Bob Gaglardi School of Business and Economics

Course Descriptions

Applied Business Technology
ABTS 1100
Word Processing 1 (45 hours)

ABTS 1100 Word Processing 1 (45 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to apply the basic functions of a word processing program as well as the proper format of documents including letters and memoranda.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1130 and ABTS 1200
For more information, search for this course here.

ABTS 1110
Word Processing 2 (45 hours)

ABTS 1110 Word Processing 2 (45 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are provided additional instruction and practice with letter styles, tables, charts and reports. Advanced features of word processing software such as merge, macros, outlines, and graphics, and styles are also demonstrated and applied.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1100
For more information, search for this course here.

ABTS 1120
Desktop Publishing (40 hours)

ABTS 1120 Desktop Publishing (40 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study desktop publishing functions, including the elements of page design and organizational tools, and the planning, drafting, and production process. They learn to apply word processing and desktop publishing software, as well as integration elements, to produce publications such as letterheads, flyers, brochures, business forms, and newsletters.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1100
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ABTS 1140
Keyboarding 2 (35 hours)

ABTS 1140 Keyboarding 2 (35 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students further develop their keyboarding skills to reach a minimum speed of 50 net words per minute.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1130 or minimum of 25 nwpm
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ABTS 1200
Introduction to Computers (30 hours)

ABTS 1200 Introduction to Computers (30 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to manipulate the Windows environment, use Windows Accessories, and manage files and folders using the computer and Windows Explorer programs. They are also introduced to the Internet, including email basics and advanced features, web browser basics, web navigation, and web research.
Prerequisite: None.
For more information, search for this course here.

ABTS 1210
Spreadsheets 1 (25 hours)

ABTS 1210 Spreadsheets 1 (25 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a working knowledge of Microsoft Excel, by learning how to design, create, modify, and present professional-looking spreadsheets for use in today's workplace. Exercises include using formulas and built-in functions to solve mathematical problems, in addition to illustrating and presenting spreadsheet data in graphic form. Prerequisites: ABTS 1200
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ABTS 1220
Spreadsheets 2 (30 hours)

ABTS 1220 Spreadsheets 2 (30 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire a higher-level of proficiency by using Microsoft Excel to create electronic spreadsheets, for advanced applications in today's workplace. Exercises include using advanced functions and formulas, performing calculations, filtering and formatting data, and developing a custom Excel application.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1210
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ABTS 1230
Database (30 hours)

ABTS 1230 Database (30 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the Microsoft Access data management system, while they plan, design, and create a database to meet the information management needs of today's workplace. Terminology, database concepts, and features of relational databases are discussed and demonstrated as students use various commands and features to create tables, queries, forms, and reports. Students enter data, work with calculations, extract information, and generate and print reports.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1200
For more information, search for this course here.

ABTS 1240
Presentation Software (20 hours)

ABTS 1240 Presentation Software (20 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students apply appropriate design concepts to present data and information in a colourful and well-organized format using PowerPoint Presentation Software. They are instructed in using design templates, applying various attributes and including a variety of objects to create, modify, save, and deliver presentations.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1200
For more information, search for this course here.

ABTS 1250
Integrated Project (10 hours)

ABTS 1250 Integrated Project (10 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students extend their word processing, spreadsheet, database, desktop publishing, and presentation software knowledge in this capstone course by completing a variety of practical, integrated projects. Decision-making, prioritizing, and other administrative skills are also developed.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1110, ABTS 1120, ABTS 1220, ABTS 1230, ABTS 1240, ABTS 1310 and ABTS 1530
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ABTS 1260
Website Design and Maintenance (30 hours)

ABTS 1260 Website Design and Maintenance (30 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire the skills needed to complete routine website maintenance and updates. Using a hands-on, practical approach, learners manipulate hypertext markup language (HTML), tags, tables, images, graphics, hyperlinks, special formatting, and forms using text and web authoring programs.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1100
For more information, search for this course here.

ABTS 1300
Business English (65 hours)

ABTS 1300 Business English (65 hours)

Credits: 2 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students focus on the correct English usage in a business environment, and are provided a comprehensive review of grammar, punctuation, and style, as well as business spelling and vocabulary development. The course materials are presented in small, easily manageable learning segments.
Prerequisite: None.
For more information, search for this course here.

ABTS 1310
Business Communications (50 hours)

ABTS 1310 Business Communications (50 hours)

Credits: 2 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn how to plan, organize, and correctly write effective "reader friendly" business documents appropriate for use in today's global business environment. Students write business letters, memos, reports, and electronic messages.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1100 and ABTS 1300
For more information, search for this course here.

ABTS 1410
Computerized Accounting (69 hours)

ABTS 1410 Computerized Accounting (69 hours)

Credits: 2 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the integrated computerized accounting system using Simply Accounting for Windows. Upon completion, students are able to establish company records; maintain daily transactions using the general ledger, accounts payable, accounts receivable, inventory, and payroll features; and create financial statements.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1200 and ABTS 1430
Corequisite: ABTS 1440
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ABTS 1430
Accounting 1 (45 hours)

ABTS 1430 Accounting 1 (45 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to manual accounting, with an emphasis on fundamental accounting principles and their application in day-to-day business situations. This course is based on a service business organized as a sole proprietorship. Students practice basic bookkeeping and accounting skills including double-entry general journal entries, posting to the general ledger, preparing a trial balance, recording adjustments in a ten-column worksheet, producing period-end financial statements, closing the temporary accounts, maintaining petty cash, and preparing bank reconciliations.
Prerequisite: None.
For more information, search for this course here.

ABTS 1440
Accounting 2 (50 hours)

ABTS 1440 Accounting 2 (50 hours)

Credits: 2 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are exposed to common accounting systems including sales, purchases, federal and provincial taxes, merchandise inventory, payroll, and annual reporting of remittances. They also introduced to subsidiary ledgers, specialized journals, combined journals, year-end procedures and worksheets. Financial statements are prepared in detail, including a classified balance sheet and an income statement for a merchandising business.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1430
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ABTS 1450
Business Math and Calculators - Online Only (45 hours)

ABTS 1450 Business Math and Calculators - Online Only (45 hours)

Credits:
Delivery: Campus

Following current trends in office technology, students are instructed in the touch method of calculator use, and common calculator features. An emphasis is placed on business problem-solving.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1550
For more information, search for this course here.

ABTS 1500
Human Relations (30 hours)

ABTS 1500 Human Relations (30 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students concentrate on developing the personal and professional development skills required in today's workplace. These skills include self-examination and assessment, development of effective communication skills, interpersonal skills, client relations, teamwork, problem solving, and an understanding of business ethics.
Prerequisite: None.
For more information, search for this course here.

ABTS 1510
Job Search (20 hours)

ABTS 1510 Job Search (20 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are provided with techniques to develop successful job search strategies for today's competitive and changing job market. Topics include self-assessment, employability skill testing, job search strategies and research, using the Internet for job search and career planning, networking, resumes, employment-related communications, application forms, portfolios, and interviews.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1300, ABTS 1100
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ABTS 1520
Practicum (40 hours)

ABTS 1520 Practicum (40 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are provided with the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills to meet the expectations of an employer in a real work situation during a 2-week practicum. They observe and learn daily office routines, and assist the host employer by performing tasks as required.
Prerequisite: Completion of all other courses in the Administrative Assistance Certificate
For more information, search for this course here.

ABTS 1530
Administrative Procedures (40 hours)

ABTS 1530 Administrative Procedures (40 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students master essential organizational skills and develop efficient office practices in preparation for entry into the contemporary office. They acquire the ability to communicate effectively, think critically, apply problem-solving skills, and work effectively with other members of the office team. The rapid pace of change demands that office workers have the ability to develop new skills and understand new processes as jobs evolve.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1100 and ABTS 1300
For more information, search for this course here.

ABTS 1540
Records Management - Online Only (35 hours)

ABTS 1540 Records Management - Online Only (35 hours)

Credits:
Delivery: Campus

The amount of information created and used in an office environment has increased significantly in recent years. Records, which contain all of the daily information necessary to the operation of any business, need to be managed effectively and efficiently. Today, maintaining the integrity of the records system means that all office workers need to be aware of the importance of correct creation, storage, use, retrieval, protection, control, and disposition of records. Technology continues to change the role played by today's office worker. This course provides students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to face these challenges and new responsibilities in dealing with both manual and electronic files.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1550 and ABTS 1100
For more information, search for this course here.

ABTS 1550
Online Learner Success - Online Only (15 hours)

ABTS 1550 Online Learner Success - Online Only (15 hours)

Credits:
Delivery: Campus

Online Learner Success (OLS) provides online learners with a working knowledge of the program called Desire 2 Learn (D2L). Assignments or activities in the course have been designed to demonstrate the use of various tools in the D2L program.
Prerequisite: None.
For more information, search for this course here.

Accounting
ACCT 1000
Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 1000 Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a basic understanding of financial accounting, which involves recording a variety of financial transactions for an organization and then preparing and evaluating its financial statements. Topics include financial statements; accounting events and journal entries; accounting adjustments; internal controls and cash; accounts receivable; inventory purchases and sales; inventory costing methods; long-term assets, liabilities; shareholders' equity; statement of cash flows; and financial statement analysis.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Diploma in Horticulture and Management, Tourism programs, Adventure Studies programs
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 1000, ACCT 1211, ACCT 1221, ACCT 2210, ACCT 2211, ACCT 1030, ACCT 1210, ACCT 1220, BBUS 2210 or BBUS 2211
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 2210
Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2210 Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to prepare and analyze the financial statements of a public corporation. Topics include the conceptual framework; accounting standards; the accounting cycle; financial statements; internal control, cash and bank reconciliations; short-term investments and receivables; inventory; long-term assets including intangibles; liabilities including bonds payable; shareholders' equity, dividends, and share repurchases; comprehensive income and the statement of shareholders' equity; statement of cash flows; and financial statement analysis.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12/ English First Peoples 12 with a minimum of 73% or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 1000, ACCT 1030, ACCT 1210/1220, ACCT 1211/1221, ACCT 2211, BBUS 2210 or BBUS 2211
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 2250
Management Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2250 Management Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to collect, analyze, and communicate quantitative and non-quantitative information to assist management in making more effective planning and control decisions. Topics include the role of managerial accounting; basic cost management concepts; job, process, hybrid and activity-based costing; cost behaviour and estimation; cost-volume-profit analysis; profit planning and activity-based budgeting; standard costing, flexible budgeting and variance analysis; cost management tools including the balanced scorecard, benchmarking and reengineering; and relevant costs for decision making such as make or buy, special orders, joint products and outsourcing.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2210 or equivalent (minimum C- grade); ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1110 or ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1140 or ENGL 1210 or equivalent (minimum C- grade)
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 2280
Accounting Software Systems (3,0,0)

ACCT 2280 Accounting Software Systems (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to maintain the financial records of a small business using Sage 50 accounting and business management software. It enables detailed tracking, reporting and analysis of business transactions. Topics include general ledger; accounts payable; accounts receivable; payables and receivables setup; payroll journal and setup; inventory transactions; orders, quotes and deposits; currency and remittances; reconciliations and deposits; and comprehensive setup.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2210 (minimum C-); ENGL 1100, ENGL 1110, ENGL 1120, ENGL 1140 or ENGL 1210 (minimum C-); or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 2280, ACCT 2281, ACCT 1920 or ACCT 1921
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 3200
Intermediate Financial Accounting 1 (3,0,0)

ACCT 3200 Intermediate Financial Accounting 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to prepare the income statement, statement of retained earnings, and asset side of the statement of financial position. Topics include the Canadian reporting environment; the conceptual framework; the income statement including irregular items and comprehensive income; overview of the statement of financial position and statement of cash flows; revenue recognition; cash and receivables; inventory; long-term and short-term investments; property plant and equipment including depreciation, impairment, and disposition; and intangible assets including impairment and goodwill. Instruction is based on International Financial Reporting Standards. Prerequisites: ACCT 1000 minimum B- or ACCT 1211 minimum B- and ACCT 1221 minimum B- or ACCT 2210 or equivalent with a minimum B- CMNS 1290 or equivalent minimum C- Exclusions: ACCT 3201, BBUS 3200, BBUS 3201
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 3210
Intermediate Financial Accounting 2 (3,0,0)

ACCT 3210 Intermediate Financial Accounting 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on ACCT 3200: Intermediate Financial Accounting 1, students learn to prepare the current liabilities, long-term liabilities, and shareholders' equity sections of the statement of financial position and the cash flow statement. Topics include current liabilities and contingencies; long-term liabilities; advanced shareholders' equity; complex financial instruments and earnings per share; income taxes; pensions and other employee future benefits; leases; accounting changes and error analysis; statement of cash flows; and other measurement and disclosure issues. Instruction is based on International Financial Reporting Standards.
Prerequisite: ACCT 3200 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3210, ACCT 3211, BBUS 3210 or BBUS 3211
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 3220
Income Taxation 1 (3,0,0)

ACCT 3220 Income Taxation 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the conceptual structure of the Income Tax Act and the application of its rules to practical situations. Topics include an introduction to federal taxation; procedures and administration; income or loss from office, employment, business, or property; capital cost allowances and cumulative eligible capital; capital gains and losses; other income and deductions; and calculation of taxable income and tax payable for individuals.
Prerequisite: ACCT 1000 (minimum B-) or ACCT 1211 (minimum B-) and ACCT 1221 (minimum B-) or ACCT 2210 (minimum B-) and CMNS 1290 (minimum C-); or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3220, ACCT 3221, ACCT 3260, BBUS 3220, BBUS 3221 or BBUS 3260
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 3230
Income Taxation 2 (3,0,0)

ACCT 3230 Income Taxation 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on on ACCT 3220: Income Taxation 1, students examine the taxation of corporations, corporate distributions, and transactions between corporations and their shareholders. Topics include an in-depth coverage of taxable capital gains; deferred income plans; and the taxation of corporate entities, partnerships, trusts and corporate reorganizations.
Prerequisite: ACCT 3220 or ACCT 3260 or equivalent (minimum C-)
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3230, ACCT 3231, BBUS 3230, or BBUS 3231
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 3250
Intermediate Management Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 3250 Intermediate Management Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on ACCT 2250: Management Accounting, students further develop their ability to use quantitative and non-quantitative information to make effective planning and control decisions. Topics include an in-depth study of the balanced scorecard and profitability analysis; interdepartmental cost allocation; cost allocation for joint products and byproducts; revenue and customer profitability analysis; process costing including spoilage, rework and scrap; cost management and the theory of constraints; capital budgeting; and transfer pricing and multinational management control systems.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2250 (minimum B-) and CMNS 1290 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3250, ACCT 3251, BBUS 3250 or BBUS 3251
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 3260
Taxation for Decision Making (3,0,0)

ACCT 3260 Taxation for Decision Making (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students analyze the general structure of the Canadian income taxation system and its effect on business decision making and financial planning. This course adopts a decision approach to taxation and focuses on the needs of non-accountants. Topics include an introduction to federal taxation; procedures and administration; income or loss from office, employment, business, and property; capital cost allowances; capital gains and losses; other income and deductions; and calculation of taxable income and tax payable for individuals.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2210 (minimum C-); CMNS 1290 (minimum C-); or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3260, ACCT 3220, ACCT 3221, BBUS 3260, BBUS 3220 or BBUS 3221
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 4200
Advanced Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 4200 Advanced Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine a number of complex issues in advanced financial reporting. Topics include financial accounting standards, temporary and long-term investments in both debt and equity securities, investments with significant influence, an in-depth study of business combinations, joint ventures, foreign currency transactions, fair value and cash flow hedges, consolidation of foreign operations, not-for-profit organizations, and public sector reporting objectives and issues. Prerequisites: ACCT 3210 or ACCT 3211 with a minimum of C-
Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of ACCT 4200, ACCT 4201
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 4230
Assurance (3,0,0)

ACCT 4230 Assurance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students will learn to gather and evaluate audit evidence related to company financial statements. The goal is to provide assurance that the financial statements fairly present the financial performance and position of the organization being audited. Risk assessment techniques available to auditors and possible responses to those risks will be examined. Topics include an introduction to auditing and the public accounting profession; the audit process; professional relationships and legal liability; materiality and risk; audit evidence, evidence mix and audit strategy; the audit of internal controls, control risk and corporate governance; audit sampling; application of the audit process and auditor reporting.
Prerequisite: ACCT 3210 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 4230, ACCT 4231, BBUS 4230 or BBUS 4231
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 4250
Performance Management (3,0,0)

ACCT 4250 Performance Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on ACCT 3250 Intermediate Management Accounting, students examine how effective corporate governance, strategic planning and development, risk management systems, analysis and provision of performance information, along with a variety of management techniques and monitoring tools are used to optimize a firm's performance. Topics include governance structure, strategic planning process, risk management, management information systems, methods for improving operating efficiency and effectiveness, quality management, change management, and performance monitoring tools.
Prerequisite: ACCT 3250 or equivalent with a minimum C-
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of ACCT 4250, ACCT 4251, BBUS 4250, or BBUS 4251
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 4270
Accounting Information Systems (3,0,0)

ACCT 4270 Accounting Information Systems (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine information systems and their applications in accounting. Topics include: an overview of accounting information systems; transaction processing; enterprise resource planning systems; system documentation techniques; relational databases and data integrity; designing systems to prevent fraud, attacks and abuse; accounting information system controls; privacy and confidentiality controls; processing integrity and availability controls; auditing accounting information systems; and accounting information systems applications.
Prerequisite: MIST 2610 or equivalent with a minimum C-
Corequisite: ACCT 4230 or equivalent with a minimum C-
Note: Students cannot get credit for both ACCT 4270 and MIST 4610
For more information, search for this course here.

Biology
ABTS 1550
Online Learner Success - Online Only (15 hours)

ABTS 1550 Online Learner Success - Online Only (15 hours)

Credits:
Delivery: Campus

Online Learner Success (OLS) provides online learners with a working knowledge of the program called Desire 2 Learn (D2L). Assignments or activities in the course have been designed to demonstrate the use of various tools in the D2L program.
Prerequisite: None.
For more information, search for this course here.

Business Law
BLAW 2910
Commercial Law (3,0,0)

BLAW 2910 Commercial Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the legal environment in which businesses operate and how common law and different provincial and federal government statutes influence decision-making. Topics include origins of Canadian law; resolving disputes and navigating the court system; tort law; contract law; sales of goods and consumer protection; methods of carrying on business; workplace law; property law; and creditor law.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
For more information, search for this course here.

BLAW 3910
Real Estate Law (3,0,0)

BLAW 3910 Real Estate Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students investigate the legal principles and law relating to acquiring property rights in and developing legal interests in land. Case law and statutes are studied in depth to reinforce an understanding of legal concepts. Topics include Canada's legal system and the real estate industry; estates and interests in land; contract law relating to land; land registration and land title procedure; land ownership and tort liability; real property transactions and agency law; mortgage law; commercial and residential tenancies; condominium law; and legal and ethical standards for real estate professionals.
Prerequisite: BLAW 2910 with a minimum C- or TMGT 2250 with a minimum C- or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

BLAW 3920
Employment Law (3,0,0)

BLAW 3920 Employment Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students investigate the legal principles and law relating to the individual employer-employee relationship and how its influences business decision-making. Topics include an overview of the legal framework; common law issues in employment; the unionized workplace; Canada Labour Code; the employment contract; employment standards legislation; human rights in the workplace; occupational health and safety; workers compensation; workplace privacy; navigating the employment relationship; resignation and retirement; dismissal with cause; dismissal without cause; and post-employment obligations.
Prerequisite: BLAW 2910 with a minimum C- or TMGT 2250 with a minimum C- or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BLAW 3920, BLAW 3921 or BBUS 3920
For more information, search for this course here.

Business
BUSN 3980
Business Research Methodology (0,3,0)

BUSN 3980 Business Research Methodology (0,3,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to identify and formulate a research question, select and apply appropriate quantitative and qualitative research methods, and present research findings. A strong focus is placed on ethical issues relevant for research in the business and economics disciplines. Topics include an introduction to research methodology; defining the problem statement; critical literature review; theoretical framework and hypothesis development; elements of research design; data collection methods; experimental designs; experimental designs; measurement of variables; sampling; research reports; research ethics; and a review of quantitative data analysis.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290; ECON 2330 or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for BUSN 3980 and BBUS 3980
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 3990
***Selected Topics in Business Administration (3,0,0)

BUSN 3990 ***Selected Topics in Business Administration (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

The subject matter in this course will vary from semester to semester depending upon the interests of students and faculty. Courses are taught by visiting professors to instill their unique perspectives or regular faculty to address emerging topics in a discipline, share research or teaching interests, or test potential new courses.
Prerequisite: Permission of the program advisor
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both BUSN 3990 and BBUS 3990
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 4960
Directed Studies in Business Administration

BUSN 4960 Directed Studies in Business Administration

Credits: 6 credits
Delivery: Campus

Individuals or groups of students engage in independent study, research, or practice related to a topic in business administration under faculty supervision. The supervisor(s) determines the appropriate curriculum, evaluation methods, and credit assignment in consultation with students and subject to the approval of the department chairperson(s) and dean.
Prerequisite: Permission of the program advisor
Note: Students cannot receive credit for BUSN 4960 and BBUS 4960
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 4980
Honours Thesis (0,3,0)(0,3,0)

BUSN 4980 Honours Thesis (0,3,0)(0,3,0)

Credits: 6 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students in the Honours Option-Thesis Route in the Bachelor of Business Administration degree prepare and defend a thesis in accordance with the policies established by the School of Business and Economics. The thesis is completed under the supervision of a faculty member and is evaluated by their thesis supervisor and a second reader.
Prerequisite: BUSN 3980 (minimum C-) or equivalent; permission of the program advisor
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BUSN 4980 or BBUS 4980
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 4990
***Selected Topics in Business Administration (3,0,0)

BUSN 4990 ***Selected Topics in Business Administration (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

The subject matter in this course varies from semester to semester depending upon the interests of students and faculty. Courses are taught by visiting professors to instill their unique perspectives or regular faculty to address emerging topics in a discipline, share research or teaching interests, or test potential new courses.
Prerequisite: Permission of the program advisor
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both BUSN 4990 and BBUS 4990
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 5010
Managerial Statistics (3,0,0)

BUSN 5010 Managerial Statistics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the statistical methods and tools required for decision making in today's business environment. Topics include descriptive statistics and numerical measures, statistical inferences with two populations, hypothesis tests and nonparametric methods, analysis of variance, simple regression models, multiple regression models, regression and the model building process, regression models with categorical dependent variables and applied models with categorical dependent variables.
Prerequisite: Admission to the GDBA or MBA or approval of degree committee
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 5010, BUSN 5011 and GBUS 5010
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 5020
Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

BUSN 5020 Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to understand financial statements. They analyze the many accounting policy choices available to companies, and the consequences of these choices for users. Topics include recording basic financial transactions, financial statement preparation, adjusting entries, accounting for receivables and inventories, depreciation and sale of capital assets, bonds and long-term debt, equity transactions, the cash flow statement, revenue and expense recognition, and leases and pensions.
Prerequisite: Admission to GDBA or MBA or approval of degree committee
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 5020, BUSN 5021 or GBUS 5000
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 5030
Management Accounting (3,0,0)

BUSN 5030 Management Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the three functions managers must perform within their organizations: planning operations, controlling activities and making decisions. To perform these functions efficiently, managers must collect and interpret appropriate information based on the firm ́s long-term strategy and annual objectives. Topics include an introduction to management accounting; costs and cost behaviours; job or project costing; activity-based costing; cost behaviour and the contribution margin; cost, volume, profit analysis; budgeting; budget variances and performance evaluation; performance measures and the balance scorecard; and short-term decision analysis.
Prerequisite: BUSN 5020 or equivalent
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 5030, BUSN 5031 or GBUS 5030
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 5040
Economics for Managers (3,0,0)

BUSN 5040 Economics for Managers (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Student develop an understanding of the fundamental tools of economic analysis that are essential for understanding managerial decision-making. Microeconomic topics include demand and supply, elasticities, production and cost analysis in the short-run and long-run, market structures and pricing strategies. Macroeconomic topics include an examination of indicators, such as GDP, economic growth, interest rates, unemployment rates, and inflation, and an overview of fiscal and monetary policies.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Certificate in Business Administration
Corequisite: None
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 5040, BUSN 5041 or GBUS 5050
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 5050
Marketing Management (3,0,0)

BUSN 5050 Marketing Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the key principles and concepts of marketing in a variety of contexts including nonprofit, international, services, and environmental issues. Topics include marketing strategy, marketing research, customer relationship management, market segmentation, branding, pricing strategies, channels of distribution, integrated marketing communications, and international marketing.
Prerequisite: Admission to GDBA or MBA or approval of degree committee
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 5050, BUSN 5051 or GBUS 5100
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 5060
Human Resource Management (3,0,0)

BUSN 5060 Human Resource Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire the knowledge and skills required to effectively design and manage a human resource management system. Human resource management systems that are aligned with strategic objectives and more capable of attracting, deploying, developing and retaining human capital are key contributors to organizational competitiveness and success. Topics include the strategic role of human resource management; the legal environment; designing and analyzing jobs; planning and recruitment; selection; orientation and training; performance appraisal; compensation; employee benefits and services; occupational health and safety; effective employee relations; and labour relations, collective bargaining, and contract administration.
Prerequisite: Admission to GDBA or MBA or approval of degree committee
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 5060, BUSN 5061 or GBUS 5140
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 6010
Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility (3,0,0)

BUSN 6010 Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students become more effective decision makers by examining the meaning and role of ethics in the business environment, and the social responsibility of business organizations. Topics include an introduction business ethics; framing business ethics in terms of corporate social responsibility, stakeholders and citizenship; evaluating business ethics using normative ethical theories; making decisions in business ethics using descriptive ethical theories; tools and techniques of business ethics management; business ethics and shareholders, employees, consumers, suppliers, competitors, civil society, government and regulation; the future of business ethics.
Prerequisite: Admission to MBA or approval of degree committee
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 6010, BUSN 6011 or GBUS 5150
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 6020
Corporate Finance (3,0,0)

BUSN 6020 Corporate Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the knowledge and skills required to effectively manage a firm's operating and fixed assets, and to fund those assets with an optimal mix of short-term and long-term debt and equity financing. Topics include time value of money; goals of the firm, corporate governance and executive compensation; financial statement analysis; quality of earnings; maturity matching; short-term financial planning; capital budgeting; risk and return and stock valuation; bond valuation and interest rates; cost of capital; capital structure; and dividend policy. Prerequisites: BUSN 5010 AND BUSN 5030 AND BUSN 5040 or equivalent
Exclusion: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BUSN 6020, BUSN 6021 or GBUS 5110
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 6030
International Business (3,0,0)

BUSN 6030 International Business (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the basic concepts of international business and competition from a manager's perspective. Topics include country differences in political economy, the cultural environment, ethics in international business, international trade theories, the political economy of international trade, foreign direct investment, regional economic integration, the foreign exchange market, the global monetary system, global strategy, global marketing and research and development, and global human resource management.
Prerequisite: BUSN 5040 and BUSN 5050 or equivalent
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 6030, BUSN 6031 or GBUS 5120
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 6040
Leadership and Organizational Development (3,0,0)

BUSN 6040 Leadership and Organizational Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students adopt a systematic understanding of the characteristics of a successful leader and what is required by leaders to attune and align organizations to the ever-changing global business environment. Topics include new realities as a force for change; the prime task of leadership - identifying new realties; critical systems thinking; philosophies, theories, and styles of leadership; the systematic leadership approach; authority, obedience, and power; authority, power, leadership, and group dynamics; organizational behavior, group dynamics, and change; the shadow side of leadership; leadership and ethics; systematic leadership and strategy; and 'the leader in you'.
Prerequisite: BUSN 5060 or equivalent
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 6040, BUSN 6041 of GBUS 5150
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 6050
Supply Chain Management (3,0,0)

BUSN 6050 Supply Chain Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire the knowledge and basic skills to effectively design a supply chain for an organization. Topics include an introduction to supply chain, the importance of information technology, supply chain slacks, demand management, supply management, inventory management, production management, transportation management, location analysis, sourcing decisions, supply chain strategy, and an overview of special types of supply chains such as green and humanitarian aid supply chains.
Prerequisite: BUSN 5010 and BUSN 5030 or equivalent
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 6050, BUSN 6051 or GBUS 5130
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 6060
Strategic Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

BUSN 6060 Strategic Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the ability of information technology to enhance the quality and efficiency of decision making by improving the various elements of the decision-making process and making data collection more cost effective. They also discover what every manager needs to know to leverage information systems for the design and implementation of business models in an organization. Topics include: introduction to information systems, organizational strategy and competitive advantage; overview of hardware and software; managing data, information and knowledge; computer networks; information systems in support of business operations; decision support systems and business intelligence; information systems for strategic advantage enterprise resource planning; World Wide Web, E-commerce and mobile commerce; management information systems development and acquisition; cybercrime, information security and controls; and ethics and privacy.
Prerequisite: Admission to MBA or approval of degree committee
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 6060, BUSN 6061 or GBUS 5300
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 6070
Project Management and Consulting Methods (3,0,0)

BUSN 6070 Project Management and Consulting Methods (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the concepts and practical techniques to apply consulting methods in their work and to participate in, or manage, complex projects. Topics include the five stages of the consulting process (entry and contracting, discovery and dialogue, analysis and the decision to act, engagement and implementation, and closing); analysis and presentation techniques; and an examination of the five major project process groups (project initiation, planning, execution, controlling, and closing).
Prerequisite: BUSN 6040 or equivalent
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 6070, BUSN 6071 or GBUS 5210
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 6080
Strategic Management (4,0,0)

BUSN 6080 Strategic Management (4,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the role of senior management in developing and implementing corporate strategy in a global context. They learn to analyze the firm's external and internal environment to identify and create competitive advantage, as well as to formulate, implement, and evaluate cross-functional decisions that directly affect the ability of an organization to achieve its stated objectives. Topics include an introduction to strategic management, measures of firm performance, analysis of the external and internal environments, business-level and corporate-level strategy, acquisition and restructuring strategies, international strategies, corporate governance, organizational structures and controls, strategic leadership, and corporate social responsibility and ethics.
Prerequisite: BUSN 6010, BUSN 6020, BUSN 6030, BUSN 6040 and BUSN 6050 or equivalent
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 6080, BUSN 6081 or GBUS 5200
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 6150
Advanced Marketing Management (3,0,0)

BUSN 6150 Advanced Marketing Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire the knowledge and skills required to develop, implement, and control successful marketing strategies. Topics include the art of case analysis; consumer behavior; marketing research and competitive analysis; marketing segmentation and position; market entry and pricing; retail selling, private labels, and channels of distribution; marketing communications; Internet marketing; corporate social responsibility and nonprofit marketing; sales management; and international marketing.
Prerequisite: BUSN 5050 or equivalent
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 6150, BUSN 6151 or GBUS 5600
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 6210
Advanced Corporate Finance (3,0,0)

BUSN 6210 Advanced Corporate Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on BUSN 6020: Corporate Finance, students continue to develop their knowledge and skills in corporate finance. Topics include long-term financial planning; sources of long-term financing; working capital management; sources of short-term financing; international corporate finance; risk management; business valuation; mergers and acquisitions; corporate restructuring; bankruptcy, reorganization, and liquidation; and economic value added.
Prerequisite: BUSN 6020 or equivalent
Note: Students may only receive credit for BUSN 6210, BUSN 6211 or GBUS 5400
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 6250
Decision Analysis and Modelling (3,0,0)

BUSN 6250 Decision Analysis and Modelling (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to integrate personal judgment and intuition in realistic business situations with the most widely applicable methodologies of decision and risk analysis, probability and statistics, competitive analysis, and management science. Topics include an introduction to decision analysis and modelling; spreadsheet engineering and error reduction; framing decision analysis problems; framework for analyzing risk; data analysis; resource allocation with optimization models; multi-period deterministic models; multi-factor deterministic models; regression modelling; strategic interactive decisions; and interpreting models, data, and decisions.
Prerequisite: BUSN 5010 and BUSN 5030 or equivalent
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 6250 or BUSN 6251
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 6310
Innovation and Entrepreneurship (3,0,0)

BUSN 6310 Innovation and Entrepreneurship (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire the knowledge and skills required to manage the development of innovations, to recognize and evaluate potential opportunities to monetize these innovations, to plan specific and detailed methods to exploit opportunities, and to acquire the resources necessary to implement plans. Topics include entrepreneurial thinking, innovation management, opportunity spotting and evaluation, industry and market research, business strategy, business models and business plans, financial forecasting and entrepreneurial finance, pitching to resource providers and negotiating deals, and launching new ventures.
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 6310, BUSN 6311 or GBUS 5210
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 6910
Selected Topics in Business Administration (3,0,0)

BUSN 6910 Selected Topics in Business Administration (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students will focus on specific topics within the field of business administration not covered by regularly scheduled, required courses in the program. Course content will vary depending on the interests of faculty and students.
Prerequisite: Approval of degree committee
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 6950
Research Methods, Preparation, and Presentation (3,0,0)

BUSN 6950 Research Methods, Preparation, and Presentation (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students receive an overview of the scientific method, research preparation, and the styles of communication used to disseminate research at the graduate level. Topics include the role of business research, theory and the business research process, organization structure and ethical issues, defining a research problem, qualitative research tools, survey research, observation methods and experimental research, measurement and scaling concepts, sampling and sample size, working with data, quantitative statistical analysis, and writing a research report.
Prerequisite: BUSN 5010 or equivalent
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 6950 or BUSN 6951
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 6960
Graduate Thesis

BUSN 6960 Graduate Thesis

Credits: 12 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students in the Graduate Thesis Option in the Master of Business Administration degree program prepare and defend a thesis in accordance with the policies established by the Research, Innovation, and Graduate Studies Office. The thesis is completed under the supervision of a faculty member and a thesis supervisory committee and evaluated by a thesis defence/examining committee.
Prerequisite: BUSN 6950 or equivalent
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 6960 or BUSN 6961
For more information, search for this course here.

BUSN 6970
Graduate Project

BUSN 6970 Graduate Project

Credits: 9 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students in the Graduate Project Option in the Master of Business Administration degree program prepare and defend a report that addresses a particular management issue or problem. The report is completed under the direction of a faculty member and evaluated by a project defence committee.
Prerequisite: BUSN 6950 or equivalent
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BUSN 6970 or BUSN 6971
For more information, search for this course here.

Communications
CMNS 1290
Introduction to Professional Writing (3,0,0)

CMNS 1290 Introduction to Professional Writing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study the theories and practice of professional organizational communication, learning the importance of effective communication to meeting goals, developing and maintaining relationships and the overall facilitation of work. Students develop skills in evaluating communication scenarios, designing communication strategies that meet goals and audience need, including requests, information sharing and persuasion. In addition, students learn to employ writing techniques and editorial skills relevant to professional communication contexts.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of CMNS 1290, CMNS 1291, CMNS 1810, CMNS 1811
For more information, search for this course here.

CMNS 3240
Advanced Professional Communication (1,2,0)

CMNS 3240 Advanced Professional Communication (1,2,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop best practice skills in advanced professional writing with an emphasis on the design and production of strategic and planning-level communication documents, including a formal report, with added emphasis on online communication contexts, including multimedia production and social media. In addition, students consider and develop multi-phased communication strategies, learn advanced research skills and consider techniques for effective collaboration. Prerequisites: CMNS 1290 OR CMNS 1291 AND Completion of 42 credits
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of CMNS 3240, BBUS 3631 AND CMNS 3241
For more information, search for this course here.

Computing Science
COMP 1020
Introduction to Spreadsheets (0,1,0)

COMP 1020 Introduction to Spreadsheets (0,1,0)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course provides students with an introduction to spreadsheets using Excel. Students develop the spreadsheet skills they need for other courses, and ultimately the modern workplace.
Prerequisite: None, although experience with computer use and typing skills would be beneficial
For more information, search for this course here.

Economics
ECON 1220
Introduction to Basic Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 1220 Introduction to Basic Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a basic understanding of economic principles, which allows for and encourages informed discussion of media-covered issues. Topics include contrasting macroeconomics and microeconomics; gross domestic product; economic growth and business cycles; unemployment and inflation; aggregate supply and demand; scarcity, opportunity costs, globalization and trade; law of supply and demand; accounting versus economic profits; money and exchange rates; government choices, markets, efficiency, and equity; monopoly and competition; externalities, public goods, and free riders.
Note: Students will not receive credit for ECON 1220 unless it has been completed prior to earning a grade of C- or better in either ECON 1900 or ECON 1950. Students will receive credit for one of ECON 1220 and ECON 1221.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 1900
Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1900 Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the interactions between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include a definition of economics; demand and supply analysis; consumer theory; production and cost; market structure including perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly; market efficiency and market failure; resource markets; and international trade.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B OR MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 1900 and ECON 1901
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 1950
Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1950 Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine economic behavour at the aggregate level, and the measurement and determination of national income. Topics include an introduction to economics; measuring macroeconomic variables including gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation; the Keynesian model; aggregate demand and supply; money and banking; the money market; fiscal policy; monetary policy and the central bank; exchange rates and the balance of payments; and economic growth.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B or MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended.
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of ECON 1950 and ECON 1951.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2320
Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2320 Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to statistics with an emphasis on its applications in business and economics. Topics include descriptive statistics and numerical measures; an introduction to probability; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling and sampling distributions; interval estimations; and testing hypotheses and statistical inferences.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950
Note:Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MATH 1200, STAT 1200, STAT 2000, ECON 2320, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, BIOL 3000, and SOCI 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2330
Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

ECON 2330 Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study advanced statistical techniques and methods and their applications in business and economics. Topics include inferences about population variance, including hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; analysis of variance and experimental designs; simple and multiple regressions; time series analysis and forecasting; statistical quality control; and decision analysis. Students are required to apply statistical techniques using Excel and/or Minitab.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950; ECON 2320 or equivalent; MIST 2610
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ECON 2330, ECON 3330, STAT 2410, and STAT 3060
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2430
Global and Canadian Economic Issues (3,0,0)

ECON 2430 Global and Canadian Economic Issues (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine a variety of economic issues facing the Canadian and world economies. The topics discussed each semester vary and may include economic crisis, environmental challenges, 'big' business and multinational corporations, globalization, free trade, health care, education, poverty, and the economics of crime.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or both ECON 1900 and ECON 1950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2630
Topics in Indigenous Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 2630 Topics in Indigenous Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students investigate topics related to Indigenous self-governance and economic development in Canada, New Zealand, United States and Australia. Topics include the economic rationale for implementing Indigenous government and jurisdiction ; the economic explanation for income differences for Indigenous groups and; the emerging Indigenous public sector; market failures and successes of First Nations & Indigenous communities; approaches to First Nations & Indigenous economic development; and Indigenous and other policy initiatives to improve Indigenous economies; and design Indigenous governments to support sustainable economies.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 2630 and ECON 2631
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2900
Intermediate Microeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2900 Intermediate Microeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine at a more advanced level how individuals and firms interact in various types of markets. Topics include consumer and producer behaviour; partial equilibrium analysis for perfectly competitive markets; and aspects of monopoly and imperfectly competitive markets. This course prepares students for advanced courses in economics.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900 or ECON 1901 and MATH 1170
Note: Students cannot credit for more than one of ECON 2900, BUEC 2040, BUEC 2041
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2950
Intermediate Macroeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2950 Intermediate Macroeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students complete an advanced, in-depth examination of economic behaviour at the aggregate level. Topics include the determination and distribution of output in the long run; the classical dichotomy and neutrality of money; the measurement, problems, and determinants of unemployment and inflation in the long run; and the role of capital accumulation, population growth, and technology in growth theory.
Prerequisite: ECON 1950 or ECON 1951
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2990
***Selected Topics in Economics (3,1,0) or (6,2,0)

ECON 2990 ***Selected Topics in Economics (3,1,0) or (6,2,0)

Credits: 3 or 6 credits
Delivery: Campus

The subject matter in this course varies from semester to semester depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Courses are taught by visiting professors to instill their unique perspectives or by regular faculty to address emerging topics in a discipline, share research or teaching interests, or test potential new courses.
Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Advisor
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3040
Managerial Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3040 Managerial Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students focus on the application of economic models and rational choice to business decision making. Topics include an introduction to managerial economics, demand analysis and estimates, production and cost analysis, technological change and industrial innovation, pricing strategies in imperfectly competitive markets, game theory and competitive strategies, government and business, and forecasting.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900; ECON 1950; MATH 1170 or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both BUEC 2040, BUEC 2041, ECON 3041 and ECON 3040
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3090
Managing Personal Economic Wealth (3,0,0)

ECON 3090 Managing Personal Economic Wealth (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to attain their financial goals and achieve financial independence through effective planning. Topics include an overview of a financial plan; planning with personal financial statements; the effects of taxation on financial decision making; banking services; assessing, managing, and securing credit; personal loans; leasing versus buying; buying and financing a home; portfolio management basics; investing in stocks, bonds, and mutual funds; and retirement planning.
Note: Credit for this course cannot be applied towards the BBA. Students cannot receive credit for both BBUS 4140 and FNCE 4140
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3100
Canadian Financial Markets (3,0,0)

ECON 3100 Canadian Financial Markets (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to money, banking, and the Canadian financial system. Topics include an overview of financial markets, interest rates and the structure of interest rates, the efficiency of financial markets, financial regulation, banks and other financial institutions, financial institutions risk management, the role of the central bank, the money supply, and monetary policy.
Prerequisite: ECON 1950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3200
Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3200 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the mathematical methods and tools most commonly used in analyzing economic problems. Topics include a review of set theory, functions, and limits; linear models and matrix algebra; application of single and multivariable calculus; unconstrained and constrained optimization; integration and difference and differential equations; application of dynamic analysis; and linear and non-linear programing.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900; ECON 1950; MATH 1170 or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3330
Applied Statistics for Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3330 Applied Statistics for Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study advanced statistical techniques and methods and their applications in business and economics. Topics include inferences about population variance, including hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; analysis of variance and experimental designs; simple and multiple regressions; time series analysis and forecasting. Students are required to apply statistical techniques using Excel and/or Minitab.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950; ECON 2320; MIST 2610
Exclusion: BUEC 2330, BUEC 3101, BUEC 3330, ECON 2330, ECON 2331, STAT 2410
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3410
Economics of Climate Change (3,0,0)

ECON 3410 Economics of Climate Change (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students investigate the climatic changes resulting from global warming and the policy actions being taken to address these problems. Topics include an overview of the science and economics of climate change; the impact of climate change on growth and economic development; the economics of stabilization including efficiency, externalities, public goods, and environmental policy instruments; inter-temporal decisions and uncertainties about the impacts of climate change; the policy responses to mitigation and adaption and their cost; international collective action and its challenges; and prominent climate policy approaches, such as the United Nations Framework Convention and the Kyoto Protocol.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3500
Public Finance (3,0,0)

ECON 3500 Public Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the rationale for government intervention in a market economy, the assessment of public policy, and the impact of government expenditures and taxation on the economy and the citizenry. Topics include government activities, externalities, public goods, social security, fiscal deficits and public debt, principles of taxation, incidence and effects of taxation, and optimal taxation.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900; ECON 1950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3550
International Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3550 International Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students analyze the movement of capital, goods, and services across international boundaries and assess their financial impact. With advances in transportation and communication, greater outsourcing, and increased globalization, trade, and foreign direct investment, the corresponding capital movements are becoming much more important to the global economy. Topics include the theories of absolute and comparative advantage; modern theories of trade, including factor-proportions; tariff and non-tariff barriers; current and capital accounts; exchange rate determination; balance of payments and exchange rate policy; evolution of the international monetary system; and trade and economic development.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900; ECON 1950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3600
Labour Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3600 Labour Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students analyze how individuals, families, firms, and governments operate within a contemporary labour market, and the impact of labour market institutions and government policy. Topics include an overview of the labour market; labour demand and elasticities; the effect of quasi-fixed labour costs on demand; labour supply and the decision to work; labour supply and household production; compensating wage differentials and labour markets; education and training; worker mobility; pay and productivity; gender, race, and inequality in earnings; and unions and the labour market.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3610
The Economics of Gender (3,0,0)

ECON 3610 The Economics of Gender (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students use economic theory and analysis in an attempt to explain why gender differences lead to different outcomes in education, career choices, family roles, and earnings. A comparison is made of the economic status of women relative to men throughout the world, with special emphasis on similarities and differences between Canada and other economically advanced nations. Topics include marriage and family; the economics of fertility; women at work; women's earnings, occupation, and education; the gender gap in earnings; women's employment and earnings; family policy; and women in developing countries.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3650
Government and Business (3,0,0)

ECON 3650 Government and Business (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students utilize neoclassical and institutional economic theory to examine government intervention in the economy. Topics include competition and economic efficiency; market failure; institutional theory; private sector governance structures; the role of the state; public sector governance structures, including competition policy, price and entry regulation, prevention of anti-competitive practices, and public enterprise and ownership; and government failure.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900; ECON 1950 or POLI 1110
Note: Students may not receive credit for both ECON 3650 and POLI 3650
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3670
Economic Analysis of Law (3,0,0)

ECON 3670 Economic Analysis of Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore and analyze legal issues from an economic perspective; economists focus primarily on whether particular legal doctrines, concepts, and processes are efficient. Topics include an introduction to the law, legal institutions, and procedures, as well as economic theory relating to property law, contracts, torts, criminal law, and general legal processes.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3690
Community Economic Development (3,0,0)

ECON 3690 Community Economic Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students investigate methods for effectively using local community resources to enhance economic opportunities while improving social conditions in a sustainable way. Topics include the theoretical basis for community economic development (CED), analytical techniques used to assess communities, environmental sustainability objectives for community development, competing strategies of community development, financing development strategies, and CED activity in Canada and other nations.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900; ECON 1950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3700
Benefit-Cost Analysis and the Economics of Project Evaluation (3,0,0)

ECON 3700 Benefit-Cost Analysis and the Economics of Project Evaluation (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine projects that are commonly evaluated using benefit-cost analysis, and the appropriate methods for determining their cost effectiveness. Topics include project evaluation techniques; measuring welfare change; correcting for market distortions using shadow wages and prices; finding the appropriate discount rate; making valid valuations that incorporate inflation and appropriate planning horizon, scrap, and spillover and secondary effects; public enterprise pricing rules; valuing intangibles; and incorporating risk and uncertainty. Case studies of projects are analyzed from a variety of areas, such as natural resources, the environment, human resources, public service, and transportation.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3710
Environmental Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3710 Environmental Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students apply the tools of microeconomic analysis to environmental issues. Topics include property rights and efficient resource use, market failure, the over-utilization of common pool resources, the Coase Theorem, non-market valuation techniques, government policies designed to cost-effectively control pollution, and real-world strategies for controlling pollution.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3730
Forestry Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3730 Forestry Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the concepts and analytical techniques used in forestry economics and their application to forest management, conservation, and policy analysis. Topics include techniques for analyzing forestry investments; timber demand, supply, and pricing; valuation of non-marketed goods and services, such as recreation and wildlife habitat; land allocation and multiple use; forest management issues, such as planting, thinning, and optimal age of crop rotation; and regulatory issues, including allowable annual cut regulations, property rights, tenure, and taxes.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3740
Land Use Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3740 Land Use Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students focus on land use issues with particular emphasis on government policies relating to the preservation and conservation of agricultural lands. Topics include rent theory; welfare measurement; property rights and externalities; project evaluation using cost-benefit and multiple accounts analysis; the economics of soil conservation; efficiency and equity in land use planning, including zoning changes; government land preservation and conservation policies, and agricultural subsidies; water use in agriculture; forest management; and multiple uses of public lands.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3840
Economic Analysis of Health (3,0,0)

ECON 3840 Economic Analysis of Health (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students apply microeconomic tools to an analysis of the health care system, while being introduced to the major issues in health economics and the ongoing debate over health care policy. Topics include the economic determinants of health, the market for medical care, the market for health insurance, the role of the government in health care, and health care reform.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3900
Intermediate Microeconomics 2 (3,0,0)

ECON 3900 Intermediate Microeconomics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students continue to study intermediate topics in partial and general equilibrium analysis. Topics include consumer choice under different scenarios, factor markets, game theory, imperfect competition, general equilibrium analysis and welfare economics, public goods, and externalities.
Prerequisite: ECON 2900; MATH 1170 or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3950
Intermediate Macroeconomics 2 (3,0,0)

ECON 3950 Intermediate Macroeconomics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students continue to study short-run macroeconomic theory and its applications to contemporary policy issues. Topics include an overview of macroeconomics; macroeconomic data; the open economy; economic fluctuations; aggregate demand, including investment savings-liquidity preference money supply (IS-LM) curves; aggregate supply, including the Phillips curve; economic stabilization and the effectiveness of fiscal and monetary policy; and money supply and demand.
Prerequisite: ECON 2950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3990
***Selected Topics in Economics (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

ECON 3990 ***Selected Topics in Economics (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

Credits: 6 credits
Delivery: Campus

The subject matter in this course varies from semester to semester depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Courses are taught by visiting professors to instill their unique perspectives or by regular faculty to address emerging topics in a discipline, share research or teaching interests, or test potential new courses. The added variety in the curriculum greatly enhances the student learning experience.
Prerequisite: Permission of the program advisor
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4100
International Financial Markets (3,0,0)

ECON 4100 International Financial Markets (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine international financial markets and institutions and their critical role in the global economy. Topics include the elements that constitute a global financial institution; types of financial institutions and markets; global market structure differences; recent market failures, their causes, and solutions; and global financial regulation and reform.
Prerequisite: BBUS 3150 or ECON 3100 or FNCE 3150 or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4320
Econometrics (3,0,0)

ECON 4320 Econometrics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to econometric models and the application of classical regression techniques to estimate socio-economic relationships. Topics include an introduction to econometrics; simple linear regression; interval estimation and hypothesis testing; predictions, goodness of fit, and modeling issues; multiple regression; non-linear relationships; heteroscedasticity; dynamic models, autocorrelation, and forecasting; simultaneous equations; and qualitative dependent variables. General econometric computer software is used to reinforce course concepts.
Prerequisite: ECON 2330 or ECON 3330 or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4330
Forecasting in Business and Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 4330 Forecasting in Business and Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students apply a variety of forecasting methods to solve problems in business and economics. Topics include qualitative forecasting methods; the forecasting process, data considerations, and model selection; moving averages and exponential smoothing; multiple regression and time series decomposition; Box-Jenkins methodology to fit autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ARCH); time-varying volatility and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) and vector autoregressive models; combining forecasting results; and implementing forecasting.
Prerequisite: ECON 2330 or ECON 3330 or equivalent
Exclusion: BUEC 4330
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4560
International Macroeconomics and Finance (3,0,0)

ECON 4560 International Macroeconomics and Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the determination of exchange rates in an open economy and policies that governments may adopt to influence their movement. Topics include balance of payments; foreign exchange markets; interaction of the money, interest rates and exchange rates; exchange rates in the long run, including purchasing power and interest rate parity; exchange rates in the short run; fixed exchange rates and foreign exchange intervention; history of the international monetary system; macroeconomic policy under floating exchange rates; and performance of global capital markets and policy issues.
Prerequisite: ECON 2330 or ECON 3330 or equivalent; ECON 2950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4660
Industrial Organization (3,0,0)

ECON 4660 Industrial Organization (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the performance and operation of imperfectly competitive markets, as well as the behavior of firms in these markets. They attempt to answer big questions, such as why are firms and markets organized the way they are; how does the behavior of firms affect the structure and performance of markets; and how does the organization of markets determine how firms behave and how markets perform. Topics include theories of the firm; market structure models; strategic interaction among firms; business practices such as mergers and acquisitions, price discrimination, advertising, innovation, vertical restraints, and cartels; and new developments in industrial organization, including network issues and auction markets.
Prerequisite: ECON 2900 or ECON 3040
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4720
Sustainable Economic Development (3,0,0)

ECON 4720 Sustainable Economic Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine theories and issues, internal and external challenges, and alternative policy options relating to sustainable economic development. Topics include a comparative analysis of the leading theories of economic growth, development, and sustainability; lack of economic growth, poverty, and income distribution; consequences of population growth and technological change; employment and migration, human capital, agriculture, and rural development; international trade and commercial policy, foreign investment, and aid; and global integration, economic transition, and environmental degradation.
Prerequisite: ECON 2950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4960
Directed Studies in Economics (0,3,0) or (0,3,0)(0,3,0)

ECON 4960 Directed Studies in Economics (0,3,0) or (0,3,0)(0,3,0)

Credits: 6 credits
Delivery: Campus

Individuals or groups of students engage in independent study, research, or practice related to a topic in economics under faculty supervision. The supervisor(s) determines the appropriate curriculum, evaluation methods, and credit assignment in consultation with the student(s) and subject to the approval of the department chairperson(s) and dean.
Prerequisite: Permission of the program advisor
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4990
***Selected Topics in Economics (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

ECON 4990 ***Selected Topics in Economics (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

Credits: 6 credits
Delivery: Campus

The subject matter in this course varies from semester to semester depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Courses are taught by visiting professors to instill their unique perspectives or by regular faculty to address emerging topics in a discipline, share research or teaching interests, or test potential new courses. The added variety in the curriculum greatly enhances the student learning experience.
Prerequisite: Permission of the program advisor
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 6010
Principles of Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 6010 Principles of Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to normative economics and receive a board overview of different approaches to economic analysis of the environment and resources. Environmental, ecological and resource problems are discussed and economic solutions are identified, analyzed and critiqued. Topics include an introduction to economic efficiency; externalities, common resources and public good provision issues; the theory of non-renewable natural resources; cost-benefit analysis; ecological economics and green accounting; and the economics of climate change.
Prerequisite: Admission to MEEM or MScEEM or approval of degree committee.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 6010 and ESMN 6010.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 6020
Applied Microeconomics for Sustainable Management (3,0,0)

ECON 6020 Applied Microeconomics for Sustainable Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine more advanced microeconomic tools and apply these to economic sustainable management. Topics include market analysis for economic sustainability, demand analysis and estimation, the role of elasticities in sustainable management; consumer behavior and rationale choice; risk behavior and assessment; production efficiency; cost analysis and estimation; the role of the market structure for sustainable management; game theory and strategic behavior; and asymmetric information problems.
Prerequisite: Admission to MEEM or MScEEM or approval of degree committee.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 6020 and ESMN 6020.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 6030
Foundations of Cost-Benefit Analysis (3,0,0)

ECON 6030 Foundations of Cost-Benefit Analysis (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the principles and practice of cost-benefit analysis and how it is applied to evaluating public policies and specific projects. Topics include the conceptual and economic foundations of cost-benefit analysis; valuing benefits and costs in primary and secondary markets; discounting benefits and costs; evaluation criteria; incorporating uncertainty and risk; the role of option price and value; existence value of projects; social discount rate; and predicting and monetizing impacts. Applications relate to such areas as human resource, natural resource, recreation economics plus economic development and urban planning.
Prerequisite: Admission to the MEEM or MScEEM or approval of degree committee.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 6030 and ESMN 6030.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 6040
Valuation Methods for Cost-Benefit Analysis (3,0,0)

ECON 6040 Valuation Methods for Cost-Benefit Analysis (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on Foundations of Cost-Benefit Analysis, students explore advanced techniques of valuing impacts and contingent valuation methods for investment projects. Valuation methods will be conducted using experiments, quasi-experiments, direct estimation and other indirect market methods. Other topics include contingent valuation, hedonic pricing method, shadow prices, econometrics of contingent valuation, cost-effectiveness analysis, distributional weighted cost-benefit analysis, and hypothesis testing in contingent valuation surveys. A critique of the valuation approaches for non-market goods and services from a philosophical perspective will be addressed.
Prerequisite: ECON 6010, ECON 6020 and ECON 6030 or equivalent.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 6040 and ESMN 6040.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 6050
Sustainable Community Economic Development (3,0,0)

ECON 6050 Sustainable Community Economic Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn about the sustainable development of urban and rural communities with an emphasis on critical evaluation of the theory and strategies and application of analytical techniques. Topics include the theoretical basis for community economic development (CED); a critical analysis of theories explaining CED; analytical techniques for community evaluation; economic impact analysis; an assessment of environmental and economic sustainability objectives for project selection; third sector structures; competing strategies for community development; financial strategies and challenges; the role of the public sector in CED; and an overview of CED activity in Canada and other nations.
Prerequisite: Admission to MEEM or MScEEM or approval of degree committee.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 6050 and ESMN 6050.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 6060
Applications of Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 6060 Applications of Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students apply the principles of sustainable economic management to environmental and resource issues. Topics include population and the environment; agriculture and food; scarcity and abundance of resources; energy sector; renewable resource using in the fisheries and the forestry sector; water economics; pollution, impacts and policy responses; industrial ecology; trade and development and the environment; and institutions for sustainable development.
Prerequisite: ECON 6010 and ECON 6020 or equivalent.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 6060 and ESMN 6060.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 6070
Sustainable Macroeconomic Development (3,0,0)

ECON 6070 Sustainable Macroeconomic Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the macroeconomic theories and issues, internal and external challenges, and alternative policy options for sustainable economic development. Topics include a comparative analysis of the leading theories of economic growth, development and sustainability; lack of economic growth, poverty and income distribution; consequences of population growth and technological change; employment and migration, human capital, agriculture and rural development, international trade and commercial policy, foreign investment and aid; and global integration, economic transition and environmental degradation.
Prerequisite: Admission to MEEM or MScEEM or approval of degree committee.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 6070 and ESMN 6070.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 6080
Policy and Regulation for Sustainable Management (3,0,0)

ECON 6080 Policy and Regulation for Sustainable Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the role of government policy in the regulation of the environment and sustainability. Topics include criteria for evaluating environmental policies; decentralized policies including liability laws and property rights; control and command policies; emission taxes and subsidies; transferable discharge permits; compliance costs, uncertainty, and information; federal and provincial environmental policy in Canada; air, land and water pollution control policies; policy on toxic and hazardous substances; local environmental issues; global environmental issues and policies.
Prerequisite: ECON 6060 or equivalent.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 6080 and ESMN 6080.
For more information, search for this course here.

English
ENGL 1100
Introduction to University Writing (3,0,0)

ENGL 1100 Introduction to University Writing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the practices of reading and writing in scholarly contexts by investigating a chosen topic or issue. Students read, critically analyze, and synthesize information and ideas found in appropriate secondary sources and coming from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds. They also develop their abilities to communicate knowledge by composing in the genres and sub-genres of scholarly writing, including the incorporation of research and documentation while using a clear, persuasive, grammatically-correct style.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12 /English First Peoples 12 with a minimum 73% or equivalent
Note: students cannot receive credit for both ENGL 1100 and ENGL 1101
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 1110
Critical Reading and Writing (3,0,0)

ENGL 1110 Critical Reading and Writing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop skills in close critical reading comprehension, written composition, and argumentation through the exploration and evaluation of a variety of creative narrative texts. Students learn critically and creatively to articulate complexities of various perspectives, techniques and rhetorical strategies, and assumptions employed by writers to convey a given subject matter or social issue. They also practice critical reflection and clear, persuasive, and grammatically-correct communication by building on scholarly writing and documentation skills. Students develop critical reading and writing skills, which are keys to success in any academic discipline and transfer directly to the workplace.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12 /English First Peoples 12 with a minimum 73% or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ENGL 1110 and ENGL 1001.
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 1120
Introduction to Poetry (3,0,0)

ENGL 1120 Introduction to Poetry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop skills in close critical reading comprehension, written composition, and argumentation through the exploration and evaluation of a variety of poetic forms that take up a particular theme, topic, or issue chosen by the professor. Through lecture, class discussion, and written assignments, students learn critically and creatively to interpret and compare classic and contemporary poetic texts. Students demonstrate how to reflect critically and to articulate the complexities of various perspectives, techniques, rhetorical strategies, and assumptions employed by poets to convey a given subject matter or social issue. They also practice clear, persuasive, grammatically-correct communication while building on scholarly writing and documentation skills. Prerequisites: English Studies 12 /English First Peoples 12 with a minimum 73% or equivalent Exclusion Requisites: ENGL 1210-Introduction To Drama & Poetry, ENGL 1011-Literature and Composition II
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 1140
Introduction to Drama (3,0,0)

ENGL 1140 Introduction to Drama (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop skills in close critical reading comprehension, written composition, and argumentation through the exploration and evaluation of a variety of poetic forms that take up a particular theme, topic, or issue chosen by the professor. Through lecture, class discussion, and written assignments, students learn critically and creatively to interpret and compare classic and contemporary poetic texts. Students demonstrate how to reflect critically and to articulate the complexities of various perspectives, techniques, rhetorical strategies, and assumptions employed by poets to convey a given subject matter or social issue. They also practice clear, persuasive, grammatically-correct communication while building on scholarly writing and documentation skills. Prerequisites: English Studies 12 /English First Peoples 12 with a minimum 73% or equivalent Exclusion Requisites: ENGL 1210-Introduction To Drama & Poetry ENGL 1011-Literature and Composition II
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 1210
Introduction to Drama and Poetry (3,0,0)

ENGL 1210 Introduction to Drama and Poetry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop skills in close critical reading comprehension, written composition, and argumentation through the exploration and evaluation of a variety of poetic and dramatic forms that take up a particular theme, topic, or issue chosen by the professor. Through lecture, class discussion, and written assignments, students learn critically and creatively to interpret and compare classic and contemporary poetic and dramatic texts. Students demonstrate how to reflect critically and to articulate the complexities of various perspectives, techniques, rhetorical strategies, and assumptions employed by poets and dramatists to convey a given subject matter or social issue. They also practice clear, persuasive, grammatically-correct communication while building on scholarly writing and documentation skills.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12 /English First Peoples 12 with a minimum 73% or equivalent Exclusion Requisites: ENGL 1140-Introduction to Drama ENGL 1120-Introduction to Poetry ENGL 1011-Literature and Composition II
For more information, search for this course here.

Entrepreneurship
ENTR 3710
Marketing for Entrepreneurs (3,0,0)

ENTR 3710 Marketing for Entrepreneurs (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students gain an understanding of marketing in an entrepreneurial context in order to develop the right business opportunities in small and medium-sized enterprises (SME). They learn how to design a marketing information system to identify opportunities, understand customers and develop effective marketing programs that allow SMEs to grow in a competitive market. Topics include: marketing in an entrepreneurial context; finding and evaluating the right marketing opportunity; using marketing research to ensure entrepreneurial success; understanding customers and competitors; segmentation, targeting and positioning for entrepreneurial opportunities; developing new products and services; building and sustaining entrepreneurial brand; entrepreneurial pricing, channel development, supply chain management and promotion; and entrepreneurial marketing plans.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

ENTR 3720
Small Business Finance (3,0,0)

ENTR 3720 Small Business Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire the knowledge and practical skills needed to successfully manage the financial affairs of a small business and new venture start-up. Topics include the importance of small business finance; evaluation of accounting software, hiring an accountant and/or bookkeeper, applicable taxes, payroll accounting, assessing insurance needs; determination of market size; sales forecasting for existing and new business ventures, pricing scenarios, importance of benchmarking to similar businesses, budgeting capital and operational expenses for start-up ventures and existing businesses, development of pro forma financial statements; development of financial modeling tools using excel for scenario and variance analysis: working capital management; sources of long-term and short-term financing; and bankruptcy.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ENTR 3720 or BBUS 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

ENTR 4750
New Venture Creation (3,0,0)

ENTR 4750 New Venture Creation (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills, values, and attitudes needed for success as an entrepreneur whether starting a new venture from scratch, joining or acquiring an existing business, or creating a new venture inside a larger organization. The primary activity is the development of a comprehensive business plan. Topics include small business entrepreneurs; the business plan; entry modes into small business; writing the business plan; target market, market research, and marketing plan; raising capital and the financial viability of new ventures; operational issues; legal structures and human resource issues; and risk management.
Prerequisite: ENTR 3720 (minimum C-); MKTG 2430 (minimum C-); or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ENTR 4750, ENTR 4751,TMGT 4120, BBUS 4750 or BBUS 4751
For more information, search for this course here.

ENTR 4760
Small Business Management (3,0,0)

ENTR 4760 Small Business Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on ENTR 4750: New Venture Creation which takes a new small business from the planning stage to start-up, students examine how to successful operate an up-and-running venture. Topics include spotting entrepreneurial opportunities in small business; buying a business; legal concerns profiling your target customer; learning from the competition-competitive intelligence; pricing and promoting your product or service; distribution and location; the power of numbers; financing your business; risk management issues; and buying a franchise or franchising your business.
Prerequisite: ENTR 4750 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ENTR 4760, TMGT 4150 or BBUS 4760
For more information, search for this course here.

Finance
FNCE 2120
Financial Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 2120 Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a basic understanding of business finance, which deals with how organizations effectively manage their operating and fixed assets and fund them with an optimal mix of debt and equity financing. Topics include the role of the financial manager; goals of the firm; financial statement analysis; time value of money; risk and return including beta and the capital asset pricing model; common and preferred share valuation; bond valuation and interest rates; capital budgeting; cost of capital; and optimal capital structure. Prerequisites: ACCT 2210 or equivalent (minimum C-), and CMNS 1290 or equivalent (minimum C-), and MATH 1070 or equivalent (minimum C-), and ECON 2320 or equivalent (minimum C-)
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 2120, FNCE 2121, FNCE 3120, BBUS 3120 or BBUS 3121
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 3120
Finance (3,0,0)

FNCE 3120 Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a basic understanding of business finance, which deals with how organizations effectively manage their operating and fixed assets and fund them with an optimal mix of debt and equity financing. Topics include the role of the financial manager; goals of the firm; financial statement analysis; time value of money; risk and return including Beta and the Capital Asset Pricing Model; common and preferred share valuation; interest rates and bond valuation; capital budgeting; cost of capital; and optimal capital structure.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2210 (minimum C-) or equivalent, and CMNS 1290 (minimum C-) or equivalent, and MATH 1070 (minimum C-) or equivalent, and ECON 2320 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 3120, FNCE 2120, FNCE 2121, BBUS 3120 or BBUS 3121
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 3140
Financial Statement Analysis (3,0,0)

FNCE 3140 Financial Statement Analysis (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to read the complex financial statements of a major corporation and how to examine its performanceusing a variety of financial ratios and other assessment tools. Emphasis is placed on the quality of financial reportingand identifying the warning signs of financial manipulation. Topics include an overview of financial reporting;review of financial statement analysis techniques; complex income statements; complex cash flow statements;complex statements of financial position focusing on current assets and liabilities, long-term assets, income taxes,post-employment and share-based compensation, intercorporate investments; and multinational operations.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 (minimum C+) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 3140 or BBUS 3140
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 3150
Portfolio and Equity Analysis (3,0,0)

FNCE 3150 Portfolio and Equity Analysis (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the different types of financial assets, the markets in which they trade, and how investors structure these assets into diversified portfolios to meet their financial objectives. Emphasis is placed on the valuation of equity securities. Topics include an introduction to risk and return; types of securities and the investment process; mutual funds; stock market and common stock valuation; stock price behaviour, market efficiency, and behavioral finance; technical analysis; fundamental analysis; return, risk and security market line; and portfolio management and performance evaluation.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 (minimum C+) or equivalent and ECON 2330 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 3150, FNCE 3151, BBUS 3150 or BBUS 3151
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 3170
Fixed Income and Alternative Investments (3,0,0)

FNCE 3170 Fixed Income and Alternative Investments (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to design and analyze fixed income securities and alternative investments. The importance of interestrates, credit risk and product features in the valuation of these assets is emphasized. Topics include an introduction tofixed income investments; fixed income markets; yield curves; bond pricing, valuation and volatility; credit analysisfor firms and individuals; asset backed securities; real estate; hedge funds and private equity.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 OR FNCE 2121 (minimum C+ grade) AND ECON 2330 OR ECON 2331 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of FNCE3170; FNCE 3171; BBUS 4150; BBUS 4151
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 3180
Derivative Securities (3,0,0)

FNCE 3180 Derivative Securities (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to value the main types of derivative securities and how to effectively utilize them in risk management, asset speculation and financial engineering. Topics include an introduction to forward and futures markets and hedging; mechanics of future markets; hedging with future contracts; theoretical and forward prices; introduction to options; calculating option contract profits; put-call parity and arbitrage bounds; option pricing models; exotic options; and swaps.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 (minimum C+ grade) or equivalent and ECON 2330 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of FNCE 4170 or FNCE 3180
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 3190
Personal Financial Services (3,0,0) 3 credits

FNCE 3190 Personal Financial Services (3,0,0) 3 credits

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the operation of the financial services industry, the products and services available, and how they are effectively marketed to satisfy the needs of consumers. Topics include an overview of the financial services industry; career progression as a financial representative; branch operations and online banking; types of bank accounts and foreign exchange services; types of consumer credit including residential mortgages, credit cards, vehicle loans and leasing, personal loans, home equity loans, lines of credit, student loans, and Registered Retirement Saving Plan loans; mortgage lending; credit assessment and calculating the cost of borrowing; responsible use of credit and personal bankruptcy; overview of business financial services; personal, need and financial assessment of clients; marketing financial services; and customer service.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent and BLAW 2910 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent and MKTG 2430 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 4110
Advanced Financial Management for Accountants (3,0,0)

FNCE 4110 Advanced Financial Management for Accountants (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on FNCE 2120: Financial Management, students majoring in accounting further develop the knowledge and skills in business finance required for admission to the Chartered Professional Accountant program. Topics include dividend policy; maturity matching of assets and liabilities; short-and long-term financial planning; working capital management; sources of temporary and permanent financing; advanced capital budgeting; business valuation; mergers and acquisitions and corporate restructuring; bankruptcy, liquidation, and reorganization; and risk management.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 (minimum C+) or equivalent and ECON 2330 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 4110, FNCE 4120, FNCE 4130, BBUS 4120 or BBUS 4130
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 4120
Business Valuation and Restructuring (3,0,0)

FNCE 4120 Business Valuation and Restructuring (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn how to value a business using commonly applied industry techniques and to restructure its operations in order to optimize performance or cope with financial distress. Topics include professional designations in business valuation; advanced cost of capital; business valuation techniques, such as income, market multiples, and asset-based approaches; valuing private companies; mergers and acquisitions; financial distress, bankruptcy, reorganization, and liquidations; divestitures, spin-offs and other forms of corporate restructuring.
Prerequisite: FNCE 3150 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 4110, FNCE 4111 or FNCE 4120
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 4130
Advanced Financial Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 4130 Advanced Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on FNCE 2120: Financial Management, students further develop their knowledge and skills in business finance. Topics include corporate governance and executive/director compensation; dividends and dividend policy; matching the maturities of assets and liabilities; short-term and long-term financial planning; sustainable growth; working capital management and sources of temporary financing; sources of permanent financing; advanced capital budgeting under uncertainty; and optimal capital structure.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 (minimum C+) or equivalent and ECON 2330 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 4130, FNCE 4110, FNCE 4111 or BBUS 4130
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 4140
Personal Financial Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 4140 Personal Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire skills to identify, structure, and resolve financial planning problems. Multiple analytical tools and tax planning strategies are used in addressing various financial planning issues. Topics include an overview of a financial plan; applying time of money concepts; planning with personal financial instruments; banking services and money management; assessing, managing, and securing credit; personal loans; purchasing and financing a home; auto and homeowner's insurance; health and life insurance; investing fundamentals; investing in stocks, bonds, and mutual funds; retirement planning; and estate planning.
Prerequisite: BLAW 2910 (minimum C-) or equivalent and FNCE 3150 (minimum C-) or equivalent and ACCT 3260 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 4140, FNCE 4150, BBUS 4140 or ECON 3090
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 4150
Personal Wealth Management (3,0,0) 3 credits

FNCE 4150 Personal Wealth Management (3,0,0) 3 credits

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to analyze the financial and insurance needs of potential clients and how to develop a plan that protects them from risk and helps achieve their financial objectives. Topics include government sponsored benefit plans; personal insurance products; deferred income plans; budgeting and personal financial statements; investment policy statement; investment products; investment strategies; investment income and tax planning; family law; wealth transfer including wills, trusts, and estates; professional ethics; and developing a comprehensive financial plan.
Prerequisite: FNCE 3190 (minimum C-) or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 4160
Advanced Portfolio Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 4160 Advanced Portfolio Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to design and implement an investment policy statement for an individual or institutional investor that establishes their financial objectives, risk tolerances, constraints, and investment and monitoring policies. Topics include setting investment objectives and policies; ethical standards and fiduciary duties; capital markets expectations; diversification and asset allocation; fixed-income, equity and alternative investment portfolio management; risk management; capital markets and securities trading; monitoring and rebalancing; and evaluating portfolio performance.
Prerequisite: FNCE 3150 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent and FNCE 3170 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent and FNCE 3180 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 4160 or BBUS 4160
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 4180
International Financial Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 4180 International Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the international aspects of corporate finance and investing. Topics include the international monetary system, balance of payments, the market for foreign exchange, international parity relationships and forecasting foreign exchange rates, international banking and money markets, international bond and equity market, futures and options on foreign exchanges, interest rate and currency swaps, international portfolio investment, and management of exposure.
Prerequisite: FNCE 3170 (minimum C-) or equivalent and FNCE 3180 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 4180 or BBUS 4180
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 4190
Financial Institutions Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 4190 Financial Institutions Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the different financial intermediaries in our economy, the financial risks they are exposed to, and how these risks are measured and managed. Topics include the types of financial institutions including deposit-taking institutions, insurance companies, securities firms, investment banks, mutual funds, hedge funds, pension funds, and finance companies; regulation of the financial industry; measuring risk including interest rate risk, market risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, off-balance sheet risk, foreign exchange risk, sovereign risk and technology and other operational risks; managing risk through the use of derivatives, loan sales and securitization; and managing risk through deposit insurance and other liability guarantees and capital adequacy standards.
Prerequisite: FNCE 3150 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent and FNCE 3170 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent and FNCE 3180 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 4190 or BBUS 4190
For more information, search for this course here.

Human Resource Management
HRMN 2820
Human Resource Management (3,0,0)

HRMN 2820 Human Resource Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the management of an organization's workforce through the design and implementation of effective human resource policies and procedures. Current Canadian issues and practices are emphasized. The topics include the strategic role of human resources management; human resources planning; job analysis and design; recruitment and selection; employment equity; compensation; training and development; performance appraisal; occupational health and safety; and employee and industrial relations.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and ORGB 2810
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of HRMN 2820, HRMN 2821, HRMN 3820, BBUS 3810, BBUS 3811 or TMGT 1140.
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 3820
Human Resources (3,0,0)

HRMN 3820 Human Resources (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the management of an organization's workforce through the design and implementation of effective human resource policies and procedures. Current Canadian issues and practices are emphasized. The topics include the strategic role of human resources management; human resources planning; job analysis and design; recruitment and selection; employment equity; compensation; training and development; performance appraisal; occupational health and safety; and employee and industrial relations.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and ORGB 2810
Note: This course should be taken by students in the Minor in Management only.
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of BBUS 3810, BBUS 3811, HRMN 2820, HRMN 2821 or TMGT 1140.
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 3830
Human Resource Planning and Staffing (3,0,0)

HRMN 3830 Human Resource Planning and Staffing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the policies and procedures for the planning, acquisition, deployment, and retention of a workforce of sufficient size and quality to allow an organization to attain its strategic goals. Topics include the strategic importance of staffing; the staffing environment; human resource planning; job analysis and design; recruitment; applicant screening; employee testing; interviews; references; decision making; employment contracts; methods of evaluating the hiring process; deployment; and retention.
Prerequisite: HRMN 2820 or HRMN 3820
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of HRMN 3831, BBUS 4810 or HRMN 3830.
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 3840
Employee and Labour Relations (3,0,0)

HRMN 3840 Employee and Labour Relations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the different aspects of union-management relations focusing on both the Canadian and international experience. The topics include an introduction to labour relations; labour relations environment; union membership, structure and actions; employment legislation and the Labour Relations Act; collective bargaining; managing the collective agreement; dispute resolution; human resources in an union environment; international labour relations; and future trends and issues in labour relations.
Prerequisite: HRMN 2820 or HRMN 3820
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of BBUS 3840, BBUS 3841, HRMN 3841 or HRMN 3840
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 4830
Total Rewards (3,0,0)

HRMN 4830 Total Rewards (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an understanding of the different rewards systems available to employers to attract, motivate and retain a sufficient number of qualified employees. The topics include the components of total rewards; the rewards environment; motivational theories and rewards; rewards strategies; types of compensation; non-monetary rewards; and rewards and performance management, attraction, and retention.
Prerequisite: HRMN 2820 or HRMN 3820
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of BBUS 4830, HRMN 4830 or HRMN 4831.
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 4840
Organizational Learning, Training and Development (3,0,0)

HRMN 4840 Organizational Learning, Training and Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the educational activities provided by organizations to enhance the current performance of individuals or groups of employees and instill a commitment to continuous improvement and advancement. They study how organizations can become more adaptive by learning from their experiences and reacting more quickly to environmental change. Topics include organization learning; training and development; learning and motivation; needs analysis; training design, methods, and delivery; transfer of training; training evaluation; and cost and benefits of training programs.
Prerequisite: HRMN 2820 or HRMN 3820
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of BBUS 4840, HRMN 4840 or HRMN 4841.
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 4890
Human Resource Strategy and Professional Practice (3,0,0)

HRMN 4890 Human Resource Strategy and Professional Practice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine a selection of contemporary issues in human resource management. Topics include occupational health and safety, human resource information management, and professional practice.
Corequisite: HRMN 3830 and HRMN 3840
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of HRMN 4890, HRMN 4891 or BBUS 4860
For more information, search for this course here.

International Business
IBUS 3510
International Business (3,0,0)

IBUS 3510 International Business (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine globalization and the steps managers take to establish or expand operations in international markets. They explore the influence of forces such as culture, economics, politics, and geography on management decision making. Topics include globalization; national differences in political economy; political economy and economic development; differences in culture; ethics in international business; international trade theory; political economy of international trade; foreign direct investment; regional economic integration; international business strategy; entry strategy and strategic alliance; and global marketing and research and development.
Prerequisite: ECON 1950 (minimum C-) or equivalent and MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of IBUS 3510, IBUS 3511, BBUS 3510 or BBUS 3511.
For more information, search for this course here.

IBUS 3530
International Trade Finance (3,0,0)

IBUS 3530 International Trade Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an understanding of the finance principles required to conduct business in a global environment, including import and export, and multinational operations. Topics include globalization; trade risk and risk assessment; methods of payment; use of bonds, guarantees, and letters of credit; currency risk management; export credit insurance; trade finance; structure trade finance; terms of payment; international trade theory; the international monetary market; the global capital market; and foreign direct investment.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 or FNCE 3120, IBUS 3510
Exclusion: BBUS 4520 and IBUS 4520
For more information, search for this course here.

IBUS 4510
Cross-cultural Management (3,0,0)

IBUS 4510 Cross-cultural Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the significance of culture in strategic decisions encompassing elements of risk management, ethics, and the management of diversity, in a range of international management contexts across Asia, Europe, Africa and the Americas. Topics include cultural dimensions of international management; comparing cultures; movement in the culture; organizational culture; culture and management communication; needs and incentives from an international perspective; dispute resolution and negotiation; and the cross-cultural dimensions of global staffing.
Prerequisite: IBUS 3510 (minimum C-) or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

IBUS 4540
Global Entrepreneurship (3,0,0)

IBUS 4540 Global Entrepreneurship (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore entrepreneurship in a global setting. The course provides an introduction to the opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurship from an international perspective. The course focuses on the need for every entrepreneur and innovator to understand the global market in today's hypercompetitive world. Topics will include globalization and the international environment; definition and importance of international entrepreneurship; culture and international entrepreneurship; developing a global business plan; selecting international business opportunities; international legal concerns; alternative entry strategies; global monetary system; global marketing and research and development; global human resource management; and implementing and managing a global entrepreneurial strategy.
Prerequisite: IBUS 3510 with a minimum C- or equivalent
Note: Students can not receive credit for both BBUS 4540 and IBUS 4540
For more information, search for this course here.

IBUS 4560
Doing Business in Emerging Markets (3,0,0)

IBUS 4560 Doing Business in Emerging Markets (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the position of emerging markets in the new global economy and the business opportunities available in these countries. It highlights challenges and opportunities associated with organizational management and business strategy in emerging economies. Topics include understanding emerging economies; markets and institutions; operating in emerging markets; emerging markets' innovations; managing risk in emerging markets; targeting emerging market clients; and business ethics in emerging markets.
Prerequisite: IBUS 3510 (minimum C-) or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

IBUS 4570
Global Management (3,0,0)

IBUS 4570 Global Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students conduct an integrative and comprehensive overview of the fundamental issues and challenges that confront the international firm. Topics include globalization and international linkages; public, legal and technological environments; meaning and dimensions of culture; organizational culture and diversity; cross-culture communication and negotiation; strategy formulation and implementation; entry strategies and organizational structures; managing political risk, government relations, and alliances; management decision and control.
Prerequisite: IBUS 3510 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of BBUS 4510, IBUS 3520 or IBUS 4570.
For more information, search for this course here.

IBUS 4590
International Business Field Study (3,0,0)

IBUS 4590 International Business Field Study (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students gain a first-hand understanding of international businesses through a focused overseas study tour during which the business, management and cultural practices of a selected country are experienced. The field study includes tours to local chambers of commerce, industrial zones and factories and enables students to meet executives in key industries. Topics include business etiquette and business customs; interpersonal and communication skills; economic, political and business environment; international trade relations; decision-making styles; and business opportunities, challenges and strategies between Canada and the foreign country.
Prerequisite: IBUS 3510 (minimum C-) or equivalent, or permission of the program advisor
For more information, search for this course here.

Legal Administration
LEGA 1010
Introduction to the Canadian Legal System (30 hours)

LEGA 1010 Introduction to the Canadian Legal System (30 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a general understanding of the Canadian legal system as a foundation for further study in the Legal Administration Assistant Certificate. Topics include an overview of the Canadian legal system, including Quebec's civil code system; introduction to the constitution and the Charter of Rights; federal and provincial jurisdiction; overview of Canadian court structure; the importance of the Charter of Rights, lawyers, judges and ethical principles; and tort, contract and criminal law.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1100; ABTS 1300
For more information, search for this course here.

LEGA 1020
Legal Office Procedures (45 Hours)

LEGA 1020 Legal Office Procedures (45 Hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the legal profession, including the functions and duties of a legal administrative assistant in British Columbia. Topics include the legal profession; office duties and procedures; client record keeping; legal correspondence; and legal instruments and court documents.
Prerequisite: ABTS 1110; ABTS 1310
For more information, search for this course here.

LEGA 1030
Litigation Procedures 1 (60 hours)

LEGA 1030 Litigation Procedures 1 (60 hours)

Credits: 2 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the functions and duties of a legal administrative assistant working in civil litigation in British Columbia. They learn to manage legal documents and procedures, from the initiation of a lawsuit through to the completion of pleadings and the possibility of obtaining a default judgment. This is a hands-on course in which students integrate keyboard, computer, transcription, and document formatting with a knowledge of civil law. Perequisite: LEGA 1010; LEGA 1020
For more information, search for this course here.

LEGA 1040
Litigation Procedures 2 (60 hours)

LEGA 1040 Litigation Procedures 2 (60 hours)

Credits: 2 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on LEGA 1030: Litigation Procedures 1, students examine the documents and procedures from the discovery process to preparation and attendance at trial and post-trial procedures, including bills of costs and enforcement procedures, and also learn to prepare for Chambers hearings. This is a hands-on course in which students integrate keyboard, computer, transcription, and document formatting with a knowledge of civil law.
Prerequisite: LEGA 1030
For more information, search for this course here.

LEGA 1050
Family Litigation Procedures (60 hours)

LEGA 1050 Family Litigation Procedures (60 hours)

Credits: 2 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the role and responsibilities of a legal administrative assistant employed in the field of family law in British Columbia. They gain knowledge and practical experience in topics such as statutes and rules, divorce and family courts, marriage in B.C., pre-nuptial and separation agreements, undefended and defended divorce actions, chamber applications, annulment, and applications to Provincial Court. This is a hands-on course in which students integrate their keyboard, computer, and document formatting skills within the context of family law.
Prerequisite: LEGA 1030
For more information, search for this course here.

LEGA 1060
Corporate Procedures 1 (60 hours)

LEGA 1060 Corporate Procedures 1 (60 hours)

Credits: 2 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the role and responsibilities of a legal administrative assistant working in the field of corporate law. They receive an overview of the various forms of business organizations, with a focus on the corporation, covering incorporation procedures, post-incorporation procedures, and annual maintenance requirements of a private (non-reporting) British Columbia company.
Prerequisite: LEGA 1010, LEGA 1020
For more information, search for this course here.

LEGA 1070
Corporate Procedures 2 (30 hours)

LEGA 1070 Corporate Procedures 2 (30 hours)

Credits: 1 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on LEGA 1060: Corporate Procedures 1, students focus on corporate structure and completion of filing forms as related to sole proprietorships, partnerships, limited partnerships, societies, cooperatives, non-reporting companies, and extra-provincial non-reporting companies. They are also introduced to securities and to BC OnLine which is an Internet access to government services and information about companies in British Columbia.
Prerequisite: LEGA 1060
For more information, search for this course here.

LEGA 1080
Conveyancing Procedures 1 (60 hours)

LEGA 1080 Conveyancing Procedures 1 (60 hours)

Credits: 2 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the role and responsibilities of a legal administrative assistant employed in the field of conveyancing in British Columbia. They gain knowledge and practical experience in topics such as systems of land registration, land title searches, contracts of purchase and sale, methods to convey interests in land, statements of adjustments, and the execution and registration of electronic documents filed in the Land Title Office. The focus is on the purchaser's procedures for a simple conveyance not involving financing.
Prerequisite: LEGA 1010, LEGA 1020
For more information, search for this course here.

LEGA 1090
Conveyancing Procedures 2 (60 hours)

LEGA 1090 Conveyancing Procedures 2 (60 hours)

Credits: 2 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on LEGA 1080: Conveyancing Procedures 1, students are introduced to the role and responsibilities of a legal administrative assistant employed in the field of conveyancing in British Columbia. They gain knowledge and practical experience in topics such as methods to convey interests in land involving purchaser financing, strata property considerations, builders' liens, acting for the vendor, acting for mortgage lenders, additional adjustments for statements of adjustments, authorities to pay, the execution and registration of electronic documents filed in the Land Title Office, acting for both the purchaser and mortgagee, and documents for the transfer of manufactured homes.
Prerequisite: LEGA 1080
For more information, search for this course here.

LEGA 1100
Wills and Estates (60 hours)

LEGA 1100 Wills and Estates (60 hours)

Credits: 2 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the role and responsibilities of a legal administrative assistant employed in the field of wills and estates in British Columbia. They gain knowledge and practical experience in preparation of wills and codicils, and the documents necessary to apply for grants of Letters Probate and Letters of Administration (with and without a will), Administration Bonds, transferring assets from the deceased, and winding up estates. They prepare documents acceptable to the Probate Registry for filing, followed by transmission and distribution of estates. This is a hands-on course in which students integrate keyboard, computer, document formatting, and transcription skills within the context of estate law.
Prerequisite: LEGA 1010, LEGA 1020
For more information, search for this course here.

Mathematics
MATH 1000
Pre-Calculus (5,0,0)

MATH 1000 Pre-Calculus (5,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course provides the mathematical foundation for an introductory calculus course. Topics include equations and inequalities; functions, models, and graphs; polynomial and rational functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric functions, identities and equations.
Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 60% (C) or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 0600 with a minimum grade of B or equivalent.
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1000 or MATH 1001.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1070
Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

MATH 1070 Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is designed for Business and Economics students. Students learn about linear and non-linear functions and models applied to cost, revenue, profit, demand and supply, systems of equations (linear and nonlinear), matrices, linear programming, difference equations, and mathematics of finance (including simple and compound interest, annuities, mortgages, and loans).
Prerequisite: Foundations of Math 12 (min. grade of C+) or Pre-Calculus 12 (min.(C+) or MATH 1000 (min. grade of C-) or MATH 1001 (min. grade of C-) or MATH 0600 (min. grade B-) or MATH 0610 (min. grade C-) or MATH 0630 (min. grade C-) or MATH 0633 (min. grade C-) or MATH 0650 (min grade of C+)
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 and MATH 1101.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1100
Finite Math with Applications 1 (3, 1.5, 0)

MATH 1100 Finite Math with Applications 1 (3, 1.5, 0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is intended primarily for Liberal Arts or Tourism students. Students solve problems that have direct relevance in the “real world." Topics to be covered include sets, counting, probability, matrices, linear programming, and math of finance. Prerequisites: Foundations of Math 11 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or Pre-Calculus 11 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum grade of 60% (C) or MATH 0510 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0520 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0523 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1090, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 or MATH 1101. Science Students do not receive credit for Math 1100.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1130
Calculus 1 for Engineering (3,1.5,0)

MATH 1130 Calculus 1 for Engineering (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students build a strong mathematical foundation for engineering by learning ideas, methods and applications of single-variable differential calculus. Limits and derivatives are defined and calculated, derivatives are interpreted as slopes and rates of change, and derivatives are then applied to many sorts of problems, such as finding maximum and minimum values of functions.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Engineering program.
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1140
Calculus 1 (3,1.5,0) or (5,0,0)

MATH 1140 Calculus 1 (3,1.5,0) or (5,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study differential calculus for functions of one variable, with applications emphasizing the physical sciences. Topics include calculation and interpretation of limits and derivatives; curve sketching; optimization and related-rate problems; l'Hospital's rule; linear approximation and Newton's method. Prerequisites: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1150
Calculus for the Biological Sciences 1 (5,0,0)

MATH 1150 Calculus for the Biological Sciences 1 (5,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study differential calculus for functions of one variable, with applications emphasizing the biological sciences. Topics include calculation and interpretation of limits and derivatives, curve sketching, and optimization problems. MATH 1140 is recommended rather than MATH 1150 for students planning to take second-year MATH courses.
Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1170
Calculus for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

MATH 1170 Calculus for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is intended for Business and Economics students. Topics include calculation and interpretation of derivatives, curve sketching, optimization (applied to business and economics), multivariable functions (including partial derivatives, optimization and Lagrange multipliers).
Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1070 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1380
MATH 1700
Discrete Mathematics 1 (3,1.5,0)

MATH 1700 Discrete Mathematics 1 (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is an introduction to the foundation of modern mathematics including basic set theory; solution to recurrence relations; logic and quantifiers; properties of integers; mathematical induction; introduction to graphs and trees; Boolean algebra and finite state machines. Students will apply the critical thinking skills developed in Mathematics to derive meaning from complex problems. Prerequisites: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum C+ or Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum C+ or MATH 0600 with a minimum grade of B or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1220, COMP 1390, MATH 1390, MATH 1700 or MATH 1701.
For more information, search for this course here.

Management Information Systems
MIST 2610
Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

MIST 2610 Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire the knowledge and skills to effectively utilize information systems and technology in support of organizational strategy. Topics include an introduction to information systems; information systems strategy; ethics, privacy, and policy; data security; data and knowledge management; networks and communications technologies; wireless and mobile computing; e-business and e-commerce; Web 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and social networks; systems development and managing information systems projects; and personal productivity software, including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MIST 2610, MIST 2611, BBUS 1370, BBUS 1371, BBUS 2370, COMP 1000, COMP 1350, COMP 1700 or COMP 1910.
For more information, search for this course here.

MIST 3620
Web-Enabled Business Applications (3,0,0)

MIST 3620 Web-Enabled Business Applications (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a comprehensive understanding of web technologies and their applications in business. Topics include foundation of e-business; overview of the technological foundations of the Internet and web; revenue models and payment systems; building a web presence; marketing on the web; legal and ethical issues; hardware and software for developing and hosting websites; online security and payment systems; and improving efficiency and reducing costs in business-to-business activities.
Prerequisite: MIST 2610 or equivalent.
For more information, search for this course here.

MIST 3630
Data and Knowledge Management (3,0,0)

MIST 3630 Data and Knowledge Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a theoretical and practical understanding of how to manage two of the most important assets of an organization: data and knowledge. Students examine issues related to the analysis, development, maintenance, and retention of information required for various organizational needs, and learn the fundamentals of how to implement solid knowledge management practices. Topics include an overview of data and knowledge management, modeling data in the organization, logical database design and the relational model, physical database design, data processing for business intelligence, data analysis and reporting, and managing organization data and knowledge.
Prerequisite: MIST 2610 and ECON 2320 or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

MIST 4610
Strategic Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

MIST 4610 Strategic Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire the knowledge and skills to support decision-making and problem-solving processes in business and accounting. An emphasis is placed on managing the entire lifecycle of data, from collecting to interpreting, to modelling, to decision making, and finally to communicating the results. Topics include accounting information systems development; information technology auditing, including data and network security; developing enterprise reporting systems; managing data, principles of extensible markup language (XML), and extensible business reporting language (XBRL); and constructing, analyzing, and presenting a suite of spreadsheet-based, decision-making models.
Prerequisite: MIST 3630
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MIST 4610 or BBUS 4280.
For more information, search for this course here.

MIST 4620
Information Security Management (3,0,0)

MIST 4620 Information Security Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a general understanding of information technology security. Dependency on computer technology and the Internet has grown to a level where all organizations must devote considerable resources to managing threats to the security of their mobile, desktop and networked computer systems. Topics include introduction to information security; basic need for security; legal, ethical, and professional issues; risk management; information security policies and procedures; information security planning; access control systems and methodology; principles of cryptography; and operations security.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and MIST 2610 or equivalents.
For more information, search for this course here.

MIST 4630
Information Technology Management for Business (3,0,0)

MIST 4630 Information Technology Management for Business (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop knowledge and experience in project management, as it applies to business software and information systems development. Topics include the foundations of information systems project management for business; project management process stages; developing the project charter and baseline project plan; the human side of project management; defining and managing project scope; the work breakdown structure and project estimation; the project schedule and budget; managing project risk; project communication, tracking, and reporting; information systems project quality management; and project implementation and evaluation.
Prerequisite: MIST 3620 and MIST 3630 and MIST 4620
For more information, search for this course here.

Marketing
MKTG 2430
Introduction to Marketing (3,0,0)

MKTG 2430 Introduction to Marketing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students receive an overall view of the marketing function, the role of marketing in society and its application within organizations. Topics include an overview of marketing; developing a marketing plan and strategies; analyzing the marketing environment; consumer behaviour; segmentation, targeting, and positioning; developing new products; product, branding, and packaging decisions; pricing concepts and strategies; distribution strategies; and integrated marketing communications.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 2430, MKTG 2431, MKTG 3430, TMGT 1150, BBUS 3430 or BBUS 3431
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 3430
Marketing (3,0,0)

MKTG 3430 Marketing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students receive an overall view of the marketing function, the role of marketing in society and its application within organizations. Topics include an introduction to marketing; developing a marketing plan and strategies; analyzing the marketing environment; consumer behaviour; segmentation, targeting, and positioning; developing new products; product, branding, and packaging decisions; pricing concepts and strategies; distribution strategies; and integrated marketing communications.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 (minimum of C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 2430, MKTG 3430, MKTG 2431, TMGT 1150, BBUS 3430 or BBUS 3431
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 3450
Professional Selling (3,0,0)

MKTG 3450 Professional Selling (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students will gain an overall view of the professional selling function. They will come to understand the role of personal selling in marketing and society and its application within organizations. Topics include relationship selling opportunities; creating value with a relationship strategy; developing a relationship strategy; communication styles; creating production solutions; buying process and buyer behavior; approaching the customer; developing and qualifying a prospect base; determining customer needs; sales demonstration; negotiating buyer concerns; and closing and confirming the sale.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 3450, MKTG 3451, HMGT 2120, BBUS 3450 or BBUS 3451
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 3470
Consumer Behaviour (3,0,0)

MKTG 3470 Consumer Behaviour (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the psychological, social and cultural theories and concepts that provide insight into consumer behaviour and then apply these principles to different consumer decision-making contexts. Topics include defining consumer behaviour and consumer behaviour research and examining how perception, learning and memory, motivation and affect, self-perception, personality, life-style, values, attitude, group influences, income, social class, family structure, subcultures, and culture affect consumer decision making.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 3470, MKTG 3471, TMGT 4130, BBUS 3470 or BBUS 3471
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 3480
Marketing Research (3,0,0)

MKTG 3480 Marketing Research (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an understanding of marketing research and its values in analyzing consumers, markets, and the environment. Topics include an introduction to market research, the marketing research industry and research ethics, the marketing research process, secondary data and databases, qualitative research, traditional survey research, primary data collection, measurement, questionnaire design, basic sampling issues, sample size determination, and statistical testing.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 and ECON 2330 (minimum C- grades) or equivalent
Note: Students can only receive credit for one of MKTG 3480, MKTG 3841, TMGT 3050, BBUS 3480 or BBUS 3481.
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 4400
Professional Sales Management (3,0,0)

MKTG 4400 Professional Sales Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students prepare for the role of an effective sales manager in today's hyper-competitive global economy by integrating current technology, research, and strategic planning activities. Topics include the role of the sales manager; buying and selling processes; customer relationship management; organizing the sales force; sales forecasting and budgeting; selecting, training, compensating, and motivating the salesperson; and evaluating salesperson performance.
Prerequisite: MKTG 3450 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MKTG 4400 or BBUS 4400
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 4410
Services Marketing (3,0,0)

MKTG 4410 Services Marketing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a thorough understanding of the extended marketing mix and service quality in service businesses. Topics include new perspectives on services marketing; consumer behaviour in a service context; positioning services in competitive markets; developing service products; distributing services through physical and e-channels; the pricing and promotion of services; designing and managing service processes; balancing demand and productive capacity; crafting the service environment; managing people for service advantage; and service quality.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MKTG 4410, MKTG 4411, BBUS 4410 or BBUS 4411.
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 4412
New Product Development (3,0,0)

MKTG 4412 New Product Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the conceptual, analytical and decision-making skills and knowledge of industry best practices needed to successfully develop and launch new products and services. Topics include opportunity identification and selection; concept generation; concept evaluation; product/service development and product testing; and marketing testing and managing the product/service launch.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 or equivalent with a minimum C- grade and MKTG 3480 or equivalent with a minimum C- grade
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 4420
Brand Management (3,0,0)

MKTG 4420 Brand Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn how brands are managed as strategic assets. They develop the necessary knowledge and skills for creating, measuring, maintaining and growing brand equity in a competitive market place. Topics include an introduction to brands and brand management, identifying and establishing brand positioning and values, planning and implementing brand marketing programs, measuring and interpreting brand equity, and growing and sustaining brand equity.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MKTG 4420 or BBUS 4420.
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 4422
Social Media Marketing (3,0,0)

MKTG 4422 Social Media Marketing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the growing importance of social media as part of Internet marketing. The goal is to produce attractive up-to-date content that users will share as part of their own social networking websites. Topics include the role of social media marketing; goals and strategies; identification of target audiences; rules of engagement for social media marketing; social media platforms and social networking sites; microblogging; content creation and sharing; video marketing; marketing on photo sharing websites; discussions, news, social bookmarking and question and answer sites; content marketing; mobile marketing; social media monitoring; tools for managing the social media marketing effort; and social media marketing plan.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 or equivalent with a minimum C-
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 4430
Retail Management (3,0,0)

MKTG 4430 Retail Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an in-depth understanding of retail and services management as well as non-store retailing. Topics include defining retail, customer behaviour, retail location decisions, merchandising, design and layout, retail pricing, promotion, retail employees, customer loyalty, and international retailing.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MKTG 4430, MKTG 4431, BBUS 4430 or BBUS 4431.
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 4450
E-Commerce (3,0,0)

MKTG 4450 E-Commerce (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine how the internet is rapidly becoming one of the primary communications, marketing and commercial medium for businesses in almost every industry, and how managers can effectively use this tool to execute their organization's strategic plans. Topics include the E-Commerce business models and concepts; E-Commerce infrastructure; building E-Commerce presence; E-Commerce security and payment systems; E-Commerce marketing and advertising concepts; social, mobile and local marketing; ethical, social and political issues in E-Commerce; online retailing and services; online content and media; social networks, auctions and portals; and business-to-business E-Commerce.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MKTG 4450, MKTG 4451, BBUS 4450, BBUS 4451 or BBUS 4453.
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 4460
Marketing Strategy (3,0,0)

MKTG 4460 Marketing Strategy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn how to effectively analyze marketing problems and opportunities in a rapidly changing environment, and then develop appropriate strategies. Emphasis is placed on building long-term customer relationships and adopting a strong customer orientation through imagination, vision and courage. Topics include segmentation, targeting and positioning (STP); creating competitive advantage; marketing program development; implementation of the marketing plan; and developing and maintaining long-term customer relationships. A marketing strategy simulation, marketing project, or marketing audit is used to reinforce course concepts.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 or equivalent with a minimum grade C- and MKTG 3480 or equivalent with a minimum grade C-
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 4460, MKTG 4461, BBUS 4460 or TMGT 4140
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 4470
International Marketing (3,0,0)

MKTG 4470 International Marketing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore all aspects of marketing from a global perspective to better respond to international opportunities and competitive situations. Topics include an overview of international marketing; history and geography and its effect on culture; cultural dynamics in assessing global markets; culture, management style and business systems; the political environment; assessing global market opportunities in the Americas, Europe, Africa, Middle East, and Asia Pacific Region; planning for global market entry; products and services for international consumers; products and services for international businesses; and international marketing channels.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MKTG 4470, MKTG 4471, BBUS 4470 or BBUS 4471.
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 4480
Integrated Marketing Communications (3,0,0)

MKTG 4480 Integrated Marketing Communications (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the promotional mix including advertising, publicity, personal selling and sales promotion from an integrative perspective. They then learn how to create and manage these promotional tools to successfully execute a business' strategic plan. Topics include an introduction to integrated marketing communication; organizing integrated marketing communication; consumer behavior and target market review; communication response models; objectives and the integrated marketing communication plan; brand positioning strategy decisions; creative strategy decisions; creative tactics decisions; types of media; media planning and budgeting; social, ethical and legal issues; and international marketing communications.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MKTG 4480, MKTG 4481, BBUS 4480 or BBUS 4481.
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 4490
Business-to-Business Marketing (3,0,0)

MKTG 4490 Business-to-Business Marketing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine how important the marketing of products and services to other businesses and organizations is to the economy, the unique nature of business customers' needs, and the different marketing strategies that can be employed to meet those needs. Topics include business markets and business marketing; character of business marketing; organizational buyer behavior; legal and regulatory environment; marketing strategy; market opportunities for current and potential customers via market research; segmentation, targeting and positioning in the business-to-business context; developing and managing product and service offerings; innovation and competitiveness; pricing; business development and planning; sales; branding; business marketing channels and partnerships; connecting through advertising, trade shows, and public relations; marketing via the Internet; and business ethics.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MKTG 4490, MKTG 4491, BBUS 4490 or BBUS 4491.
For more information, search for this course here.

Management
MNGT 1710
Introduction to Business (3,0,0)

MNGT 1710 Introduction to Business (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of many business disciplines such as accounting, finance, marketing, human resource management, supply chain management, and entrepreneurship. Students will engage with community business experts for example guest speakers, who will share their business experience dealing with a wide range of issues. Students will simulate, adapt, and respond to a variety of business challenges, expanding their knowledge of business. Throughout the course students will be encouraged to set goals, reflect on their learning and plan for their futures. Topics include multiple perspectives on business, management functions, forms of business ownership, the importance of entrepreneurship, and Indigenous business.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12/English First Peoples 12 with a minimum of 73% or equivalent; or ENGL 0600 with minimum C+; or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a C+.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MNGT 1711, MNGT 1701 or MNGT 1710
For more information, search for this course here.

MNGT 3710
Business Ethics and Society (3,0,0)

MNGT 3710 Business Ethics and Society (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the complex business environment and the relationships organizations have with each other, civil society, and the natural environment. Through this examination, students learn how critical ethical decision-making is to the successful management of any organization. Topics include elements of critical thinking, business ethics fundamentals, frameworks for ethical thinking, awareness of ethical pitfalls, ethical reasoning, ethical principles, drafting a code of ethics, illustrating an ethical decision-making process, applying ethical decision-making skills, ethical decision-making in the workplace, corporate social responsibility and sustainable development, and stakeholder theory.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BBUS 3030, MNGT 3711, BBUS 3031 or MNGT 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

MNGT 3730
Leadership (3,0,0)

MNGT 3730 Leadership (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students cultivate a deep understanding of what leadership is and what leaders do to be successful. An emphasis is placed on the development of practical leadership skills. Topics include an introduction to leadership, leadership traits, leadership style and philosophy, leadership and relationships, developing leadership skills, leadership and ethics, creating a vision, leadership and out-group members, leadership and conflict, and managing obstacles to effective leadership.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and ORGB 2810
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MNGT 3730, MNGT 3731, BBUS 3641 or BBUS 3671.
For more information, search for this course here.

MNGT 4710
Decision Analysis (3,0,0)

MNGT 4710 Decision Analysis (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students focus on the development, implementation, and utilization of business models for making informed managerial decisions. Models and management cases from diverse industries, and functional areas are used extensively to illustrate important decision tools, their assumptions and limitations, and how to communicate decisions to management. Topics include critical thinking, avoiding bias in decision making, data analysis, decision analysis, forecasting, resource allocation, and risk analysis.
Prerequisite: ECON 2320 or an equivalent introductory statistics course
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MNGT 4710, MNGT 4711 or BBUS 3621.
For more information, search for this course here.

MNGT 4720
Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (3,0,0)

MNGT 4720 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the fundamental theories of negotiation and conflict resolution and the essential skills required to be a successful negotiator. The negotiation process is pervasive in business, and the ability to negotiate is an essential skill for successful managers. Topics include the nature of negotiation; strategy and tactics of distributive bargaining and integrative negotiation planning; integrative negotiation; negotiation, planning, and strategy; perception, cognition, and emotion; communication and the negotiation process; power; and ethics.
Prerequisite: MNGT 3730
For more information, search for this course here.

MNGT 4730
Business Project Management 1 (3,0,0)

MNGT 4730 Business Project Management 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the concepts and frameworks of project management. Topics include an introduction to project management, life-cycle management, feasibility, selection, scope management, scheduling, costing, leadership, and managing teams.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2250 and ECON 2330 or equivalent, and MNGT 3730.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MNGT 4751, BBUS 4681, or MNGT 4730.
For more information, search for this course here.

MNGT 4740
Business Project Management 2 (3,0,0)

MNGT 4740 Business Project Management 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on on MNGT 4730: Business Project Management 1, students further develop their understanding of the practical and systematic tools used to successfully plan and manage complex projects. Topics include resource constrained schedules; budgeting; performance and progress reporting; risk management; communication, organization, and time management; advanced management and control; special topics such as contracts, environmental sustainability, and international projects; and applications of project management practice in various industries and environments.
Prerequisite: MNGT 4730
Note: Students may receive credit for only one of MNGT 4740, MNGT 4751 or BBUS 4681.
For more information, search for this course here.

MNGT 4780
Strategic Management (3,0,0)

MNGT 4780 Strategic Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the basic concepts and methodologies of developing and executing successful business strategies in a dynamic global environment. Effective strategy is about developing competitive advantage. Learners develop insights into the working of CEOs and top management teams in preparation for senior positions in organizations. Topics include an introduction to strategic management, an analysis of the internal and external environments, business-level strategy, competitive strategy and dynamics, corporate-level strategy, acquisition and restructuring strategies, international strategies, and strategy implementation.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 or FNCE 3120, and MKTG 2430 or MKTG 3430, and HRMN 2820 or HRMN 3820 and SCMN 3320 and IBUS 3510.
Note: It is recommended that this course be taken in the student's final year.
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MNGT 4780, MNGT 4781, BBUS 4701 or BBUS 4780.
For more information, search for this course here.

Organizational Behaviour
ORGB 2810
Organizational Behaviour (3,0,0)

ORGB 2810 Organizational Behaviour (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the behavior of individuals and how they interact with each other in different workplace organizations. Topics include defining organizational behavior; perception, personality and emotions; values, attitudes and their effects in the workplace; motivating self and others; working in teams; communication, conflict and negotiation; power and politics; leadership; decision making, creativity and ethics; and organizational culture and change.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of ORGB 2810, ORGB 2811, BBUS 2720, BBUS 2721 or TMGT 1160.
For more information, search for this course here.

ORGB 3750
Creativity and Innovation (3,0,0)

ORGB 3750 Creativity and Innovation (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the theory and practical strategies for promoting creative and innovative thinking in the workplace and managing employees through these processes. Topics include types of innovation, the S-shaped diffusion curve, generating new ideas, recognizing opportunities, moving innovations to the market, creative groups, enhancing creativity, and leading creativity.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and ORGB 2810
For more information, search for this course here.

ORGB 3770
Teamwork in Organizations (3,0,0)

ORGB 3770 Teamwork in Organizations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an understanding of the nature, design and processes of effective teamwork as well as a practical skill set for team membership. Topics include the importance of teams; assessing a team's experience and insights; building a balanced team; building a high performance team; becoming a team member, follower, and leader; team building; team evaluation and accountability; observing team leadership skills at work; identifying and overcoming team dysfunctions; motivating team members and leaders; and developing intercultural teams.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and ORGB 2810
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of BBUS 3880 or ORGB 3770.
For more information, search for this course here.

ORGB 3810
Organizational Theory and Design (3,0,0)

ORGB 3810 Organizational Theory and Design (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the theory and application of organizing in complex workplace environments. Various conceptual tools and theoretical frameworks are utilized to systematically investigate organizing processes and contexts and solve practical problems. Topics include organizations and organization theory; organizational stakeholders; the external environment; organizational structure and design; organizational culture; decision making; conflict, power and politics; and organizational change and transformation.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and ORGB 2810
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of ORGB 3811 or ORGB 3810.
For more information, search for this course here.

ORGB 4870
Organizational Development and Change (3,0,0)

ORGB 4870 Organizational Development and Change (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

In today's business environment, a human resource practitioner must be a skilled change manager. Students learn to become agents for change, to improve human resources and organizational effectiveness, and to increase productivity. Topics include an introduction to organizational development; change process; organizational change and human resource management; organizational assessments; assessment tools and techniques; organizational interventions; human resource management interventions; and human resource metrics.
Prerequisite: ORGB 3810
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of BBUS 4870, BBUS 4661 or ORGB 4871.
For more information, search for this course here.

Philosophy
PHIL 1110
Introduction to Critical Thinking (3,0,0)

PHIL 1110 Introduction to Critical Thinking (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students access the basic blocks of knowledge building through an exploration of logical analysis. Students use the philosophical methodology of argument analysis to navigate issues presented in natural language and to resolve real world problems. Students examine the meaning of logical terms and philosophically investigate their contribution to arguments. Students give considerable attention to representing the logical structure of arguments and discovering their validity or invalidity.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of PHIL 1110, PHIL 1111.
For more information, search for this course here.

Psychology
PSYC 2100
Analysis of Psychological Data (3,0,0)

PSYC 2100 Analysis of Psychological Data (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students apply critical thinking skills as they develop a conceptual and practical understanding of a variety of data analysis methods commonly used in psychological research. Students learn the underlying rationale for the major statistical methods and evaluate various experimental designs to ensure appropriate application of a given statistical test to a particular dataset. Students practice articulating and applying a variety of statistical methods, including descriptive statistics, correlation, t-tests, chi-square, and ANOVA, in order to derive meaning from diverse datasets. Students practice using critical thinking skills to assess the validity of a variety of statistical claims they are likely to encounter in their everyday lives.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110 and PSYC 1210 or permission of the instructor
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of PSYC 2100, PSYC 2101, BIOL 3000, BUEC 2320, MATH 1200, SOCI 2710, SOCI 3710, STAT 1200, STAT 1201 or STAT 2000.
For more information, search for this course here.

Statistics
STAT 1200
Introduction to Statistics (3,1.5,0)

STAT 1200 Introduction to Statistics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to statistical reasoning in this course. Students will learn to interpret quantities relating to descriptive statistics; correlation; regression; probability; and probability distributions including the binomial and normal. Students will learn different facets of sampling and experimental design. Students will learn to make appropriate inferences from confidence intervals and hypothesis tests including analysis of variance. Prerequisites: Foundations of Mathematics 11 with a minimum grade of C+ or Pre-calculus 11 with a minimum grade of C+ or equivalent or Foundations of Math 12 or equivalent with a minimum grade of C+ or MATH 0510 with a minimum score of C- or MATH 0523 with a minimum score of C- or equivalent. MATH 1100 or MATH 1101 is recommended.
Note: Students can get credit for only one of BIOL 3000, ECON 2320, PSYC 2100, STAT 1200, STAT 1201, and STAT 2000.
For more information, search for this course here.

STAT 2000
Probability and Statistics (3,1.5,0)

STAT 2000 Probability and Statistics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is intended for math or science students. Students are introduced to probability and statistical reasoning. Students will learn to both calculate and interpret quantities relating to descriptive statistics; correlation; regression; probability; and probability distributions including the binomial and normal. Students will learn different facets of sampling and experimental design and the construction and appropriate inference from confidence intervals and hypothesis tests including analysis of variance. Students will apply their knowledge in groups to investigate and resolve divergent views on data analysis.
Prerequisite: MATH 1140 with a score of C- or MATH 1130 with a score of C- or MATH 1150 with a score of C- or MATH 1157 with a score of C- or MATH 1170 with a score of C- or MATH 1171 with a score of C-
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BIOL 3000, ECON 2320, GEOG 2700, PSYC 2100, PSYC 2101, STAT 1200, STAT 1201, and STAT 2000
For more information, search for this course here.

STAT 2410
Applied Statistics (3,1,0)

STAT 2410 Applied Statistics (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is designed for students who have already completed an introductory statistics course and desire exposure to further commonly-used statistical techniques. Topics include analysis of variance, multiple regression, goodness of fit, non-parametric methods, quality control, and decision theory.
Prerequisite: STAT 2000 or MATH 1200 or equivalent Required Seminar: STAT 2410S
For more information, search for this course here.

Supply Chain Management
SCMN 3320
Supply Chain Management (3,0,0)

SCMN 3320 Supply Chain Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the strategic fit of supply chains with organizational goals; this course lays the foundation for advanced study in the field. Topics include an introduction to supply chain management; supply chain strategy; demand management, inventory management; inventory modeling; supply chain network design and facility location; warehouse management; and transportation management.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2250 or ACCT 2251 and MIST 2610 or MIST 2611 and ECON 2330 or ECON 3330 or STAT 2410 or equivalent.
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of SCMN 3320, SCMN 3321 or BBUS 3320.
For more information, search for this course here.

SCMN 3330
Procurement Management (3,0,0)

SCMN 3330 Procurement Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the methods used by organizations to acquire the raw materials, components, supplies, equipment, facilities, and services needed to operate. Topics include strategic procurement, procurement process, competitive bidding and negotiation, procurement and supply management organization, make or buy, price and cost analysis, quality and inventory, supplier selection, supplier development and certification, services procurement, e-Procurement, and involving users and suppliers.
Prerequisite: SCMN 3320 or SCMN 3321.
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of SCMN 3330 or BBUS 4300.
For more information, search for this course here.

SCMN 4310
Operations Management (3,0,0)

SCMN 4310 Operations Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study the design, planning, establishment, operation, control and improvement of all activities in the creation of a firm's products. Practices in both manufacturing and service businesses are explored. Topics include an introduction to operations management; project management; total quality management; product and process design; job design and measurement; facility layout and assembly line balancing; material requirement planning and production scheduling; capacity management; inventory management; and decision tools including simulation, linear programming and decision analysis.
Prerequisite: MATH 1170 or MATH 1171 or MATH 1130 or MATH 1140 or MATH 1141 or MATH 1150 or MATH 1157 and SCMN 3320 or SCMN 3321.
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of SCMN 4310 or BBUS 3331.
For more information, search for this course here.

SCMN 4320
Logistics and Transportation (3,0,0)

SCMN 4320 Logistics and Transportation (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the movement of raw materials and parts from the supplier to the manufacturer and the movement of finished products to the final consumer. An effective integration and optimization of each step in the process is emphasized. Topics include an introduction to business logistics; logistics strategy and planning; logistics product; third and fourth party logistics providers; customer services and order processing; transportation fundamentals including transportation modes, inter-model services, pricing, and other shipping terms and documentation; transportation decision making and modeling; warehouse and storage management; and distribution requirement planning.
Prerequisite: MATH 1170 or MATH 1171 or equivalent and SCMN 3320 or SCMN 3321.
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of SCMN 4320 or BBUS 4320.
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SCMN 4390
Selected Topics in Supply Chain Management (3,0,0)

SCMN 4390 Selected Topics in Supply Chain Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine a selection of contemporary issues in supply chain management. Topics include strategic supply chain management; global supply chains; sustainable supply chains; service supply chains; supply chain resilience; reverse supply chains; quality in supply chain management; modern manufacturing methods; product design and encouraging technical innovation; process reengineering and competitive benchmarking; and supply chain optimization.
Prerequisite: SCMN 3330 and SCMN 4310 and SCMN 4320.
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of SCMN 4390 or BBUS 4390.
For more information, search for this course here.


 

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