Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University
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On-Campus

There are a number of ways to register for on-campus courses at TRU which are determined by your program of study.

Open Learning

We offer 590 courses by distance learning. These courses are offered in several formats, including print-based, web-based and online.


Continuing Studies

Community U provides individuals and organizations with formal and non-formal opportunities to pursue personal and professional goals life-long.

Trades and Technology

Apprenticeship, foundation and continuing studies courses are offered in construction, mechanical trades, professional driving and more.

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Courses - S
Title Name Delivery
SAWF 2000

 Circular Saw Filer (120 hours)

Credits: 4
This course covers circular saws including inspection for plumb, level and proper tension. Students will also learn tooth geometry, how to correct defects, maintain and align saw machine centers. Prerequisite: Admission into the Saw Filer program and completion of SAWF 1000 or equivalent

Campus
SAWF 3000

 Saw Filer Level 3 (120 hours)

Credits: 4
This course covers band saws including inspection for plumb, level and proper tension. Students will also learn tooth geometry, how to correct defects, maintain and align saw machine centers. Prerequisite: Admission into the Saw Filer program and completion of SAWF 2000 or equivalent

Campus
SAWF 1000

 Saw Filer Level 1 (180 hours)

Credits: 6
This course covers the fundamentals required to work in the Saw Filer trade. Students will learn how to inspect, install, adjust, operate, maintain and repair saw sharpening equipment. Prerequisite: Admission into the Saw Filer program

Campus
SCMN 4310

 Operations Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students study the design, planning, establishment, operation, control and improvement of all activities in the creation of a firm's products. Practices in both manufacturing and service businesses are explored. Topics include an introduction to operations management; project management; total quality management; product and process design; job design and measurement; facility layout and assembly line balancing; material requirement planning and production scheduling; capacity management; inventory management; and decision tools including simulation, linear programming and decision analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 1170 or equivalent; SCMN 3320

Campus
SCMN 3320

 Supply Chain Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the strategic fit of supply chains with organizational goals; this course lays the foundation for advanced study in the field. Topics include an introduction to supply chain management; supply chain strategy; demand management, inventory management; inventory modeling; supply chain network design and facility location; warehouse management; and transportation management. Prerequisite: ACCT 2250; MIST 2610; ECON 2330 or equivalent

Campus
SCMN 4320

 Transportation and Logistics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the movement of raw materials and parts from the supplier to the manufacturer and the movement of finished products to the final consumer. An effective integration and optimization of each step in the process is emphasized. Topics include an introduction to business logistics; logistics strategy and planning; logistics product; third and fourth party logistics providers; customer services and order processing; transportation fundamentals including transportation modes, inter-model services, pricing, and other shipping terms and documentation; transportation decision making and modeling; warehouse and storage management; and distribution requirement planning. Prerequisite: MATH 1170 or equivalent; SCMN 3320

Campus
SCMN 3330

 Procurement Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the methods used by organizations to acquire the raw materials, components, supplies, equipment, facilities, and services needed to operate. Topics include strategic procurement, procurement process, competitive bidding and negotiation, procurement and supply management organization, make or buy, price and cost analysis, quality and inventory, supplier selection, supplier development and certification, services procurement, e-Procurement, and involving users and suppliers. Prerequisite: SCMN 3320

Campus
SCMN 4390

 Selected Topics in Supply Chain Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine a selection of contemporary issues in supply chain management. Topics include strategic supply chain management; global supply chains; sustainable supply chains; service supply chains; supply chain resilience; reverse supply chains; quality in supply chain management; modern manufacturing methods; product design and encouraging technical innovation; process reengineering and competitive benchmarking; and supply chain optimization. Prerequisite: SCMN 3330; SCMN 4310; SCMN 4320

Campus
SERV 3000

 Service Learning (Third Year) (0,0,5P)

Credits: 3
Third year students are provided with supervised service learning opportunities. Academic service learning provides a venue for senior-level students to share their knowledge and skills with the community through approved community-based projects. Service learning projects may be initiated by students, community members, groups, agencies, organizations, and faculty. To qualify for service learning credit, a faculty member must authorize the course and then agree to supervise and evaluate the project. Students may receive service learning credit by working individually or in cohorts of up to 5 students on the same community project. Students meet with the faculty supervisor for initial consultation and/or training during the first week of classes, and are expected to keep the faculty supervisor informed about the project on a regular basis. Upon completion of the course or project, students present the faculty supervisor with an evaluation form completed by the community group, agency, or organization served, and a combination of the following: a research paper, report, or document; a student journal or activity log; a presentation, performance, or exhibition. Prerequisite: Students must have completed 60 credits Note: Criteria for authorizing service level credit: the student's service learning must demonstrate civic participation, community involvement, formal critical reflection. In addition, the project must involve students (normally 3 - 5 hours per week) in an organized community service that addresses local needs.
Note: Criteria for authorizing service level credit: the student's service learning must demonstrate civic participation, community involvement, formal critical reflection. In addition, the project must involve students (normally 3 - 5 hours per week) in an organized community service that addresses local needs.

Campus
SERV 4000

 Service Learning (Fourth Year) (0,0,5P)

Credits: 3
Fourth year students are provided with supervised service learning opportunities. Academic service learning provides a venue for senior-level students to share their knowledge and skills with the community through approved community-based projects. Service learning projects may be initiated by students, community members, groups, agencies, organizations, and faculty. To qualify for service learning credit, a faculty member must authorize the course and then agree to supervise and evaluate the project. Students may receive service learning credit by working individually or in cohorts of up to 5 students on the same community project. Students meet with the faculty supervisor for initial consultation and/or training during the first week of classes, and are expected to keep the faculty supervisor informed about the project on a regular basis. Upon completion of the course or project, students present the faculty supervisor with an evaluation form completed by the community group, agency, or organization served, and a combination of the following: a research paper, report, or document; a student journal or activity log; a presentation, performance, or exhibition. Prerequisite: Students must have completed 90 credits Note: Criteria for authorizing service level credit: the student's service learning must demonstrate civic participation, community involvement, and formal critical reflection. In addition, the project must involve students (normally 3 - 5 hours per week) in an organized community service that addresses local needs.
Note: Criteria for authorizing service level credit: the student's service learning must demonstrate civic participation, community involvement, and formal critical reflection. In addition, the project must involve students (normally 3 - 5 hours per week) in an organized community service that addresses local needs.

Campus
SFPF 1000

 Steamfitter/Pipefitter Apprenticeship Level 1 (180 hours)


This course is intended for BC ITA first year Steamfitter/Pipefitter apprentices. Students will learn how to use blueprints and project specifications, in order to construct, test, repair and maintain piping systems that carry water, steam, chemicals and fuel using specialized equipment to ensure the safety of the pipes and other components of the system such as the automatic controls. They also learn about different types of materials including steel, copper, plastic and numerous metal alloys. Prerequisite: BC ITA sponsorship

Campus
SFPF 1900

 Steamfitter/Pipefitter Sampler (120 Hours)


Students will be introduced to the Steamfitter/Pipefitter trade, the type of work this trade entails and the opportunities for jobs in this trade. Referring to the Program Outline from the Industry Training Authority of BC, they will learn about safe work practices for this trade, safe use of the latest in Steamfitter/Pipefitter tools and technology. They will also learn and work with the common materials encountered in the trade and learn how to measure, cut and join pipe. Prerequisite: Completion of Grade 10

Campus
SFPF 2000

 Steamfitter/Pipefitter Apprenticeship Level 2 (180 hours)


This course is intended for BC ITA second year Steamfitter/Pipefitter apprentices. Students will learn how to use blueprints and project specifications, in order to construct, test, repair and maintain piping systems that carry water, steam, chemicals and fuel using specialized equipment to ensure the safety of the pipes and other components of the system such as the automatic controls. They also learn about different types of materials including steel, copper, plastic and numerous metal alloys. Prerequisite: BC ITA sponsorship

Campus
SFPF 3000

 Steamfitter/Pipefitter Apprenticeship Level 3 (180 hours)


This course is intended for BC ITA third year Steamfitter/Pipefitter apprentices. Students will learn how to use blueprints and project specifications, in order to construct, test, repair and maintain piping systems that carry water, steam, chemicals and fuel using specialized equipment to ensure the safety of the pipes and other components of the system such as the automatic controls. They also learn about different types of materials including steel, copper, plastic and numerous metal alloys. Prerequisite: BC ITA sponsorship

Campus
SFPF 4000

 Steamfitter/Pipefitter Apprenticeship Level 4 (240 hours)


This course is intended for BC ITA fourth year Steamfitter/Pipefitter apprentices. Students will learn how to use blueprints and project specifications, in order to construct, test, repair and maintain piping systems that carry water, steam, chemicals and fuel using specialized equipment to ensure the safety of the pipes and other components of the system such as the automatic controls. They also learn about different types of materials including steel, copper, plastic and numerous metal alloys. Prerequisite: BC ITA sponsorship

Campus
SHMT 1900

 Sheet Metal Worker Sampler (120 Hours)


Students will be introduced to the Sheet Metal Worker trade, the type of work this trade entails and the opportunities for jobs in this trade. Referring to the Program Outline from the Industry Training Authority of BC, they will learn about safe work practices for this trade, safe use of the latest in Sheet Metal Worker tools and technology. They will also learn and work with the common materials encountered in the trade and learn how to measure, cut and frabicate metal ductwork, fittings and components. Prerequisite: Completion of Grade 10

Campus
SINC 500

 Foundations of Science (5,0,2)

Credits: 4
ABE - Advanced: This course introduces important basic science concepts relevant to the general or allied health sciences. The principles of chemistry, biology and physics are covered in a manner which emphasizes the links between disciplines. This course will sufficiently strengthen the students' background in science, so that they can further explore their area of interest. Note: This course is taught by the University Preparation Department Required Lab: SINC 0500L
Note: This course is taught by the University Preparation Department Required Lab: SINC 0500L

Campus
SOCI 2100

 Canadian Social Issues (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers a descriptive and analytic survey of features in Canadian society as a basis for understanding current social issues. These features include demographic characteristics, class structure, ethnicity, and regional variation. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210

Campus
SOCI 2500

 Crime and Society (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the central issues of criminology, such as the definition of crime; methods of research into criminal activities, the operation of the criminal justice system in the "making" and "controlling" of crime, and theories that are used to explain the origins of crime and criminality. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 Required Seminar: SOCI 2500S

Campus
SOCI 3200

 Classical Social Theory (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced and guided through the study of complex works by three influential founders of sociology (Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, and Max Weber), as well as other relevant theorists who contributed to the formation of the basic concepts and methods of the social sciences. Students also examine the pitfalls of a male-centred perspective on society in the classical canon, and the contributions of early feminist social theorists. The course focuses on the development of capitalism, the formation of modern society, and the discovery of the society as an object of knowledge. Prerequisite: Admission to the Sociology Major Program Required Seminar: SOCI 3200S

Campus
SOCI 3600

 Sociology and Natural Resources (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine sociological perspectives on property, resource development, resource communities, and resource industries. Social causes and consequences of change in the social organization (e.g. ownership and labour force), and social policies (e.g. land use, property rights) in industries such as agriculture, fishing, forestry and mining may also be examined. Prerequisites: SOCI 1110 and 1210; SOCI 2620 or GEOG 1100 recommended

Campus
SOCI 3800

 Introduction to Social Survey Design and Analysis (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn to design questionnaires, complete interviews, draw samples, and analyze survey data. This is a core course for the sociology major program. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 and Soci 2720 Required Seminar: SOCI 380S

Campus
SOCI 4200

 Complex Organizations (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the history of the formation of complex organizations during the industrial and political revolutions of modernity, including their initial bureaucratic arrangement, and their newer, more flexible and dynamic forms due to technological change and globalization. A critical sociological perspective on organizational analysis is discussed, including how to recognize the different `species' of organizations, and how they touch virtually all aspects of modern life. This perspective allows students to appreciate the relationships between modern complex organizations and individuals, and how organizations interact with the larger institutions of society and the world. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 or instructor's written consent Required Seminar: SOCI 4200S

Campus
SOCI 4600

 Globalization (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the origins, nature, and impact of globalization in the modern world. Links between nations, regions, and peoples are increasing at an unprecedented rate. New technologies make possible previously unimaginable forms of interdependence, but the consequences of these changes are not uniform. The impacts vary from region to region. Students explore how people from different nations may view globalization, and consider how groups work to ensure that globalization contributes to desirable outcomes in local contexts. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 Required Seminar: SOCI 4600S

Campus
SOCI 4700

 Sociology of Crime and Justice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers a critical examination of specific forms of crime and delinquency in relation to the criminal justice systems of the common law (adversarial) and civil (inquisitorial) law traditions. These include law, law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Issues of ethics, morality and social justice are raised. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210

Campus
SOCI 3100

 Canadian Society (3,0,0) or (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
Students examine selected features of the social organization of Canadian society. Topics may include the relationships between industrial organization and other social institutions and processes, such as family structure, welfare systems, crime rates, ethnic relations, industrial, and political conflict. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210

Campus
SOCI 1110

 Introduction to Sociology 1 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the core concepts of the discipline of sociology by examining key concepts (such as culture, socialization, social interaction, social roles, and educational issues) that allow us to locate ourselves within society. Students also explore theoretical perspectives within sociology and the fundamentals of research methods, including how sociologists gather information about society. Required Seminar: SOCI 1110S

Campus
SOCI 1210

 Introduction to Sociology 2 (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
In this second half of Introduction to Sociology, students are introduced to such topics as crime and deviance, social control, large scale organizations, principal institutions such as religion, politics, and economy. Students also critically examine the impact of social structure, such as race and ethnicity, social stratification, and gender relations, on individual's lives. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110 Required Seminar: SOCI 1210S

Campus
SOCI 2010

 Race and Ethnic Relations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine sociological descriptions and theoretical explanations for race and ethnic inequality in Canada. This course challenges students to critically examine race and ethnic relations in Canada vis-a-vis other countries.Prerequisites: SOCI 1110/1210

Campus
SOCI 3210

 Feminist Theory (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the history of Western feminist thought and the major traditions of feminist theory. Classical and contemporary debates on gender relations relevant to sociologists and other social theorists are examined in depth. This is a core course for students in the sociology major program. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110, 1210 and 3200 Required Seminar: SOCI 3210S

Campus
SOCI 3610

 Social Inequality (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the tendencies toward equality and inequality; the manifestations of inequality and their consequences, including occupation, ethnic groups, income, and power; caste and class features of major stratification systems; theories of social class; and the stratification profile of contemporary industrial societies. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210, 3rd year standing

Campus
SOCI 4210

 The Social Constructionof Knowledge and Freedom (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students engage in an analysis and critical examination of the notion of individual freedom and the scientific production of knowledge. Students examine mainstream social theories as well as alternative knowledge systems; debate the actuality of modern individualism; and review recent critiques of knowledge production that focus on issues such as overarching universalisms, colonialism, and androcentrism. Prerequisite: Completion of 45 credits

Campus
SOCI 4810

 Directed Studies in Sociology (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

Credits: 6
This course is designed to allow upper-level students to undertake an investigation on a specific topic as agreed upon by the faculty member and the student. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210, one 2nd year methods and one 3rd year theory course in Sociology. One specific Sociology course on the general topic of the directed studies course. Declared major in Sociology. GPA minimum as per TRU Honours Degree Policy ED 16-2. Permission of the Instructor.

Campus
SOCI 1111

 Introduction to Sociology I

Credits: 3
Together with SOCI 1211: Introduction to Sociology II, this course introduces students to the discipline of sociology. Because humans are social by nature, all of us are members of various social groupings and located within a social system; we can only achieve an adequate understanding of ourselves after we have acquired the tools to understand that social system. Students learn to understand our social system and how it shapes and influences us all as individuals. Students discuss basic concepts of the sociological perspective, understand the importance of the transformation of Western society, examine the concepts developed to describe capitalist society, and explore the sociology of Canada. Prerequisites: None. This course or equivalent is a prerequisite to advanced sociology courses.
More information about this course.

Distance
SOCI 2620

 Sociology of the Environment (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to several theories that sociologists use to explain the exploitation and despoiling of the natural environment. How and why society defines and uses natural resources is examined, in addition to how and why environmental degradation is defined as an issue while other degradation is not. Students learn that values, norms and definition change across time and place. Due to the nature of environmental issues and problems, students focus on global and Canadian issues. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210

Campus
SOCI 2720

 Introductory Social Research Methods (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to an overview of the philosophy and practice of social research. Topics include research ethics, research design, survey research, field research, interviewing, quasi-experimentation, and data analysis. This is a core course for students in the sociology major program. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 (Grade of C or better) Required Seminar: SOCI 2720S

Campus
SOCI 3120

 Gender Relations (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the nature of gender relations, their social and cultural expression, and theories of gender inequality drawn from social science research. Prerequisites: Completion of 45 credits

Campus
SOCI 3220

 Contemporary Issues in Social Theory (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine contemporary issues in social theory, and learn to evaluate the range of strategies theorists use to clarify and resolve theoretical problems. Links between theory, research, and explanation are also explored. This is a core course for students in the sociology major program. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 and 3200

Campus
SOCI 3520

 Organization of Work (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the meaning of work and leisure, and the properties of work organization, such as division of labour and specialization; technology and working knowledge; and the means of coordinating work, such as cooperation, authority, and exchange. Student may also research topics such as work in households, offices and industry, division of labour by gender, industrial democracy, and the relation of work and social inequality. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210

Campus
SOCI 3620

 ***Special Topics in Social Problems (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on a selected social problem, or area within the sociology discipline. The specific social problem varies from year to year. Prospective students should consult the current sociology at TRU handbook or a member of the Department for information concerning the availability of this course. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210, 3rd year standing Required Seminar: SOCI 3620S

Campus
SOCI 3820

 Socio-Ethnographic Research Methods in Sociology (Qualitative Methods) (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the six main ways of collecting qualitative (non-numerical) data: interviewing, focus groups, ethnography, sociometry, `unobtrusive' measures, and historiography. Students also discover methodologies for how to make sense of this data.This is a core course for sociology major students. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 and 2720 Required Seminar: SOCI 3820S

Campus
SOCI 2230

 Collective Behaviour (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to explanations and analyses of crowd and mass action. Students aim to describe and analyze such behaviors as riots, fads, demonstrations, public opinion, and emergent social movements. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 Required Seminar: SOCI 2230S

Campus
SOCI 4130

 Family and Kinship (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are exposed to a cross-cultural survey of methodologies for defining family relations and kinship organizations through theoretical analysis and case studies. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210

Campus
SOCI 4730

 Global Social Change (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine the societal developments that gave rise to colonization and prepared the grounds for globalization. The issues facing ordinary people, from Asia, Africa and Latin America, are explored as a consequence of colonization and the imbalance of power in the world. Topics include dictatorship and human rights abuses; unequal economic development; struggles for decolonization and independence; the status of women; environmental degradation; and the circumstances of ethnic minorities and aboriginal peoples. Students also discuss grass-roots social movements that have achieved transnational organization and that oppose the effects of global neo-colonialism. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210

Campus
SOCI 2130

 Women in Global Perspective (3,0,0) or (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
This course provides a global approach to the study of women's lives. Topics include sexuality, the sex trade, family relations, violence, the global economy, domestic work, and politics. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210

Campus
SOCI 3030

 The European Orient: Balkans, Russia and Eastern Europe (3,0,0) (3,0,0)

Credits: 6
Students survey the cultures shaping Central and Eastern Europe, including Russia, examining the interplay between local and national culture, and between ethnic and political identity. Cannot receive credit for more than one of: SOCI 3030, ANTH 3030, HIST 3030 or POLI 3070

Campus
SOCI 4030

 Ethnography of Special Areas - Field Course in East/Central Europe (3,0,0)

Credits: 6
This course offers an advanced introduction to the societies and cultures of East and Central Europe by way of a month-long field trip to Austria, Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Ukraine. While immersed in the geographical area, students ethnographically examine the religions, ethnic relations, economies, and politics shaping the buffer zone between the European East and West. Note: This course is equivalent to ANTH 4030
Note: This course is equivalent to ANTH 4030

Campus
SOCI 4840

 Sociology of Health and Illness (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore sociological perspectives on health, illness, and health care as represented in classic and contemporary sociological studies. Topics may include illness experience, social aspects of the practice of health professionals, training of health professionals, and the social organization of health delivery systems. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210

Campus
SOCI 3150

 Aboriginal Restorative Justice (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
As an introduction to the aboriginal restorative justice paradigm, students critically examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Aboriginal/Indigenous peoples in Canada. The idea of “justice" is explored and compared amongst some Indigenous, restorative, retributive and rehabilitative conceptions. Particular attention is paid to the importance of values, relationships, needs, and healing for those who cause harm and have been harmed. Indigenous and restorative justice approaches are evaluated in the context of law enforcement, the law, corrections, community development, and crime prevention.

Campus
SOCI 2160

 The Family in Cross-Cultural Perspectives (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the study of family life in its formation, the relevance of marriage and cohabitation, bringing up children, and the impact of family issues. In this cross-cultural comparison of family life, students are familiarized with the variations that occur throughout the world in the structure and meaning of marriage relations; forms of domestic organization; the sexual division of labour, property and inheritance, and the familial influence in the construction of gender relations in different cultures around the world. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210

Campus
SOCI 2260

 Medical Sociology (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on the social factors which influence help seeking and illness behaviour, as well as the nature and organization of Canada's health care system. The main purpose of this course is to illustrate that health and illness are not entirely individual phenomena, but that the cause, distribution, and consequences of injury and illness are at least partly the product of social, economic, and political factors. Topics include policy and delivery of health care; interaction between health care providers and patients; occupational health and safety; environment, work and illness; health care and the elderly; and inequality and health care. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 Required Seminar: SOCI 2260S

Campus
SOCI 3160

 Sexuality (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Sexuality is a set of discourses about `good' and `bad' sexual practices, and it is a part of any society's social institutional structure. Students examine sexuality in its multiple dimensions, and as the basis for progressive and regulatory, or repressive, counter-movements. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210

Campus
SOCI 4660

 Socialization and Education (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides a study of the induction into social structures and the acquisition of membership in society. Students analyze the structure and influence of education, and other socializing institutions. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210

Campus
SOCI 2170

 The Sociology of Popular Culture (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the sociological implications of popular culture, and focus on issues central to the presentation, consumption, and construction of current social life. Popular culture affects everyone; however, everyone does not participate in it equally. Thus both the unequal consumption of popular culture, and the representations (and justifications) of inequality between groups in Western society as presented in popular culture is studied in the course. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 Required Seminar: SOCI 2170S

Campus
SOCI 2270

 ***Selected Topics in Sociology (2,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided an opportunity to explore theories, topics, or issues that are not normally offered by the department, or in the permanent course rotation. Subtitles reflect the topic for a specific offering and therefore vary. Students may enroll in SOCI 2270 twice, providing the subtitles are different at each enrolment. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 Required Seminar: SOCI 2270S

Campus
SOCI 3680

 Deviance and Social Control (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6
Students learn the analytic framework for the study of the generation and control of deviant activities. The course aims to explore the essence of deviant behaviour, including its construction, explanation, commission, and control. Students focus on the major theoretical approaches to the study of deviance and deviants, and may discuss classical and contemporary theories. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210

Campus
SOCI 2590

 Deviance and Control (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students learn to adopt a sociological perspective when thinking about 'deviant' behaviour, while examining the complex task of defining 'deviance' and how these definitions vary over time and place. Students critically evaluate the social category of deviance and its use in social institutions and daily social interactions, and consider the role of power in reinforcing and challenging 'deviant' identities. Major topics may include an exploration of sexuality, youth, physical appearance, mental disorders, religion, and scientific beliefs. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210

Campus
SOCI 3990

 Sociology of Diversity: Issues for Canadians (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students engage in in-depth study of topics in the sociology of diversity. They explore the tensions and challenges that arise from multiculturalism, the presence of multiple nations within Canada, and the varied social identities found among communities and groups in Canada's pluralistic society. Prerequisite: 45 Credits

Campus
SOCI 1211

 Introduction to Sociology II

Credits: 3
Together with SOCI 1111: Introduction to Sociology I, this course introduces students to Sociology, by means of a systematic analysis of the character of modern Western capitalist society, and building on the concepts and perspectives introduced in SOCI 1111. Students examine issues such as liberal ideology, inequality, the role of the state, socialization for work, the role of the family, and problems of deviance. Prerequisites: None. SOCI 1111 (previously SOCI 101) or equivalent skills and knowledge are recommended.
More information about this course.

Distance
SOCI 2251

 Sociological Explanations of Criminal Behaviour

Credits: 3
This course will critically examine the sociological, socio-cultural, and socio-psychological explanations of criminal behaviour such as the ecological theories, conflict theories, control theories, and symbolic interactionist theories. Some of the specific theories subjected to critical examination will be those concerned with class and group conflict, subcultures, soassociation, labelling and gender.
More information about this course.

Distance
SOCI 2501

 Sociology of Crime

Credits: 3
This course adopts a radically sociological view of crime that emphasizes the social construction of crime, and challenges assumptions about the criminal justice system. Students focus on the creation of law, police work, activities of the courts, andthe experience of incarceration. Students are also provided an excellent introduction to the application of social theory. Prerequisites: None
More information about this course.

Distance
SOCI 3821

 Socio-Ethnographic Research Methods

Credits: 3
Students examine the ways social scientists employ qualitative research to identify, document and critically analyse complex social phenomena and patterns and practices of interaction. The course is intended to provide an overview of particular techniques in research design, data collection, and data analysis most commonly associated with qualitative research. Prerequisites: Recommended: CRIM 1011 SOCI 1111 SOCI 1211 CRIM 3821
More information about this course.

Distance
SOCI 3991

 Sociology of Diversity: Issues for Canadians

Credits: 3
This course offers an in-depth study of special topics in the sociology of diversity. Students explore the tensions and challenges that arise from multiculturalism, the presence of multiple nations within the state of Canada, and the varied social identities found among communities and groups in Canada's pluralistic society. Topics include: Is Canada really a nation? How is social unity achieved in a multi-nation and multi-ethnic state? Has the role of the citizen been diminished? Does identity politics threaten our ability to act as citizens? Should nations within Canada have special status? This course is suitable for learners completing degrees in a number of discipline areas such as science, engineering, humanities, social science, business or general studies. Prerequisites: 60 Credits.
More information about this course.

Distance
SOCI 4221

 The Social Construction of Crime and Deviance

Credits: 3
This course offers an advanced examination of the processes involved in the social construction of crime and deviance from the perspectives of structural conflict theory, symbolic interactionism, and ethnomethodology. It looks at the work of citizens, legislators, police, courts, welfare agencies, schools, and others in the creation of deviance and deviants. Delivered from a distinctly interpretivist point of view, the course is not concerned with the causes of crime or recommendations for reducing crime or deviance. It is grounded in numerous examples of real-life situations and students are encouraged to apply the conceptual and theoretical materials to their own lives and work experiences. Prerequisites: SOCI 1111 (previously SOCI 101) or SOCI 1211 (previously SOCI 102) or equivalent. Exclusions: Students with credit for SOCI 4221 (previously SOCI 422) may not take this course for further credit.
More information about this course.

Distance
SOCI 4301

 Family Life in Contemporary Canada

Credits: 3
Students examine the many facets of contemporary family life in Canada, beginning historically and looking cross-culturally within the nation. Sociological concepts, theories, and research methodologies are employed as a means to explain the causes and consequences of transformations of family life over time. These transformations include those that have already occurred and those that continue to take place, including dramatic changes in gender roles and divisions of labour. Emphasis is placed upon diversity within and between families; the increased pressures on families within a consumer society; and the impacts upon families from globalization and a pervasive neoliberal ideological, social, political, and economic context. Prerequisites: SOCI 1111 or SOCI 1211, or the equivalent.
More information about this course.

Distance
SOCI 4311

 Sociology of Families: Families in a Multicultural World

Credits: 3
This course is an exploration of cultural diversity among the world's family systems; students are provided a comparison of families from Asia, Africa and North America to illustrate how households, family relationships, and community bonds vary from society to society. This cross-cultural study demonstrates that there is no universal family unit, but a great variety of organizational forms and value systems. Sociological perspectives are used to help understand reasons why different family forms occur and how they have been shaped by their social context. Canadians live in a multicultural country made up of people who have different values, backgrounds, and family organizations. By learning and understanding these differences, students can distinguish between legitimate critique and ethnocentric bias.
More information about this course.

Distance
SOCI 4991

 Directed Studies

Credits: 3
This course is a requirement for completion of the Bachelor of Arts, sociology major and may be taken to complete the Post- Baccalaureate Certificate in Liberal Arts. Students are required to review the literature, both original and interpretative, in their particular area of study, offer critical assessment of the literature, and submit a major research paper based on the course reading list.
More information about this course.

Distance
SOCW 3000

 Canadian Social Policy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course explores the socio-historical, economic, ideological, and institutional contexts for the development of social policy in Canada. Students discuss the policy making process, as well as the role of social policy in processes of inclusion, exclusion, marginalization, and oppression. A critical analysis of selected social policies is emphasized. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program, or permission of the program coordinator Note: Students must maintain a minimum C grade
Note: Students must maintain a minimum C grade

Campus
SOCW 3100

 Aboriginal Life Cycles (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course utilizes seven interconnected circles to represent the life cycles of creation, birth and childhood, youth, women, men, elders, and Spirit World. Students examine stages of development and learning through these life cycles, in social and cultural contexts. This course seeks to create understanding and knowledge of Indigenous people through differing ways of knowing, being, seeing, and doing. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120

Campus
SOCW 3300

 International Field Studies (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course offers a two-week international study experience in a selected country. Students explore the political, economic, cultural, and social conditions of their selected country, including globalization and its effects on citizens, social welfare policy and practice, community development strategies, and the marginalization and oppression of groups. Activities involve presentations and seminars by international leaders, professionals, and residents, as well as visits to a range of community sites and organizations. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator Note: This course is identical to POLI 3300
Note: This course is identical to POLI 3300

Campus
SOCW 4000

 Policy in the Human Services (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided with an introduction to the main organizational structures of, and stages in, the social policy making process in Canada. The course aims to strengthen students' skills in the analysis of policies and programs in Canadian human services; to critically reflect on different ideologies and theories through which the welfare state has been examined in various countries; and to develop an appreciation of the interdisciplinary nature of social policy as a field of academic and applied activity. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, SOCW 3000, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 4200

 Family Violence and Social Work Practice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to social work practice with individuals, families, and communities in response to violence in adult intimate relationships. Students explore family violence and social work practice from a variety of perspectives, including cross-cultural, international, Aboriginal, and feminist. This course emphasizes a social work practice approach that is community-based, culturally sensitive, feminist, and anti-oppressive. In this course, family violence is understood as violence in adult intimate relationships, including same-sex couples. Additional topics include family violence in Aboriginal communities, children who witness violence, and violence during dating. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 4300

 Sexual Orientation and Gender Expression (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to interpersonal and systemic issues that sexually diverse and gender varied people encounter on a daily basis. Policies, legislation, and social contexts are analyzed with a view to understanding the impact of intersecting oppressions and privileges on sexual and gender minorities. Students discuss social work strategies to support and advocate for gay, lesbian, bisexual, trans-identified, two-spirit, intersex, queer, and questioning (GLBTTsIQQ) people, plus their families and communities, including courses of action for being an ally. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 4400

 Social Work and Mental Health (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the practice of social work in the field of mental health by critically examining historical and contemporary theoretical perspectives on mental illness, Canadian mental health law and policy, cultural and diversity aspects, classification and treatment, ethical issues, and an exploration of additional selected mental health issues. Students are presented with the personal accounts of individuals who have experienced mental health problems. The course is intended to provide introductory foundational knowledge in the field of mental health, rather than advanced knowledge and skills that are required for mental health practice. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 4500

 Leadership Practice in Social Service Organizations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are provided with a critical introduction to leadership in social service organizations, and review organizational theory and its application to government and non-profit organizations. Leadership in a diverse workplace, program development, budgeting, staff appraisal, supervision, and work with voluntary boards are also discussed. Through experiential learning methods, students explore the key organizational skills that are necessary for effective leadership in organizations. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 4600

 ***Special Topics in Social Work and Social Welfare (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore special issues in social welfare and various approaches to social work practice. This variable content course is restricted to students in third or fourth year. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 4800

 International Social Work (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the field of international social work. Current global social welfare issues and challenges are critically explored and discussed, including global Indigenous issues and development approaches of different countries. Students complete an in-depth examination of the economic, political, social, and cultural dimensions of globalization. Implications for international social work and its social justice and anti-oppressive mandate are analyzed by addressing complex global issues such as disaster relief and humanitarian aid, human trafficking, and forced migration of people. The impact of political, social, economic, cultural, religious, and environmental influences on human rights, social and economic justice, social policies, and service delivery are explored. The role of social work in facilitating international social development is examined in local and global contexts. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 4900

 Directed Studies (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This independent study course is designed to allow students the opportunity to investigate a specific issue within a field or topic in social work, such as gerontology, mental health, sexual assault, or corrections. Consultation with, and permission of, a faculty member and the Associate Dean is required.

Campus
SOCW 3010

 Introduction to Social Work Research (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the concepts, methods, and processes of social research, and develop skills in conducting and assessing research. Students are challenged to examine their own approach to knowing, to incorporate research into practice, and to think critically about research in relation to social work practice. The subjectivity of the researcher, the political and ethical context of research, and the role of research as an instrument of power in the lives of oppressed peoples is discussed. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator Note: Student must maintain a grade of C or better
Note: Student must maintain a grade of C or better

Campus
SOCW 3110

 Aboriginal Perspectives on Social Policy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students inquire into the process of decolonization as it relates to social policy, and explore and analyze historical Canadian policies and legislation and their implications for Aboriginal people today. Students critique and analyze the efficacy of existing policies, and create a framework to interpret and develop effective policies for Aboriginal peoples. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120

Campus
SOCW 4010

 

Credits: 3

Campus
SOCW 4610

 Social Work Practice with Groups (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the historical development of the use of groups in social work practice, and examine the various theoretical approaches to group work including anti-oppression, feminist, and Aboriginal perspectives. Students examine the use of groups as vehicles for treatment, task accomplishment, self-help, mutual aid, community intervention, peer supervision, and professional association. This course provides an opportunity to understand the stages of group development, and to practice skills related to group processes. Students participate in structured group experiences. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 4020

 Social Work Field Practice (0,1,28P)

Credits: 9
Students apply ethics, theory, and research to social work practice while developing professional practice skills. This course is completed at the end of the student's studies in the Bachelor of Social Work degree program and develops analytic and practical abilities sufficient to begin professional practice. The practicum is a structured educational experience that includes specific learning objectives; professional supervision is provided in an evaluative, disciplined, and reflective manner. Through seminar discussions, students analyze inequality, injustice, and oppression in practice. This practicum is normally completed four days a week, includes a seminar, and is a total of 432 hours. Prerequisite: 4th-year standing, a minimum of 45 social work credits, SOCW 3040 or HUMS 1600, and HUMS 2600

Campus
SOCW 2120

 An Introduction to Social Welfare in Canada (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the Canadian welfare state and the response of the federal and provincial governments to poverty in Canada. An overview of the historical development of social security policies and programs in Canada is provided, and the influence of ideology on policy is discussed. The impact of policy on youth, women, older persons, and Aboriginal peoples is described. The human service/social worker's role in formulating and influencing policy is considered.

Campus
SOCW 3020

 Data Analysis in the Health and Human Service Professions (3,0,1)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to facilitate learner understanding of the data-analysis process in relation to research-based professional practice in nursing and social work. Students apply a range of analytical techniques to qualitative and quantitative data, while enhancing their ability to analyze data and critically review research literature applicable to their professional practice. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator Note: Students normally will receive credit for only one of the following: BIOL 3000, BUEC 2320, MATH 1200, PSYC 2100, SOCI 3710, SOCW 3020, STAT 2000
Note: Students normally will receive credit for only one of the following: BIOL 3000, BUEC 2320, MATH 1200, PSYC 2100, SOCI 3710, SOCW 3020, STAT 2000

Campus
SOCW 4520

 Educating for Social Change (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus on the use of education as a strategy for individual and social change through the concept of education as the practice of freedom, and as a process of social transformation through conscientization. Principles and practices of adult education are examined for their application in social work as vehicles for empowerment and change. Students present workshops, plays, or web programs to develop the specific skills and knowledge for planning and delivering educational programs. Students further explore feminist, Aboriginal, and anti-oppression perspectives. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 3530

 Social Work Practice with Individuals (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students develop effective communication skills and apply these to social work practice. From anti-oppression, feminist, and Aboriginal perspectives, students establish communication concepts and methods applicable to practice with diverse groups. Through experiential methods, students increase self-awareness and problem-solving skills, develop a beginning purposeful intervention framework, and gain experience in the conscious, disciplined use of self. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 4030

 Generalist Social Work Practice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students strengthen their understanding of generalist social work practice and problem solving approaches, heighten their ability to recognize and grapple with ethical dilemmas, and think critically about their own conceptual and philosophical orientation to social work practice. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, SOCW 3010, SOCW 3040, SOCW 3060, SOCW 3070, SOCW 3530, with a C standing or better in all required courses and a minimum of 30 social work credits

Campus
SOCW 3540

 First Nations Issues and Human Services (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students critically examine the historical process of colonization in Canada, the resulting barriers embedded in policy and practice, and alternative ways of viewing the social-psychological position of First Nations people in Canadian society. Contemporary issues and the movement toward self-determination are discussed in relation to social work theory and practice. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator Note: Students must maintain a grade of C or better to successfully complete this course
Note: Students must maintain a grade of C or better to successfully complete this course

Campus
SOCW 4040

 Ethical Practice in Aboriginal Communities (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students focus specifically on ethical considerations and decision making when working in Aboriginal communities. The course examines codes of ethics in the social work profession, Aboriginal codes of ethics, and mainstream theoretical aspects of ethical practices. Students are also provided an opportunity to engage in an exploration of integrated, personal, and ethical practices that are culturally based through validation and revitalization of Aboriginal codes of ethics. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120

Campus
SOCW 4540

 Aboriginal Decolonizing Social Work Practice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine social workers' roles and responsibilities in working with diverse Aboriginal peoples such as First Nations, Inuit, Metis, and on and off reserve peoples. The concept and process of decolonization is introduced and connected to contemporary stories, community social work program initiatives, and practices of Aboriginal peoples. This course utilizes a gendered Aboriginal perspective and explores strategies for reconciliation, building relationships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples, and practices within the social work profession. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, SOCW 3540, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program, or permission of the program coordinator Note: Student must maintain a grade of C or better to successfully complete the coures
Note: Student must maintain a grade of C or better to successfully complete the coures

Campus
SOCW 3040

 Social Work Field Practice (0,1,21P)

Credits: 6
Students apply ethics, theory, and research to social work practice while developing professional practice skills. Students integrate classroom learning with practical experience while working in partnership with clients, community groups, and other professions. The practicum is a structured educational experience that includes specific learning objectives and professional supervision provided in an evaluative, disciplined, and reflective manner. Through seminar discussions, students analyze inequality, injustice, and oppression in practice. The practicum is normally completed three days a week and is accompanied by a seminar, for a total of 300 hours including pre-practicum orientation and practicum seminars. Prerequisite: SOCW 3060, SOCW 3530

Campus
SOCW 3550

 Human Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
The objectives of this course are to introduce students to concepts and models of how human behaviour is acquired, maintained, and modified, and to promote an understanding of normal human development as a knowledge base for practice with individuals, families, and groups in a rural context. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 3750

 Cultural Immersion (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an opportunity to experience First Nations culture and traditions from a holistic perspective. Students are immersed in cultural activities, ceremonies, and teachings to deepen their knowledge and appreciation of First Nations culture. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120

Campus
SOCW 4550

 Social Work Practice with Communities (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the construction of community and analyze marginalization, exclusion, and oppression in communities. The course outlines social work roles as well as strategies for change in diverse communities. The history, philosophy, models, and methods of social practice with communities are described. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, 3060, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 4650

 Older People, Aging and Society (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to working with and on behalf of older people from an anti-oppression and inter-disciplinary perspective. Students examine age in relation to other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, class, gender, (dis)ability, faith, sexual orientation, aboriginal ancestry, and marital status. Students consider issues affecting older adults locally and globally; critically examine beliefs and attitudes related to aging and older people--our own and those of others; and develop a framework for anti-oppression practice with older people. Students discuss policy, practice, and research issues within the field of aging, and focus on structural inequalities in later life and the voices of older people. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 2060

 Introduction to Social Work Practice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore the history, philosophical foundation, and theoretical perspectives of the profession of social work, including a review of the relevant codes of ethics and practice standards that guide practitioners. This course provides an overview of the roles in which social workers become involved, for example, as advocates, policy analysts, administrators, activists, educators, counsellors, facilitators, mediators, organizers, and researchers. Social workers are committed to working for social justice; therefore, students examine the social structures that influence people's lives and how various sources and forms of oppression and marginalization impact the lives of people in Canadian society. Prerequisite: 2nd year standing

Campus
SOCW 3060

 Theory and Ideology of Social Work (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to social work theory and ideology, while they examine the links between social values, theory, and practice in social work. Various social work practice theories are introduced to build a foundation for critical social work practice. The social, political, and economic contexts of social work and social welfare are addressed. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 3760

 Family and Child Welfare Practice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students analyze family and child welfare systems and current British Columbia models of practice from anti-oppression, Aboriginal, and feminist perspectives. An introductory critique of the legal system is provided, and its relationship to practice with diverse populations is considered. Students also discuss the importance of understanding personal and professional values and ethics in a climate of constant change. Major emphasis is given to First Nations and Aboriginal child welfare due to the high rate of Aboriginal children in care. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 4560

 Decolonizing Practice 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course centres on the revival and renewal of indigenous philosophies as they relate to social work practice. Students apply their knowledge and skills to issues related to ceremony, family systems, art, language, and storytelling to reaffirm and revitalize indigenous ways of knowing and being in order to challenge oppression. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120

Campus
SOCW 4660

 Addictions and Social Work Practice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed to give students an introduction to substance misuse as well as compulsive and addictive behaviour. Major addiction theories are examined, and the role of social work is explored. Substance abuse and other addictive behaviours in relation to cultural minorities, youth, and older adults are examined. Students acquire knowledge of the local network of available services and resources. This course fosters a critical perspective on legal issues and government policy regarding addictive substances. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work students program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 4760

 Family and Child Welfare Policy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students critically examine family and child welfare policy and practice issues. The conceptual framework of this course includes an overview of ideological influences and stresses the importance of a gender, race, and class analysis of family and child welfare issues and practice in Canada. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 3070

 Models of Social Work Practice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students review and examine social work practice models such as humanist/existential, ecological, task-centred, behavioural, feminist, cognitive, and radical/structural. The seminar focuses on the integration of communication skills, practice experience, and theoretical knowledge. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, SOCW 3530, 3060 (grades of C or better), admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator. Corequisite: SOCW 3040
Corequisite: SOCW 3040

Campus
SOCW 3570

 Social Work, Law and Social Policy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides a basic introduction to legal issues and an examination of the social impact of legislation and policy. Students develop a beginning knowledge base in areas of law that are particularly relevant to social work practice. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator Note: Students will receive credit for only one of the following: SOCW 3570, CYCA 3570
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of the following: SOCW 3570, CYCA 3570

Campus
SOCW 4770

 Social Work Practice with Families (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore social work practice within contemporary families with diverse structures and backgrounds. Utilizing a variety of theoretical perspectives, including anti-oppression, feminist, and Aboriginal, students develop an understanding of families within a social, cultural, economic, and political context, and examine ethical and practice issues commonly encountered in social work practice with families. Through class discussion, assignments, and experiential exercises, students develop skills and integrate theory and practice. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060 and SOCW 2120 and admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 3580

 Legal Skills for Social Workers (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students explore theory and practice approaches to mediation, alternative dispute resolution, and advocacy. Through participation in role play, practice simulations, and a moot court experience, students develop skills in evidence-giving, investigation, and report-writing. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 4780

 Introduction to Disability Studies (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
Students examine perspectives on disability, race, gender, and class, as well as critically analyze current theories, policies, and practice. Students are introduced to issues affecting people with disabilities within a framework of human rights, citizenship, and inclusion. This course also engages students in an examination of their own beliefs and attitudes about disability, and emphasizes knowledge required for anti-ableist practice. Significant events and the contributions of pioneers in the disability rights movement are explored. The roles and perspectives of people with disabilities, their family members, and professionals are considered in relation to social work values, theory, policy, and practice. Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator

Campus
SOCW 3590

 Social Work Practice with Diverse Populations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course builds on established interview skills and practice with individuals. Students are introduced to work with diverse social and cultural groups including Aboriginal, Asian, and francophone peoples within British Columbia. Communication with Aboriginal people is a core emphasis in this course. Students develop a culturally sensitive approach in problem-solving situations while working with individuals. Theories of intervention are introduced, practiced, and critiqued by students. Prerequisite: SOCW 3530 or HUMS 3530

Campus
SOCW 2061

 Introduction to Social Work Practice

Credits: 3
This course introduces students to social work practice through an exploration of the history, philosophical foundation and theoretical perspectives of the profession of social work. This includes a review of the relevant codes of ethics and practice standards that guide practitioners and an overview of the roles in which social workers become involved. The course also examines the social structures influencing people's lives and how various sources and forms of oppression and marginalization impact the lives of people in Canadian society.
More information about this course.

Distance
SOCW 2121

 Social Welfare in Canada

Credits: 3
This course provides an overview of the income security system in Canada - its development, programs, and major policy debates. It is intended for those seeking an understanding of the many income security programs and policies, how they reflect ideologies, and how effectively they work (or fail to work) in practice. This course provides an overview of social welfare in Canada - its hisotrical foundations, developmental and program delivery system. The course will consider how social policy responds to populations in need.
More information about this course.

Distance
SOCW 3551

 Human Development

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the aspects and models of how human behaviour is acquired, maintained and modified in a social environment. A perspective of bio-psycho-social- spiritual human development is used as a knowledge base for practice with individuals, families and groups. Human development and behaviour is examined through the lens of various theoretical perspectives including Aboriginal, feminist and anti-oppressive approaches to practice. Prerequisites: None Exclusions: PSYC 2131 PSYC 3151 PSYC 3451 PSYC 3461 SOCW 3550 Note: This course is required for the TRU-OL Social Service Certificate Program.
Note: This course is required for the TRU-OL Social Service Certificate Program.
More information about this course.

Distance
SOSC 600

 Introduction to Social Sciences (6,0,0)

Credits: 4
This course provides an overview of the following disciplines of social science: Anthropology, Psychology, Political Science, Sociology and History. Prerequisite: ENGL 0500 or equivalent Note: This course is taught by the University Preparation Department
Note: This course is taught by the University Preparation Department

Campus
SPAN 1001

 Introduction to Spanish I

Credits: 3
This course is designed for students with little or no knowledge of the language to begin their study of Spanish at the university level. The course emphasizes a communicative approach to acquiring written and oral language skills. A variety of learning activities are included, with emphasis on a creative approach to generating authentic written and oral communication in Spanish. A combination of reading, writing, viewing, listening, and speaking enables students to acquire a basic knowledge of Spanish quickly and effectively. Students are also introduced to the diverse cultural contexts in which Spanish is spoken and emphasizes the cultural differences among Spain, Central America, and South America. Upon successful completion, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR A1 level of proficiency Prerequisites: None. Exclusions: Students who speak Spanish as their first language and/or students with credit for a Spanish 11 or higher course may not take this course for further credit. SPAN 1110
More information about this course.

Distance
SPAN 1011

 Introduction to Spanish II

Credits: 3
The course emphasizes a communicative approach to acquiring written and oral language skills. A variety of learning activities are included, with emphasis on a creative approach to generating authentic written and oral communication in Spanish. A combination of reading, writing, viewing, listening, and speaking enables students to acquire a basic knowledge of Spanish quickly and effectively. Students are also introduced to the diverse cultural contexts in which Spanish is spoken and emphasizes the cultural differences among Spain, Central America, and South America. Upon successful completion, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR A1+ level of proficiency. Prerequisites: SPAN 1001 or equivalent is recommended. Exclusions: Students who speak Spanish as their first language may not take this course for further credit. SPAN 1210 SPAN 1039
More information about this course.

Distance
SPAN 2500

 Spanish for Business 1 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course provides a basic foundation in Spanish vocabulary and discourse related to functional business areas. Students practice writing commercial documents in Spanish, while focusing on business topics, business vocabulary, and grammar points. Reading, writing, speaking, and listening tasks are completed in a business or commercial context. Students also concentrate on cross-cultural communication between Latin America, Spain, and North America. Prerequisite: SPAN 1210 or equivalent Required Lab: SPAN 2500L

Campus
SPAN 1110

 Introductory Spanish 1 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course allows beginners to develop cultural knowledge and communication skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in modern standard Spanish. Upon successful completion, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR A1 level of proficiency. Required Lab: SPAN 1110L Note: Students who have completed Spanish in Grade 11 or equivalent within the last two years may not take this course for credit unless approved by Modern Languages
Note: Students who have completed Spanish in Grade 11 or equivalent within the last two years may not take this course for credit unless approved by Modern Languages

Campus
SPAN 1210

 Introductory Spanish 2 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course builds upon skills acquired in SPAN 1110: Introductory Spanish 1. Upon successful completion, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR A1+ level of proficiency. Prerequisite: SPAN 1110 or equivalent Required Lab: SPAN 1210L Note: Students who have completed Spanish in Grade 11 or equivalent within the last two years may not take this course for credit unless approved by Modern Languages
Note: Students who have completed Spanish in Grade 11 or equivalent within the last two years may not take this course for credit unless approved by Modern Languages

Campus
SPAN 2110

 Intermediate Spanish 1 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
Students continue to develop their communication skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing, and explore language from a variety of different areas, registers, and periods. Upon successful completion, students are expected to demonstrate a low CEFR A2 level of proficiency. Prerequisite: SPAN 1210 or equivalent Required Lab: SPAN 2110L

Campus
SPAN 2210

 Intermediate Spanish 2 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
Students solidify their skills and extend their knowledge of the Spanish language while being introduced to increasingly advanced language structures. Upon successful completion, students are expected to demonstrate an intermediate CEFR A2 level of proficiency. Prerequisite: SPAN 2110 or equivalent Required Lab: SPAN 2210L

Campus
SPAN 2510

 Spanish for Business 2 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of SPAN 2500: Spanish for Business 1. This course provides a basic foundation in vocabulary and discourse related to functional business areas. Students practice writing commercial documents in Spanish, while focusing on business topics, business vocabulary, and grammar points. Reading, writing, speaking and listening exercises are completed in a business or commercial context. Students also concentrate on cross-cultural communication between Latin America, Spain, and North America. Prerequisite: SPAN 2500 or equivalent Required Lab: SPAN 2510L

Campus
SPAN 3010

 Studies in Hispanic Literature 1 (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course, conducted in Spanish, surveys representative works of literature from Spain and Spanish America from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Students examine the relation between literature and other disciplines, as they are presented with basic tools and techniques of research and criticism related to Hispanic literature. Prerequisite: SPAN 2110 and SPAN 2210 or equivalent

Campus
SPAN 3020

 Studies in Hispanic Literature 2 (4,0,0)

Credits: 3
Continuing from SPAN 3010: Studies in Hispanic Literature 1, this course, conducted in Spanish, is a survey of representative works of literature from Spain and Spanish America, from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Students examine the relationship between literature and other disciplines, as they are presented with basic tools and techniques of research and criticism related to Hispanic literature. Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or equivalent

Campus
SPAN 2150

 Oral Spanish 1 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course, conducted in Spanish, is designed to enhance oral communicative skills. Students review grammar and expand their vocabulary. A variety of activities are aimed at enabling the student to progress to a superior level of fluency. Upon successful completion, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR B1+ - B2 level of proficiency. Prerequisite: SPAN 2210 or equivalent. Native speakers of Spanish may not take this course for credit. Corequisite: Students are encouraged to take SPAN 2110/2210 and SPAN 2150/2250 concurrently Required Lab: SPAN 2150L
Corequisite: Students are encouraged to take SPAN 2110/2210 and SPAN 2150/2250 concurrently Required Lab: SPAN 2150L

Campus
SPAN 2250

 Oral Spanish 2 (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of SPAN 2150: Oral Spanish 1. Upon successful completion, students are expected to demonstrate a CEFR B2 level of proficiency. Prerequisite: SPAN 2150 or instructor's approval. Native speakers of Spanish may not take this course for credit. Corequisite: Students are encouraged to take SPAN 2110/2210 and SPAN 2150/2250 concurrently Required Lab: SPAN 2250L
Corequisite: Students are encouraged to take SPAN 2110/2210 and SPAN 2150/2250 concurrently Required Lab: SPAN 2250L

Campus
SPEE 1500

 Speech Communications (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This is a performance-oriented course designed to present students with a study of the oral communication process, and the presentational skills required in the preparation of effective oral communications.

Campus
SPEE 2500

 Professional Presentations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course presents the communication skills necessary to plan and conduct presentations effectively. A wide range of presentation skills are developed and practiced in the course, including introductions, advocacy, informational sessions, public readings, demonstration skills, and interviewing. Prerequisite: 3 credits of English, Communications or Journalism, or permission of the department chair

Campus
SRCL 1000

 Introduction to Community Service-Learning (2,1,3P)

Credits: 3
This course, intended for a wide variety of community-minded first year students, provides students with opportunities to connect their academic course work with service in community organizations in Kamloops. The primary focus of this course is the service experience of the students. Concurrent with this experience, students broaden their personal, cultural, academic and professional knowledge through topics such as workplace culture and career exploration. Students demonstrate their service-learning through reflective oral and written assignments. Prerequisite: Completion of ESAL Level 3 (65% or better) or by English placement test into ESAL Level 4

Campus
STAT 600

 Introductory Statistics (6,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course provides an introduction to statistics. Topics to be covered include data collection and descriptors, formats for displaying data sets, measures for central tendency and variation, probability, normal distribution, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: MATH 0510 or equivalent

Campus
STAT 1200

 Introduction to Statistics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3
This course is for non-science students who require an introduction to statistical reasoning. Topics include: descriptive statistics; correlation and regression; normal and binomial distributions; sample and experimental design; chi-square distribution; and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: Foundations of Math 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 or equivalent (BC graduates of 2013 onwards) or Principles of Math 11, or Applications of Math 12 or equivalent (BC graduates prior to 2013), or MATH 0510 or MATH 0523 or equivalent. MATH 1100 or MATH 1101 is recommended. Required Seminar: STAT 1200S Note: Students may normally receive credit for only one of the following: BIOL 3000, BUEC 2320, MATH 1200, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, SOCI 3710, STAT 1200, STAT 2000, STAT 1201
Note: Students may normally receive credit for only one of the following: BIOL 3000, BUEC 2320, MATH 1200, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, SOCI 3710, STAT 1200, STAT 2000, STAT 1201

Campus
STAT 2000

 Introduction to Statistics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3
This course is for science and forestry students who require an introduction to probability and statistical reasoning. Topics include: descriptive statistics; correlation and regression; probability; probability distributions; binomial and normal distributions; sample and experimental design, chi-square distribution, hypothesis testing, and analysis of variance. Applications in science and forestry are emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 1140 or equivalent first semester of calculus Required Seminar: STAT 2000S Note: Students may normally receive credit for only one of the following: BIOL 3000, BUEC 2320, MATH 1200, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, SOCI 3710, STAT 1200, STAT 2000, STAT 1201
Note: Students may normally receive credit for only one of the following: BIOL 3000, BUEC 2320, MATH 1200, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, SOCI 3710, STAT 1200, STAT 2000, STAT 1201

Campus
STAT 2410

 Applied Statistics (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course is designed for students who have already completed an introductory statistics course and desire exposure to further commonly-used statistical techniques. Topics include analysis of variance, multiple regression, goodness of fit, non-parametric methods, quality control, and decision theory. Prerequisite: STAT 2000 or MATH 1200 or equivalent Required Seminar: STAT 2410S

Campus
STAT 4310

 Introduction to Multivariate Analysis (3,0,1)

Credits: 3
Students analyze and interpret multivariate data in a number of different contexts. Topics include linear models, analysis of variance and covariance, multivariate analysis of variance, principle component analysis, and tree models. Students explore techniques for exploratory data analysis, model identification, and diagnostic checking. The course involves extensive use of software tools to apply the various analytical approaches. Prerequisite: STAT 2000 or BIOL 3000 Recommended: MATH 2120 OR MATH 3020 OR STAT 3060 OR STAT 4040

Campus
STAT 4040

 Analysis of Variance (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students discuss the analysis of variance for standard experimental designs. Topics include single factor designs, fixed and random effects, block designs, hierarchical designs, multiple comparisons, factorial designs, mixed models, general rules for analysis of balanced designs, and analysis of covariance. Co-Requisite: STAT 3060 Required Seminar: STAT 4040S

Campus
STAT 3050

 Introduction to Statistical Inference (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines the theory behind statistical inference. Topics include a review of probability theory, sampling distributions, and methods of estimation and hypothesis testing. Methods such as maximum likelihood estimation, bootstrapping, Bayesian methods, likelihood ratio testing, and confidence interval construction are emphasized. Prerequisite: STAT 2000 and MATH 3020

Campus
STAT 3060

 Applied Regression Analysis (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
This course concentrates on the applications rather than the theory of regression analysis. Topics include residual analysis, diagnostics, transformations, model selection and checking, weighted least squares and nonlinear models. Additional topics may include are inverse, robust, ridge and logistic regression. Prerequisite: MATH 2120, STAT 2000 Required Seminar: STAT 3060S

Campus
STAT 4980

 Directed Studies in Statistics

Credits: 3
Students undertake an investigation on a specific topic as agreed to by the faculty member and the student. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

Campus
STAT 3990

 ***Selected Topics in Statistics (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students consider, in depth, a selection of topics drawn from Statistics. The particular topics may vary each time the course is offered. Prerequisite: STAT 2000 and at least 3 credits of MATH or STAT at the 2000 level or higher, or permission of the instructor Required Seminar: STAT 3990S

Campus
STAT 4990

 ***Selected Topics in Statistics (3,1,0)

Credits: 3
Students consider, in depth, a selection of topics drawn from Statistics. The particular topics may vary each time the course is offered. Prerequisite: At least two of MATH 3020, MATH 3030, STAT 3050, STAT 3060 or permission of the instructor Required Seminar: STAT 4990S

Campus
STAT 1201

 Introduction to Probability and Statistics

Credits: 3
Students are introduced to the concepts and methods of statistics, including variability, randomness, and probability. A statistical software program is used to facilitate the analysis of data sets and the understanding of statistical concepts, and to carry out simulation of experiments. Many jobs or professions require that objective decisions be made based on statistical data; students are taught how to collect, analyze, and interpret data correctly. Students are also shown how to clearly and accurately present data to others. Prerequisites: Although this course does not involve complex mathematics, Principles of Math 11, or Applications of Math 12, or equivalent skills as established by assessment, are recommended as the minimum mathematical knowledge required. Students lacking the required mathematical background are advised to take a preparatory course before attempting this course. Basic computer literacy is recommended.
More information about this course.

Distance
STSS 500

 An Introduction to Student Success (6,0,0)

Credits: 4
This course is designed for University Preparation students to enhance their learning skills and to promote success in lifelong learning. The course is experiential in nature with practical applications, and includes small group activities designed to improve student success. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0400 or equivalent

Campus
STSS 1030

 Student Success and Study Skills (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
Students develop the study habits and academic skills necessary to succeed at university. Students are challenged with opportunities to master theory-based strategies and practical skills in time management, research, retention, reading for academic purposes, note-taking and test-taking. Prerequisite: English 11 with a C+ minimum, or equivalent

Campus
STSS 1040

 Student Success and Wellbeing (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
Students learn how to utilize available resources and strategies to help them maintain a healthy balance in their lives academically, physically, mentally, emotionally, and financially. Topics include nutrition, sleep, exercise, mental health, addiction, stress, sexual health, and money. Students adopt methods for maintaining a healthy balance in their lives at university. Prerequisite: English 11 with a C+ minimum, or equivalent

Campus
STSS 1050

 Student Success and Communication (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
Students are introduced to the skills required for effective interpersonal communication. Students discover their own communication styles and explore a variety of techniques that develop their speaking and listening skills. Topics include direct/indirect and verbal/non-verbal communication, emotional intelligence, conflict management, and diversity. Prerequisite: English 11 with a C+ minimum, or equivalent

Campus
STSS 1060

 Intercultural Perspectives (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
Students develop the intercultural capacity essential for engagement with the increasingly diverse communities within TRU and beyond. Through a number of interactive self-assessments, students evaluate their own personalities before building an understanding of different communication and learning models from a variety of cultures. Prerequisite: English 11 with a C+ minimum, or equivalent

Campus
STSS 1070

 Performing to Academic Standards (1,0,0)

Credits: 1
Students develop critical thinking and problem- solving skills, and information fluency. Students practice and improve fundamental skills in research and writing, and utilizing library resources, that are required in post-secondary education and beyond, and gain a solid understanding of academic integrity. Topics include the issues of plagiarism, responsible research and citation (e.g., integrating quotations, paraphrasing, style and format for referencing), and developing solid arguments. Prerequisite: English 11 with a minimum C+, or equivalent

Campus
SUST 1000

 Introduction to Sustainability (3,0,0)

Credits: 3
This course examines sustainability as a 'problem-driven' science studying the interaction between the human and environmental spheres. Students explore the economic, social, political and technological spheres of influence on how humans have impacted the natural resources and natural systems of this planet, and how all of these must be integrated in order to find solutions to the problems that have resulted from human activity. Course topics include sustainability theory and practice, population, ecosystems, climate change, energy, agriculture, water, environmental economics and policy, ethics and cultural history.

Campus