for students is client education regarding the role parasites play in the health of animals. Competency in the area of fecal evaluation is stressed. Students examine prepared specimens and are given appropriate demonstrations. On a weekly basis, students use fresh samples for fecal flotations and specialized recovery techniques for the identification of parasites.

Campus
ANHT 1990

 Animal Behaviour 2 (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
This course is a continuation of ANHT 1090: Animal Behavior 1, in which students further develop their awareness, knowledge and skills in applied animal behavior. The course includes lectures and demonstrations with a major emphasis on normal feline behavior.

Campus
ANHT 2090

 Animal Behaviour 3 (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
In this continuation of Animal Behavior 1 and 2, students further develop their knowledge and skills in applied animal behavior. Emphasis is on the in-depth study of specific common behavior problems in dogs and cats. Guest speakers, case studies and demonstrations may be used to present advanced dog and cat training and management skills using program animals.

Campus
ANHT 2200

 Clinical Practicum (240 hours)

Credits: 6
Practicum students spend two three-week periods, for a total of six weeks, working in two different veterinary facilities, which are small or mixed animal private veterinary practices. After successful application, some students may qualify to spend one of these three-week periods in a veterinary facility with a limited scope, such as equine, emergency, or research.

Campus
ANHT 2210

 Clinical Cases 1 (0,2,0)

Credits: 2
Students apply and integrate material from the Animal Health Technology program through the use of clinical case studies. Clinical case presentations and/or clinical pathological specimens are discussed each week. Students may be assigned mystery clinical case worksheets, which are completed by using laboratory equipment to examine samples, slides, or images.

Campus
ANHT 2220

 Clinical Cases 2 (0,2,0)

Credits: 2
This course is a continuation of ANHT 2210: Clinical Cases 1. Students continue to work on clinical cases, either presented or assigned by the instructor. In addition, each student investigates, presents and leads a discussion of a clinical case.

Campus
ANHT 2530

 Large and Small Animal Diseases (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
Students are introduced to common diseases in companion and farm animals. Clinical signs, diagnostic tests, treatment, prevention, and client communication are discussed, including the role of the veterinary technologist in these areas.

Campus
ANHT 2540

 Large Animal Sciences (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Animal health technology students develop a practical, working knowledge of farm animal nutrition, breeding, general management and animal health. Emphasis is placed on global perceptions of animal consumption, animal care and welfare.

Campus
ANHT 2550

 Large Animal Clinics 1 (0,1,2)(L)

Credits: 1
This course is an introduction to herd health management, husbandry, restraint, nutrition, and physical examinations on large animals and wildlife. Students are familiarized with the routine techniques performed on the following species: equine, bovine, ovine, caprine, camelids, avian, as well as wildlife. Post mortem examinations and tissue sampling is included.

Campus
ANHT 2560

 Anesthesia for Veterinary Technologists (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This is an introductory course in veterinary anesthesia. Theoretical and practical application familiarizes students with using anesthetic agents including analgesics, patient monitoring, and operating and maintaining anesthetic equipment.

Campus
ANHT 2570

 Surgical Assistance 1 (2,0,3)(L)

Credits: 2
This course is designed to familiarize students with the concepts of sterility, operating room conduct and procedures. Students implement these concepts with small group practice. At the completion of this course, students can prepare basic equipment, materials, facilities, personnel, and surgical patients for surgery, and perform the duties of a surgical assistant.

Campus
ANHT 2580

 Diagnostic Imaging 1 (1,1,2)(L)

Credits: 2
This course is a combination of classroom and laboratory sessions that enable students to understand and apply the basic principles of veterinary diagnostic imaging. Hands-on clinical work allows students to become familiar with the proper preparation and positioning of companion (small) animals for routine imaging procedures. The importance of radiation safety is stressed throughout the course.

Campus
ANHT 2590

 Animal Nursing 3 (1,0,1)(L)

Credits: 1
This course is a continuation of technical and patient care skill training acquired in Animal Nursing 1 and 2, with an emphasis on nutrition, bandaging skills, and the care of geriatric and recumbent patients.

Campus
ANHT 2600

 Field Work Experience (0,3,0)

Credits: 3
This course consists of weekly guest speakers or tours, including an off-campus tour of Vancouver and area during the month of May. Students are responsible for their personal costs incurred during this trip.

Campus
ANHT 2610

 Theriogenology (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
Students are introduced to reproductive cycles, breeding, fertility, artificial insemination, parturition and reproductive disease in domestic animals.

Campus
ANHT 2620

 Animal Nursing 4 (1,0,1)(L)

Credits: 1
Animal Nursing is a four semester course, in which a variety of aspects in the nursing care of animals are explored, ranging from basic animal restraint to more technical diagnostic and medical procedures. Animal Nursing 4 focusses on external fixation, vaginal cytology, semen collection, necropsy and tissue cytology.

Campus
ANHT 2650

 Large Animal Clinics 2 (0,1,2)(L)

Credits: 1
This course is designed as a continuation of ANHT 2550: Large Animal Clinics 1. The emphasis of this course is on basic ranch management and the practice of large animal and wildlife care skills. Laboratory sessions take place at selected ranches in the Kamloops area and at the BC Wildlife Park. Exercises in public speaking are also part of this course.

Campus
ANHT 2660

 Anesthesia and Critical Care for Veterinary Technologists (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of ANHT 2560: Anesthesia for Veterinary Technologists. Theoretical and practical application allows students to become proficient with anesthesia in small animals, including specialized techniques and fluid therapy. Anesthesia of pediatric, geriatric, traumatized, critically ill, and large animal patients is discussed.

Campus
ANHT 2670

 Surgical Assistance 2 (2,0,3)(L)

Credits: 2
This course is a continuation of ANHT 2570: Surgical Assistance 1, and is designed to familiarize students with common veterinary surgical procedures, including dental techniques. The role of the veterinary technologist in preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative duties, and the nursing care of the surgical patient is discussed.

Campus
ANHT 2680

 Diagnostic Imaging 2 (1,1,2)(L)

Credits: 2
This course is a continuation of ANHT 2580: Diagnostic Imaging 1. Students are introduced to the theory and practical application of equine radiographic positioning, technical errors, contrast imaging procedures, formulating technique charts, and the basics of ultrasonography, endoscopy and digital imaging. The importance of radiation safety is stressed throughout the course.

Campus
ANHT 2690

 Laboratory and Exotic Animals (1,0,0)(1,0,1)(L)

Credits: 2
This course is designed to introduce students to the housing and husbandry needs of common exotic pets and laboratory animal species. Students learn how to handle, sex and restrain the more common species for clinical procedures. Discussion topics include animal research, the ethics of animals used in research and animal welfare.

Campus
ANHT 2700

 The Animal Health Technologist and Society (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
Using written materials, small group discussion, guest speakers, and case examples, this course enables students to explore issues relevant to practicing animal health technologists. Topics include professional associations, ethical and legal issues, the human-animal bond, animal advocacy, pet loss grief and maximizing employment opportunities.

Campus
ANHT 2990

 Animal Behaviour 4 (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
Fourth in the applied Animal Behavior series, this course focuses on the integration of animal behavior into small animal veterinary practice, with an emphasis on the role of the animal health technologist. The course uses a 'problem-based learning' format, whereby some of the presented material is case-based; groups of students research and report on specific cases. Course topics are predominantly related to canines and felines.

Campus
ANTH 1210

 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
A general introduction to cultural anthropology. The course is a survey of the main features of nonindustrial societies in various parts of the world. Subjects to be considered are: economy, political organization, kinship and marriage, forms of religious devotion. Required Seminar: ANTH 1210S

Campus
ANTH 2140

 Canadian Native Peoples (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
An introduction to the present situation of Canada's Indians, Metis and Inuit, interpreted on the basis of contemporary and historical political, economic and cultural developments. Major topics include: the Indian Act, the reserve system, land claims, directed culture change, social consequences of paternalism.

Campus
ANTH 2150

 Cultural Explorations (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
An advanced introduction to cultural anthropology, this course examines how anthropologists describe the societies they study, and the conclusions they draw. Case studies to be used may include books as well as ethnographic films depicting the cultural diversity of the modern world.

Campus
ANTH 2250

 Sex, Gender and Culture (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
A cross cultural survey of the different ways in which a biological condition (sex) is transformed into a cultural status. A central issue concerns the question whether there are 'natural' male and female behaviours that are expressed regardless of local cultural influences.

Campus
ANTH 2600

 Minorities in the Modern World (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
An introduction to the anthropological study of minorities, with special reference to the present position of indigenous peoples around the world. Case studies from North America, Europe, Asia, Russia and Oceania illuminate the concepts of genocide, ethnocide, pluralism and multiculturalism.

Campus
ANTH 2921

 Anthropology of Illness

Credits: 3
This course provides a basic introduction to the study of health and illness in diverse cultural settings and explores fundamental concepts that form the core of medical systems worldwide. All groups have their own systems of medical knowledge and their own concepts of health and illness. It is important that we understand these systems in order to deal with suffering and facilitate healing. You will be introduced to the concepts of medical anthropology through a selection of readings that range from the theoretical t o the particular. A variety of ethnographic studies will familiarize you with the way individuals in different cultural settings perceive and experience health and illness in all aspects of their daily lives.
More information about this course

Distance
ANTH 3000

 Current Issues in Cultural Anthropology (3,0,0) or (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
The study of selected areas and communities drawn from around the world with an emphasis on problems of cross- cultural comparison and on theoretical issues of current importance in the discipline.

Campus
ANTH 3030

 The European Orient: Balkans, Russia and Eastern Europe (3,0,0) or (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
A specialized survey of the cultures shaping Central and Eastern Europe including Russia. Primary areas of concern are the interplay between peasant and national culture and between ethnic and political identity.
Note: Different culture areas or regions may be selected in subsequent offerings of the course. Same course as POLI 3070

Campus
ANTH 3270

 First Nations Natural Resource Management (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
A review of historical and contemporary issues shaping Aboriginal peoples' relationship to their lands and resources and the impact of governmental policies on this relationship. Topics will include the Indian Act, traditional aboriginal views of resource management, treaties, and analysis of current policies on resource management and aboriginal life.

Campus
ANTH 3280

 Indigenous Peoples in Comparative Perspective (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course takes a cross-cultural comparative approach to the study of contemporary Indigenous Peoples. Indigenous Peoples constitute a diverse range of groups throughout the world. What they have in common is the shared experience of colonization. Recognizing the diversity of Indigenous Peoples throughout the world, this course will explore both those experiences shared between groups, and those unique to local contexts.

Campus
ANTH 3390

 ***Special Topics in Anthropology (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This is a variable content course intended to provide topics beyond those of regular departmental offerings. The course will be offered from time-to-time, and may make use of the specializations of visiting faculty.

Campus
ANTH 4000

 History of Anthropology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The development of the major approaches in anthropology in their institutional contexts.

Campus
ANTH 4010

 Native Peoples of North America (3,0,0) or (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
Native cultures of the United States and Canada; linguistic and cultural relationships; the culture of reserves and the reserve system in both countries.

Campus
ANTH 4030

 Field School in East/Central Europe (3,0,0)

Credits: 6
This course offers an introduction to the societies and cultures of East/Central Europe by way of a month-long field trip. The itinerary includes rural and urban locations in several countries that lend themselves to an ethnographic examination of the ethnic relations, religions, economies, and politics shaping the buffer zone between the European East and West.
Note: Same course as POLI 4030 and SOCI 4030

Campus
ANTH 4040

 People and Cultures of the North American Arctic (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course introduces the North American sub-Arctic, Arctic, and High Arctic as discrete cultural regions. Surveying the historical, ecological and cultural diversity of the Arctic, this course reviews anthropological perspectives on the past and present lives and experiences of indigenous peoples who have made the high latitudes their home for millenia. This course documents patterns of social organisation among Inuit, Dene, and Metis with a secondary focus directed towards recent economic, political, and cultural trends in the region resulting from European contact, colonisation, and political devolution.

Campus
ANTH 4050

 Canadian Status/Treaty Indian Reserve Communities (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course will present Canadian reserve communities as distinct societies. A survey of status Indian reserve communities across Canada, this course chronicles the origin of the numbered reserve system historically by introducing the Indian Act, Registered Indians, and the numbered treaty process. It surveys the variety of reserve communities nationally, as well as documenting present-day reserve conditions from the point of view of social scientists and Native writers alike.

Campus
ANTH 4150

 Religion and Society (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Comparative study of religious beliefs and practices; relations between religious, social and political institutions; religion as a force for stability as well as change.
Note: SOCI 1110/1210 means not either/or, but both.

Campus
ANTH 4330

 Directed Studies (3,0,0) or (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
General reading and/or a research undertaking, with the agreement, and under the supervision, of a Department faculty member selected by the student. No more than 6 credits of Directed Studies may be taken for credit towards a degree.

Campus
ANTH 4600

 Cultural Ecology and Evolution (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Social organization in the context of the theoretical approaches of cultural evolution and cultural ecology with particular emphasis on primitive societies: kinship, political organization, warfare, economic organization, peasant societies, religious movements, underdevelopment, and social change.

Campus
APEC 1610

 Introduction to First Nation Taxation (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided with an overview of First Nation taxation and how it can be used to improve the investment climate and support economic development on First Nation lands. The role of government in making markets work is explained, focusing primarily on First Nation local revenue authority using the First Nations Fiscal Management Act (FMA). Topics include the role of government in facilitating investment; the concept of property taxation; First Nation property taxation; FMA and institutions; the First Nation Goods and Services Tax (FNGST).

Campus
APEC 1620

 Establishing First Nations Tax Rates and Expenditures (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn how to set First Nation property tax rates through the preparation of a local services budget and how to communicate effectively with council and taxpayers during this process. Topics include setting tax rates and expenditure policy issues; preparation of local revenue budgets; preparation of annual tax rates and expenditure laws; understanding user fees and business occupancy taxes; and communication and notification requirements under the authority of the First Nations Fiscal Management Act (FMA) or s.83 of the Indian Act.

Campus
APEC 1630

 Assessment and Assessment Appeal Procedures (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine property markets with a focus on property assessments and assessment appeals in Canada under the authority of the First Nations Fiscal Management Act (FMA) or s. 83 of the Indian Act. Topics include an introduction to valuing land, assessment theory and practice, assessment law and practice, assessment appeals, and an assessment appeal role play.

Campus
APEC 1631

 Assessment and Assessment Appeal Procedures

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to property markets and property assessment, with an emphasis on property assessments and assessment appeals in Canada under the authority of the First Nation Fiscal and Statistical Management Act (FSMA) or s. 83 of the Indian Act. Topics include land tenure, approaches to assessing residential or income earning properties, assessment rolls, and assessment appeal processes, which meet the FSMA regulatory requirements. Upon completion of this course, participants should have the knowledge and skills to fulfill the First Nation Tax Administrator's role in regards to managing the assessment and assessment appeals process.
More information about this course

Distance
APEC 1640

 Administration: Tax Notices, Collection and Enforcement (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn to manage a First Nation and/or local government tax administration system focusing on taxpayer notification and local revenue billing, collection and enforcement. Best practices from systems across Canada are presented along with the regulatory requirements associated with the First Nations Fiscal Management Act (FMA). Significant time is devoted to using the First Nations Tax Commission's (FNTC) specialized Tax Administration System (TAS) for local revenue administration.

Campus
APEC 1650

 Communication, Taxpayer Relations and Dispute Resolutions (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine how to establish a mutually beneficial working relationship between First Nation tax authorities and taxpayers. Topics include communications planning and products; reaching agreement through consensus; taxpayer representation structures and laws; local dispute resolution; and the formal dispute resolution process from theF irst Nations Fiscal Management Act (FMA).

Campus
APEC 1660

 Service Agreements and Joint Contracts (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine how to develop service agreements and joint contracts for the delivery of services or the construction of infrastructure involving local governments and/or private partners. Topics include service agreements; contracting; service agreement calculations and negotiations; interest-based negotiations; service agreements for additions to reserves (ATR) and treaty land entitlement (TLE) settlements; and a service agreement case study. Students utilize tools developed by the First Nations Tax Commission (FNTC) to assist in service agreement negotiations.

Campus
APEC 1670

 Development Cost Charge (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn to establish fair and transparent development cost charge (DCC) and service tax (ST) systems for First Nations or local governments under the authority of the First Nations Fiscal Management Act (FMA) and the First Nations Tax Commission (FNTC). These systems are intended to support the financing of infrastructure and service improvements. Topics include options for First Nation community financing infrastructure; calculating rates; developing First Nation DDC and ST laws; implementing First Nation DCC and ST laws; and DCC and ST case studies.

Campus
APEC 1671

 Development Cost Charges

Credits: 3
This course discusses the development of a fair and transparent development cost charge (DCC) system for First Nations or local governments. Students focus on creating DCC systems under the authority of the Financial Management Association and First Nation Tax Commission procedures and standards related to DCCs. The course presents DCC best practices throughout Canada. Recommended APEC 1611, APEC 1621
More information about this course

Distance
APEC 1680

 Capital Infrastructure and Debenture Financing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn how to plan, cost, and finance local government infrastructure projects using long-term debentures in the First Nation Fiscal Management Act (FMA). They also examine the legal, planning and policy requirements established by the First Nation Finance Authority (FNFA), the First Nations Tax Commission (FNTC) and the First Nations Financial Management Board (FMB) as well as best practices in economic, capital and financial planning. Topics include economic infrastructure; economic strategy; integrated capital planning; capital financing and borrowing; borrowing laws and procedures; and a case study in infrastructure financing.

Campus
APEC 2640

 Residential and Commercial Development on First Nation Lands (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine residential and commercial development on First Nation lands, using the Indian Act, the First Nation Fiscal Management Act (FMA), and the First Nation Land Management Act (FNLMA). Some of the legal, administrative, and financing infrastructure gaps in the Indian Act that inhibit residential and commercial development are highlighted, and strategies to overcome these legal barriers are explored. Topics include investment on First Nation lands; First Nation property rights; land management and development on First Nations lands; and a case study in First Nations development negotiations.

Campus
APEC 2650

 Investment Facilitation on First Nations Lands (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students study the interests of public and private investors and what can be done to attract investment on First Nation lands. Given that is it four to six times more expensive to facilitate investment for First Nation projects, emphasis is placed on solutions to reduce investment transaction costs. Topics include transaction costs and economic growth; the legal and administrative framework to facilitate investment; building infrastructure; and creating an investment facilitation work plan.

Campus
APEC 2700

 Economic Feasibility and Impact Analysis on First Nations Lands (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine cost-benefit analysis and how it can be used to evaluate the economic feasibility and impact of investments on First Nations lands. Knowledge and skills relating to the time value of money and basic statistical concepts will be developed. Topics include the investment climate and economic strategies; fiscal benefits estimates; estimating economic impacts of investment; cost-benefit analysis fundamentals; and presentation of a cost-benefit assessment.

Campus
APSC 1200

 Introduction to Engineering (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
This course is an introduction to the engineering profession and to engineering design. Weekly guest speakers and lectures are used to illustrate various aspects of the engineering profession. Each year a design project is selected to contextualize the design portion of the course. Working in teams, students work through the design steps of need assessment, research, analysis, concept selection, detailed design, and reporting to develop thoughtful and realistic solutions.
Note: This course is only offered in the Fall semester

Campus
ARCH 1100

 Exploring Archaeology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Discover the fascinating world of archaeology with this survey of remarkable discoveries and intriguing mysteries as we explore ancient sites and cultures from around the world. Witness the remarkable journey of humanity through ancient technologies, 'lost' civilizations, great explorers, and modern discoveries. Students learn that the multidisciplinary field of archaeology is equal parts Arts and Science, discovery and adventure.

Campus
ARCH 1110

 Human Origins (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
An introduction to the anthropological study of human origins. The course addresses the distinction between mythical and scientific explanations of the emergence of animal and human life. It outlines the basic principles of evolution and reviews the major stages of human prehistory. Although some attention is paid to the interplay between biology and culture, the course is designed for social science students who may lack extensive knowledge of biology. Required Seminar: ARCH 1110S

Campus
ARCH 2010

 Introduction to Archaeology (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
An introduction to the discipline of archaeology, including the ways in which archaeologists reconstruct past cultures and lifeways, the development and major discoveries of archaeology, and the relationships between human material remains and human behavior. Students will gain an appreciation of what the past was like, what archaeological data are, and how archaeology is used to answer questions about the human condition. Required Seminar: ARCH 2010S

Campus
ARCH 2160

 Ancient Civilizations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This is an introductory course offering students a broad survey of the archaeology of ancient, pre-industrial, Old World and New World civilizations. The course includes an overview of basic theoretical and methodological concepts in archaeology, emphasizing classical (historic) archaeology. The topics of study include the origins of urbanism; early systems of writing; the earliest civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus Valley, and China; the classical civilizations of the Mediterranean; and the early Mesoamerican and Andean states.

Campus
ARCH 2190

 Ancient North Americans (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
A survey of the archaeological evidence for prehistoric colonization of North America, the expansion of Paleo- Indian hunters, the adaptations of archaic hunter-foragers to post-Ice Age environments, the origins of farming and village life, and the rise and fall of complex chiefdom societies. The course examines how technological innovations, population growth, natural resources, and social and ideological factors influenced the various cultural developments in different regions of North America.

Campus
ARCH 2230

 Native Peoples of British Columbia (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
A survey of the traditional Indian cultures of British Columbia as known through ethnography and archaeology. Topics will include regional variation and adaptation in economy, technology, language, religion, art, medicine, kinship, and social organization. The contemporary social problems of the native peoples are not part of this course.

Campus
ARCH 2330

 Old World Archaeology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers a broad survey of prehistoric archaeology of the Old World. Through the exploration of archaeological evidence, students will follow the development of human culture, from the earliest material evidence of the Old Stone Age, through the development of increasingly complex and diverse cultures from ancient Africa, Asia, and Europe.

Campus
ARCH 3050

 Theory in Archaeology (2,1,0) or (2,1,0)(2,1,0)

Credits: 6
Overview of major theoretical and methodological issues in archaeology, involving a history of archaeological thought, the formulation of research designs, and how archaeology fits into science. The student will gain an understanding of the general characteristics of the archaeological data base, and what paradigms, theories, and methods are used to address archaeological problems in culture, history, settlement, ecology, and technological change.

Campus
ARCH 3060

 Summer Field Training in Archaeology (L)

Credits: 6
Intensive training in excavation techniques, and interpretation, including mapping procedures, recording preliminary analysis, and reporting. Students will participate in an excavation for the Summer session and will use this field experience as a basis for lectures, discussion, and reports. Lab Fee required.

Campus
ARCH 3260

 Environmental Archaeology (2,2,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines the ways in which archaeologists reconstruct past environments and the relationships between humans and important environmental resources and variables. Interdisciplinary data recovery and analysis methods from geology, soil sciences, botany, zoology, chemistry, physics, and ecology, have resulted in new specialties in archaeology, including zooarchaeology, paleobotany, raw material sourcing, geophysical and geomorphological analysis, paleoenvironmental reconstruction, and seasonality studies. Their applications will be illustrated by examples from the Paleolithic, through classical civilizations, to urban archaeology.

Campus
ARCH 4060

 Cultural Resource Management (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course explores the practical, theoretical, social, and legal issues of cultural resource management archaeology, including the origins and application of heritage legislation within Canada, the United States, and abroad. Topical issues on contract archaeology, public archaeology, aboriginal heritage, and avocational archaeological societies are incorporated.

Campus
ARCH 4110

 ***Prehistory of a Special Area in the New World

Credits: 3
Analysis of the prehistory of a selected New World area, including a summary of the literature and discussion of relevant problems. The course will provide background for students in North, Central, and South America area studies. Typical offerings include the prehistory of Mesoamerica, the Southwest, North America, and the Mayan areas.
Note: Generally taught as companion course to ARCH 3060

Campus
ARCH 4200

 Archaeology of British Columbia (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 or 6
An advanced study of the prehistoric archaeology of interior and/or coastal British Columbia, including an analysis of the archaeological evidence, and interpretations of prehistoric cultural developments from selected field studies.

Campus
ARET 1100

 Graphical Communication (2,1,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course involves the fundamentals of basic drawing and hand sketching, with emphasis on drawing skills, conventions, techniques, layout and representation theory. This course is available in the Fall semester only.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrollment program Required Lab: ARET 1100L Required Seminar: ARET 1100S

Campus
ARET 1110

 Computer Aided Design and Drafting 1 (2,0,2)(L)

Credits: 2
This course involves the fundamentals of computer aided drafting as an alternative to traditional hand drafting. Utilizing computers and the latest Autodesk software, this course forms the basis for other courses within the Architectural and Engineering Technology program. This course is available in the Fall semester only.
Corequisite: ARET 1100
Note: This course is part of a limited enrollment program Required Lab: ARET 1110L

Campus
ARET 1120

 Introduction to Architectural Representation (1,1,0)(L)

Credits: 2
This course introduces the student to the basics of creating architectural drawings using Autodesk software and elevations. Using the current architectural software, the student creates basic floor plan and associated drawings. Upon completion of the course, students design a 3D building model and generate the 2D plans required by the construction industry. This course is available in the Fall semester only.
Corequisite: ARET 1100, ARET 1110, ARET 1200
Note: This course is part of a limited enrollment program Required Seminar: ARET 1120S

Campus
ARET 1200

 Materials and Applications 1 - Specifications (3,1,0)(L)

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to building materials and methods applied in contemporary building construction. Lectures include an introduction to contract documents (specifications and working drawings), the advantages and limitations of the various types of contracts, the bidding procedure using bid depository regulations, and the types of bonds most currently in use. This course is available in the Fall semester only.
Corequisite: ARET 1110
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program Required Seminar: ARET 1200S

Campus
ARET 1300

 Building Technology 1 (3,2,3)(L)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to basic platform framing, commonly used in residential buildings that are regulated under Part 9 (Housing and Small Buildings) of the British Columbia Building Code. This course is available in the Winter semester only.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program Required Lab: ARET 1300L Required Seminar: ARET 1300S

Campus
ARET 1400

 Civil Technology 1 (4,1,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is an entry level course into the field of Civil Engineering Design and Drafting. The course includes Traverse survey computations, geometric design calculations, area calculations and earthwork calculations. The student will use the latest version of Autodesk's Civil 3D software to produce a subdivision layout comprising of a plan and profile drawing with horizontal and vertical alignments and cross-sections.

Campus
ARET 1410

 Construction Surveying (60 hours)(L)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the basic techniques of construction surveying. This course has a compressed schedule and is offered at the end of the Winter semester.
Note: This course involves outdoor field work. This course is part of a limited enrolment program Required Seminar: ARET 1410S

Campus
ARET 1500

 Building Electrical Design (2,0,1)(L)

Credits: 2
This fundamental course in building electrical systems design involves a detailed analysis of the Canadian Electrical Code pertinent to residential and/or multi-residential building electrical distribution systems, electrical engineering design practices, and electrical design drawing production. During the course, students interpret electrical code rules and apply the requirements defined by those rules, demonstrate good engineering practice in the development of a residential and/or multi-residential building electrical design, and create electrical working drawings. This course is available in the Fall Semester only.
Corequisite: ARET 1100, ARET 1110
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program Required Lab: ARET 1500L

Campus
ARET 1510

 Building Lighting Design (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course involves a detailed analysis of the factors considered in the selection of light sources and equipment through the utilization of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) calculation methods and engineering practices. In addition, the fundamentals of the biology of sight and the psychology of colour as it pertains to the development of a building lighting system is discussed. Students determine the illumination requirements of a building through the utilization of IESNA calculation methods, apply the building illumination requirements utilizing engineering practices, develop a commercial building lighting system design, and create a commercial building lighting system working drawing. This course is available in the Winter Semester only.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program

Campus
ARET 2100

 Computer Aided Design and Drafting 2 (2,0,2)(L)

Credits: 2
Upon completion, successful students have a working knowledge of OLE, menu customization, attribute extraction, importing and exporting different file formats, external reference files, the creation of 3D surface and solid models, and the extraction of orthographic views from solid models. This course is available after the Winter semester.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program Required Lab: ARET 2100L

Campus
ARET 2120

 Building Information Technology (2,3,0)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to Revit Architecture. Students learn the techniques for the mass modeling of a building. The building information model is then developed into a complete set of architectural working drawings. The building model may also be used for construction planning, conflict detection, fabrication and sustainable design. Using knowledge obtained in the first year of the program, successful students are able to develop the building model components including walls, roofs, floors, slabs, railings and fences, as well as customizing families for REVIT software. Presentation techniques, details, and annotation of plans and details are also discussed. This course is only offered in the Winter semester.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program Required Seminar: ARET 2120S

Campus
ARET 2200

 Materials and Applications 2 - Estimating (2,1,0)(L)

Credits: 3
This course provides the fundamentals of construction estimating. Students apply traditional estimating material takeoff procedures, analyze the concepts of unit pricing and productivity, and estimate material and labour costs utilizing traditional estimating procedures. On completion of this course, successful students are able to interpret the information provided on an architectural drawing set and, from that information, generate a material takeoff and a material and labour cost estimate. This course is only available in the Fall Semester.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program Required Seminar: ARET 2200S

Campus
ARET 2210

 Construction Management (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course involves the fundamental aspects of construction management, including on-site management and inspection, construction safety, construction laws and labour relations, contract and construction administration, and the planning, scheduling, and controlling of construction projects.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program Required Seminar: ARET 2210S

Campus
ARET 2220

 Applied Research Project (0,1,0)

Credits: 1
This seminar course may be used as an extension to one of ARET 1300, ARET 2400 or ARET 2500 to support the completion of the Applied Research Project. In the seminar, students focus their research toward specific applications and implementations, and prepare to develop their final conclusions and report.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program

Campus
ARET 2300

 Building Regulations (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides students with an overview of the British Columbia Building Code, with in-depth analysis of Part 3 Fire Protection, Occupant Safety and Accessibility, and Part 5 Environmental Separation. In addition, students research common municipal zoning by-law requirements, in reference to Kamloops Zoning By-law No. 5-1-200 by-laws. This course is offered in the Winter semester only.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program Required Seminar: ARET 2300S

Campus
ARET 2400

 Site Planning and Development (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course provides an introduction to the land development process and focuses on specific issues related to site planning, organization and circulation. The connection between land use and transportation is explored and methods to assess on-site and off-site transportation requirements are introduced. The course includes planning concepts, site planning principles, sustainable site design principles, an application study of the Kamloops Zoning Bylaw, trip generation calculation, site organization and layout, parking layout, site amenities and landscaping. This course is available in the Winter semester only.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program Required Lab: ARET 2400L

Campus
ARET 2410

 Civil Technology 2 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course builds on the Civil Technology 1 course and expands the student's knowledge of Civil Engineering Design and Drafting. The course focuses on the geometric design of roads and highways and uses criteria and procedures developed by the Transportation Association of Canada and illustrated in the Geometric Design Guide for Canadian Roads as its foundation.

Campus
ARET 2500

 Building Plumbing Design (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course provides a detailed analysis of the B.C. Plumbing Code, the Canadian Gas Code, plumbing engineering practices, plumbing design, and drawing production. Students create sanitary, storm, domestic water distribution, and natural gas system designs, and apply those designs to the creation of a plumbing working drawing for a commercial building. This course is only available in the Fall Semester.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program Required Lab: ARET 2500L

Campus
ARET 2600

 Statics and Strength of Materials (5,0,0)

Credits: 3
This design course is intended to familiarize students with the concepts of static equilibrium and strength of materials. The course includes force analysis of trusses and frames, centroids, moments of inertia, and shear force and bending moment diagrams. Students examine the stress and strain effects of axial, torsional, bending, and shear forces. The emphasis of the course is on problem solving. Students demonstrate the application of the principles of statics and strength of materials as applied to basic structural and mechanical design problems. This course is available in the Winter Semester only.
Corequisite: PHYS 1610
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program

Campus
ARET 3300

 Building Design (2,1,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course provides students with the basic tools and appreciation of building design, and involves studies of aesthetic principles and basic space planning. The term project consists of preliminary design drawings for a moderate-sized commercial, institutional or assembly type building. This project forms the basis for a more detailed partial set of working drawings to be developed in ARET 3310: Building Technology 2. This course is available in the Fall semester only.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program Required Lab: ARET 3300L Required Seminar: ARET 3300S

Campus
ARET 3310

 Building Technology 2 (3,2,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of ARET 3300 and advances students' knowledge of construction systems commonly used in multi-storey commercial, institutional or multi-residential buildings that are regulated under Parts 3 and 5 of the British Columbia Building Code. This course is available in the Winter semester only.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program Required Lab: ARET 3310L Required Seminar: ARET 3310S

Campus
ARET 3400

 Fluid Mechanics (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students analyze fluid mechanics including fluid statics, energy concepts in fluid dynamics, fluid flow in pipes, pump selection and open channel flow. The course includes an introduction to municipal service design. Hydrologic concepts are introduced and the rational method is applied to storm sewer design. This course is available in the Fall semester only.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program

Campus
ARET 3410

 Sustainable Site Planning and Development (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3
This course will provide an introduction to site planning and the land development process and will focus specifically on issues related to site planning, organization and circulation. The connection between land use, regulation and transportation will be explored. The course will include planning concepts, site planning principles, sustainable site design principles, an application study of the Kamloops Zoning Bylaw, site organization and layout, parking layout, site amenities and landscaping.

Campus
ARET 3500

 Building Services Theory (3,1,1)(L)

Credits: 3
Students are offered the fundamentals of thermodynamics pertaining to building component assemblies, an analysis of the American Society of Heating Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) heat transfer calculation methods, an analysis of the ASHRAE fenestration calculation process, and psychrometrics. The fundamentals of hydraulic and/or pneumatic system theory and design are also analyzed. Students demonstrate competency in heat transfer, fenestration, and psychrometric calculation processes as defined by ASHRAE. The course also provides opportunities for students to apply their knowledge of design procedures for developing a hydraulic system design and the creation of a hydraulic power drawing, while utilizing hydraulic engineering representation standards. This course is only available in the Fall Semester.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program Required Lab: ARET 3500L Required Seminar: ARET 3500S

Campus
ARET 3510

 Building HVAC Design (4,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3
This course builds on the acquired knowledge in ARET 3500 with a further analysis of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) building systems and system applications.Students explore the fundamentals of HVAC system components, including an investigation of the methods of the review and selection of HVAC equipment, and a detailed analysis of sizing ductwork and mechanical heating piping. In addition, students examine HVAC system representation utilizing current engineering practices in system drawing creation. Upon completion, students demonstrate competency in commercial building HVAC system design, equipment specification writing, control theory, and creation of a HVAC working drawing to engineering representation practices and standards. This course is only available in the Winter Semester.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program Required Lab: ARET 3510L

Campus
ARET 3600

 Structural Analysis (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers instruction in structural loads and structural analysis, and includes a review of statics and strength of materials, load path, arches and cable structures. Students explore the concept of bending and shear stresses, solve statically indeterminate beams using both the method of consistent displacements and the three-moment equation, and analyze statically indeterminate frames using moment distribution. Students also learn Part 4 of the National Building Code of Canada. This course is available in the Fall semester only.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program

Campus
ARET 3610

 Steel Design (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This is a design course with major emphasis on the design and behaviour of steel structures. Students explore the selection of open web steel joists, the design of structural steel trusses, purlins, beams, girders, girts, pin-ended columns, beam columns, bracing, the design of bolted connections, base plate design, and welded connections. This course is offered in the Winter semester only.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program

Campus
ARET 3620

 Wood Design (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers an analysis in the design and behaviour of wood structures. Students explore the design of timber trusses, purlins, beams, girders, pin-ended columns, beam-columns and bracing using sawn lumber, plywood, glulam and manufactured products. The course also includes a study of connection design using nails, bolts, lag screws and timber rivets. This course is offered in the Fall semester only.
Corequisite: ARET 3600
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program

Campus
ARET 3630

 Reinforced Concrete Design (5,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course instructs students in the design of reinforced concrete structures. Students explore the design of reinforced concrete beams, T-beams, columns, walls, footings, and retaining walls. Students also examine various methods of forming concrete beams, slabs, columns, walls, footings and detailing of reinforced concrete. This course is offered in the Winter semester only.
Note: This course is part of a limited enrolment program

Campus
ARET 4100

 Energy Modeling (2,0,3)(L)

Credits: 2
This course introduces the student to energy modeling of building systems using latest versions of freely available software. During the course the student will determine the energy consumption for new and existing buildings and will evaluate the effectiveness of energy conservation measures when applied to new and existing buildings.

Campus
ARET 4110

 Green Building Rating Systems (2,0,2)(L)

Credits: 2
This course will focus on the principles of sustainable design relating to building structures. Various green building rating systems will be reviewed and assessed. An appropriate green building rating system will be applied to the term project to determine the level of sustainability. Case studies and relevant examples will be examined.

Campus
ARET 4300

 Architectural and Planning Systems 1 (2,2,2)(L)

Credits: 3
Students will be involved in master planning and schematic architectural design of a mixed-use development. The design project will comply with the current building codes and zoning regulations. Students will create presentation documents, coordinate with other engineering disciplines and incorporate sustainable design principles.

Campus
ARET 4310

 Architectural and Planning Systems 2 (2,2,2)(L)

Credits: 3
The student will be involved in design development and construction documents for the undergraduate design project. Students will coordinate the engineering consultants while ensuring compliance with current building codes and zoning regulations. Students will be expected to develop design details with a focus on rigorous building envelope practices. Green Building rating systems will guide the overall development of the design details. This course will feature industry professionals working in collaboration with faculty and students to further enhance building integration methods.
Corequisite: ARET 4510, ARET 4610 Required Lab: ARET 4310L Required Seminar: ARET 4310S

Campus
ARET 4500

 Building Systems 1 (2,0,2)(L)

Credits: 2
This course is an advanced study of the processes, techniques, and tools involved in an energy audit of building systems. Energy conservation measures (ECM) applicable to electrical, lighting, and HVAC will be covered in detail.
Corequisite: ARET 4300, ARET 4600 Required Lab: ARET 4500L

Campus
ARET 4510

 Building Systems 2 (2,0,2)(L)

Credits: 2
This course is an advanced study of commonly used sustainable energy technologies in building systems: photovoltaic technology, ground-source heat pumps, and wind turbine systems. Students will be taught the basics of design applications for grid-connected and standalone PhotoVoltaic (PV) systems.

Campus
ARET 4600

 Civil Structural 1 (2,0,2)(L)

Credits: 2
This course builds on prerequisite courses and provides the student with an understanding of site selection processes and considerations. The successful student will be able to make informed decisions on building site selection and site preparation, foundation design criteria, building structural grids and support systems location and design.

Campus
ARET 4610

 Civil Structural 2 (2,0,2)(L)

Credits: 2
This course is an in depth examination of building structural systems, modeling, loads and analysis. This course examines in detail various structural elements and their load transfer mechanisms for preparation and modeling in structural analysis software.

Campus
ARTS 3000

 Arts Program and Career Planning (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
This course introduces best practices for student success in the Faculty of Arts, including instruction in program planning and research and study methods. This introduction will be followed by the exploration of two post-baccalaureate options: graduate school and career planning.

Campus
ASET 0200

 Community Networking 1 (55 hours)


Community Networking 1 is course content targeted at the specific development of awareness and application of appropriate and effective employability skills and community resources. Guest speakers present informational content on various workplace related topics in several different media: video, audio, power point, etc. Content learning and coverage is specific and relative to workplace topics.

Campus
ASET 0210

 Community Networking 2 (50 hours)


Community Networking 2 is a continuation of Community Networking 1. Students explore community resources and their application to their employability. Guest speakers present informational content on various workplace related topics in several different media: video, audio, power point, etc.

Campus
ASET 0620

 Communications 1 (180 hours)


Communications 1 is wide ranging interpersonal communications skills content that covers basic interpersonal skills training and application inclusive of: listening, responding, problem solving, stress management and assertiveness skills. Content focuses on effective and appropriate communications skills in the work place environment. Motivation, initiative, and comprehension, specific to the workplace are also covered. Students are challenged to engage in practical hands-on role play, interactive exercises, self directed content and large group discussion format. Active participation and flexibility are required for student success.

Campus
ASET 0630

 Communications 2 (130 hours)


Communications 2 is a continuation of Communications 1 - wide ranging interpersonal skills training content which covers basic skills inclusive of the following: listening, responding, assertiveness skills, problem solving, anger management, conflict resolution, motivation, initiative, stress reduction and management. Students will continue to be challenged to learn, improve and master effective and appropriate communication skills specific to the work place environment. Students will engage in practical, hands-on and interactive content and application inclusive of video and audio presentations and exercises. Students will continue to work and learn with self directed content, individual and group projects and also with a large group discussion format.

Campus
ASET 0910

 Workplace Numeracy and Literacy 1 (110 hours)


Workplace Numeracy and Literacy 1 is an introduction and review of basic functional literacy skills specifically relative to the workplace environment. Students work from an education plan, beginning at their individual functioning and skill level with the specific goals of improving and demonstrating progressive improvement in functional and demonstrated literacy. Topics covered include money management (budgeting and personal finance), reading and following directions, basic letter writing skills, note and message taking, workplace and personal vocabulary enhancement and basic calculator usage.

Campus
ASET 0920

 Workplace Numeracy and Literacy 2 (120 hours)


Workplace Numeracy and Literacy 2 is a continuation of Workplace Numeracy and Literacy 1. The course builds on competency levels of students who continue to work to improve functional and demonstrated literacy skills. Topics include money management skills (budgeting, handling money), measurement (metric system), reading and following directions, taking messages, simple letter writing in preparation for resume writing, work and personal vocabulary enhancement and effective calculator usage.

Campus
ASET 0960

 Computing 1 (60 hours)


Computing 1 introduces students to basic computer terminology, technology, and usage.

Campus
ASET 0970

 Computing 2 (60 hours)


Computing 2 builds on skills developed in Computing 1. Students improve keyboarding skills and are introduced to other software as appropriate (database, spreadsheet, desktop publishing).

Campus
ASHS 4610

 Client Centered Approach to Asthma (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
A post-graduate certificate for health care professionals with an interest in the management of asthma. Graduates receive an Asthma Educators' Certificate. Through a collaborative partnership with the University of Alberta and the Alberta Asthma Centre, TRU offers this multidisciplinary, CNRC-approved, online, asthma educators' program. The program gives students the necessary background to optimally educate clients with asthma in prevention, health promotion and disease selfmanagement. Graduates will be eligible to sit the CNRC exam for national certification as an asthma educator.

Campus
ASHS 4620

 Concepts in Asthma (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
A post-graduate certificate for health care professionals with an interest in the management of asthma. Graduates receive an Asthma Educators' Certificate.

Campus
ASHS 4630

 Asthma Management Planning (2,0,0)

Credits: 2
In Part 1 of this course, you will assess the availability and quality of asthma education resources. You will learn about the steps involved in developing an asthma support/education plan for various situations. You will experience, first-hand, the barriers a client faces in following daily disease monitoring plans. You will conduct a videotaped client interview and take a complete client history. The information you gather in the face-to-face interview and in the staged-case will become the basis of the care plans that you develop for each client. You will also have another opportunity to pursue an asthma-related topic in your professional area of interest and share your completed project with other course participants. In Part 2, through case scenarios, the staged-case and your final, face-to-face videotaped client interview, you will use the collected client information and monitoring data to develop working asthma action plans. You will conduct follow-up visits on two clients in order to evaluate the appropriateness of a client's self-management strategies and to make necessary adjustments to care and action plans. Various asthma topics will be discussed and you will have an opportunity to pose questions about current clinical trends in treatment to an on-line content expert. Using the community support/education plan developed in Part 1 of this course, you will deliver and videotape your public teaching session. You will also have another opportunity to pursue an asthma-related topic in your professional area of interest and share your completed project with other course participants.

Campus
ASHS 4710

 Client-Centred Approach to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Care (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
ASHS 4710 Client-Centered Approach to COPD Care is the first of two courses comprising the online COPD educators program. This course focuses primarily on the knowledge and skills utilized by health care professionals to establish good rapport and lay the foundation for a therapeutic client/professional relationship at the bedside, in a rehabilitation clinic or in a clients home.

Campus
ASHS 4720

 Concepts in the Management of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Fourth in a series for the Certified Respiratory Educator Program, this course provides participants with the theoretical knowledge and abilities to effectively assess, plan, implement, manage, and evaluate educational programs that support improved quality of life for clients with COPD. The course is intended to be a natural progression for participants who have completed a CNRC-approved Asthma Educator Program since clients presenting with a combination of Asthma and COPD are commonly seen clinically. Participants perform a client interview, practice strategies for critically reviewing research papers, and demonstrate breathing and relaxation teaching techniques in a video-recorded session. An online midterm and final exam is scheduled within this course. Upon completion, participants can sit the Certified Respiratory Educator ( CRE) National Certification Exam, offered June and November, annually.

Campus
ASTR 1140

 Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This is a general interest introductory course on the history of astronomy and the solar system, and is intended for non-science majors. Topics include: telescopes and observing the night sky, ancient astronomy, space exploration, the Earth/Moon system, formation and evolution of the solar system, the planets, minor members of the solar system and the Sun.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ASTR 1130 and ASTR 1140

Campus
ASTR 1141

 Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System

Credits: 3
This is a general interest introductory course on the history of astronomy and the solar system, and is intended for non-science majors. Topics Include: Telescopes and observing the night sky, ancient astronomy, space exploration, the Earth/Moon system, formation and evolution of the solar system, the planets, minor members of the solar system and the Sun.
More information about this course

Distance
ASTR 1150

 Introductory Astronomy: Stars and Galaxies (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This is a general interest introductory course on the night sky, stars and galaxies, and is intended for non-science majors. Topics include: telescopes and observing the night sky, radiation and spectra, stellar properties and evolution, black holes, the Milky Way and other galaxies and cosmology.

Campus
ASTR 1151

 Introductory Astronomy: Stars and Galaxies

Credits: 3
This is a general interest introductory course on the night sky, stars and galaxies, and is intended for non-science majors. Topics Include: Telescopes and observing the night sky, radiation and spectra, stellar properties and evolution, black holes, the Milky Way and other galaxies, and cosmology.
More information about this course

Distance
ASTR 3300

 Topics in Astrophysics (3,0,3*)

Credits: 3
This course presents selected topics in stellar and galactic astrophysics at a level suitable for upper level science students. Topics include telescopes, observing techniques and data reduction, stellar properties, stellar evolution, galactic kinematics and dynamics, and external galaxies. A three-hour laboratory takes place every other week, and students use the campus observatory on a regular basis.

Campus
ASUR 1010

 Introductory Residency Lab (2,0,0)(L)

Credits: 2
During this one-week residency, students become familiar with the educational technologies used in the program and are required to demonstrate standard ranch safe operating procedures. Participants tour a variety of ranch sites in the Cariboo-Chilcotin region and explore the historical issues that have shaped the ranching industry. Students discuss the challenges and opportunities that ranchers face in building resilient ranching operations.

Campus
ASUR 1020

 Sustainable Business Enterprise (10,0,0)

Credits: 10
Students build a sustainable business strategy for their ranch, including a strategic marketing and human resource management plan. They also develop skills in enterprise costing, preparing budget projections and management of financial statements. In addition, students explore governance frameworks, government programs, and key success factors for farm/life balance, succession planning, communication, conflict resolution, and crisis management.

Campus
ASUR 1030

 Environmentally Sustainable Ranching (7,3,0,20)

Credits: 10
Students explore considerations and methodology for developing an environmentally sustainable ranch operation. Students develop management techniques to address soil fertility and soil health, riparian and watershed systems, wildlife and predator interactions, and urban and agriculture land interfaces. An appreciation for traditional uses of land by Aboriginal peoples and the legal requirements surrounding traditional-use sites is examined. Students create grazing management plans that demonstrate an appreciation for the importance of biodiversity in a healthy landscape and exemplify pasture stewardship principles for a variety of ecosystems.

Campus
ASUR 1040

 Skill Development and Diversification (10,0,0,20)

Credits: 10
In this skills-based course, students explore a variety of techniques commonly used in ranch operations. Students apply skills related to humane animal care, stockmanship and dog training, equipment preventative maintenance, safe operating procedures, and fencing techniques. Additionally, students examine opportunities for diversification, including key success factors and production and income benchmarks for a number of alternative agriculture enterprises.

Campus
ASUR 2010

 Beef Production (10,0,0,4)

Credits: 6
Students develop skills related to beef cattle nutrition. Genetic parameters, finishing, processing, yield, product costing, and pricing will be explored. Students then create a herd-health, parasite prevention and marketing program specific to the beef enterprise on their ranch.

Campus
ASUR 2020

 Sheep Production (10,0,0,4)

Credits: 6
Students develop skills related to sheep nutrition and grazing management. Genetic diversity, finishing, processing, yield, product costing, and pricing will be explored. Students then create a flock-health, parasite prevention and marketing program specific to the sheep enterprise on their ranch.

Campus
ASUR 2030

 Winter Feed Production (4,0,0,13)

Credits: 5
Students develop skills related to winter feed management for their farm/ranch enterprise. Use of equipment, selection of seed and fertilizer, irrigation management, and best practices in forage harvesting are examined. Students create a marketing plan for their hay sales operation complete with product costing and pricing.

Campus
ASUR 2040

 Soft Adventure and Agri-Tourism (4,0,0,13)

Credits: 5
Students explore the soft adventure and agri-tourism industry at a global and local level. Historical, geographical and cultural contexts will be examined in relation to the development of produce and service opportunities. Students use strategic planning, competitive strategy and information technology tools to design a soft-adventure and agri-tourism marketing plan for his/her ranch.

Campus
ASUR 2050

 Sustainable Ranching Final Project (12,0,0,180)

Credits: 6
Students complete a business and five year financial plan for the entire ranch operation using existing or virtual ranch/farm lands that includes the following components: 1. Strategic plan 2. Human resource management plan 3. Operations management plan for each of the enterprises 4. Marketing plan for each of the enterprises 5. Environmental and range use plan 6. Financial projections including net-worth, cash flow, and income statements 7. Capital improvement and finance plan

Campus
AUTO 1500

 Auto Service Technician Foundation (900 hours)


This foundation course is designed for those individuals wishing to become Automotive Service Technicians. In it students will learn to examine, test and repair the parts and systems on cars and light trucks. Students will also learn how to use computerized diagnostic equipment to test, adjust and repair key vehicle components such as engines, steering systems, braking systems, drive trains, vehicle suspensions and electrical systems.

Campus
AUTO 1900

 Automotive Sampler (120 hours)


This course is a sampler of the Automotive trade based on the Automotive Service Technician Foundation Program Outline from the Industry Training Authority of BC. Students will gain familiarity with the safe use of tools and other equipment regularly used by Auto Service Techs, as well as gain familiarity with materials and processes used in the Trade. The emphasis of this course is on developing practical, hands-on automotive and mechanical skills.

Campus
AUTO 2000

 Automotive Service Technician Apprentice Level 1 (210 hours)


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on shop experience in the following topics: workplace safety; employability skills; tools and equipment; general automotive maintenance; general automotive practices; basic electrical systems; and brake, steering and suspension systems.

Campus
AUTO 3000

 Automotive Service Technician Apprentice Level 2 (180 hours)


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on shop experience in the following topics: advanced electrical systems; heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems; engines; engine support systems; and hybrid vehicle safety.

Campus
AUTO 4000

 Automotive Service Technician Apprentice Level 3 (210 hours)


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on shop experience in the following topics: electrical and electronic systems; fuel delivery systems; electronic ignition systems, engine management systems; and emission control systems.

Campus
AUTO 5000

 Automotive Service Technician Apprentice Level 4 (180 hours)


Students are introduced to theory and gain hands-on shop experience in the following topics: clutch systems; manual transmissions; automatic transmissions; drive lines; all wheel and four wheel drive systems; and hybrid drive line technology.

Campus
AWCP 0500

 Animal Care


Students delve into the areas of animal anatomy, physiology, and the handling of animals often seen in an animal care facility. Topics include birds and wild animals, breed identification, animal disease, small animal nutrition, dog and cat first aid, microchipping, immunology, euthanasia, cleaning and disinfection, husbandry of rabbits and pocket pets, large animal handling and disease, avian nutrition, immunology and shelter enrichment. Videos produced at TRU, and included in the course package, demonstrate many of the animal handling techniques discussed in this course.

Campus
AWCP 0510

 Safety in the Workplace


Students discuss safety issues, such as zoonotic disease, chemicals, environmental issues, WHMIS standards, and disposal of biomedical wastes. The course is designed to promote safety of the animal welfare person and their animal charges, and to provide education on the legal requirements surrounding the storage and handling of chemical or hazardous substances.

Campus
AWCP 0520

 Humane Education


Students explore a wide range of humane issues, such as the history of the humane movement, violence prevention against animals, the link between animal and child abuse, teaching responsible pet care, building empathy, teaching controversial subjects, and how to build a humane program and network within a shelter. Students also discuss animals in therapeutic programs.

Campus
AWCP 0530

 Small Animal Care


Students delve into the study of animal anatomy, physiology, and the practice of handling animals often seen in an animal care facility. Topics include birds and wild animals, breed identification, animal disease, small animal nutrition, dog and cat first aid, microchipping, immunology, euthanasia, cleaning and disinfection, and the husbandry of rabbits and pocket pets. Videos produced at TRU, and included in the course package, demonstrate many of the animal handling techniques discussed in this course.

Campus
AWCP 0540

 Large Animal Care


Students build on the knowledge acquired from AWCP 0500: Animal Care (module 0100). Topics include large animal and wildlife handling and first aid. Immunology and avian nutrition are discussed in the supplied notes and DVDs, and animal diseases are explored in depth using a body systems approach. Students also consider the enrichment of the lives of shelter animals, and how they can be trained to be more adoptable.

Campus
AWCP 0550

 Humane Education - Advanced


This course is a continuation of AWCP 0520: Humane Education (module 0160). Topics include establishing a humane education program within a shelter, exploring animal issues, teaching controversial subjects, animals in therapeutic contexts and building a humane network.

Campus
AWCP 0560

 Advanced Legal Issues, Animal Welfare


Students build on their knowledge of the issues discussed in AWCP 0570: General Legal Issues (module 0120) ,and progress from activities within the animal care facility, to focusing on legal issues that may be encountered when the animal care worker is out in public. These issues may include abuse investigations, entering private property, and incident investigations.

Campus
AWCP 0570

 General Legal Issues


This course addresses the legalities of impounding a stray dog or a known aggressive dog found at large, the rights of clients, and enforcement of the laws pertaining to animal welfare. Basic ideas on enrichment and assessments are explored. This course relates the BC Provincial Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act (PCA Act) and the Canadian Federal Criminal Code to daily operations in an SPCA shelter.

Campus
AWCP 0620

 Basic Business Techniques


Since most animal care facilities are run independently and manage their own finances through fundraising, licensing, and fines, for example, it is important that their employees have some basic business skills. This course is broken down into several areas which begin to address these skill requirements, including such topics as bookkeeping, word processing and communication.

Campus
AWCP 1700

 General Animal Welfare

Credits: 3
This course is intended for employees of animal care facilities who are relatively new to the organization. Material directly pertaining to the BCSPCA is included, however, all of the information can be utilized by a student interested in animals and the animal humane movement. Course topics include animal care, legal issues, human conflict resolution, the business of running a shelter, safety in the workplace and humane education.

Campus
AWCP 1710

 Advanced Animal Welfare

Credits: 3
This course is directed at the more experienced employees of an animal care facility or at students with an extensive background in animal care. The emphasis is on management techniques such as fundraising, managing volunteers, and managing employees. Animal and human-animal relations are investigated in depth, while students focus on activities outside the animal care facility (abuse investigations, injured domestic and wild animals, public education). Students with experience in these areas could proceed directly to AWCP 1710 without taking AWCP 1700. Course modules include animal care, legal issues, human conflict resolution, business management, humane education, managing volunteers, fundraising, and safety in the workplace.

Campus