Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University
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On-Campus

There are a number of ways to register for on-campus courses at TRU which are determined by your program of study.

Open Learning

We offer 590 courses by distance learning. These courses are offered in several formats, including print-based, web-based and online.


Continuing Studies

Community U provides individuals and organizations with formal and non-formal opportunities to pursue personal and professional goals life-long.

Trades and Technology

Apprenticeship, foundation and continuing studies courses are offered in construction, mechanical trades, professional driving and more.

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Courses - T
Title Name Delivery
TECH 3010

 Emerging and Disruptive Technologies (3,0,0)

3 credits
The goal of this course is to develop the skills to anticipate and predict how disruptive technologies can be leveraged to move organizations forward. Using 'design-thinking' methods, the student will develop the skills to assess and analyze the benefit or impact of new technologies in their workplace and integrate these technologies where appropriate. By the end of this course, the student should be able to select one or more technology trends, and based on research and analysis, determine how technology should be selectede, deployed and supported for strategic benefit of an organization. Prerequisite: Third-year standing

Campus
TECH 4910

 Project Management 1 (3,0,0)

3 credits
The goal of this course is to help the learner develop skills in the fundamentals of project management. Students will learn how to initiate, plan and execute a project that meets objectives and satisfies stakeholders. Prerequisite: Third-year standing

Campus
TECH 4920

 Project Management 2 (3,0,0)

3 credits
The goal of this course is to select a hypothetical, real life project or case study and effectively resolve project management challenges. Students will be expected to use practical strategies and tools in order to successfully manage a project to conclusion using known best practices guidelines from the Project Management Institute. Prerequisite: TECH 4910

Campus
TESL 3010

 Curriculum and Instruction (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course emphasizes the development and practical application of ESL teaching methodology. Topics include curriculum design; lesson planning; techniques for teaching reading, writing, listening, and speaking; evaluation; and assessment. Prerequisite: Admission to the TESL program Corequisite: TESL 3020, TESL 3030, TESL 3040

Campus
TESL 3020

 Pedagogical Grammar (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course focuses on developing knowledge about the English language system in relation to grammar and the factors affecting second language learning. Topics include comparative grammars, inter-language awareness, and micro and macro skills related to grammar. Prerequisite: Admission to the TESL program Corequisite: TESL 3010, TESL 3030, TESL 3040

Campus
TESL 3030

 Intercultural Communication Studies (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course enables students to gain a better awareness and understanding of culture and values, including a definition of what they are and how they impact the ESL classroom. Students participate interactively while they examine theoretical models and perspectives in the field of intercultural communication. Prerequisite: Admission to the TESL program Corequisite: TESL 3010, TESL 3020, TESL 3040

Campus
TESL 3040

 TESL Techniques (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course is an introduction to selected studies in current ESL teaching techniques used in teaching various ESL disciplines and contexts. The course is divided into three modules: second language acquisition theory, pronunciation, and assessment. In addition, the use of digital technology is explored. Students must successfully complete all 3 modules to receive credit for this course. Prerequisite: Admission to the program Corequisite: TESL 3010, TESL 3020 and TESL 3030

Campus
TESL 3050

 TESL Practicum (3,0,2)

3 credits
The practicum is designed to prepare and support student-teachers throughout their classroom experience. Students plan and deliver lessons, discuss classroom management strategies, and reflect on their practicum sessions. Prerequisite: Admission to the TESL program; TESL 3010, TESL 3020, TESL 3030, TESL 3040 Corequisite: TESL 3010, TESL 3020, TESL 3030, TESL 3040

Campus
TESL 3150

 TESL Educational Support Workers Practicum (3,0,2) 3 credits

3 credits
The practicum is designed to prepare Educational Support Workers and/or tutors through development of their skills in planning and delivering level-appropriate English language. lessons within an elementary, secondary or tutoring environment Students observe one-to-one instruction in appropriate English as a Second Language settings, find and develop relevant materials for lesson delivery, are observed in practice and receive feedback related to their specific educational environment, and engage in reflective prractice related to their teaching. Prerequisite: TESL 3010, TESL 3020, TESL 3030, TESL 3040

Campus
THTR 1000

 Theatre Appreciation: From Page to Stage (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course is designed to enhance students' understanding and appreciation of today's theatre. Students read contemporary scripts selected from the current season of Western Canada Theatre and Actors Workshop Theatre, watch film versions of plays and attend live theatre performances.

Campus
THTR 1100

 Introduction to Theatre 1 (3,0,0)

3 credits
A lecture and discussion-oriented course designed to acquaint students with the various aspects of the theatrical process such as acting, playwrighting, directing and designing. Students discuss theatre history, theory and criticism. Students are required to participate in practical projects and expected to attend local professional theatre productions.

Campus
THTR 1110

 Introduction to Acting (3,1,0)

3 credits
This is a performance-oriented course designed to help students develop the basic requirements necessary for a dramatic presentation. The course focuses on stage movement, vocal training, improvisation, character development and portrayal.

Campus
THTR 1200

 Introduction to Theatre 2 (3,0,0)

3 credits
Continuing from THTR 1100, this lecture and discussion-oriented course is designed to further explore the various aspects of the theatrical process such as acting, playwrighting, directing and designing. Students continue an in-depth discussion of theatre history, theory and criticism. Students are required to participate in practical projects and expected to attend local professional theatre productions. Prerequisite: THTR 1100, or permission of the instructor

Campus
THTR 1210

 Introduction to Acting 2 (3,1,0)

3 credits
A continuation of the work begun in THTR 1110, this course focuses on the analysis and development of character portrayal. An emphasis is placed on students working with a script and studying the actor's role in the performance situation. Prerequisite: THTR 1110 or instructor's written consent

Campus
THTR 1500

 Play Production 1 (1,0,8P)

3 credits
This course is designed for students who have auditioned and been cast in a TRU Actor's Workshop stage production. Students rehearse and perform, for public presentation, the play that is staged in the appropriate semester. Prerequisite: Successful audition for a TRU Actor's Workshop Production

Campus
THTR 2110

 Acting and Character Portrayal 1 (3,1,0)

3 credits
In this intermediate performance course, committed acting students further develop and polish the skills associated with the onstage presentation of completely drawn characters. Students analyze and practice the necessary techniques to effectively present character portrayals from the contemporary theatre. Exploration includes character and scene analysis, drama, comedy, and monologues. Prerequisite: THTR 1110 and THTR 1210

Campus
THTR 2120

 Introduction to Theatre Production 1 (2,2,0)

3 credits
This is a hands-on practical course designed to introduce students to the elementary principles of scenery and properties construction; stagecraft, lighting, electrical and audio operations; and costume construction.

Campus
THTR 2210

 Acting and Character Portrayal 2 (3,1,0)

3 credits
In this intermediate performance course, a continuation from THTR 2110, committed acting students further develop and polish the skills associated with the onstage presentation of completely drawn characters. Students analyze and practice the necessary techniques to effectively present character portrayals from the contemporary theatre. Exploration includes character and scene analysis, drama, comedy, and monologues. Prerequisite: THTR 2110, or permission from instructor

Campus
THTR 2220

 Introduction to TheatreProduction 2 (2,2,0)

3 credits
Continuing from THTR 2120, this course is a hands-on practical course designed to introduce students to the elementary principles of scenery and properties construction; stagecraft, lighting, electrical and audio operations, and costume construction. In addition, students are introduced to stage management. Prerequisite: THTR 2120 or instructor's written consent Note: Credit cannot be given for both THTR 1120/1220 and 2120/2220

Campus
THTR 2310

 Acting for the Camera (4,0,0)

3 credits
This course is the study of the basic techniques of acting for the camera with an examination of all the aspects of film production through lectures, demonstrations, and screenings. Students are required to participate in class scene work as well as outside class filming sessions to prepare taped scenes for evaluation. Prerequisite: B- or better in THTR 1110, or permission from the instructor

Campus
THTR 2500

 Play Production 2 (1,0,8P)

3 credits
Play Production is designed for students who have auditioned and been cast in a TRU Actor's Workshop stage production. Students rehearse and perform for public presentation the play that is staged in the appropriate semester. Prerequisite: Successful audition for a TRU Actor's Workshop Production

Campus
THTR 3230

 Advanced Theatre Production 1 (2,2,0)

3 credits
An advanced, practical course exploring direction and coordination of technical theatre elements such as lighting, sound, costumes, props and set that were introduced in THTR 2120 and THTR 2220. This course will include practicum work associated with all Actor's Worshop Theatre productions. Prerequisite: THTR 2120 and THTR 2220

Campus
THTR 3240

 Advanced Theatre Production 2 (2,2,0)

3 credits
An advanced, practical course building on Advanced Theatre Production 1. This course further explores direction and coordination of technical theatre elements such as lighting, sound, costumes, props and sets. This course will include practicum work associated with all Actors Workshop Theatre productions. Prerequisite: THTR 3230

Campus
THTR 3410

 Design for the Theatre 1 (2,2,0)

3 credits
This practical course explores the basic principles and techniques of design for the theatre including set, props, lighting and costume. This course includes practicum work associated with all Actors Workshop Theatre Productions.

Campus
THTR 3420

 Design for the Theatre 2 (2,2,0)

3 credits
This practical course explores the basic principles and techniques of design for the theatre including set, props, lighting and costume and includes practicum work associated with all Actors Workshop Theatre Productions. This course is a continuation of THTR 3410. Prerequisite: THTR 3410

Campus
THTR 3500

 Play Production 3 (1,0,8P)

3 credits
Play Production is designed for students who have auditioned and been cast in a TRU Actor's Workshop stage production. Students rehearse and perform for public presentation the play that is staged in the appropriate semester. Prerequisite: Successful audition for a TRU Actor's Workshop Production

Campus
THTR 3600

 The Role: Interpretation and Characterization 1 (2,2,0)

3 credits
This upper division acting course emphasizes externalizing the inner character in conjunction with work in textual analysis, improvisation and internal techniques. THTR 3600 students work with student directors where they learn and practice the role of the actor in a formal rehearsal setting. Prerequisite: THTR 2110/2210

Campus
THTR 3610

 The Role: Interpretation and Characterization 2 (2,2,0)

3 credits
Building on THTR 3600, this upper division acting course emphasizes externalizing the inner character in conjunction with work in textual analysis, improvisation and internal techniques. Students work with student directors where they learn and practice the role of the actor in a formal rehearsal setting. The final assignment for this course is performing a role in a one-act play for the Directors Festival, which is the final production of the season for the Actors Workshop Theatre. Prerequisite: THTR 3600

Campus
THTR 3700

 Effective Public Speaking (4,0,0)

3 credits
This course is an experiential study of the principles and performance requirements necessary for effective public speaking through various literary styles, with an emphasis on audience, purpose and message.

Campus
THTR 3800

 Voice for the Stage (2,2,0)

3 credits
A performance oriented course designed to further develop an approach for the establishment of a personal vocal production technique designed for the demands of stage performance. Areas of study include breath, alignment, various vocal elements as well as the basics of speech. Prerequisite: THTR 1110 and THTR 1210

Campus
THTR 3990

 ***Selected Topics in Theatre (2,2,0)

3 credits
This is a variable content course that changes from semester to semester. Generally, the topics in this course complement or lie outside regular program offerings. Students engage in diverse, practice-based approaches to productions. Areas of study may include the business of acting, musical theatre, mask, devised theatre, and stage combat. Prerequisite: Permission from the Theatre Program Coordinator

Campus
THTR 4000

 Direction and Staging 1 (3,2,0)

3 credits
A study of the processes of stage direction and the development of a method for transferring the script to the stage. THTR 4000 students work with student actors where they learn and practice the role of the director in a formal rehearsal setting. Prerequisite: THTR 3600

Campus
THTR 4010

 Directing and Staging 2 (3,2,0)

3 credits
Building on THTR 4000, this course is a further study of the processes of stage direction and the development of a method for transferring the script to the stage. Students work with student actors where they learn and practice the role of the director in a formal rehearsal setting. The final assignment for this course is directing a one-act play for the Directors Festival, which is the final production of the season for the Actors Workshop Theatre. Prerequisite: THTR 4000

Campus
THTR 4500

 Play Production 4 (1,0,8P)

3 credits
Play Production is designed for students who have auditioned and been cast in a TRU Actor's Workshop stage production. Students rehearse and perform, for public presentation, the play that is staged in the appropriate semester. Prerequisite: Successful audition for a TRU Actor's Workshop Production

Campus
THTR 4600

 Acting Styles 1 (2,2,0)

3 credits
This course examines 2 classic scripts and the eras in which they were written, through performance and dramaturgy, in order to comprehensively study select styles of acting from significant periods in history. Prerequisite: THTR 3600 and 3610

Campus
THTR 4610

 Acting Styles 2 (2,2,0)

3 credits
Building on THTR 4600, this course examines 2 classic scripts and the eras in which they are written through performance and dramaturgy in order to comprehensively study select styles of acting from significant periods in history. Prerequisite: THTR 4600

Campus
THTR 4900

 Directed Studies - Special Topics in Theatre Arts (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course is designed for theatre majors in their final year of studies. Students are provided an opportunity to work on a special topic in Theatre Arts with an individual Theatre Arts faculty member. Topics may include history, theory, criticism, performance, and technical theatre studies. Prerequisite: Restricted to Theatre Majors in their final year of studies and faculty member approval following a written proposal

Campus
TMGT 1110

 Introduction to Tourism (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course provides an introduction to tourism as an industry and a phenomenon. Topics covered during the semester will include the economic, social, environmental and political environment in which tourism operates at a global and local level. Students will be introduced to tourism products and experiences in BC and be given the opportunity to identify career opportunities in the tourism industry. Prerequisite: English 12/English 12 First Peoples with a minimum of 73% (within the last five years), or Level 4 on the composition section of the LPI (within the last two years), or completion of ENGL 0600, or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a grade of C+ or better Note: CONV 1011 is an alternate and equivalent course to TMGT 1110

Campus
TMGT 1140

 Human Resources Management (3,0,0)

3 credits
Changing values, shifting demographics, evolving legislation and a growing emphasis on social responsibility are among the forces shaping the way we manage people today. In this course, students examine human resource management issues as they relate to human resource planning, the legal environment, recruitment and selection, evaluation and development, compensation, and emerging issues and trends in the tourism industry.Prerequisite: English 12/English 12 First Peoples with a minimum of 73% (within the last five years), or Level 4 on the composition section of the LPI (within the last two years), or completion of ENGL 0600, or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a grade of C+ or better Note: Students cannot receive credit for both TMGT 1140 (C+ minimum) and HRMN 2820

Campus
TMGT 1150

 Marketing and Customer Service (4,0,0)

3 credits
This course discusses the role, concepts and principles of marketing. It examines market research and planning, product pricing and costing, packaging, promotion, service as a primary product, advertising methods, target marketing, factors in consumer preference and assessment of guest satisfaction. Prerequisite: English 12/English 12 First Peoples with a minimum of 73% (within the last five years), or Level 4 on the composition section of the LPI (within the last two years), or completion of ENGL 0600, or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a grade of C+ or better Note: CONV 1061 is an alternate and equivalent course to TMGT 1150. Students cannot receive credit for both TMGT 1150 (C+ minimum) and MKTG 3430.

Campus
TMGT 1160

 Organizational Leadership in Tourism (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course is designed to address the changes occurring in the workplace today. As many of the graduates of this program will find themselves in supervisory positions within the tourism industry, the course will be delivered from the perspective of a supervisor and how he/she fits into today's organizations. Prerequisite: English 12/English 12 First Peoples with a minimum of 73% (within the last five years), or Level 4 on the composition section of the LPI (within the last two years), or completion of ENGL 0600, or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a grade of C+ or better Note: Students cannot receive credit for both TMGT 1160 and ORGB 2810

Campus
TMGT 2010

 Financial Operations Control in Tourism (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course offers students an understanding of how they can use managerial accounting skills in their careers in the tourism industry. Students use accounting information for decision making, planning and control in the areas of marketing, operations, human resources, strategic investment, business erformance evaluation, and budgeting. Prerequisite: English 12/English First Peoples with a minimum of 73% or equivalent (within the last five years) ACCT 1000-Introduction to Financial Accounting

Campus
TMGT 2060

 People, Places and the Toured Landscape (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course provides students with a historical, geographical and cultural context for understanding tourism. Attention is given to the way tourism practices have unfolded over time in various regions of the world, and the way in which visual representation and written narrative shapes the tourism landscape. Global and local themes affecting the tourism product and experience are discussed. Prerequisite: English 12/English 12 First Peoples with a minimum of 73% (within the last five years), or Level 4 on the composition section of the LPI (within the last two years), or completion of ENGL 0600, or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a grade of C+ or better

Campus
TMGT 2070

 Staging Special Events (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course is a basic introduction to the skills and terminology of the technical aspects of staging festivals, special events, concerts and conventions. Learners will be exposed to some of the fundamentals of staging including set design, lighting, and sound. Prerequisite: CONV 2260

Campus
TMGT 2080

 Culinary Tourism (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students are introduced to the concepts and research associated with culinary tourism from an academic and industry perspective. Using global case studies, students review current trends, theories, culinary tourism products and profiles of culinary tourists. Prerequisite: English 12/English 12 First Peoples with a minimum of 73% (within the last five years), or Level 4 on the composition section of the LPI (within the last two years), or completion of ENGL 0600, or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a grade of C+ or better

Campus
TMGT 2090

 Wellness Tourism (3,0,0)

3 credits
Tourism supports a process of self-regeneration for the traveler. This course focuses on the development,management and marketing of wellness tourism as a global phenomenon. The concept of wellness implies a holistic understanding of the traveler's body, mind and spirit and the creation of a balance in the different areas of one's life.In this course students examine the history, origins and scope of wellness tourism and the products and services being developed to address this expanding sector of the tourism industry. Prerequisite: English 12/English 12 First Peoples with a minimum of 73% (within the last five years), or Level 4 on the composition section of the LPI (within the last two years), or completion of ENGL 0600, or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a grade of C+ or better

Campus
TMGT 2250

 Hospitality Law (3,0,0)

3 credits
In this course, students are introduced to the legal rights, responsibilities and obligations of organizations in the hospitality industry. This industry operates under a combination of Common Law and Statute Law passed by both federal and provincial legislature. Emphasis is placed on the legal problems regularly faced by business firms within this industry and their possible solutions. Prerequisite: English 12/English 12 First Peoples with a minimum of 73% (within the last five years), or Level 4 on the composition section of the LPI (within the last two years), or completion of ENGL 0600, or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a grade of C+ or better Note: CONV 1050 is an alternate and equivalent course to TMGT 2250. Students cannot receive credit for both TMGT 2250 (C+ minimum) and BBUS 3930.

Campus
TMGT 2500

 Field Trip Activity Fee (Year 2 Tourism Management Diploma)


Required for all second year students of the Tourism Management Diploma Program. The opportunity to better understand the concepts discussed in the classroom by exposure to their application in industry.

Campus
TMGT 2590

 Entrepreneurship (4,0,0)

3 credits
This course is designed to introduce students to entrepreneurship. Students examine the role and nature of entrepreneurship as a mechanism for creating new ventures along with career opportunities, and some methods forindividual self-assessment. Additional topics include generating ideas for a business venture, opportunity analysis, locating and mobilizing resources, and developing a business plan. Prerequisite: TMGT 1150 and TMGT 2010 or equivalent

Campus
TMGT 2610

 Environmental Issues in the Tourism Industry (3,0,0)

3 credits
The rapid growth of tourism on a global scale has resulted in significant negative environmental impacts, and there is increasing concern about the relationship between tourism and the environment, both natural and cultural. This course explores the challenges facing the tourism industry in attempting to create a balance between environmental and economic concerns. The rich history of the conservation movement and development of the national parks system provides a lens through which to understand the foundation of the North American tourism industry. In addition, students examine the current 'greening' of the tourism industry. Prerequisite: English 12/English 12 First Peoples with a minimum of 73% (within the last five years), or Level 4 on the composition section of the LPI (within the last two years), or completion of ENGL 0600, or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a grade of C+ or better

Campus
TMGT 2980

 *** Special Topics in Tourism (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

6 credits
The content in this course varies depending on the interests of faculty and students. Credits for the course are determined as per Policy ED-8-0. Prerequisite: Permission from the Tourism Management Department

Campus
TMGT 3000

 Practicum in Tourism (0,1,8P) 3 credits

3 credits
This 3-credit course is designed to provide students with a meaningful opportunity to relate current theory from classroom to a practical Canadian work experience context, under the direction of professionals in extended work assignments. Prerequisite: This course is only available to students who have been admitted into a Faculty of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism Post-Baccalaureate Diploma program and are in their second year of study in these programs

Campus
TMGT 3010

 Community and Cultural Issues in Tourism (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students are introduced to the ways in which cultures meet and interact in tourism settings. Consideration is given to intercultural communications, cross-cultural issues, and challenges in meeting the needs of both the “host' community and the “guest' from a tourism perspective. Students explore the range and diversity of cultural narratives and place-based approaches for developing cultural tourism experiences. Prerequisite: 3rd year standing Recommended: TMGT 2610 and/or TMGT 2060

Campus
TMGT 3020

 Tourism Policy and Planning (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students are introduced to policy and planning theories and their application to tourism. The relationship between tourism, public policy, planning, and development is also examined. Prerequisite: 3rd year standing

Campus
TMGT 3030

 Financial Management for Tourism (3,0,1)(L)

3 credits
This course examines the principles of financial management as they apply to firms in tourism and hospitality sectors. Topics covered include financial statement analysis; budgeting; time value-of-money; profit planning and decision-making; cost-volume-profit analysis; and capital budgeting. Special topics in hospitality and tourism include management contracts; franchising; revenue management; and Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITS). Prerequisite: TMGT 2010 or equivalent and third year standing Note: Students cannot receive credit for both TMGT 3030 and FNCE 3120. Students should be computer literate and proficiently use spreadsheet and presentation software.

Campus
TMGT 3040

 Land Use Management and Tourism (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students are introduced to the theory and practice of land use planning and management in western Canada. Students review various land use designations that are important to tourism development, the policies and processes for developing commercial recreation on crown land, and various management strategies aimed at optimizing the use of natural areas for quality recreation and tourism experiences. Prerequisite: 3rd year standing

Campus
TMGT 3050

 Research in Tourism (3,1,0)

3 credits
Students engage in the process of conducting and evaluating research in the field of tourism. Prerequisite: GEOG 2700 or a course in research methodology or statistics approved by the Department AND third year standing Note: Students cannot receive credit for both MKTG 3480 and TMGT 3050 Required Seminar: TMGT 3050S

Campus
TMGT 3980

 ***Special Topics in Tourism (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

6 credits
Course content varies depending on the interests of faculty and students. Credits for the course are determined as per Policy ED-8-0. Prerequisite: Permission from the Tourism Management Department

Campus
TMGT 4010

 Experience Creation and Product Development (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course deals with the concept of experiences as products and the overall development of new products/services in the tourism field. Students will explore the foundations and theories of an 'experience-driven' enterprise or economy from both the consumer (tourist) and producer (firm or destination) perspective. Emphasis is placed on undertaking new tourism product inventories to ensure the provision of engaging experiences and vivid memories for guests. Prerequisite: TMGT 1150 or equivalent and third-year standing

Campus
TMGT 4020

 Graduating Seminar (0,3,0)

3 credits
Students conduct research and create a professional presentation of a major project with a direct application to the tourism industry. Prerequisite: TMGT 3050 and either 4th year standing in the Bachelor of Tourism Management program or 2nd year standing in a Faculty of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism post-baccalaureate diploma

Campus
TMGT 4030

 Resort Management (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students develop an understanding of how and why resort properties are developed as tourist destinations. The focus is on the planning, development, operation, design, financing, and special needs of resort properties. Prerequisite: 3rd year standing

Campus
TMGT 4040

 Tourism and Sustainable Development (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students examine the social, environmental, ecconomic and political aspects of planning, developing, and sustaining tourism destinations. The major focus is on the benefits and impacts associated with tourism activities, and the importance of planning at the regional and community level. Prerequisite: 3rd year standing

Campus
TMGT 4050

 Event Tourism (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course examines the emerging field of event tourism and identifies market opportunities and trends. Students explore the important role events play in destination marketing and development as catalysts, animators, image makers and tourist attractions. The impact of events on destinations from a economic, cultural and social perspective is also a focus of the course. Prerequisite: 3rd year standing

Campus
TMGT 4060

 ***Selected Topics in Tourism (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students are introduced to various issues and events that influence the travel and tourism industry. Course topics vary to ensure a timely coverage of issues and trends. Prerequisite: 3rd year standing

Campus
TMGT 4070

 Directed Studies in Tourism (0,3,0)

3 credits
In this independent study course students investigate a specific field or topic in tourism. Consultation with, and permission of, a Bachelor of Tourism Management faculty member and the Dean is required. Prerequisite: TMGT 3050, 4th year standing and permission of the Chair and Dean

Campus
TMGT 4080

 Reflecting Philosophically on Tourism (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students are required to reflect on their tourism knowledge and practice in a deep theoretical and philosophical manner, and examine their own positions and values as future professionals in the tourism field. Drawing largely on classic and contemporary writings in philosophy and social theory outside the tourism canon, students cultivate an understanding of the unquestioned and presumed ideologies that lie behind some of today's most problematic tourism practices. Students are exposed to theoretical and philosophical positions that present an alternative way forward. Prerequisite: 4th year standing

Campus
TMGT 4090

 The Culture of Events (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course will chronicle significant events in world history from organizational, communications, and cultural studies perspectives. The goal of the course is to familiarize students with the development of the event-planning phenomenon from pre-modern, through modern, and post-modern innovations. Prerequisite: 3rd year standing

Campus
TMGT 4100

 The Social Side of Tourism (3,0,0)

3 credits
Travel is intertwined with issues of personal identity and growth, cultural beliefs and values, power, and social change. Students explore these issues, and more, in the search for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of tourism and its consequences for individuals and societies. Prerequisite: 3rd year standing

Campus
TMGT 4110

 Innovation and Leadership in Tourism (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students are introduced to theories, definitions and categorizations of innovation, including the precondition of commercial value production as a tourism business concept. The roles of leadership and organizational culture in innovation are also examined, including styles, techniques, personality profiles, and examples or cases from applications in tourism and other modern enterprises. Prerequisite: TMGT 1150 or equivalent and 3rd year standing

Campus
TMGT 4120

 Developing New Tourism Enterprises (3,0,0)

3 credits
Building upon the foundation laid in TMGT 4010: Experience Creation and Product Development, this course guides students through the process of conceiving and planning a new tourism business. Topics include evaluating business opportunities and start-up strategies, resource requirements for a new business, financing new ventures, and the business start-up process. Prerequisite: TMGT 4010 or equivalent AND TMGT 3030 or equivalent AND 3rd year standing Note: Students cannot receive credit for both TMGT 4120 and BBUS 4750/ENTR 4750

Campus
TMGT 4130

 Tourist Behaviour (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students explore the determinants that shape tourist behaviour, including travel and tourism motivations; destination choice; personality and psychographics; the tourist decision process; the tourist experience; and post-experience behaviour. Using both a theoretical and applied approach, students examine how and why people purchase and consume travel and tourism products. Prerequisite: TMGT 1150 or equivalent and 3rd year standing Note: Students cannot receive credit for both TMGT 4130 and BBUS 3470

Campus
TMGT 4140

 Tourism Strategy (3,0,0)(L)

3 credits
This course explores strategic management and planning in a tourism context. Using both a theoretical and practical approach, students examine the concepts of strategic planning and competitive strategy and how they can be successfully applied by tourism organizations in an increasingly complex and global tourism environment. Prerequisite: TMGT 1150 or equivalent and 3rd year standing Note: Students cannot receive credit for both TMGT 4140 and BBUS 4460/MKTG 4460

Campus
TMGT 4150

 Managing Small Tourism Enterprises (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students examine the environment of small tourism firms and the unique challenges of management both in growth-oriented and small 'lifestyle' tourism firms. The focus is on formulating and developing strategies that allow these firms to thrive in this dynamic and highly competitive environment. Prerequisite: TMGT 1150 or equivalent and 3rd year standing Note: Students cannot receive credit for both TMGT 4150 and ENTR 4760/BBUS 4760

Campus
TMGT 4160

 Tourism in a Global Environment (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students examine tourism and its dynamics from a global perspective. Specifically, students develop a thorough understanding of tourism as an economic, political, social, cultural and environmental force on the world stage, the impacts of this influence, and the strategies that tourism businesses can adopt to thrive in this environment. Prerequisite: 3rd year standing

Campus
TMGT 4170

 Information Technology and Tourism (3,0,0)

3 credits
Students examine the relationship between information technology (IT) and tourism from both a consumer and organizational perspective. Specifically, the course encourages students to critically evaluate current and emerging developments in IT and their impact on tourism consumers and suppliers. Students also develop an understanding of how IT can be used to facilitate and promote innovation and support the overall strategic objectives of a firm. Prerequisite: 3rd year standing

Campus
TMGT 4180

 Managing the Tourist Experience (3,0,0)

3 credits
The tourism product holds an important position in the fast growing experience economy, requiring firms that are marketing these intangible products, to overcome unique challenges. In this course, students are provided with the concepts, tools, and strategic focus to effectively manage the tourist experience and to investigate how experiences are designed, delivered, and evaluated. Students are encouraged to employ innovative approaches in the application of their acquired knowledge to real business settings. Prerequisite: TMGT 1150 or equivalent AND TMGT 3050 or equivalent AND 3rd year standing

Campus
TMGT 4210

 Casino Operations Management (3,0,0)

3 credits
This course explores the relationship between tourism development, hospitality services and casino operations. Topics include the development and current status of gaming in Canada, identification of different types of gaming operations, identification of stakeholders and the costs and benefits of casino establishments to the local community, comparison of gaming laws, controls and fundraising opportunities. This course will also identify marketing and management strategies for casino operations in a tourism setting. Prerequisite: Third-year standing

Campus
TMGT 4220

 Mountain Studies (3,0,0)

3 credits
Mountain Studies allows students the opportunity to engage in an interdisciplinary study of mountain environments, communities, resorts, activities, web presence, arts, sustainability and destination experiences with an emphasis on undergraduate research. topics vary from year to year. Potential areas of focus include mountain culture (literature, painting, film, photography, history, new media) and web-mapping with the provision of rich content; the development and sustainability of mountain national parks in Western Canada; mountain literature and art; comparative studies of the mountain resorts that ring TRU; mountains and participant-observer new media applications; and public relations and mountain resorts. Prerequisite: 3rd year standing

Campus
TMGT 4800

 Tourism Enterprise Consulting Project (0,3,0)

3 credits
Students build upon and apply the knowledge and skills, acquired in previous work experience and courses in the Bachelor of Tourism Management program, in a consulting assignment for a small- to medium-sized tourism enterprise. Students secure a consulting assignment with a business organization, and work closely with the owner and/ or managers to identify a specific problem or challenge facing the firm. Students are then expected to set objectives, research, prepare, and present a report that addresses this problem. Prerequisite: TMGT 3050, permission of the instructor, and either 4th year standing in the Bachelor of Tourism Management program or 2nd year standing in a Faculty of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism Post-Baccalaureate diploma

Campus
TMGT 4980

 ***Special Topics in Tourism (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

6 credits
Course content varies depending on the interests of faculty and students. Credits for the course are determined as per Policy ED-8-0. Prerequisite: Permission from the Tourism Management Department

Campus
TMGT 4990

 Honours Thesis (0,3,0)(0,3,0)

6 credits
Students conduct an original research project in the Honours Program of the Bachelor of Tourism Management (BTM) Degree. The project is completed under the direction of a faculty member from the School of Tourism. Students accepted into the BTM Honours Program register for this course in both the fall and winter semesters of their final academic year. Prerequisite: 4th year standing in the Bachelor of Tourism Management Honours Program and TMGT 3050

Campus
TMPT 1000

 Transportation and Motive Power Foundations (500 hours)

16 credits
This course will introduce students to the full range of knowledge, abilities and skills required to diagnose, repair, adjust, overhaul, maintain, operate and test commercial trucks, emergency vehicles, buses, commercial trailers, road transport vehicles and vehicles with alternative fuel systems and hybrid drives. Prerequisite: Admission into the Diploma of Transportation and Motive Power program

Campus
TMPT 2000

 Principles of Transportation Systems (725 hours)

24 credits
This course will provide students with an in-depth understanding of how to diagnose, repair, adjust, overhaul, maintain, operate and test steering, suspensions, powertrains, electrical systems and heating/ventilation/air conditioning systems. Prerequisite: Successful completion of TMPT 1000

Campus
TMPT 3000

 Advanced Principles of Transportation Systems (300 hours)

10 credits
This course will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the advanced technologies, principles and systems within the transportation and motive power industry. Upon completion, students will be able to compare original equipment manufacturers products and use appropriate technology to solve problems. Prerequisite: Successful completion of TMPT 2000

Campus
TROW 1010

 Theory for Trowel Trades (100 hours) 4 credits

4 credits
This course covers theory related to the installation of bricks, stone, tiles, concrete finishing and stucco. Topics include: proper operation and set-up of portable equipment; ladders and scaffolding; safe work practices required on a job-site; and the proper use and application of personal protective equipment.

Campus
TROW 1110

 Shop Practical for Trowel Trades (500 hours) 15 credits

15 credits
Theory is integrated into practical experience with the hands-on installation of bricks, stone, tiles, concrete finishing and stucco. Topics include: the proper operation and set-up of portable equipment, ladders and scaffolding; safe work practices required while working on a job-site; and the proper use and application of personal protective equipment.

Campus
TTME 4000

 Truck and Transport Mechanic Apprenticeship Level 4 (120 hours)


This fourth level apprenticeship course is designed as the final training level for a Truck and Transport Mechanic Tradesperson. They possess the full range of knowledge, abilities and skills required to diagnose, repair, adjust, overhaul, maintain, operate and test commercial trucks, emergency vehicles, buses, commercial trailers and road transport vehicles. They may also work on recreational vehicles and vehicles with alternative fuel systems and hybrid drives. Prerequisite: HDMC 300 or equivalent and ITA sponsorship

Campus