Bob Gaglardi School of Business and Economics

Post-Baccalaureate Program Details and Requirements

Students must achieve a grade of C- or better in all courses to graduate, except Accounting and Finance which have a higher grade requirement. Students must complete a minimum of 10 courses at TRU after exemptions to receive a post- baccalaureate diploma.

 Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in Accounting (20 Courses)
MATH 1070
Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

MATH 1070 Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is designed for Business and Economics students. Topics include linear and non-linear functions and models applied to cost, revenue, profit, demand and supply, systems of equations (linear and nonlinear), matrices, linear programming, difference equations, and mathematics of finance (including simple and compound interest, annuities, mortgages, and loans).
Prerequisite: Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum grade of C+ or Pre-Calculus 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or equivalent or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0600 or MATH 0610 or MATH 0630 or MATH 0633 or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1091, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 or MATH 1101.
For more information, search for this course here.

or
MATH 1100
Finite Math with Applications 1 (3, 1.5, 0)

MATH 1100 Finite Math with Applications 1 (3, 1.5, 0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is intended primarily for Liberal Arts or Tourism students. Students solve problems that have direct relevance in the “real world." Topics to be covered include sets, counting, probability, matrices, linear programming, and math of finance. Prerequisites: Foundations of Math 11 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or Pre-Calculus 11 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum grade of 60% (C) or MATH 0510 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0520 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0523 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1090, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 or MATH 1101. Science Students do not receive credit for Math 1100.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 1900
Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1900 Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the interactions between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include a definition of economics; demand and supply analysis; consumer theory; production and cost; market structure including perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly; market efficiency and market failure; resource markets; and international trade.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B OR MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 1900 and ECON 1901
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 1950
Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1950 Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine economic behavour at the aggregate level, and the measurement and determination of national income. Topics include an introduction to economics; measuring macroeconomic variables including gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation; the Keynesian model; aggregate demand and supply; money and banking; the money market; fiscal policy; monetary policy and the central bank; exchange rates and the balance of payments; and economic growth.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B or MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended.
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of ECON 1950 and ECON 1951.
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 2120
Financial Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 2120 Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a basic understanding of business finance, which deals with how organizations effectively manage their operating and fixed assets and fund them with an optimal mix of debt and equity financing. Topics include the role of the financial manager; goals of the firm; financial statement analysis; time value of money; risk and return including beta and the capital asset pricing model; common and preferred share valuation; bond valuation and interest rates; capital budgeting; cost of capital; and optimal capital structure. Prerequisites: ACCT 2210 or equivalent (minimum C-), and CMNS 1290 or equivalent (minimum C-), and MATH 1070 or equivalent (minimum C-), and ECON 2320 or equivalent (minimum C-)
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 2120, FNCE 2121, FNCE 3120, BBUS 3120 or BBUS 3121
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 2210
Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2210 Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to prepare and analyze the financial statements of a public corporation. Topics include the conceptual framework; accounting standards; the accounting cycle; financial statements; internal control, cash and bank reconciliations; short-term investments and receivables; inventory; long-term assets including intangibles; liabilities including bonds payable; shareholders' equity, dividends, and share repurchases; comprehensive income and the statement of shareholders' equity; statement of cash flows; and financial statement analysis.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12/ English First Peoples 12 with a minimum of 73% or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 1000, ACCT 1030, ACCT 1210/1220, ACCT 1211/1221, ACCT 2211, BBUS 2210 or BBUS 2211
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 2250
Management Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2250 Management Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to collect, analyze, and communicate quantitative and non-quantitative information to assist management in making more effective planning and control decisions. Topics include the role of managerial accounting; basic cost management concepts; job, process, hybrid and activity-based costing; cost behaviour and estimation; cost-volume-profit analysis; profit planning and activity-based budgeting; standard costing, flexible budgeting and variance analysis; cost management tools including the balanced scorecard, benchmarking and reengineering; and relevant costs for decision making such as make or buy, special orders, joint products and outsourcing.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2210 or equivalent (minimum C- grade); ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1110 or ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1140 or ENGL 1210 or equivalent (minimum C- grade)
For more information, search for this course here.

BLAW 2910
Commercial Law (3,0,0)

BLAW 2910 Commercial Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the legal environment in which businesses operate and how common law and different provincial and federal government statutes influence decision-making. Topics include origins of Canadian law; resolving disputes and navigating the court system; tort law; contract law; sales of goods and consumer protection; methods of carrying on business; workplace law; property law; and creditor law.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2320
Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2320 Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to statistics with an emphasis on its applications in business and economics. Topics include descriptive statistics and numerical measures; an introduction to probability; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling and sampling distributions; interval estimations; and testing hypotheses and statistical inferences.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950
Note:Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MATH 1200, STAT 1200, STAT 2000, ECON 2320, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, BIOL 3000, and SOCI 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2330
Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

ECON 2330 Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study advanced statistical techniques and methods and their applications in business and economics. Topics include inferences about population variance, including hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; analysis of variance and experimental designs; simple and multiple regressions; time series analysis and forecasting; statistical quality control; and decision analysis. Students are required to apply statistical techniques using Excel and/or Minitab.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950; ECON 2320 or equivalent; MIST 2610
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ECON 2330, ECON 3330, STAT 2410, and STAT 3060
For more information, search for this course here.

MIST 2610
Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

MIST 2610 Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire the knowledge and skills to effectively utilize information systems and technology in support of organizational strategy. Topics include an introduction to information systems; information systems strategy; ethics, privacy, and policy; data security; data and knowledge management; networks and communications technologies; wireless and mobile computing; e-business and e-commerce; Web 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and social networks; systems development and managing information systems projects; and personal productivity software, including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MIST 2610, MIST 2611, BBUS 1370, BBUS 1371, BBUS 2370, COMP 1000, COMP 1350, COMP 1700 or COMP 1910.
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 3200
Intermediate Financial Accounting 1 (3,0,0)

ACCT 3200 Intermediate Financial Accounting 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to prepare the income statement, statement of retained earnings, and asset side of the statement of financial position. Topics include the Canadian reporting environment; the conceptual framework; the income statement including irregular items and comprehensive income; overview of the statement of financial position and statement of cash flows; revenue recognition; cash and receivables; inventory; long-term and short-term investments; property plant and equipment including depreciation, impairment, and disposition; and intangible assets including impairment and goodwill. Instruction is based on International Financial Reporting Standards. Prerequisites: ACCT 1000 minimum B- or ACCT 1211 minimum B- and ACCT 1221 minimum B- or ACCT 2210 or equivalent with a minimum B- CMNS 1290 or equivalent minimum C- Exclusions: ACCT 3201, BBUS 3200, BBUS 3201
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 3210
Intermediate Financial Accounting 2 (3,0,0)

ACCT 3210 Intermediate Financial Accounting 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on ACCT 3200: Intermediate Financial Accounting 1, students learn to prepare the current liabilities, long-term liabilities, and shareholders' equity sections of the statement of financial position and the cash flow statement. Topics include current liabilities and contingencies; long-term liabilities; advanced shareholders' equity; complex financial instruments and earnings per share; income taxes; pensions and other employee future benefits; leases; accounting changes and error analysis; statement of cash flows; and other measurement and disclosure issues. Instruction is based on International Financial Reporting Standards.
Prerequisite: ACCT 3200 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3210, ACCT 3211, BBUS 3210 or BBUS 3211
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 3220
Income Taxation 1 (3,0,0)

ACCT 3220 Income Taxation 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the conceptual structure of the Income Tax Act and the application of its rules to practical situations. Topics include an introduction to federal taxation; procedures and administration; income or loss from office, employment, business, or property; capital cost allowances and cumulative eligible capital; capital gains and losses; other income and deductions; and calculation of taxable income and tax payable for individuals.
Prerequisite: ACCT 1000 (minimum B-) or ACCT 1211 (minimum B-) and ACCT 1221 (minimum B-) or ACCT 2210 (minimum B-) and CMNS 1290 (minimum C-); or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3220, ACCT 3221, ACCT 3260, BBUS 3220, BBUS 3221 or BBUS 3260
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 3230
Income Taxation 2 (3,0,0)

ACCT 3230 Income Taxation 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on on ACCT 3220: Income Taxation 1, students examine the taxation of corporations, corporate distributions, and transactions between corporations and their shareholders. Topics include an in-depth coverage of taxable capital gains; deferred income plans; and the taxation of corporate entities, partnerships, trusts and corporate reorganizations.
Prerequisite: ACCT 3220 or ACCT 3260 or equivalent (minimum C-)
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3230, ACCT 3231, BBUS 3230, or BBUS 3231
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 3250
Intermediate Management Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 3250 Intermediate Management Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on ACCT 2250: Management Accounting, students further develop their ability to use quantitative and non-quantitative information to make effective planning and control decisions. Topics include an in-depth study of the balanced scorecard and profitability analysis; interdepartmental cost allocation; cost allocation for joint products and byproducts; revenue and customer profitability analysis; process costing including spoilage, rework and scrap; cost management and the theory of constraints; capital budgeting; and transfer pricing and multinational management control systems.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2250 (minimum B-) and CMNS 1290 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3250, ACCT 3251, BBUS 3250 or BBUS 3251
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 4110
Advanced Financial Management for Accountants (3,0,0)

FNCE 4110 Advanced Financial Management for Accountants (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on FNCE 2120: Financial Management, students majoring in accounting further develop the knowledge and skills in business finance required for admission to the Chartered Professional Accountant program. Topics include dividend policy; maturity matching of assets and liabilities; short-and long-term financial planning; working capital management; sources of temporary and permanent financing; advanced capital budgeting; business valuation; mergers and acquisitions and corporate restructuring; bankruptcy, liquidation, and reorganization; and risk management.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 (minimum C+) or equivalent and ECON 2330 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 4110, FNCE 4120, FNCE 4130, BBUS 4120 or BBUS 4130
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 4200
Advanced Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 4200 Advanced Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine a number of complex issues in advanced financial reporting. Topics include financial accounting standards, temporary and long-term investments in both debt and equity securities, investments with significant influence, an in-depth study of business combinations, joint ventures, foreign currency transactions, fair value and cash flow hedges, consolidation of foreign operations, not-for-profit organizations, and public sector reporting objectives and issues. Prerequisites: ACCT 3210 or ACCT 3211 with a minimum of C-
Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of ACCT 4200, ACCT 4201
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 4230
Assurance (3,0,0)

ACCT 4230 Assurance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students will learn to gather and evaluate audit evidence related to company financial statements. The goal is to provide assurance that the financial statements fairly present the financial performance and position of the organization being audited. Risk assessment techniques available to auditors and possible responses to those risks will be examined. Topics include an introduction to auditing and the public accounting profession; the audit process; professional relationships and legal liability; materiality and risk; audit evidence, evidence mix and audit strategy; the audit of internal controls, control risk and corporate governance; audit sampling; application of the audit process and auditor reporting.
Prerequisite: ACCT 3210 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 4230, ACCT 4231, BBUS 4230 or BBUS 4231
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 4250
Performance Management (3,0,0)

ACCT 4250 Performance Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on ACCT 3250 Intermediate Management Accounting, students examine how effective corporate governance, strategic planning and development, risk management systems, analysis and provision of performance information, along with a variety of management techniques and monitoring tools are used to optimize a firm's performance. Topics include governance structure, strategic planning process, risk management, management information systems, methods for improving operating efficiency and effectiveness, quality management, change management, and performance monitoring tools.
Prerequisite: ACCT 3250 or equivalent with a minimum C-
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of ACCT 4250, ACCT 4251, BBUS 4250, or BBUS 4251
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 4270
Accounting Information Systems (3,0,0)

ACCT 4270 Accounting Information Systems (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine information systems and their applications in accounting. Topics include: an overview of accounting information systems; transaction processing; enterprise resource planning systems; system documentation techniques; relational databases and data integrity; designing systems to prevent fraud, attacks and abuse; accounting information system controls; privacy and confidentiality controls; processing integrity and availability controls; auditing accounting information systems; and accounting information systems applications.
Prerequisite: MIST 2610 or equivalent with a minimum C-
Corequisite: ACCT 4230 or equivalent with a minimum C-
Note: Students cannot get credit for both ACCT 4270 and MIST 4610
For more information, search for this course here.

 Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in Business Administration (20 Courses)
MATH 1070
Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

MATH 1070 Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is designed for Business and Economics students. Topics include linear and non-linear functions and models applied to cost, revenue, profit, demand and supply, systems of equations (linear and nonlinear), matrices, linear programming, difference equations, and mathematics of finance (including simple and compound interest, annuities, mortgages, and loans).
Prerequisite: Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum grade of C+ or Pre-Calculus 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or equivalent or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0600 or MATH 0610 or MATH 0630 or MATH 0633 or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1091, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 or MATH 1101.
For more information, search for this course here.

or
MATH 1100
Finite Math with Applications 1 (3, 1.5, 0)

MATH 1100 Finite Math with Applications 1 (3, 1.5, 0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is intended primarily for Liberal Arts or Tourism students. Students solve problems that have direct relevance in the “real world." Topics to be covered include sets, counting, probability, matrices, linear programming, and math of finance. Prerequisites: Foundations of Math 11 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or Pre-Calculus 11 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum grade of 60% (C) or MATH 0510 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0520 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0523 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1090, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 or MATH 1101. Science Students do not receive credit for Math 1100.
For more information, search for this course here.

MNGT 1710
Introduction to Business (3,0,0)

MNGT 1710 Introduction to Business (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of many business disciplines such as accounting, finance, marketing, human resource management, supply chain management, and entrepreneurship. Students will engage with community business experts for example guest speakers, who will share their business experience dealing with a wide range of issues. Students will simulate, adapt, and respond to a variety of business challenges, expanding their knowledge of business. Throughout the course students will be encouraged to set goals, reflect on their learning and plan for their futures. Topics include multiple perspectives on business, management functions, forms of business ownership, the importance of entrepreneurship, and Indigenous business.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12/English First Peoples 12 with a minimum of 73% or equivalent; or ENGL 0600 with minimum C+; or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a C+.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MNGT 1711, MNGT 1701 or MNGT 1710
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 1900
Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1900 Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the interactions between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include a definition of economics; demand and supply analysis; consumer theory; production and cost; market structure including perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly; market efficiency and market failure; resource markets; and international trade.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B OR MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 1900 and ECON 1901
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 1950
Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1950 Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine economic behavour at the aggregate level, and the measurement and determination of national income. Topics include an introduction to economics; measuring macroeconomic variables including gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation; the Keynesian model; aggregate demand and supply; money and banking; the money market; fiscal policy; monetary policy and the central bank; exchange rates and the balance of payments; and economic growth.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B or MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended.
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of ECON 1950 and ECON 1951.
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 2120
Financial Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 2120 Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a basic understanding of business finance, which deals with how organizations effectively manage their operating and fixed assets and fund them with an optimal mix of debt and equity financing. Topics include the role of the financial manager; goals of the firm; financial statement analysis; time value of money; risk and return including beta and the capital asset pricing model; common and preferred share valuation; bond valuation and interest rates; capital budgeting; cost of capital; and optimal capital structure. Prerequisites: ACCT 2210 or equivalent (minimum C-), and CMNS 1290 or equivalent (minimum C-), and MATH 1070 or equivalent (minimum C-), and ECON 2320 or equivalent (minimum C-)
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 2120, FNCE 2121, FNCE 3120, BBUS 3120 or BBUS 3121
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 2210
Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2210 Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to prepare and analyze the financial statements of a public corporation. Topics include the conceptual framework; accounting standards; the accounting cycle; financial statements; internal control, cash and bank reconciliations; short-term investments and receivables; inventory; long-term assets including intangibles; liabilities including bonds payable; shareholders' equity, dividends, and share repurchases; comprehensive income and the statement of shareholders' equity; statement of cash flows; and financial statement analysis.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12/ English First Peoples 12 with a minimum of 73% or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 1000, ACCT 1030, ACCT 1210/1220, ACCT 1211/1221, ACCT 2211, BBUS 2210 or BBUS 2211
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 2250
Management Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2250 Management Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to collect, analyze, and communicate quantitative and non-quantitative information to assist management in making more effective planning and control decisions. Topics include the role of managerial accounting; basic cost management concepts; job, process, hybrid and activity-based costing; cost behaviour and estimation; cost-volume-profit analysis; profit planning and activity-based budgeting; standard costing, flexible budgeting and variance analysis; cost management tools including the balanced scorecard, benchmarking and reengineering; and relevant costs for decision making such as make or buy, special orders, joint products and outsourcing.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2210 or equivalent (minimum C- grade); ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1110 or ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1140 or ENGL 1210 or equivalent (minimum C- grade)
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2320
Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2320 Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to statistics with an emphasis on its applications in business and economics. Topics include descriptive statistics and numerical measures; an introduction to probability; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling and sampling distributions; interval estimations; and testing hypotheses and statistical inferences.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950
Note:Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MATH 1200, STAT 1200, STAT 2000, ECON 2320, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, BIOL 3000, and SOCI 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2330
Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

ECON 2330 Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study advanced statistical techniques and methods and their applications in business and economics. Topics include inferences about population variance, including hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; analysis of variance and experimental designs; simple and multiple regressions; time series analysis and forecasting; statistical quality control; and decision analysis. Students are required to apply statistical techniques using Excel and/or Minitab.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950; ECON 2320 or equivalent; MIST 2610
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ECON 2330, ECON 3330, STAT 2410, and STAT 3060
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 2430
Introduction to Marketing (3,0,0)

MKTG 2430 Introduction to Marketing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students receive an overall view of the marketing function, the role of marketing in society and its application within organizations. Topics include an overview of marketing; developing a marketing plan and strategies; analyzing the marketing environment; consumer behaviour; segmentation, targeting, and positioning; developing new products; product, branding, and packaging decisions; pricing concepts and strategies; distribution strategies; and integrated marketing communications.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 2430, MKTG 2431, MKTG 3430, TMGT 1150, BBUS 3430 or BBUS 3431
For more information, search for this course here.

MIST 2610
Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

MIST 2610 Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire the knowledge and skills to effectively utilize information systems and technology in support of organizational strategy. Topics include an introduction to information systems; information systems strategy; ethics, privacy, and policy; data security; data and knowledge management; networks and communications technologies; wireless and mobile computing; e-business and e-commerce; Web 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and social networks; systems development and managing information systems projects; and personal productivity software, including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MIST 2610, MIST 2611, BBUS 1370, BBUS 1371, BBUS 2370, COMP 1000, COMP 1350, COMP 1700 or COMP 1910.
For more information, search for this course here.

ORGB 2810
Organizational Behaviour (3,0,0)

ORGB 2810 Organizational Behaviour (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the behavior of individuals and how they interact with each other in different workplace organizations. Topics include defining organizational behavior; perception, personality and emotions; values, attitudes and their effects in the workplace; motivating self and others; working in teams; communication, conflict and negotiation; power and politics; leadership; decision making, creativity and ethics; and organizational culture and change.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of ORGB 2810, ORGB 2811, BBUS 2720, BBUS 2721 or TMGT 1160.
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 2820
Human Resource Management (3,0,0)

HRMN 2820 Human Resource Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the management of an organization's workforce through the design and implementation of effective human resource policies and procedures. Current Canadian issues and practices are emphasized. The topics include the strategic role of human resources management; human resources planning; job analysis and design; recruitment and selection; employment equity; compensation; training and development; performance appraisal; occupational health and safety; and employee and industrial relations.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and ORGB 2810
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of HRMN 2820, HRMN 2821, HRMN 3820, BBUS 3810, BBUS 3811 or TMGT 1140.
For more information, search for this course here.

BLAW 2910
Commercial Law (3,0,0)

BLAW 2910 Commercial Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the legal environment in which businesses operate and how common law and different provincial and federal government statutes influence decision-making. Topics include origins of Canadian law; resolving disputes and navigating the court system; tort law; contract law; sales of goods and consumer protection; methods of carrying on business; workplace law; property law; and creditor law.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
For more information, search for this course here.

SCMN 3320
Supply Chain Management (3,0,0)

SCMN 3320 Supply Chain Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the strategic fit of supply chains with organizational goals; this course lays the foundation for advanced study in the field. Topics include an introduction to supply chain management; supply chain strategy; demand management, inventory management; inventory modeling; supply chain network design and facility location; warehouse management; and transportation management.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2250 or ACCT 2251 and MIST 2610 or MIST 2611 and ECON 2330 or ECON 3330 or STAT 2410 or equivalent.
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of SCMN 3320, SCMN 3321 or BBUS 3320.
For more information, search for this course here.

IBUS 3510
International Business (3,0,0)

IBUS 3510 International Business (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine globalization and the steps managers take to establish or expand operations in international markets. They explore the influence of forces such as culture, economics, politics, and geography on management decision making. Topics include globalization; national differences in political economy; political economy and economic development; differences in culture; ethics in international business; international trade theory; political economy of international trade; foreign direct investment; regional economic integration; international business strategy; entry strategy and strategic alliance; and global marketing and research and development.
Prerequisite: ECON 1950 (minimum C-) or equivalent and MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of IBUS 3510, IBUS 3511, BBUS 3510 or BBUS 3511.
For more information, search for this course here.

MNGT 3710
Business Ethics and Society (3,0,0)

MNGT 3710 Business Ethics and Society (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the complex business environment and the relationships organizations have with each other, civil society, and the natural environment. Through this examination, students learn how critical ethical decision-making is to the successful management of any organization. Topics include elements of critical thinking, business ethics fundamentals, frameworks for ethical thinking, awareness of ethical pitfalls, ethical reasoning, ethical principles, drafting a code of ethics, illustrating an ethical decision-making process, applying ethical decision-making skills, ethical decision-making in the workplace, corporate social responsibility and sustainable development, and stakeholder theory.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BBUS 3030, MNGT 3711, BBUS 3031 or MNGT 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

MNGT 4780
Strategic Management (3,0,0)

MNGT 4780 Strategic Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the basic concepts and methodologies of developing and executing successful business strategies in a dynamic global environment. Effective strategy is about developing competitive advantage. Learners develop insights into the working of CEOs and top management teams in preparation for senior positions in organizations. Topics include an introduction to strategic management, an analysis of the internal and external environments, business-level strategy, competitive strategy and dynamics, corporate-level strategy, acquisition and restructuring strategies, international strategies, and strategy implementation.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 or FNCE 3120, and MKTG 2430 or MKTG 3430, and HRMN 2820 or HRMN 3820 and SCMN 3320 and IBUS 3510.
Note: It is recommended that this course be taken in the student's final year.
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MNGT 4780, MNGT 4781, BBUS 4701 or BBUS 4780.
For more information, search for this course here.

One additional 3000/4000 business course
One additional 3000/4000 business course

Note:  Business courses include those beginning with the ACCT, BLAW, MIST, ENTR, FNCE, HRMN, IBUS, MKTG, MNGT, ORGB, SCMN, or BUSN acronyms.

 Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in Economics (20 Courses)
MATH 1070
Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

MATH 1070 Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is designed for Business and Economics students. Topics include linear and non-linear functions and models applied to cost, revenue, profit, demand and supply, systems of equations (linear and nonlinear), matrices, linear programming, difference equations, and mathematics of finance (including simple and compound interest, annuities, mortgages, and loans).
Prerequisite: Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum grade of C+ or Pre-Calculus 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or equivalent or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0600 or MATH 0610 or MATH 0630 or MATH 0633 or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1091, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 or MATH 1101.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1170
Calculus for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)(recommended)

MATH 1170 Calculus for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is intended for Business and Economics students. Topics include calculation and interpretation of derivatives, curve sketching, optimization (applied to business and economics), multivariable functions (including partial derivatives, optimization and Lagrange multipliers).
Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1070 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
For more information, search for this course here.

or
MATH 1140
Calculus 1 (3,1.5,0) or (5,0,0)

MATH 1140 Calculus 1 (3,1.5,0) or (5,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study differential calculus for functions of one variable, with applications emphasizing the physical sciences. Topics include calculation and interpretation of limits and derivatives; curve sketching; optimization and related-rate problems; l'Hospital's rule; linear approximation and Newton's method. Prerequisites: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 1900
Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1900 Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the interactions between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include a definition of economics; demand and supply analysis; consumer theory; production and cost; market structure including perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly; market efficiency and market failure; resource markets; and international trade.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B OR MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 1900 and ECON 1901
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 1950
Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1950 Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine economic behavour at the aggregate level, and the measurement and determination of national income. Topics include an introduction to economics; measuring macroeconomic variables including gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation; the Keynesian model; aggregate demand and supply; money and banking; the money market; fiscal policy; monetary policy and the central bank; exchange rates and the balance of payments; and economic growth.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B or MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended.
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of ECON 1950 and ECON 1951.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2900
Intermediate Microeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2900 Intermediate Microeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine at a more advanced level how individuals and firms interact in various types of markets. Topics include consumer and producer behaviour; partial equilibrium analysis for perfectly competitive markets; and aspects of monopoly and imperfectly competitive markets. This course prepares students for advanced courses in economics.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900 or ECON 1901 and MATH 1170
Note: Students cannot credit for more than one of ECON 2900, BUEC 2040, BUEC 2041
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2950
Intermediate Macroeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2950 Intermediate Macroeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students complete an advanced, in-depth examination of economic behaviour at the aggregate level. Topics include the determination and distribution of output in the long run; the classical dichotomy and neutrality of money; the measurement, problems, and determinants of unemployment and inflation in the long run; and the role of capital accumulation, population growth, and technology in growth theory.
Prerequisite: ECON 1950 or ECON 1951
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2320
Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2320 Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to statistics with an emphasis on its applications in business and economics. Topics include descriptive statistics and numerical measures; an introduction to probability; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling and sampling distributions; interval estimations; and testing hypotheses and statistical inferences.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950
Note:Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MATH 1200, STAT 1200, STAT 2000, ECON 2320, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, BIOL 3000, and SOCI 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2330
Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

ECON 2330 Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study advanced statistical techniques and methods and their applications in business and economics. Topics include inferences about population variance, including hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; analysis of variance and experimental designs; simple and multiple regressions; time series analysis and forecasting; statistical quality control; and decision analysis. Students are required to apply statistical techniques using Excel and/or Minitab.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950; ECON 2320 or equivalent; MIST 2610
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ECON 2330, ECON 3330, STAT 2410, and STAT 3060
For more information, search for this course here.

At least 12 from the following:
ECON 3100
Canadian Financial Markets (3,0,0)

ECON 3100 Canadian Financial Markets (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to money, banking, and the Canadian financial system. Topics include an overview of financial markets, interest rates and the structure of interest rates, the efficiency of financial markets, financial regulation, banks and other financial institutions, financial institutions risk management, the role of the central bank, the money supply, and monetary policy.
Prerequisite: ECON 1950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3200
Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3200 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the mathematical methods and tools most commonly used in analyzing economic problems. Topics include a review of set theory, functions, and limits; linear models and matrix algebra; application of single and multivariable calculus; unconstrained and constrained optimization; integration and difference and differential equations; application of dynamic analysis; and linear and non-linear programing.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900; ECON 1950; MATH 1170 or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3410
Economics of Climate Change (3,0,0)

ECON 3410 Economics of Climate Change (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students investigate the climatic changes resulting from global warming and the policy actions being taken to address these problems. Topics include an overview of the science and economics of climate change; the impact of climate change on growth and economic development; the economics of stabilization including efficiency, externalities, public goods, and environmental policy instruments; inter-temporal decisions and uncertainties about the impacts of climate change; the policy responses to mitigation and adaption and their cost; international collective action and its challenges; and prominent climate policy approaches, such as the United Nations Framework Convention and the Kyoto Protocol.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3500
Public Finance (3,0,0)

ECON 3500 Public Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the rationale for government intervention in a market economy, the assessment of public policy, and the impact of government expenditures and taxation on the economy and the citizenry. Topics include government activities, externalities, public goods, social security, fiscal deficits and public debt, principles of taxation, incidence and effects of taxation, and optimal taxation.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900; ECON 1950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3550
International Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3550 International Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students analyze the movement of capital, goods, and services across international boundaries and assess their financial impact. With advances in transportation and communication, greater outsourcing, and increased globalization, trade, and foreign direct investment, the corresponding capital movements are becoming much more important to the global economy. Topics include the theories of absolute and comparative advantage; modern theories of trade, including factor-proportions; tariff and non-tariff barriers; current and capital accounts; exchange rate determination; balance of payments and exchange rate policy; evolution of the international monetary system; and trade and economic development.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900; ECON 1950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3600
Labour Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3600 Labour Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students analyze how individuals, families, firms, and governments operate within a contemporary labour market, and the impact of labour market institutions and government policy. Topics include an overview of the labour market; labour demand and elasticities; the effect of quasi-fixed labour costs on demand; labour supply and the decision to work; labour supply and household production; compensating wage differentials and labour markets; education and training; worker mobility; pay and productivity; gender, race, and inequality in earnings; and unions and the labour market.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3610
The Economics of Gender (3,0,0)

ECON 3610 The Economics of Gender (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students use economic theory and analysis in an attempt to explain why gender differences lead to different outcomes in education, career choices, family roles, and earnings. A comparison is made of the economic status of women relative to men throughout the world, with special emphasis on similarities and differences between Canada and other economically advanced nations. Topics include marriage and family; the economics of fertility; women at work; women's earnings, occupation, and education; the gender gap in earnings; women's employment and earnings; family policy; and women in developing countries.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3650
Government and Business (3,0,0)

ECON 3650 Government and Business (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students utilize neoclassical and institutional economic theory to examine government intervention in the economy. Topics include competition and economic efficiency; market failure; institutional theory; private sector governance structures; the role of the state; public sector governance structures, including competition policy, price and entry regulation, prevention of anti-competitive practices, and public enterprise and ownership; and government failure.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900; ECON 1950 or POLI 1110
Note: Students may not receive credit for both ECON 3650 and POLI 3650
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3670
Economic Analysis of Law (3,0,0)

ECON 3670 Economic Analysis of Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore and analyze legal issues from an economic perspective; economists focus primarily on whether particular legal doctrines, concepts, and processes are efficient. Topics include an introduction to the law, legal institutions, and procedures, as well as economic theory relating to property law, contracts, torts, criminal law, and general legal processes.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3700
Benefit-Cost Analysis and the Economics of Project Evaluation (3,0,0)

ECON 3700 Benefit-Cost Analysis and the Economics of Project Evaluation (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine projects that are commonly evaluated using benefit-cost analysis, and the appropriate methods for determining their cost effectiveness. Topics include project evaluation techniques; measuring welfare change; correcting for market distortions using shadow wages and prices; finding the appropriate discount rate; making valid valuations that incorporate inflation and appropriate planning horizon, scrap, and spillover and secondary effects; public enterprise pricing rules; valuing intangibles; and incorporating risk and uncertainty. Case studies of projects are analyzed from a variety of areas, such as natural resources, the environment, human resources, public service, and transportation.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3710
Environmental Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3710 Environmental Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students apply the tools of microeconomic analysis to environmental issues. Topics include property rights and efficient resource use, market failure, the over-utilization of common pool resources, the Coase Theorem, non-market valuation techniques, government policies designed to cost-effectively control pollution, and real-world strategies for controlling pollution.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3730
Forestry Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3730 Forestry Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the concepts and analytical techniques used in forestry economics and their application to forest management, conservation, and policy analysis. Topics include techniques for analyzing forestry investments; timber demand, supply, and pricing; valuation of non-marketed goods and services, such as recreation and wildlife habitat; land allocation and multiple use; forest management issues, such as planting, thinning, and optimal age of crop rotation; and regulatory issues, including allowable annual cut regulations, property rights, tenure, and taxes.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3740
Land Use Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3740 Land Use Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students focus on land use issues with particular emphasis on government policies relating to the preservation and conservation of agricultural lands. Topics include rent theory; welfare measurement; property rights and externalities; project evaluation using cost-benefit and multiple accounts analysis; the economics of soil conservation; efficiency and equity in land use planning, including zoning changes; government land preservation and conservation policies, and agricultural subsidies; water use in agriculture; forest management; and multiple uses of public lands.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3840
Economic Analysis of Health (3,0,0)

ECON 3840 Economic Analysis of Health (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students apply microeconomic tools to an analysis of the health care system, while being introduced to the major issues in health economics and the ongoing debate over health care policy. Topics include the economic determinants of health, the market for medical care, the market for health insurance, the role of the government in health care, and health care reform.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3900
Intermediate Microeconomics 2 (3,0,0)

ECON 3900 Intermediate Microeconomics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students continue to study intermediate topics in partial and general equilibrium analysis. Topics include consumer choice under different scenarios, factor markets, game theory, imperfect competition, general equilibrium analysis and welfare economics, public goods, and externalities.
Prerequisite: ECON 2900; MATH 1170 or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3950
Intermediate Macroeconomics 2 (3,0,0)

ECON 3950 Intermediate Macroeconomics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students continue to study short-run macroeconomic theory and its applications to contemporary policy issues. Topics include an overview of macroeconomics; macroeconomic data; the open economy; economic fluctuations; aggregate demand, including investment savings-liquidity preference money supply (IS-LM) curves; aggregate supply, including the Phillips curve; economic stabilization and the effectiveness of fiscal and monetary policy; and money supply and demand.
Prerequisite: ECON 2950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3990
***Selected Topics in Economics (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

ECON 3990 ***Selected Topics in Economics (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

Credits: 6 credits
Delivery: Campus

The subject matter in this course varies from semester to semester depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Courses are taught by visiting professors to instill their unique perspectives or by regular faculty to address emerging topics in a discipline, share research or teaching interests, or test potential new courses. The added variety in the curriculum greatly enhances the student learning experience.
Prerequisite: Permission of the program advisor
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4100
International Financial Markets (3,0,0)

ECON 4100 International Financial Markets (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine international financial markets and institutions and their critical role in the global economy. Topics include the elements that constitute a global financial institution; types of financial institutions and markets; global market structure differences; recent market failures, their causes, and solutions; and global financial regulation and reform.
Prerequisite: BBUS 3150 or ECON 3100 or FNCE 3150 or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4320
Econometrics (3,0,0)

ECON 4320 Econometrics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to econometric models and the application of classical regression techniques to estimate socio-economic relationships. Topics include an introduction to econometrics; simple linear regression; interval estimation and hypothesis testing; predictions, goodness of fit, and modeling issues; multiple regression; non-linear relationships; heteroscedasticity; dynamic models, autocorrelation, and forecasting; simultaneous equations; and qualitative dependent variables. General econometric computer software is used to reinforce course concepts.
Prerequisite: ECON 2330 or ECON 3330 or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4330
Forecasting in Business and Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 4330 Forecasting in Business and Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students apply a variety of forecasting methods to solve problems in business and economics. Topics include qualitative forecasting methods; the forecasting process, data considerations, and model selection; moving averages and exponential smoothing; multiple regression and time series decomposition; Box-Jenkins methodology to fit autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ARCH); time-varying volatility and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) and vector autoregressive models; combining forecasting results; and implementing forecasting.
Prerequisite: ECON 2330 or ECON 3330 or equivalent
Exclusion: BUEC 4330
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4560
International Macroeconomics and Finance (3,0,0)

ECON 4560 International Macroeconomics and Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the determination of exchange rates in an open economy and policies that governments may adopt to influence their movement. Topics include balance of payments; foreign exchange markets; interaction of the money, interest rates and exchange rates; exchange rates in the long run, including purchasing power and interest rate parity; exchange rates in the short run; fixed exchange rates and foreign exchange intervention; history of the international monetary system; macroeconomic policy under floating exchange rates; and performance of global capital markets and policy issues.
Prerequisite: ECON 2330 or ECON 3330 or equivalent; ECON 2950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4660
Industrial Organization (3,0,0)

ECON 4660 Industrial Organization (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the performance and operation of imperfectly competitive markets, as well as the behavior of firms in these markets. They attempt to answer big questions, such as why are firms and markets organized the way they are; how does the behavior of firms affect the structure and performance of markets; and how does the organization of markets determine how firms behave and how markets perform. Topics include theories of the firm; market structure models; strategic interaction among firms; business practices such as mergers and acquisitions, price discrimination, advertising, innovation, vertical restraints, and cartels; and new developments in industrial organization, including network issues and auction markets.
Prerequisite: ECON 2900 or ECON 3040
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4720
Sustainable Economic Development (3,0,0)

ECON 4720 Sustainable Economic Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine theories and issues, internal and external challenges, and alternative policy options relating to sustainable economic development. Topics include a comparative analysis of the leading theories of economic growth, development, and sustainability; lack of economic growth, poverty, and income distribution; consequences of population growth and technological change; employment and migration, human capital, agriculture, and rural development; international trade and commercial policy, foreign investment, and aid; and global integration, economic transition, and environmental degradation.
Prerequisite: ECON 2950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4960
Directed Studies in Economics (0,3,0) or (0,3,0)(0,3,0)

ECON 4960 Directed Studies in Economics (0,3,0) or (0,3,0)(0,3,0)

Credits: 6 credits
Delivery: Campus

Individuals or groups of students engage in independent study, research, or practice related to a topic in economics under faculty supervision. The supervisor(s) determines the appropriate curriculum, evaluation methods, and credit assignment in consultation with the student(s) and subject to the approval of the department chairperson(s) and dean.
Prerequisite: Permission of the program advisor
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4990
***Selected Topics in Economics (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

ECON 4990 ***Selected Topics in Economics (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

Credits: 6 credits
Delivery: Campus

The subject matter in this course varies from semester to semester depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Courses are taught by visiting professors to instill their unique perspectives or by regular faculty to address emerging topics in a discipline, share research or teaching interests, or test potential new courses. The added variety in the curriculum greatly enhances the student learning experience.
Prerequisite: Permission of the program advisor
For more information, search for this course here.

 Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in Economics and Political Studies (15 Courses)

Note: Contact ArtsAdvising@tru.ca for this program option.

Required courses (7 courses)
ECON 1900
Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1900 Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the interactions between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include a definition of economics; demand and supply analysis; consumer theory; production and cost; market structure including perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly; market efficiency and market failure; resource markets; and international trade.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B OR MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 1900 and ECON 1901
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 1950
Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1950 Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine economic behavour at the aggregate level, and the measurement and determination of national income. Topics include an introduction to economics; measuring macroeconomic variables including gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation; the Keynesian model; aggregate demand and supply; money and banking; the money market; fiscal policy; monetary policy and the central bank; exchange rates and the balance of payments; and economic growth.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B or MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended.
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of ECON 1950 and ECON 1951.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2950
Intermediate Macroeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2950 Intermediate Macroeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students complete an advanced, in-depth examination of economic behaviour at the aggregate level. Topics include the determination and distribution of output in the long run; the classical dichotomy and neutrality of money; the measurement, problems, and determinants of unemployment and inflation in the long run; and the role of capital accumulation, population growth, and technology in growth theory.
Prerequisite: ECON 1950 or ECON 1951
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2320
Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2320 Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to statistics with an emphasis on its applications in business and economics. Topics include descriptive statistics and numerical measures; an introduction to probability; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling and sampling distributions; interval estimations; and testing hypotheses and statistical inferences.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950
Note:Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MATH 1200, STAT 1200, STAT 2000, ECON 2320, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, BIOL 3000, and SOCI 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

Any two 1000 or 2000 level Political Studies course
Elective courses (8 courses)
At least four from the following (only one 2000 level)
ECON 2430
Global and Canadian Economic Issues (3,0,0)

ECON 2430 Global and Canadian Economic Issues (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine a variety of economic issues facing the Canadian and world economies. The topics discussed each semester vary and may include economic crisis, environmental challenges, 'big' business and multinational corporations, globalization, free trade, health care, education, poverty, and the economics of crime.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or both ECON 1900 and ECON 1950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2900
Intermediate Microeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2900 Intermediate Microeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine at a more advanced level how individuals and firms interact in various types of markets. Topics include consumer and producer behaviour; partial equilibrium analysis for perfectly competitive markets; and aspects of monopoly and imperfectly competitive markets. This course prepares students for advanced courses in economics.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900 or ECON 1901 and MATH 1170
Note: Students cannot credit for more than one of ECON 2900, BUEC 2040, BUEC 2041
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3100
Canadian Financial Markets (3,0,0)

ECON 3100 Canadian Financial Markets (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to money, banking, and the Canadian financial system. Topics include an overview of financial markets, interest rates and the structure of interest rates, the efficiency of financial markets, financial regulation, banks and other financial institutions, financial institutions risk management, the role of the central bank, the money supply, and monetary policy.
Prerequisite: ECON 1950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3330
Applied Statistics for Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3330 Applied Statistics for Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study advanced statistical techniques and methods and their applications in business and economics. Topics include inferences about population variance, including hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; analysis of variance and experimental designs; simple and multiple regressions; time series analysis and forecasting. Students are required to apply statistical techniques using Excel and/or Minitab.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950; ECON 2320; MIST 2610
Exclusion: BUEC 2330, BUEC 3101, BUEC 3330, ECON 2330, ECON 2331, STAT 2410
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3410
Economics of Climate Change (3,0,0)

ECON 3410 Economics of Climate Change (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students investigate the climatic changes resulting from global warming and the policy actions being taken to address these problems. Topics include an overview of the science and economics of climate change; the impact of climate change on growth and economic development; the economics of stabilization including efficiency, externalities, public goods, and environmental policy instruments; inter-temporal decisions and uncertainties about the impacts of climate change; the policy responses to mitigation and adaption and their cost; international collective action and its challenges; and prominent climate policy approaches, such as the United Nations Framework Convention and the Kyoto Protocol.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3500
Public Finance (3,0,0)

ECON 3500 Public Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the rationale for government intervention in a market economy, the assessment of public policy, and the impact of government expenditures and taxation on the economy and the citizenry. Topics include government activities, externalities, public goods, social security, fiscal deficits and public debt, principles of taxation, incidence and effects of taxation, and optimal taxation.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900; ECON 1950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3550
International Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3550 International Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students analyze the movement of capital, goods, and services across international boundaries and assess their financial impact. With advances in transportation and communication, greater outsourcing, and increased globalization, trade, and foreign direct investment, the corresponding capital movements are becoming much more important to the global economy. Topics include the theories of absolute and comparative advantage; modern theories of trade, including factor-proportions; tariff and non-tariff barriers; current and capital accounts; exchange rate determination; balance of payments and exchange rate policy; evolution of the international monetary system; and trade and economic development.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900; ECON 1950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3600
Labour Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3600 Labour Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students analyze how individuals, families, firms, and governments operate within a contemporary labour market, and the impact of labour market institutions and government policy. Topics include an overview of the labour market; labour demand and elasticities; the effect of quasi-fixed labour costs on demand; labour supply and the decision to work; labour supply and household production; compensating wage differentials and labour markets; education and training; worker mobility; pay and productivity; gender, race, and inequality in earnings; and unions and the labour market.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3610
The Economics of Gender (3,0,0)

ECON 3610 The Economics of Gender (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students use economic theory and analysis in an attempt to explain why gender differences lead to different outcomes in education, career choices, family roles, and earnings. A comparison is made of the economic status of women relative to men throughout the world, with special emphasis on similarities and differences between Canada and other economically advanced nations. Topics include marriage and family; the economics of fertility; women at work; women's earnings, occupation, and education; the gender gap in earnings; women's employment and earnings; family policy; and women in developing countries.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3650
Government and Business (3,0,0)

ECON 3650 Government and Business (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students utilize neoclassical and institutional economic theory to examine government intervention in the economy. Topics include competition and economic efficiency; market failure; institutional theory; private sector governance structures; the role of the state; public sector governance structures, including competition policy, price and entry regulation, prevention of anti-competitive practices, and public enterprise and ownership; and government failure.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900; ECON 1950 or POLI 1110
Note: Students may not receive credit for both ECON 3650 and POLI 3650
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3670
Economic Analysis of Law (3,0,0)

ECON 3670 Economic Analysis of Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore and analyze legal issues from an economic perspective; economists focus primarily on whether particular legal doctrines, concepts, and processes are efficient. Topics include an introduction to the law, legal institutions, and procedures, as well as economic theory relating to property law, contracts, torts, criminal law, and general legal processes.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3700
Benefit-Cost Analysis and the Economics of Project Evaluation (3,0,0)

ECON 3700 Benefit-Cost Analysis and the Economics of Project Evaluation (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine projects that are commonly evaluated using benefit-cost analysis, and the appropriate methods for determining their cost effectiveness. Topics include project evaluation techniques; measuring welfare change; correcting for market distortions using shadow wages and prices; finding the appropriate discount rate; making valid valuations that incorporate inflation and appropriate planning horizon, scrap, and spillover and secondary effects; public enterprise pricing rules; valuing intangibles; and incorporating risk and uncertainty. Case studies of projects are analyzed from a variety of areas, such as natural resources, the environment, human resources, public service, and transportation.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3710
Environmental Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3710 Environmental Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students apply the tools of microeconomic analysis to environmental issues. Topics include property rights and efficient resource use, market failure, the over-utilization of common pool resources, the Coase Theorem, non-market valuation techniques, government policies designed to cost-effectively control pollution, and real-world strategies for controlling pollution.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3730
Forestry Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3730 Forestry Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the concepts and analytical techniques used in forestry economics and their application to forest management, conservation, and policy analysis. Topics include techniques for analyzing forestry investments; timber demand, supply, and pricing; valuation of non-marketed goods and services, such as recreation and wildlife habitat; land allocation and multiple use; forest management issues, such as planting, thinning, and optimal age of crop rotation; and regulatory issues, including allowable annual cut regulations, property rights, tenure, and taxes.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3740
Land Use Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3740 Land Use Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students focus on land use issues with particular emphasis on government policies relating to the preservation and conservation of agricultural lands. Topics include rent theory; welfare measurement; property rights and externalities; project evaluation using cost-benefit and multiple accounts analysis; the economics of soil conservation; efficiency and equity in land use planning, including zoning changes; government land preservation and conservation policies, and agricultural subsidies; water use in agriculture; forest management; and multiple uses of public lands.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3840
Economic Analysis of Health (3,0,0)

ECON 3840 Economic Analysis of Health (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students apply microeconomic tools to an analysis of the health care system, while being introduced to the major issues in health economics and the ongoing debate over health care policy. Topics include the economic determinants of health, the market for medical care, the market for health insurance, the role of the government in health care, and health care reform.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3990
***Selected Topics in Economics (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

ECON 3990 ***Selected Topics in Economics (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

Credits: 6 credits
Delivery: Campus

The subject matter in this course varies from semester to semester depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Courses are taught by visiting professors to instill their unique perspectives or by regular faculty to address emerging topics in a discipline, share research or teaching interests, or test potential new courses. The added variety in the curriculum greatly enhances the student learning experience.
Prerequisite: Permission of the program advisor
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4560
International Macroeconomics and Finance (3,0,0)

ECON 4560 International Macroeconomics and Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the determination of exchange rates in an open economy and policies that governments may adopt to influence their movement. Topics include balance of payments; foreign exchange markets; interaction of the money, interest rates and exchange rates; exchange rates in the long run, including purchasing power and interest rate parity; exchange rates in the short run; fixed exchange rates and foreign exchange intervention; history of the international monetary system; macroeconomic policy under floating exchange rates; and performance of global capital markets and policy issues.
Prerequisite: ECON 2330 or ECON 3330 or equivalent; ECON 2950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4720
Sustainable Economic Development (3,0,0)

ECON 4720 Sustainable Economic Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine theories and issues, internal and external challenges, and alternative policy options relating to sustainable economic development. Topics include a comparative analysis of the leading theories of economic growth, development, and sustainability; lack of economic growth, poverty, and income distribution; consequences of population growth and technological change; employment and migration, human capital, agriculture, and rural development; international trade and commercial policy, foreign investment, and aid; and global integration, economic transition, and environmental degradation.
Prerequisite: ECON 2950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4990
***Selected Topics in Economics (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

ECON 4990 ***Selected Topics in Economics (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)

Credits: 6 credits
Delivery: Campus

The subject matter in this course varies from semester to semester depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Courses are taught by visiting professors to instill their unique perspectives or by regular faculty to address emerging topics in a discipline, share research or teaching interests, or test potential new courses. The added variety in the curriculum greatly enhances the student learning experience.
Prerequisite: Permission of the program advisor
For more information, search for this course here.

At least four from the following (only one 2000 level)
POLI 2230 is highly recommended
POLI 2150
Comparative Politics (3,0,0)

POLI 2150 Comparative Politics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are furnished with the tools and concepts of political analysis to examine the functioning of several political systems. Using comparative analysis, students gain an interdisciplinary and intercultural understanding of the variety of systems of governance in the world today. Students consider contemporary issues gripping the world including the impact of globalization. Students explore topics including poverty, corruption, human rights, democracy, conflict, religion, social movements, as well as sustainable development. Students also consider these topics in diverse country-specific case studies to apply and grow their awareness of politics in diverse contexts.
Prerequisite: Completion of 30 credits (any discipline).
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 2220
Political Philosophy (3,0,0)

POLI 2220 Political Philosophy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine important themes of the Western political tradition through an analysis of selected political philosophers such as Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, and Marx. Students' encounter with these theorists initiates discussion of such concepts as authority, justice, freedom, equality, and political participation. Through these discussions, students apply the principles of certain political traditions and theorists to modern issues and consider ongoing and real-world political challenges and possibilities.
Prerequisite: Completion of 30 credits (any discipline)
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 2230
Canadian Public (3,0,0)highly recommended

POLI 2230 Canadian Public (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students will acquire an introductory knowledge of the policy-making process and the different perspectives on policymaking and implementation in Canada. From an understanding of established policies in important policy areas – healthcare, economy, immigration, environment, climate change, Indigenous Reconciliation, social challenges, post-secondary education - students will acquire the skills to evaluate the strengths and limitations of these policies and deliberate on the range of policy options and instruments to address contemporary challenges.
Prerequisite: POLI 1110 or POLI 1111
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 2600
International Politics (3,0,0)

POLI 2600 International Politics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students analyse the relations between states using frameworks based in political studies. Students examine the evolution of international systems and research East-West and North-South issues through historical and contemporary lenses. Students also ponder techniques of wielding international influence through diplomacy, propaganda, foreign aid, subversion, and war as they assess the sources and nature of international conflict and cooperation. By examining political theory alongside case studies, students gain breadth and depth in knowledge about modern social, economic, and ecological issues. They also develop strategies for making informed decisions to tackle these modern international issues with compassion, a human rights orientation, and a sense of fairness and equality.
Prerequisite: Completion of 30 credits (any discipline)
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 3010
Canadian Political Parties (3,0,0)

POLI 3010 Canadian Political Parties (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the organization and operation of party politics and the systems of party competition in Canada. Students examine political parties in Canada with an emphasis on national-level politics.
Prerequisite: Completion of 30 credits (any discipline)
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 3030
Federalism in Canada (3,0,0)

POLI 3030 Federalism in Canada (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the theory and practice of federalism, including cultural duality, social stresses, problems of flexibility, the Constitution, and the role of the courts. Prerequisites: Completion of 30 credits (any discipline).
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 3050
Canadian Political Ideas (3,0,0)

POLI 3050 Canadian Political Ideas (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the political theories and ideologies in Canada, and analyze key Canadian political writers and the impact of ideas on political issues. Prerequities: Completion of 30 credits (any discipline).
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 3100
Local Government and Politics in Canada (3,0,0)

POLI 3100 Local Government and Politics in Canada (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to local government in Canada and the contemporary social, economic, and ecological issues facing municipalities. Students will discuss themes that concern local government powers and responsibilities, community planning, fiscal and investment issues, and elections and community participation. By assessing the challenges and opportunities of local government, students will examine the roles that municipalities play in addressing contemporary and future issues through lenses of privilege, equality, equity, and economic and environmental sustainability. Students use their knowledge of these political systems to make informed decisions and innovate positive change at local levels.
Prerequisite: ANTH 1210 or SOCI 1110 or SOCI 1210 or POLI 1210.
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 3200
American Government and Politics (3,0,0)

POLI 3200 American Government and Politics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the social context of American politics, voting behaviour, legislature process, executive powers, executive-legislative relations, judicial behaviour, and problems of policy.
Prerequisite: Completion of 30 credits (any discipline).
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 3420
Modern Political Theory: Analysis of a Selected Theorist (3,0,0)

POLI 3420 Modern Political Theory: Analysis of a Selected Theorist (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course offers a detailed examination of an acknowledged masterpiece of modern political theory. The text and attendant literature selection varies from year to year.
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 3440
Social and Political Thought (3,0,0)

POLI 3440 Social and Political Thought (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine major concepts in political philosophy such as justice, equality, rights, obligation, and liberty in the context of both classical and contemporary political thought. Students will identify central problems and questions in political theory; understand the arguments used by political theorists to resolve these problems; analyze and assess the consistency and plausibility of major schools of thought; and understand the nature, scope, and limits of human knowledge.
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 3460
Democratic Theory (3,0,0)

POLI 3460 Democratic Theory (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is an examination of both classical and contemporary theories of democracy including representative democratic theory, participatory democratic theory and their relationship to 20th century concepts of democracy.
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 3500
The Politics of Mexico (3,0,0)

POLI 3500 The Politics of Mexico (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the contemporary political, social and economic problems that confront Mexico, with an emphasis on democratization, human rights, economic restructuring, free trade, political parties, reformist and revolutionary movements.
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 3520
Politics of Developing Nations (3,0,0)

POLI 3520 Politics of Developing Nations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the problems of economic development, social change and democratization in the Developing World from a political perspective. The themes discussed in this course include colonialism, decolonization, relations between developed - developing nations, and political theories of development.
Prerequisite: POLI 1210 is recommended.
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 3610
Canadian Foreign Policy (3,0,0)

POLI 3610 Canadian Foreign Policy (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the study of Canadian foreign policy and focus on competing perspectives on Canadian foreign policy, the evolution and formation of Canadian foreign policy, and Canada's role in the globe as a middle power. Students engage with major theories to investigate pressing Canadian foreign policy issues in our contemporary world. Students learn how to communicate foreign policy through an experiential learning activity designed to simulate how diplomacy and policy are achieved within the international system through a major experiential learning activity such as Model United Nations, Model NATO, or Model Arctic Council.
Prerequisite: Completion of 30 credits. POLI 2600 is recommended.
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 3640
Politics of the Middle East (3,0,0)

POLI 3640 Politics of the Middle East (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is an introduction to the evolution and operation of Middle East political systems and issues. Students explore a number of major themes and issues that are relevant to the politics of the region specifically, and international relations in general. These issues include Islamism, colonialism, politics of oil, gender and democratization.
Prerequisite: POLI 1210 or POLI 2600 is recommended.
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 3650
Government and Business (3,1,0)

POLI 3650 Government and Business (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students analyze government intervention in the face of mergers, bigness, and monopoly power, and consider possible government intervention in the face of unacceptable firm behaviour.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900 and ECON 1950 or POLI 1110 with a grade of C or better
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of POLI 3650 or ECON 3650. POLI 3650 or ECON 3650 may be used to fulfill the pre-BBA elective requirement or the BBA Environmental requirement, but not both.
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 4010
Canadian Provincial and Regional Politics (3,0,0)

POLI 4010 Canadian Provincial and Regional Politics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine political parties, processes, and institutions in the provincial political systems. Students consider the regional arrangement between provinces. Prerequisites: Completion of 30 credits (any discipline)
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 4020
Politics of the Canadian Constitutions (3,0,0)

POLI 4020 Politics of the Canadian Constitutions (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the creation and amendment of the Canadian Constitutions. Students consider the political aspects of the Canadian judicial system. Students also learn about and assess the political consequences of decisions made in Canada related to the Constitutions. Prerequisites: Completion of 30 credits (any discipline)
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 4050
***Topics in Canadian Politics (3,0,0)

POLI 4050 ***Topics in Canadian Politics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This seminar course offers an in-depth examination of the important issues in Canadian politics.
For more information, search for this course here.

POLI 4060
***Topics in Latin American Politics (3,0,0)

POLI 4060 ***Topics in Latin American Politics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine contemporary political, social, and economic problems that confront Latin America. Demilitarization, democratization, human rights, economic restructuring, and free trade are emphasized.
Prerequisite: Completion of 30 credits (any discipline)
For more information, search for this course here.

 Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in Entrepreneurship (20 Courses)
MATH 1070
Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)(recommended)

MATH 1070 Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is designed for Business and Economics students. Topics include linear and non-linear functions and models applied to cost, revenue, profit, demand and supply, systems of equations (linear and nonlinear), matrices, linear programming, difference equations, and mathematics of finance (including simple and compound interest, annuities, mortgages, and loans).
Prerequisite: Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum grade of C+ or Pre-Calculus 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or equivalent or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0600 or MATH 0610 or MATH 0630 or MATH 0633 or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1091, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 or MATH 1101.
For more information, search for this course here.

or
MATH 1100
Finite Math with Applications 1 (3, 1.5, 0)

MATH 1100 Finite Math with Applications 1 (3, 1.5, 0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is intended primarily for Liberal Arts or Tourism students. Students solve problems that have direct relevance in the “real world." Topics to be covered include sets, counting, probability, matrices, linear programming, and math of finance. Prerequisites: Foundations of Math 11 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or Pre-Calculus 11 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum grade of 60% (C) or MATH 0510 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0520 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0523 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1090, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 or MATH 1101. Science Students do not receive credit for Math 1100.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2320
Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2320 Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to statistics with an emphasis on its applications in business and economics. Topics include descriptive statistics and numerical measures; an introduction to probability; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling and sampling distributions; interval estimations; and testing hypotheses and statistical inferences.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950
Note:Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MATH 1200, STAT 1200, STAT 2000, ECON 2320, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, BIOL 3000, and SOCI 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2330
Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

ECON 2330 Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study advanced statistical techniques and methods and their applications in business and economics. Topics include inferences about population variance, including hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; analysis of variance and experimental designs; simple and multiple regressions; time series analysis and forecasting; statistical quality control; and decision analysis. Students are required to apply statistical techniques using Excel and/or Minitab.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950; ECON 2320 or equivalent; MIST 2610
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ECON 2330, ECON 3330, STAT 2410, and STAT 3060
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 2120
Financial Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 2120 Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a basic understanding of business finance, which deals with how organizations effectively manage their operating and fixed assets and fund them with an optimal mix of debt and equity financing. Topics include the role of the financial manager; goals of the firm; financial statement analysis; time value of money; risk and return including beta and the capital asset pricing model; common and preferred share valuation; bond valuation and interest rates; capital budgeting; cost of capital; and optimal capital structure. Prerequisites: ACCT 2210 or equivalent (minimum C-), and CMNS 1290 or equivalent (minimum C-), and MATH 1070 or equivalent (minimum C-), and ECON 2320 or equivalent (minimum C-)
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 2120, FNCE 2121, FNCE 3120, BBUS 3120 or BBUS 3121
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 2210
Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2210 Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to prepare and analyze the financial statements of a public corporation. Topics include the conceptual framework; accounting standards; the accounting cycle; financial statements; internal control, cash and bank reconciliations; short-term investments and receivables; inventory; long-term assets including intangibles; liabilities including bonds payable; shareholders' equity, dividends, and share repurchases; comprehensive income and the statement of shareholders' equity; statement of cash flows; and financial statement analysis.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12/ English First Peoples 12 with a minimum of 73% or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 1000, ACCT 1030, ACCT 1210/1220, ACCT 1211/1221, ACCT 2211, BBUS 2210 or BBUS 2211
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 2250
Management Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2250 Management Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to collect, analyze, and communicate quantitative and non-quantitative information to assist management in making more effective planning and control decisions. Topics include the role of managerial accounting; basic cost management concepts; job, process, hybrid and activity-based costing; cost behaviour and estimation; cost-volume-profit analysis; profit planning and activity-based budgeting; standard costing, flexible budgeting and variance analysis; cost management tools including the balanced scorecard, benchmarking and reengineering; and relevant costs for decision making such as make or buy, special orders, joint products and outsourcing.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2210 or equivalent (minimum C- grade); ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1110 or ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1140 or ENGL 1210 or equivalent (minimum C- grade)
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 2430
Introduction to Marketing (3,0,0)

MKTG 2430 Introduction to Marketing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students receive an overall view of the marketing function, the role of marketing in society and its application within organizations. Topics include an overview of marketing; developing a marketing plan and strategies; analyzing the marketing environment; consumer behaviour; segmentation, targeting, and positioning; developing new products; product, branding, and packaging decisions; pricing concepts and strategies; distribution strategies; and integrated marketing communications.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 2430, MKTG 2431, MKTG 3430, TMGT 1150, BBUS 3430 or BBUS 3431
For more information, search for this course here.

MIST 2610
Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

MIST 2610 Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire the knowledge and skills to effectively utilize information systems and technology in support of organizational strategy. Topics include an introduction to information systems; information systems strategy; ethics, privacy, and policy; data security; data and knowledge management; networks and communications technologies; wireless and mobile computing; e-business and e-commerce; Web 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and social networks; systems development and managing information systems projects; and personal productivity software, including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MIST 2610, MIST 2611, BBUS 1370, BBUS 1371, BBUS 2370, COMP 1000, COMP 1350, COMP 1700 or COMP 1910.
For more information, search for this course here.

ORGB 2810
Organizational Behaviour (3,0,0)

ORGB 2810 Organizational Behaviour (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the behavior of individuals and how they interact with each other in different workplace organizations. Topics include defining organizational behavior; perception, personality and emotions; values, attitudes and their effects in the workplace; motivating self and others; working in teams; communication, conflict and negotiation; power and politics; leadership; decision making, creativity and ethics; and organizational culture and change.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of ORGB 2810, ORGB 2811, BBUS 2720, BBUS 2721 or TMGT 1160.
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 2820
Human Resource Management (3,0,0)

HRMN 2820 Human Resource Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the management of an organization's workforce through the design and implementation of effective human resource policies and procedures. Current Canadian issues and practices are emphasized. The topics include the strategic role of human resources management; human resources planning; job analysis and design; recruitment and selection; employment equity; compensation; training and development; performance appraisal; occupational health and safety; and employee and industrial relations.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and ORGB 2810
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of HRMN 2820, HRMN 2821, HRMN 3820, BBUS 3810, BBUS 3811 or TMGT 1140.
For more information, search for this course here.

BLAW 2910
Commercial Law (3,0,0)

BLAW 2910 Commercial Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the legal environment in which businesses operate and how common law and different provincial and federal government statutes influence decision-making. Topics include origins of Canadian law; resolving disputes and navigating the court system; tort law; contract law; sales of goods and consumer protection; methods of carrying on business; workplace law; property law; and creditor law.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
For more information, search for this course here.

SCMN 3320
Supply Chain Management (3,0,0)

SCMN 3320 Supply Chain Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the strategic fit of supply chains with organizational goals; this course lays the foundation for advanced study in the field. Topics include an introduction to supply chain management; supply chain strategy; demand management, inventory management; inventory modeling; supply chain network design and facility location; warehouse management; and transportation management.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2250 or ACCT 2251 and MIST 2610 or MIST 2611 and ECON 2330 or ECON 3330 or STAT 2410 or equivalent.
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of SCMN 3320, SCMN 3321 or BBUS 3320.
For more information, search for this course here.

ENTR 3710
Marketing for Entrepreneurs (3,0,0)

ENTR 3710 Marketing for Entrepreneurs (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students gain an understanding of marketing in an entrepreneurial context in order to develop the right business opportunities in small and medium-sized enterprises (SME). They learn how to design a marketing information system to identify opportunities, understand customers and develop effective marketing programs that allow SMEs to grow in a competitive market. Topics include: marketing in an entrepreneurial context; finding and evaluating the right marketing opportunity; using marketing research to ensure entrepreneurial success; understanding customers and competitors; segmentation, targeting and positioning for entrepreneurial opportunities; developing new products and services; building and sustaining entrepreneurial brand; entrepreneurial pricing, channel development, supply chain management and promotion; and entrepreneurial marketing plans.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

ENTR 3720
Small Business Finance (3,0,0)

ENTR 3720 Small Business Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire the knowledge and practical skills needed to successfully manage the financial affairs of a small business and new venture start-up. Topics include the importance of small business finance; evaluation of accounting software, hiring an accountant and/or bookkeeper, applicable taxes, payroll accounting, assessing insurance needs; determination of market size; sales forecasting for existing and new business ventures, pricing scenarios, importance of benchmarking to similar businesses, budgeting capital and operational expenses for start-up ventures and existing businesses, development of pro forma financial statements; development of financial modeling tools using excel for scenario and variance analysis: working capital management; sources of long-term and short-term financing; and bankruptcy.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ENTR 3720 or BBUS 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 4412
New Product Development (3,0,0)

MKTG 4412 New Product Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the conceptual, analytical and decision-making skills and knowledge of industry best practices needed to successfully develop and launch new products and services. Topics include opportunity identification and selection; concept generation; concept evaluation; product/service development and product testing; and marketing testing and managing the product/service launch.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 or equivalent with a minimum C- grade and MKTG 3480 or equivalent with a minimum C- grade
For more information, search for this course here.

ENTR 4750
New Venture Creation (3,0,0)

ENTR 4750 New Venture Creation (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills, values, and attitudes needed for success as an entrepreneur whether starting a new venture from scratch, joining or acquiring an existing business, or creating a new venture inside a larger organization. The primary activity is the development of a comprehensive business plan. Topics include small business entrepreneurs; the business plan; entry modes into small business; writing the business plan; target market, market research, and marketing plan; raising capital and the financial viability of new ventures; operational issues; legal structures and human resource issues; and risk management.
Prerequisite: ENTR 3720 (minimum C-); MKTG 2430 (minimum C-); or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ENTR 4750, ENTR 4751,TMGT 4120, BBUS 4750 or BBUS 4751
For more information, search for this course here.

ENTR 4760
Small Business Management (3,0,0)

ENTR 4760 Small Business Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on ENTR 4750: New Venture Creation which takes a new small business from the planning stage to start-up, students examine how to successful operate an up-and-running venture. Topics include spotting entrepreneurial opportunities in small business; buying a business; legal concerns profiling your target customer; learning from the competition-competitive intelligence; pricing and promoting your product or service; distribution and location; the power of numbers; financing your business; risk management issues; and buying a franchise or franchising your business.
Prerequisite: ENTR 4750 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ENTR 4760, TMGT 4150 or BBUS 4760
For more information, search for this course here.

At least two of:
ACCT 3260
Taxation for Decision Making (3,0,0)

ACCT 3260 Taxation for Decision Making (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students analyze the fundamental framework of the Canadian Income Taxation system and its effect on business decision making and financial planning. This course adopts a decision approach to taxation and focuses on the needs of non-accountants. Topics include an introduction to federal taxation; procedures and administration; income or loss from office, employment, business, or property; capital cost allowances and cumulative eligible capital; capital gains and losses; other income and deductions; and calculation of taxable income and tax payable for individuals.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2210 (minimum C-); CMNS 1290 (minimum C-); or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3260, ACCT 3220, ACCT 3221, BBUS 3260, BBUS 3220 or BBUS 3221
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 3480
Marketing Research (3,0,0)

MKTG 3480 Marketing Research (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an understanding of marketing research and its values in analyzing consumers, markets, and the environment. Topics include an introduction to market research, the marketing research industry and research ethics, the marketing research process, secondary data and databases, qualitative research, traditional survey research, primary data collection, measurement, questionnaire design, basic sampling issues, sample size determination, and statistical testing.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 and ECON 2330 (minimum C- grades) or equivalent
Note: Students can only receive credit for one of MKTG 3480, MKTG 3841, TMGT 3050, BBUS 3480 or BBUS 3481.
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 3830
Human Resource Planning and Staffing (3,0,0)

HRMN 3830 Human Resource Planning and Staffing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the policies and procedures for the planning, acquisition, deployment, and retention of a workforce of sufficient size and quality to allow an organization to attain its strategic goals. Topics include the strategic importance of staffing; the staffing environment; human resource planning; job analysis and design; recruitment; applicant screening; employee testing; interviews; references; decision making; employment contracts; methods of evaluating the hiring process; deployment; and retention.
Prerequisite: HRMN 2820 or HRMN 3820
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of HRMN 3831, BBUS 4810 or HRMN 3830.
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 4450
E-Commerce (3,0,0)

MKTG 4450 E-Commerce (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine how the internet is rapidly becoming one of the primary communications, marketing and commercial medium for businesses in almost every industry, and how managers can effectively use this tool to execute their organization's strategic plans. Topics include the E-Commerce business models and concepts; E-Commerce infrastructure; building E-Commerce presence; E-Commerce security and payment systems; E-Commerce marketing and advertising concepts; social, mobile and local marketing; ethical, social and political issues in E-Commerce; online retailing and services; online content and media; social networks, auctions and portals; and business-to-business E-Commerce.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MKTG 4450, MKTG 4451, BBUS 4450, BBUS 4451 or BBUS 4453.
For more information, search for this course here.

 Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in Finance (20 Courses)
MATH 1070
Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)(recommended)

MATH 1070 Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is designed for Business and Economics students. Topics include linear and non-linear functions and models applied to cost, revenue, profit, demand and supply, systems of equations (linear and nonlinear), matrices, linear programming, difference equations, and mathematics of finance (including simple and compound interest, annuities, mortgages, and loans).
Prerequisite: Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum grade of C+ or Pre-Calculus 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or equivalent or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0600 or MATH 0610 or MATH 0630 or MATH 0633 or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1091, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 or MATH 1101.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1170
Calculus for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

MATH 1170 Calculus for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is intended for Business and Economics students. Topics include calculation and interpretation of derivatives, curve sketching, optimization (applied to business and economics), multivariable functions (including partial derivatives, optimization and Lagrange multipliers).
Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1070 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 1900
Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1900 Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the interactions between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include a definition of economics; demand and supply analysis; consumer theory; production and cost; market structure including perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly; market efficiency and market failure; resource markets; and international trade.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B OR MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 1900 and ECON 1901
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 1950
Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1950 Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine economic behavour at the aggregate level, and the measurement and determination of national income. Topics include an introduction to economics; measuring macroeconomic variables including gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation; the Keynesian model; aggregate demand and supply; money and banking; the money market; fiscal policy; monetary policy and the central bank; exchange rates and the balance of payments; and economic growth.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B or MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended.
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of ECON 1950 and ECON 1951.
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 2120
Financial Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 2120 Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a basic understanding of business finance, which deals with how organizations effectively manage their operating and fixed assets and fund them with an optimal mix of debt and equity financing. Topics include the role of the financial manager; goals of the firm; financial statement analysis; time value of money; risk and return including beta and the capital asset pricing model; common and preferred share valuation; bond valuation and interest rates; capital budgeting; cost of capital; and optimal capital structure. Prerequisites: ACCT 2210 or equivalent (minimum C-), and CMNS 1290 or equivalent (minimum C-), and MATH 1070 or equivalent (minimum C-), and ECON 2320 or equivalent (minimum C-)
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 2120, FNCE 2121, FNCE 3120, BBUS 3120 or BBUS 3121
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 2210
Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2210 Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to prepare and analyze the financial statements of a public corporation. Topics include the conceptual framework; accounting standards; the accounting cycle; financial statements; internal control, cash and bank reconciliations; short-term investments and receivables; inventory; long-term assets including intangibles; liabilities including bonds payable; shareholders' equity, dividends, and share repurchases; comprehensive income and the statement of shareholders' equity; statement of cash flows; and financial statement analysis.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12/ English First Peoples 12 with a minimum of 73% or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 1000, ACCT 1030, ACCT 1210/1220, ACCT 1211/1221, ACCT 2211, BBUS 2210 or BBUS 2211
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 2250
Management Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2250 Management Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to collect, analyze, and communicate quantitative and non-quantitative information to assist management in making more effective planning and control decisions. Topics include the role of managerial accounting; basic cost management concepts; job, process, hybrid and activity-based costing; cost behaviour and estimation; cost-volume-profit analysis; profit planning and activity-based budgeting; standard costing, flexible budgeting and variance analysis; cost management tools including the balanced scorecard, benchmarking and reengineering; and relevant costs for decision making such as make or buy, special orders, joint products and outsourcing.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2210 or equivalent (minimum C- grade); ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1110 or ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1140 or ENGL 1210 or equivalent (minimum C- grade)
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2320
Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2320 Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to statistics with an emphasis on its applications in business and economics. Topics include descriptive statistics and numerical measures; an introduction to probability; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling and sampling distributions; interval estimations; and testing hypotheses and statistical inferences.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950
Note:Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MATH 1200, STAT 1200, STAT 2000, ECON 2320, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, BIOL 3000, and SOCI 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2330
Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

ECON 2330 Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study advanced statistical techniques and methods and their applications in business and economics. Topics include inferences about population variance, including hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; analysis of variance and experimental designs; simple and multiple regressions; time series analysis and forecasting; statistical quality control; and decision analysis. Students are required to apply statistical techniques using Excel and/or Minitab.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950; ECON 2320 or equivalent; MIST 2610
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ECON 2330, ECON 3330, STAT 2410, and STAT 3060
For more information, search for this course here.

MIST 2610
Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

MIST 2610 Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire the knowledge and skills to effectively utilize information systems and technology in support of organizational strategy. Topics include an introduction to information systems; information systems strategy; ethics, privacy, and policy; data security; data and knowledge management; networks and communications technologies; wireless and mobile computing; e-business and e-commerce; Web 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and social networks; systems development and managing information systems projects; and personal productivity software, including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MIST 2610, MIST 2611, BBUS 1370, BBUS 1371, BBUS 2370, COMP 1000, COMP 1350, COMP 1700 or COMP 1910.
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 3150
Portfolio and Equity Analysis (3,0,0)

FNCE 3150 Portfolio and Equity Analysis (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the different types of financial assets, the markets in which they trade, and how investors structure these assets into diversified portfolios to meet their financial objectives. Emphasis is placed on the valuation of equity securities. Topics include an introduction to risk and return; types of securities and the investment process; mutual funds; stock market and common stock valuation; stock price behaviour, market efficiency, and behavioral finance; technical analysis; fundamental analysis; return, risk and security market line; and portfolio management and performance evaluation.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 (minimum C+) or equivalent and ECON 2330 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 3150, FNCE 3151, BBUS 3150 or BBUS 3151
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 3170
Fixed Income and Alternative Investments (3,0,0)

FNCE 3170 Fixed Income and Alternative Investments (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to design and analyze fixed income securities and alternative investments. The importance of interestrates, credit risk and product features in the valuation of these assets is emphasized. Topics include an introduction tofixed income investments; fixed income markets; yield curves; bond pricing, valuation and volatility; credit analysisfor firms and individuals; asset backed securities; real estate; hedge funds and private equity.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 OR FNCE 2121 (minimum C+ grade) AND ECON 2330 OR ECON 2331 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of FNCE3170; FNCE 3171; BBUS 4150; BBUS 4151
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 3180
Derivative Securities (3,0,0)

FNCE 3180 Derivative Securities (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to value the main types of derivative securities and how to effectively utilize them in risk management, asset speculation and financial engineering. Topics include an introduction to forward and futures markets and hedging; mechanics of future markets; hedging with future contracts; theoretical and forward prices; introduction to options; calculating option contract profits; put-call parity and arbitrage bounds; option pricing models; exotic options; and swaps.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 (minimum C+ grade) or equivalent and ECON 2330 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of FNCE 4170 or FNCE 3180
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 4130
Advanced Financial Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 4130 Advanced Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Building on FNCE 2120: Financial Management, students further develop their knowledge and skills in business finance. Topics include corporate governance and executive/director compensation; dividends and dividend policy; matching the maturities of assets and liabilities; short-term and long-term financial planning; sustainable growth; working capital management and sources of temporary financing; sources of permanent financing; advanced capital budgeting under uncertainty; and optimal capital structure.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 (minimum C+) or equivalent and ECON 2330 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 4130, FNCE 4110, FNCE 4111 or BBUS 4130
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 4180
International Financial Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 4180 International Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the international aspects of corporate finance and investing. Topics include the international monetary system, balance of payments, the market for foreign exchange, international parity relationships and forecasting foreign exchange rates, international banking and money markets, international bond and equity market, futures and options on foreign exchanges, interest rate and currency swaps, international portfolio investment, and management of exposure.
Prerequisite: FNCE 3170 (minimum C-) or equivalent and FNCE 3180 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 4180 or BBUS 4180
For more information, search for this course here.

At least five of:
BLAW 2910
Commercial Law (3,0,0)

BLAW 2910 Commercial Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the legal environment in which businesses operate and how common law and different provincial and federal government statutes influence decision-making. Topics include origins of Canadian law; resolving disputes and navigating the court system; tort law; contract law; sales of goods and consumer protection; methods of carrying on business; workplace law; property law; and creditor law.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 3140
Financial Statement Analysis (3,0,0)

FNCE 3140 Financial Statement Analysis (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to read the complex financial statements of a major corporation and how to examine its performanceusing a variety of financial ratios and other assessment tools. Emphasis is placed on the quality of financial reportingand identifying the warning signs of financial manipulation. Topics include an overview of financial reporting;review of financial statement analysis techniques; complex income statements; complex cash flow statements;complex statements of financial position focusing on current assets and liabilities, long-term assets, income taxes,post-employment and share-based compensation, intercorporate investments; and multinational operations.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 (minimum C+) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 3140 or BBUS 3140
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 3260
Taxation for Decision Making (3,0,0)

ACCT 3260 Taxation for Decision Making (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students analyze the fundamental framework of the Canadian Income Taxation system and its effect on business decision making and financial planning. This course adopts a decision approach to taxation and focuses on the needs of non-accountants. Topics include an introduction to federal taxation; procedures and administration; income or loss from office, employment, business, or property; capital cost allowances and cumulative eligible capital; capital gains and losses; other income and deductions; and calculation of taxable income and tax payable for individuals.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2210 (minimum C-); CMNS 1290 (minimum C-); or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 3260, ACCT 3220, ACCT 3221, BBUS 3260, BBUS 3220 or BBUS 3221
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 4120
Business Valuation and Restructuring (3,0,0)

FNCE 4120 Business Valuation and Restructuring (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn how to value a business using commonly applied industry techniques and to restructure its operations in order to optimize performance or cope with financial distress. Topics include professional designations in business valuation; advanced cost of capital; business valuation techniques, such as income, market multiples, and asset-based approaches; valuing private companies; mergers and acquisitions; financial distress, bankruptcy, reorganization, and liquidations; divestitures, spin-offs and other forms of corporate restructuring.
Prerequisite: FNCE 3150 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 4110, FNCE 4111 or FNCE 4120
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 4140
Personal Financial Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 4140 Personal Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire skills to identify, structure, and resolve financial planning problems. Multiple analytical tools and tax planning strategies are used in addressing various financial planning issues. Topics include an overview of a financial plan; applying time of money concepts; planning with personal financial instruments; banking services and money management; assessing, managing, and securing credit; personal loans; purchasing and financing a home; auto and homeowner's insurance; health and life insurance; investing fundamentals; investing in stocks, bonds, and mutual funds; retirement planning; and estate planning.
Prerequisite: BLAW 2910 (minimum C-) or equivalent and FNCE 3150 (minimum C-) or equivalent and ACCT 3260 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 4140, FNCE 4150, BBUS 4140 or ECON 3090
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 4160
Advanced Portfolio Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 4160 Advanced Portfolio Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to design and implement an investment policy statement for an individual or institutional investor that establishes their financial objectives, risk tolerances, constraints, and investment and monitoring policies. Topics include setting investment objectives and policies; ethical standards and fiduciary duties; capital markets expectations; diversification and asset allocation; fixed-income, equity and alternative investment portfolio management; risk management; capital markets and securities trading; monitoring and rebalancing; and evaluating portfolio performance.
Prerequisite: FNCE 3150 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent and FNCE 3170 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent and FNCE 3180 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 4160 or BBUS 4160
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 4190
Financial Institutions Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 4190 Financial Institutions Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the different financial intermediaries in our economy, the financial risks they are exposed to, and how these risks are measured and managed. Topics include the types of financial institutions including deposit-taking institutions, insurance companies, securities firms, investment banks, mutual funds, hedge funds, pension funds, and finance companies; regulation of the financial industry; measuring risk including interest rate risk, market risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, off-balance sheet risk, foreign exchange risk, sovereign risk and technology and other operational risks; managing risk through the use of derivatives, loan sales and securitization; and managing risk through deposit insurance and other liability guarantees and capital adequacy standards.
Prerequisite: FNCE 3150 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent and FNCE 3170 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent and FNCE 3180 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 4190 or BBUS 4190
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4330
Forecasting in Business and Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 4330 Forecasting in Business and Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students apply a variety of forecasting methods to solve problems in business and economics. Topics include qualitative forecasting methods; the forecasting process, data considerations, and model selection; moving averages and exponential smoothing; multiple regression and time series decomposition; Box-Jenkins methodology to fit autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ARCH); time-varying volatility and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) and vector autoregressive models; combining forecasting results; and implementing forecasting.
Prerequisite: ECON 2330 or ECON 3330 or equivalent
Exclusion: BUEC 4330
For more information, search for this course here.

 Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in Human Resource Management (20 Courses)
MNGT 1710
Introduction to Business (3,0,0)

MNGT 1710 Introduction to Business (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of many business disciplines such as accounting, finance, marketing, human resource management, supply chain management, and entrepreneurship. Students will engage with community business experts for example guest speakers, who will share their business experience dealing with a wide range of issues. Students will simulate, adapt, and respond to a variety of business challenges, expanding their knowledge of business. Throughout the course students will be encouraged to set goals, reflect on their learning and plan for their futures. Topics include multiple perspectives on business, management functions, forms of business ownership, the importance of entrepreneurship, and Indigenous business.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12/English First Peoples 12 with a minimum of 73% or equivalent; or ENGL 0600 with minimum C+; or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a C+.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MNGT 1711, MNGT 1701 or MNGT 1710
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 2210
Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2210 Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to prepare and analyze the financial statements of a public corporation. Topics include the conceptual framework; accounting standards; the accounting cycle; financial statements; internal control, cash and bank reconciliations; short-term investments and receivables; inventory; long-term assets including intangibles; liabilities including bonds payable; shareholders' equity, dividends, and share repurchases; comprehensive income and the statement of shareholders' equity; statement of cash flows; and financial statement analysis.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12/ English First Peoples 12 with a minimum of 73% or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 1000, ACCT 1030, ACCT 1210/1220, ACCT 1211/1221, ACCT 2211, BBUS 2210 or BBUS 2211
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 2250
Management Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2250 Management Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to collect, analyze, and communicate quantitative and non-quantitative information to assist management in making more effective planning and control decisions. Topics include the role of managerial accounting; basic cost management concepts; job, process, hybrid and activity-based costing; cost behaviour and estimation; cost-volume-profit analysis; profit planning and activity-based budgeting; standard costing, flexible budgeting and variance analysis; cost management tools including the balanced scorecard, benchmarking and reengineering; and relevant costs for decision making such as make or buy, special orders, joint products and outsourcing.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2210 or equivalent (minimum C- grade); ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1110 or ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1140 or ENGL 1210 or equivalent (minimum C- grade)
For more information, search for this course here.

MIST 2610
Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

MIST 2610 Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire the knowledge and skills to effectively utilize information systems and technology in support of organizational strategy. Topics include an introduction to information systems; information systems strategy; ethics, privacy, and policy; data security; data and knowledge management; networks and communications technologies; wireless and mobile computing; e-business and e-commerce; Web 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and social networks; systems development and managing information systems projects; and personal productivity software, including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MIST 2610, MIST 2611, BBUS 1370, BBUS 1371, BBUS 2370, COMP 1000, COMP 1350, COMP 1700 or COMP 1910.
For more information, search for this course here.

ORGB 2810
Organizational Behaviour (3,0,0)

ORGB 2810 Organizational Behaviour (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the behavior of individuals and how they interact with each other in different workplace organizations. Topics include defining organizational behavior; perception, personality and emotions; values, attitudes and their effects in the workplace; motivating self and others; working in teams; communication, conflict and negotiation; power and politics; leadership; decision making, creativity and ethics; and organizational culture and change.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of ORGB 2810, ORGB 2811, BBUS 2720, BBUS 2721 or TMGT 1160.
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 2820
Human Resource Management (3,0,0)

HRMN 2820 Human Resource Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the management of an organization's workforce through the design and implementation of effective human resource policies and procedures. Current Canadian issues and practices are emphasized. The topics include the strategic role of human resources management; human resources planning; job analysis and design; recruitment and selection; employment equity; compensation; training and development; performance appraisal; occupational health and safety; and employee and industrial relations.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and ORGB 2810
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of HRMN 2820, HRMN 2821, HRMN 3820, BBUS 3810, BBUS 3811 or TMGT 1140.
For more information, search for this course here.

BLAW 2910
Commercial Law (3,0,0)

BLAW 2910 Commercial Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the legal environment in which businesses operate and how common law and different provincial and federal government statutes influence decision-making. Topics include origins of Canadian law; resolving disputes and navigating the court system; tort law; contract law; sales of goods and consumer protection; methods of carrying on business; workplace law; property law; and creditor law.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
For more information, search for this course here.

MNGT 3710
Business Ethics and Society (3,0,0)

MNGT 3710 Business Ethics and Society (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the complex business environment and the relationships organizations have with each other, civil society, and the natural environment. Through this examination, students learn how critical ethical decision-making is to the successful management of any organization. Topics include elements of critical thinking, business ethics fundamentals, frameworks for ethical thinking, awareness of ethical pitfalls, ethical reasoning, ethical principles, drafting a code of ethics, illustrating an ethical decision-making process, applying ethical decision-making skills, ethical decision-making in the workplace, corporate social responsibility and sustainable development, and stakeholder theory.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BBUS 3030, MNGT 3711, BBUS 3031 or MNGT 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

MNGT 3730
Leadership (3,0,0)

MNGT 3730 Leadership (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students cultivate a deep understanding of what leadership is and what leaders do to be successful. An emphasis is placed on the development of practical leadership skills. Topics include an introduction to leadership, leadership traits, leadership style and philosophy, leadership and relationships, developing leadership skills, leadership and ethics, creating a vision, leadership and out-group members, leadership and conflict, and managing obstacles to effective leadership.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and ORGB 2810
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MNGT 3730, MNGT 3731, BBUS 3641 or BBUS 3671.
For more information, search for this course here.

ORGB 3750
Creativity and Innovation (3,0,0)

ORGB 3750 Creativity and Innovation (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the theory and practical strategies for promoting creative and innovative thinking in the workplace and managing employees through these processes. Topics include types of innovation, the S-shaped diffusion curve, generating new ideas, recognizing opportunities, moving innovations to the market, creative groups, enhancing creativity, and leading creativity.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and ORGB 2810
For more information, search for this course here.

ORGB 3770
Teamwork in Organizations (3,0,0)

ORGB 3770 Teamwork in Organizations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an understanding of the nature, design and processes of effective teamwork as well as a practical skill set for team membership. Topics include the importance of teams; assessing a team's experience and insights; building a balanced team; building a high performance team; becoming a team member, follower, and leader; team building; team evaluation and accountability; observing team leadership skills at work; identifying and overcoming team dysfunctions; motivating team members and leaders; and developing intercultural teams.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and ORGB 2810
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of BBUS 3880 or ORGB 3770.
For more information, search for this course here.

ORGB 3810
Organizational Theory and Design (3,0,0)

ORGB 3810 Organizational Theory and Design (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the theory and application of organizing in complex workplace environments. Various conceptual tools and theoretical frameworks are utilized to systematically investigate organizing processes and contexts and solve practical problems. Topics include organizations and organization theory; organizational stakeholders; the external environment; organizational structure and design; organizational culture; decision making; conflict, power and politics; and organizational change and transformation.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and ORGB 2810
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of ORGB 3811 or ORGB 3810.
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 3830
Human Resource Planning and Staffing (3,0,0)

HRMN 3830 Human Resource Planning and Staffing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the policies and procedures for the planning, acquisition, deployment, and retention of a workforce of sufficient size and quality to allow an organization to attain its strategic goals. Topics include the strategic importance of staffing; the staffing environment; human resource planning; job analysis and design; recruitment; applicant screening; employee testing; interviews; references; decision making; employment contracts; methods of evaluating the hiring process; deployment; and retention.
Prerequisite: HRMN 2820 or HRMN 3820
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of HRMN 3831, BBUS 4810 or HRMN 3830.
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 3840
Employee and Labour Relations (3,0,0)

HRMN 3840 Employee and Labour Relations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the different aspects of union-management relations focusing on both the Canadian and international experience. The topics include an introduction to labour relations; labour relations environment; union membership, structure and actions; employment legislation and the Labour Relations Act; collective bargaining; managing the collective agreement; dispute resolution; human resources in an union environment; international labour relations; and future trends and issues in labour relations.
Prerequisite: HRMN 2820 or HRMN 3820
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of BBUS 3840, BBUS 3841, HRMN 3841 or HRMN 3840
For more information, search for this course here.

BLAW 3920
Employment Law (3,0,0)

BLAW 3920 Employment Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students investigate the legal principles and law relating to the individual employer-employee relationship and how its influences business decision-making. Topics include an overview of the legal framework; common law issues in employment; the unionized workplace; Canada Labour Code; the employment contract; employment standards legislation; human rights in the workplace; occupational health and safety; workers compensation; workplace privacy; navigating the employment relationship; resignation and retirement; dismissal with cause; dismissal without cause; and post-employment obligations.
Prerequisite: BLAW 2910 with a minimum C- or TMGT 2250 with a minimum C- or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BLAW 3920, BLAW 3921 or BBUS 3920
For more information, search for this course here.

MNGT 4720
Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (3,0,0)

MNGT 4720 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the fundamental theories of negotiation and conflict resolution and the essential skills required to be a successful negotiator. The negotiation process is pervasive in business, and the ability to negotiate is an essential skill for successful managers. Topics include the nature of negotiation; strategy and tactics of distributive bargaining and integrative negotiation planning; integrative negotiation; negotiation, planning, and strategy; perception, cognition, and emotion; communication and the negotiation process; power; and ethics.
Prerequisite: MNGT 3730
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 4830
Total Rewards (3,0,0)

HRMN 4830 Total Rewards (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an understanding of the different rewards systems available to employers to attract, motivate and retain a sufficient number of qualified employees. The topics include the components of total rewards; the rewards environment; motivational theories and rewards; rewards strategies; types of compensation; non-monetary rewards; and rewards and performance management, attraction, and retention.
Prerequisite: HRMN 2820 or HRMN 3820
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of BBUS 4830, HRMN 4830 or HRMN 4831.
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 4840
Organizational Learning, Training and Development (3,0,0)

HRMN 4840 Organizational Learning, Training and Development (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the educational activities provided by organizations to enhance the current performance of individuals or groups of employees and instill a commitment to continuous improvement and advancement. They study how organizations can become more adaptive by learning from their experiences and reacting more quickly to environmental change. Topics include organization learning; training and development; learning and motivation; needs analysis; training design, methods, and delivery; transfer of training; training evaluation; and cost and benefits of training programs.
Prerequisite: HRMN 2820 or HRMN 3820
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of BBUS 4840, HRMN 4840 or HRMN 4841.
For more information, search for this course here.

ORGB 4870
Organizational Development and Change (3,0,0)

ORGB 4870 Organizational Development and Change (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

In today's business environment, a human resource practitioner must be a skilled change manager. Students learn to become agents for change, to improve human resources and organizational effectiveness, and to increase productivity. Topics include an introduction to organizational development; change process; organizational change and human resource management; organizational assessments; assessment tools and techniques; organizational interventions; human resource management interventions; and human resource metrics.
Prerequisite: ORGB 3810
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of BBUS 4870, BBUS 4661 or ORGB 4871.
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 4890
Human Resource Strategy and Professional Practice (3,0,0)

HRMN 4890 Human Resource Strategy and Professional Practice (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine a selection of contemporary issues in human resource management. Topics include occupational health and safety, human resource information management, and professional practice.
Corequisite: HRMN 3830 and HRMN 3840
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of HRMN 4890, HRMN 4891 or BBUS 4860
For more information, search for this course here.

 Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in International Business (16 Courses)

Note: University programs sometimes change but it is important to understand that your graduation is governed by the program which existed when you were admitted. As an active business school, TRU SoBE often reviews its programs to ensure they are applicable and relevant to the business community. As such, IBUS and MKTG were most recently reviewed and adjusted for this purpose.

Students who were admitted and began their TRU studies in September 2020 will graduate from the new 16-course program. The program changes for existing students will only be available from January 2021. As of January 2021, if you are in the 20-course program and have not yet completed any of the courses which have been removed, upon review of your file you can be exempted from the removed courses. However, there are no refunds or other accommodations for students who took courses prior to and including Fall 2020.

Please direct any questions to the SoBE Advising Team at Undergraduate Advising Form

ACCT 2210
Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2210 Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to prepare and analyze the financial statements of a public corporation. Topics include the conceptual framework; accounting standards; the accounting cycle; financial statements; internal control, cash and bank reconciliations; short-term investments and receivables; inventory; long-term assets including intangibles; liabilities including bonds payable; shareholders' equity, dividends, and share repurchases; comprehensive income and the statement of shareholders' equity; statement of cash flows; and financial statement analysis.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12/ English First Peoples 12 with a minimum of 73% or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 1000, ACCT 1030, ACCT 1210/1220, ACCT 1211/1221, ACCT 2211, BBUS 2210 or BBUS 2211
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 2250
Management Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2250 Management Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to collect, analyze, and communicate quantitative and non-quantitative information to assist management in making more effective planning and control decisions. Topics include the role of managerial accounting; basic cost management concepts; job, process, hybrid and activity-based costing; cost behaviour and estimation; cost-volume-profit analysis; profit planning and activity-based budgeting; standard costing, flexible budgeting and variance analysis; cost management tools including the balanced scorecard, benchmarking and reengineering; and relevant costs for decision making such as make or buy, special orders, joint products and outsourcing.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2210 or equivalent (minimum C- grade); ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1110 or ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1140 or ENGL 1210 or equivalent (minimum C- grade)
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2320
Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2320 Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to statistics with an emphasis on its applications in business and economics. Topics include descriptive statistics and numerical measures; an introduction to probability; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling and sampling distributions; interval estimations; and testing hypotheses and statistical inferences.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950
Note:Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MATH 1200, STAT 1200, STAT 2000, ECON 2320, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, BIOL 3000, and SOCI 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2330
Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

ECON 2330 Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study advanced statistical techniques and methods and their applications in business and economics. Topics include inferences about population variance, including hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; analysis of variance and experimental designs; simple and multiple regressions; time series analysis and forecasting; statistical quality control; and decision analysis. Students are required to apply statistical techniques using Excel and/or Minitab.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950; ECON 2320 or equivalent; MIST 2610
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ECON 2330, ECON 3330, STAT 2410, and STAT 3060
For more information, search for this course here.

FNCE 2120
Financial Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 2120 Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a basic understanding of business finance, which deals with how organizations effectively manage their operating and fixed assets and fund them with an optimal mix of debt and equity financing. Topics include the role of the financial manager; goals of the firm; financial statement analysis; time value of money; risk and return including beta and the capital asset pricing model; common and preferred share valuation; bond valuation and interest rates; capital budgeting; cost of capital; and optimal capital structure. Prerequisites: ACCT 2210 or equivalent (minimum C-), and CMNS 1290 or equivalent (minimum C-), and MATH 1070 or equivalent (minimum C-), and ECON 2320 or equivalent (minimum C-)
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of FNCE 2120, FNCE 2121, FNCE 3120, BBUS 3120 or BBUS 3121
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 2430
Introduction to Marketing (3,0,0)

MKTG 2430 Introduction to Marketing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students receive an overall view of the marketing function, the role of marketing in society and its application within organizations. Topics include an overview of marketing; developing a marketing plan and strategies; analyzing the marketing environment; consumer behaviour; segmentation, targeting, and positioning; developing new products; product, branding, and packaging decisions; pricing concepts and strategies; distribution strategies; and integrated marketing communications.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 2430, MKTG 2431, MKTG 3430, TMGT 1150, BBUS 3430 or BBUS 3431
For more information, search for this course here.

IBUS 3510
International Business (3,0,0)

IBUS 3510 International Business (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine globalization and the steps managers take to establish or expand operations in international markets. They explore the influence of forces such as culture, economics, politics, and geography on management decision making. Topics include globalization; national differences in political economy; political economy and economic development; differences in culture; ethics in international business; international trade theory; political economy of international trade; foreign direct investment; regional economic integration; international business strategy; entry strategy and strategic alliance; and global marketing and research and development.
Prerequisite: ECON 1950 (minimum C-) or equivalent and MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of IBUS 3510, IBUS 3511, BBUS 3510 or BBUS 3511.
For more information, search for this course here.

IBUS 3530
International Trade Finance (3,0,0)

IBUS 3530 International Trade Finance (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an understanding of the finance principles required to conduct business in a global environment, including import and export, and multinational operations. Topics include globalization; trade risk and risk assessment; methods of payment; use of bonds, guarantees, and letters of credit; currency risk management; export credit insurance; trade finance; structure trade finance; terms of payment; international trade theory; the international monetary market; the global capital market; and foreign direct investment.
Prerequisite: FNCE 2120 or FNCE 3120, IBUS 3510
Exclusion: BBUS 4520 and IBUS 4520
For more information, search for this course here.

MNGT 3710
Business Ethics and Society (3,0,0)

MNGT 3710 Business Ethics and Society (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the complex business environment and the relationships organizations have with each other, civil society, and the natural environment. Through this examination, students learn how critical ethical decision-making is to the successful management of any organization. Topics include elements of critical thinking, business ethics fundamentals, frameworks for ethical thinking, awareness of ethical pitfalls, ethical reasoning, ethical principles, drafting a code of ethics, illustrating an ethical decision-making process, applying ethical decision-making skills, ethical decision-making in the workplace, corporate social responsibility and sustainable development, and stakeholder theory.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BBUS 3030, MNGT 3711, BBUS 3031 or MNGT 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 4470
International Marketing (3,0,0)

MKTG 4470 International Marketing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore all aspects of marketing from a global perspective to better respond to international opportunities and competitive situations. Topics include an overview of international marketing; history and geography and its effect on culture; cultural dynamics in assessing global markets; culture, management style and business systems; the political environment; assessing global market opportunities in the Americas, Europe, Africa, Middle East, and Asia Pacific Region; planning for global market entry; products and services for international consumers; products and services for international businesses; and international marketing channels.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of MKTG 4470, MKTG 4471, BBUS 4470 or BBUS 4471.
For more information, search for this course here.

IBUS 4510
Cross-cultural Management (3,0,0)

IBUS 4510 Cross-cultural Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the significance of culture in strategic decisions encompassing elements of risk management, ethics, and the management of diversity, in a range of international management contexts across Asia, Europe, Africa and the Americas. Topics include cultural dimensions of international management; comparing cultures; movement in the culture; organizational culture; culture and management communication; needs and incentives from an international perspective; dispute resolution and negotiation; and the cross-cultural dimensions of global staffing.
Prerequisite: IBUS 3510 (minimum C-) or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

IBUS 4540
Global Entrepreneurship (3,0,0)

IBUS 4540 Global Entrepreneurship (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore entrepreneurship in a global setting. The course provides an introduction to the opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurship from an international perspective. The course focuses on the need for every entrepreneur and innovator to understand the global market in today's hypercompetitive world. Topics will include globalization and the international environment; definition and importance of international entrepreneurship; culture and international entrepreneurship; developing a global business plan; selecting international business opportunities; international legal concerns; alternative entry strategies; global monetary system; global marketing and research and development; global human resource management; and implementing and managing a global entrepreneurial strategy.
Prerequisite: IBUS 3510 with a minimum C- or equivalent
Note: Students can not receive credit for both BBUS 4540 and IBUS 4540
For more information, search for this course here.

IBUS 4560
Doing Business in Emerging Markets (3,0,0)

IBUS 4560 Doing Business in Emerging Markets (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the position of emerging markets in the new global economy and the business opportunities available in these countries. It highlights challenges and opportunities associated with organizational management and business strategy in emerging economies. Topics include understanding emerging economies; markets and institutions; operating in emerging markets; emerging markets' innovations; managing risk in emerging markets; targeting emerging market clients; and business ethics in emerging markets.
Prerequisite: IBUS 3510 (minimum C-) or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

IBUS 4570
Global Management (3,0,0)

IBUS 4570 Global Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students conduct an integrative and comprehensive overview of the fundamental issues and challenges that confront the international firm. Topics include globalization and international linkages; public, legal and technological environments; meaning and dimensions of culture; organizational culture and diversity; cross-culture communication and negotiation; strategy formulation and implementation; entry strategies and organizational structures; managing political risk, government relations, and alliances; management decision and control.
Prerequisite: IBUS 3510 (minimum C- grade) or equivalent
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of BBUS 4510, IBUS 3520 or IBUS 4570.
For more information, search for this course here.

At least two of:
ECON 3550
International Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3550 International Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students analyze the movement of capital, goods, and services across international boundaries and assess their financial impact. With advances in transportation and communication, greater outsourcing, and increased globalization, trade, and foreign direct investment, the corresponding capital movements are becoming much more important to the global economy. Topics include the theories of absolute and comparative advantage; modern theories of trade, including factor-proportions; tariff and non-tariff barriers; current and capital accounts; exchange rate determination; balance of payments and exchange rate policy; evolution of the international monetary system; and trade and economic development.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900; ECON 1950
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 3450
Professional Selling (3,0,0)

MKTG 3450 Professional Selling (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students will gain an overall view of the professional selling function. They will come to understand the role of personal selling in marketing and society and its application within organizations. Topics include relationship selling opportunities; creating value with a relationship strategy; developing a relationship strategy; communication styles; creating production solutions; buying process and buyer behavior; approaching the customer; developing and qualifying a prospect base; determining customer needs; sales demonstration; negotiating buyer concerns; and closing and confirming the sale.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 3450, MKTG 3451, HMGT 2120, BBUS 3450 or BBUS 3451
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 3480
Marketing Research (3,0,0)

MKTG 3480 Marketing Research (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an understanding of marketing research and its values in analyzing consumers, markets, and the environment. Topics include an introduction to market research, the marketing research industry and research ethics, the marketing research process, secondary data and databases, qualitative research, traditional survey research, primary data collection, measurement, questionnaire design, basic sampling issues, sample size determination, and statistical testing.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 and ECON 2330 (minimum C- grades) or equivalent
Note: Students can only receive credit for one of MKTG 3480, MKTG 3841, TMGT 3050, BBUS 3480 or BBUS 3481.
For more information, search for this course here.

IBUS 4590
International Business Field Study (3,0,0)

IBUS 4590 International Business Field Study (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students gain a first-hand understanding of international businesses through a focused overseas study tour during which the business, management and cultural practices of a selected country are experienced. The field study includes tours to local chambers of commerce, industrial zones and factories and enables students to meet executives in key industries. Topics include business etiquette and business customs; interpersonal and communication skills; economic, political and business environment; international trade relations; decision-making styles; and business opportunities, challenges and strategies between Canada and the foreign country.
Prerequisite: IBUS 3510 (minimum C-) or equivalent, or permission of the program advisor
For more information, search for this course here.

SCMN 3320
Supply Chain Management (3,0,0)

SCMN 3320 Supply Chain Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the strategic fit of supply chains with organizational goals; this course lays the foundation for advanced study in the field. Topics include an introduction to supply chain management; supply chain strategy; demand management, inventory management; inventory modeling; supply chain network design and facility location; warehouse management; and transportation management.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2250 or ACCT 2251 and MIST 2610 or MIST 2611 and ECON 2330 or ECON 3330 or STAT 2410 or equivalent.
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of SCMN 3320, SCMN 3321 or BBUS 3320.
For more information, search for this course here.

 Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in Mathematics and Economics (20 Courses)
ECON 1900
Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1900 Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the interactions between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include a definition of economics; demand and supply analysis; consumer theory; production and cost; market structure including perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly; market efficiency and market failure; resource markets; and international trade.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B OR MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 1900 and ECON 1901
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 1950
Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1950 Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine economic behavour at the aggregate level, and the measurement and determination of national income. Topics include an introduction to economics; measuring macroeconomic variables including gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation; the Keynesian model; aggregate demand and supply; money and banking; the money market; fiscal policy; monetary policy and the central bank; exchange rates and the balance of payments; and economic growth.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B or MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended.
Note: Students will only receive credit for one of ECON 1950 and ECON 1951.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2900
Intermediate Microeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2900 Intermediate Microeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine at a more advanced level how individuals and firms interact in various types of markets. Topics include consumer and producer behaviour; partial equilibrium analysis for perfectly competitive markets; and aspects of monopoly and imperfectly competitive markets. This course prepares students for advanced courses in economics.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900 or ECON 1901 and MATH 1170
Note: Students cannot credit for more than one of ECON 2900, BUEC 2040, BUEC 2041
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2950
Intermediate Macroeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2950 Intermediate Macroeconomics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students complete an advanced, in-depth examination of economic behaviour at the aggregate level. Topics include the determination and distribution of output in the long run; the classical dichotomy and neutrality of money; the measurement, problems, and determinants of unemployment and inflation in the long run; and the role of capital accumulation, population growth, and technology in growth theory.
Prerequisite: ECON 1950 or ECON 1951
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3900
Intermediate Microeconomics 2 (3,0,0)

ECON 3900 Intermediate Microeconomics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students continue to study intermediate topics in partial and general equilibrium analysis. Topics include consumer choice under different scenarios, factor markets, game theory, imperfect competition, general equilibrium analysis and welfare economics, public goods, and externalities.
Prerequisite: ECON 2900; MATH 1170 or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

or
ECON 3950
Intermediate Macroeconomics 2 (3,0,0)

ECON 3950 Intermediate Macroeconomics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students continue to study short-run macroeconomic theory and its applications to contemporary policy issues. Topics include an overview of macroeconomics; macroeconomic data; the open economy; economic fluctuations; aggregate demand, including investment savings-liquidity preference money supply (IS-LM) curves; aggregate supply, including the Phillips curve; economic stabilization and the effectiveness of fiscal and monetary policy; and money supply and demand.
Prerequisite: ECON 2950
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4320
Econometrics (3,0,0)

ECON 4320 Econometrics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to econometric models and the application of classical regression techniques to estimate socio-economic relationships. Topics include an introduction to econometrics; simple linear regression; interval estimation and hypothesis testing; predictions, goodness of fit, and modeling issues; multiple regression; non-linear relationships; heteroscedasticity; dynamic models, autocorrelation, and forecasting; simultaneous equations; and qualitative dependent variables. General econometric computer software is used to reinforce course concepts.
Prerequisite: ECON 2330 or ECON 3330 or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 4330
Forecasting in Business and Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 4330 Forecasting in Business and Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students apply a variety of forecasting methods to solve problems in business and economics. Topics include qualitative forecasting methods; the forecasting process, data considerations, and model selection; moving averages and exponential smoothing; multiple regression and time series decomposition; Box-Jenkins methodology to fit autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ARCH); time-varying volatility and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) and vector autoregressive models; combining forecasting results; and implementing forecasting.
Prerequisite: ECON 2330 or ECON 3330 or equivalent
Exclusion: BUEC 4330
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1130
Calculus 1 for Engineering (3,1.5,0)

MATH 1130 Calculus 1 for Engineering (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students build a strong mathematical foundation for engineering by learning ideas, methods and applications of single-variable differential calculus. Limits and derivatives are defined and calculated, derivatives are interpreted as slopes and rates of change, and derivatives are then applied to many sorts of problems, such as finding maximum and minimum values of functions.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Engineering program.
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1140
Calculus 1 (3,1.5,0) or (5,0,0)

MATH 1140 Calculus 1 (3,1.5,0) or (5,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study differential calculus for functions of one variable, with applications emphasizing the physical sciences. Topics include calculation and interpretation of limits and derivatives; curve sketching; optimization and related-rate problems; l'Hospital's rule; linear approximation and Newton's method. Prerequisites: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1230
Calculus 2 for Engineering (3,1.5,0)

MATH 1230 Calculus 2 for Engineering (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn the ideas and techniques of single-variable integral calculus from an engineering perspective. Integrals are defined, evaluated and used to calculate areas, volumes, arc lengths and physical quantities such as force, work and centres of mass. Differential equations are introduced and used to model various physical phenomena. Ideas about infinite series are pursued, including some convergence tests, with particular emphasis on Taylor series.
Prerequisite: MATH 1130 with a minimum grade of C.
Note: Students will get credit for only one of MATH 1230, MATH 1240, MATH 1241 or MATH 1250.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1240
Calculus 2 (3,1.5,0) or (5,0,0)

MATH 1240 Calculus 2 (3,1.5,0) or (5,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course covers integral calculus for functions of one variable, with applications emphasizing the physical sciences. Topics include Riemann sums, definite and indefinite integrals, techniques of integration, improper integrals, applications of integration (including area, volume, arc length, probability and work), separable differential equations, and series. Prerequisites: MATH 1130 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1140 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1141 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1150 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1157 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students will get credit for only one of MATH 1230, MATH 1240, MATH 1241 or MATH 1250.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 2110
Calculus 3 (3,1.5,0)

MATH 2110 Calculus 3 (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

The concepts of single-variable calculus are extended to higher dimensions by using vectors as variables. Topics include vector geometry and the analytic geometry of lines, planes and surfaces; calculus of curves in two or three dimensions, including arc length and curvature; calculus of scalar-valued functions of several variables, including the gradient, directional derivatives and the Chain Rule; Lagrange multipliers and optimization problems; double integrals in rectangular and polar coordinates. Prerequisites: MATH 1230 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 1240 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 1241 with a minimum grade of C.
Note: Students will get credit for only one of MATH 2110, MATH 2111 or MATH 2650.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1700
Discrete Mathematics 1 (3,1.5,0)

MATH 1700 Discrete Mathematics 1 (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is an introduction to the foundation of modern mathematics including basic set theory; solution to recurrence relations; logic and quantifiers; properties of integers; mathematical induction; introduction to graphs and trees; Boolean algebra and finite state machines. Students will apply the critical thinking skills developed in Mathematics to derive meaning from complex problems. Prerequisites: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum C+ or Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum C+ or MATH 0600 with a minimum grade of B or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1220, COMP 1390, MATH 1390, MATH 1700 or MATH 1701.
For more information, search for this course here.

or
MATH 2240
Differential Equations 1 (3,1.5,0)

MATH 2240 Differential Equations 1 (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course examines ordinary differential equations and related initial-value problems, and emphasizes their many applications in science and engineering. Students discuss methods for solving such equations either exactly or approximately. Topics include first-order equations; higher order linear equations; modelling with differential equations; systems of linear equations; and phase plane analysis of nonlinear systems. Prerequisites: MATH 1240 or MATH 1241 and MATH 2110 or 2111 and MATH 2120 or MATH 2121, all with a minimum grade of C. NOTE: MATH 2110 or 2111 and MATH 2120 or MATH 2121 may be taken as co-requisites with MATH 2240.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 2120
Linear Algebra 1 (3,1.5,0)

MATH 2120 Linear Algebra 1 (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to linear algebra. Topics include vector spaces, Matrix algebra and matrix inverse, systems of linear equations and row-echelon form, bases and dimension, orthogonality, geometry of n-dimensional space, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, linear transformations. Prerequisites: MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1241 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1700 or MATH 1701 all with a minimum grade of C.
Note: Students will only receive credit for one MATH 1300, MATH 2120 or MATH 2121.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2320
Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2320 Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to statistics with an emphasis on its applications in business and economics. Topics include descriptive statistics and numerical measures; an introduction to probability; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling and sampling distributions; interval estimations; and testing hypotheses and statistical inferences.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950
Note:Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MATH 1200, STAT 1200, STAT 2000, ECON 2320, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, BIOL 3000, and SOCI 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

Upper Level ECON Elective
Upper Level ECON Elective
Choose one stream:
Mathematics stream:
STAT 3060
Applied Regression Analysis (3,1,0)

STAT 3060 Applied Regression Analysis (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are exposed to the concepts of regression analysis with an emphasis on application. Students will learn how to appropriately conduct residual analysis, perform diagnostics, apply transformations, select and check models, and augment regression such as with weighted least squares and nonlinear models. Students may learn additional topics such as inverse, robust, ridge and logistic regression.
Prerequisite: MATH 1300 with a minimum C- grade or MATH 2121 with a minimum C- grade or MATH 2120 with a minimum C- grade and STAT 2000 with a minimum C- grade.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 3160
Differential Equations 2 (3,1,0)

MATH 3160 Differential Equations 2 (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course begins with an introduction to Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Next, series solutions of ordinary differential equations are examined. Power series methods are applied to obtain solutions near ordinary points and regular singular points. Students then consider Sturm-Liouville boundary value problems and series of eigenfunctions. Initial value and boundary value problems involving partial differential equations are then examined. Solutions are found using the methods of separation of variables, Green's functions and integral transforms. Physical applications discussed include the heat/diffusion equation, wave equation and Laplace's equation. Prerequisites: MATH 2240-Differential Equations with a minimum grade of C
Exclusion: Students will only receive credit for one of MATH 3160 or PHYS 3120.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 3400
Introduction to Linear Programming (3,1,0)

MATH 3400 Introduction to Linear Programming (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course introduces the theory and applications of linear programming. Topics include: the graphic method, the simplex algorithm, the revised simplex method, duality theory, and sensitivity analysis. Some special linear programming problems such as transportation, network flows, and game theory are explored. Prerequisites: MATH 2120 or MATH 2121 with a minimum grade of C
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 4410
Modelling of Discrete Optimization Problems (3,1,0)

MATH 4410 Modelling of Discrete Optimization Problems (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Real-world optimization problems are formulated in order to be resolved by standard techniques involving linear programming, integer programming, network flows, dynamic programming and goal programming. Additional techniques may include post-optimality analysis, game theory, nonlinear programming, and heuristic techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 3400-Intro to Linear Programming with a minimum grade of C
For more information, search for this course here.

Upper Level MATH Elective
Statistics stream:
MATH 3020
Introduction to Probability (3,1,0)

MATH 3020 Introduction to Probability (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course provides a theoretical foundation for the study of statistics. Topics include basic notions of probability, random variables, probability distributions (both single-variable and multi-variable), expectation and conditional expectation, limit theorems and random number generation.
Prerequisite: MATH 2110 or 2111 with a minimum grade of C-
For more information, search for this course here.

STAT 3060
Applied Regression Analysis (3,1,0)

STAT 3060 Applied Regression Analysis (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are exposed to the concepts of regression analysis with an emphasis on application. Students will learn how to appropriately conduct residual analysis, perform diagnostics, apply transformations, select and check models, and augment regression such as with weighted least squares and nonlinear models. Students may learn additional topics such as inverse, robust, ridge and logistic regression.
Prerequisite: MATH 1300 with a minimum C- grade or MATH 2121 with a minimum C- grade or MATH 2120 with a minimum C- grade and STAT 2000 with a minimum C- grade.
For more information, search for this course here.

Choose three from MATH 3030 and upper level MATH electives
MATH 3030
Introduction to Stochastic Processes (3,1,0)

MATH 3030 Introduction to Stochastic Processes (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine simple random processes, including discrete and continuous Markov chains, Poisson processes and Brownian motion. Renewal theory is also discussed.
Prerequisite: MATH 3020 with a minimum C-
For more information, search for this course here.

General stream:
STAT 3060
Applied Regression Analysis (3,1,0)

STAT 3060 Applied Regression Analysis (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are exposed to the concepts of regression analysis with an emphasis on application. Students will learn how to appropriately conduct residual analysis, perform diagnostics, apply transformations, select and check models, and augment regression such as with weighted least squares and nonlinear models. Students may learn additional topics such as inverse, robust, ridge and logistic regression.
Prerequisite: MATH 1300 with a minimum C- grade or MATH 2121 with a minimum C- grade or MATH 2120 with a minimum C- grade and STAT 2000 with a minimum C- grade.
For more information, search for this course here.

Choose four from:
MATH 3020
Introduction to Probability (3,1,0)

MATH 3020 Introduction to Probability (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course provides a theoretical foundation for the study of statistics. Topics include basic notions of probability, random variables, probability distributions (both single-variable and multi-variable), expectation and conditional expectation, limit theorems and random number generation.
Prerequisite: MATH 2110 or 2111 with a minimum grade of C-
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 3030
Introduction to Stochastic Processes (3,1,0)

MATH 3030 Introduction to Stochastic Processes (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine simple random processes, including discrete and continuous Markov chains, Poisson processes and Brownian motion. Renewal theory is also discussed.
Prerequisite: MATH 3020 with a minimum C-
For more information, search for this course here.

STAT 3050
Introduction to Statistical Inference (3,1,0)

STAT 3050 Introduction to Statistical Inference (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course examines the theory behind statistical inference. Students will review probability theory, sampling distributions, methods of estimation, and hypothesis testing. Students will learn more advanced inferential techniques such as maximum likelihood estimation, bootstrapping, Bayesian methods, likelihood ratio testing, and confidence intervals. There will be an emphasis on the theory of these approaches in addition to their application.
Prerequisite: STAT 2000 with a minimum grade of C and MATH 3020 with a minimum grade of C or instructor permission.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 3160
Differential Equations 2 (3,1,0)

MATH 3160 Differential Equations 2 (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course begins with an introduction to Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Next, series solutions of ordinary differential equations are examined. Power series methods are applied to obtain solutions near ordinary points and regular singular points. Students then consider Sturm-Liouville boundary value problems and series of eigenfunctions. Initial value and boundary value problems involving partial differential equations are then examined. Solutions are found using the methods of separation of variables, Green's functions and integral transforms. Physical applications discussed include the heat/diffusion equation, wave equation and Laplace's equation. Prerequisites: MATH 2240-Differential Equations with a minimum grade of C
Exclusion: Students will only receive credit for one of MATH 3160 or PHYS 3120.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 3400
Introduction to Linear Programming (3,1,0)

MATH 3400 Introduction to Linear Programming (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course introduces the theory and applications of linear programming. Topics include: the graphic method, the simplex algorithm, the revised simplex method, duality theory, and sensitivity analysis. Some special linear programming problems such as transportation, network flows, and game theory are explored. Prerequisites: MATH 2120 or MATH 2121 with a minimum grade of C
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 4410
Modelling of Discrete Optimization Problems (3,1,0)

MATH 4410 Modelling of Discrete Optimization Problems (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Real-world optimization problems are formulated in order to be resolved by standard techniques involving linear programming, integer programming, network flows, dynamic programming and goal programming. Additional techniques may include post-optimality analysis, game theory, nonlinear programming, and heuristic techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 3400-Intro to Linear Programming with a minimum grade of C
For more information, search for this course here.

STAT 4040
Analysis of Variance (3,1,0)

STAT 4040 Analysis of Variance (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students discuss the analysis of variance for standard experimental designs. Topics include single factor designs, fixed and random effects, block designs, hierarchical designs, multiple comparisons, factorial designs, mixed models, general rules for analysis of balanced designs, and analysis of covariance. Co-Requisite: STAT 3060 Required Seminar: STAT 4040S
For more information, search for this course here.

And any upper level MATH/STAT elective
 Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in Marketing (16 Courses)

Note: University programs sometimes change but it is important to understand that your graduation is governed by the program which existed when you were admitted. As an active business school, TRU SoBE often reviews its programs to ensure they are applicable and relevant to the business community. As such, IBUS and MKTG were most recently reviewed and adjusted for this purpose.

Students who were admitted and began their TRU studies in September 2020 will graduate from the new 16-course program. The program changes for existing students will only be available from January 2021. As of January 2021, if you are in the 20-course program and have not yet completed any of the courses which have been removed, upon review of your file you can be exempted from the removed courses. However, there are no refunds or other accommodations for students who took courses prior to and including Fall 2020.

Please direct any questions to the SoBE Advising Team at Undergraduate Advising Form

ACCT 2210
Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2210 Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to prepare and analyze the financial statements of a public corporation. Topics include the conceptual framework; accounting standards; the accounting cycle; financial statements; internal control, cash and bank reconciliations; short-term investments and receivables; inventory; long-term assets including intangibles; liabilities including bonds payable; shareholders' equity, dividends, and share repurchases; comprehensive income and the statement of shareholders' equity; statement of cash flows; and financial statement analysis.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12/ English First Peoples 12 with a minimum of 73% or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 1000, ACCT 1030, ACCT 1210/1220, ACCT 1211/1221, ACCT 2211, BBUS 2210 or BBUS 2211
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2320
Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2320 Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to statistics with an emphasis on its applications in business and economics. Topics include descriptive statistics and numerical measures; an introduction to probability; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling and sampling distributions; interval estimations; and testing hypotheses and statistical inferences.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950
Note:Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MATH 1200, STAT 1200, STAT 2000, ECON 2320, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, BIOL 3000, and SOCI 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2330
Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

ECON 2330 Economics and Business Statistics 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study advanced statistical techniques and methods and their applications in business and economics. Topics include inferences about population variance, including hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; analysis of variance and experimental designs; simple and multiple regressions; time series analysis and forecasting; statistical quality control; and decision analysis. Students are required to apply statistical techniques using Excel and/or Minitab.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950; ECON 2320 or equivalent; MIST 2610
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ECON 2330, ECON 3330, STAT 2410, and STAT 3060
For more information, search for this course here.

IBUS 3510
International Business (3,0,0)

IBUS 3510 International Business (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine globalization and the steps managers take to establish or expand operations in international markets. They explore the influence of forces such as culture, economics, politics, and geography on management decision making. Topics include globalization; national differences in political economy; political economy and economic development; differences in culture; ethics in international business; international trade theory; political economy of international trade; foreign direct investment; regional economic integration; international business strategy; entry strategy and strategic alliance; and global marketing and research and development.
Prerequisite: ECON 1950 (minimum C-) or equivalent and MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students will receive credit for only one of IBUS 3510, IBUS 3511, BBUS 3510 or BBUS 3511.
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 2430
Introduction to Marketing (3,0,0)

MKTG 2430 Introduction to Marketing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students receive an overall view of the marketing function, the role of marketing in society and its application within organizations. Topics include an overview of marketing; developing a marketing plan and strategies; analyzing the marketing environment; consumer behaviour; segmentation, targeting, and positioning; developing new products; product, branding, and packaging decisions; pricing concepts and strategies; distribution strategies; and integrated marketing communications.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 2430, MKTG 2431, MKTG 3430, TMGT 1150, BBUS 3430 or BBUS 3431
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 3470
Consumer Behaviour (3,0,0)
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