TRU Science

Bachelor of Natural Resource Science (BNRS)

Former NRS student Kailee Streichert

In a world where specialization is the norm, professionals who are well versed in all aspects of natural resources are in demand.

This unique program consists of 120 credits which can be completed in four or five-years on a full-time basis, or up to seven- years on a part-time basis once admitted to the program. You will take courses in biology, chemistry, ecology, scientific methods, and specific resource management courses.

The program prepares you for a wide range of natural resource sector careers and for further study in graduate school. You will be ready to work in resource management and planning for government or industry.

For students interested in certification by a professional association, TRU is seeking accreditation for selected specific courses from the Association of British Columbia Professional Foresters.

Completion of the BNRS degree fulfils the academic requirements of the BC Institute of Agrologists and College of Applied Biology.

Students wishing to enter a teaching program at the secondary level can do so with an additional six credits of upper-level biology courses. Contact your chairperson before planning electives.

Admission requirements

To be admitted to the TRU BNRS Program, students must satisfy the following entrance requirements:

  • Grade 12 graduation or equivalent, or mature student status
  • English Studies 12/English First Peoples 12 with a minimum of 73% (B) or equivalent
  • Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum of 67% (C+) or equivalent
  • Life Sciences 11 with a minimum of 67% (C+) or equivalent
  • Chemistry 11 with a minimum of 67% (C+) or equivalent

Students with Anatomy and Physiology 12 (or equivalent) and Chemistry 12 (or equivalent) will be given preference.

If you do not meet all admission requirements you may be conditionally accepted and can commence your studies while upgrading neccessary courses. 
Upgrade Pathways: University and Employment Preparation: Thompson Rivers University (tru.ca)

Application process

Students apply online at Apply for Admission and submit the following documentation to the Admissions Office in support of their application.

  • Official transcripts from all secondary and post-secondary insitutions attended
  • Proof of citizenship or permanent resident status
  • A completed Application for Admission form

Registration Fee

You will be notified in writing by Admissions if you have been accepted into the program. Once admitted, you should be prepared to pay a commitment fee as early as June in order to secure your seat.

Prior to registration, you will be asked to arrange a meeting with the Program Coordinator, to discuss course requirements.

Course requirements

Course summary 2023-24
Year 1
Fall Semester
ENGL 1100
Introduction to University Writing (3,0,0)

ENGL 1100 Introduction to University Writing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the practices of reading and writing in scholarly contexts by investigating a chosen topic or issue. Students read, critically analyze, and synthesize information and ideas found in appropriate secondary sources and coming from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds. They also develop their abilities to communicate knowledge by composing in the genres and sub-genres of scholarly writing, including the incorporation of research and documentation while using a clear, persuasive, grammatically-correct style.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12 /English First Peoples 12 with a minimum 73% or equivalent
Note: students cannot receive credit for both ENGL 1100 and ENGL 1101
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 1110
The Science and Management of Natural Resources (2,0,2)(L)

NRSC 1110 The Science and Management of Natural Resources (2,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire an understanding of current issues within the management of natural resources by engaging with guest speakers, conducting laboratory experiments, and partaking in field excursions. They develop skills to apply scientific inquiry and knowledge to better understand the relationship between people and societies and natural resource management strategies. Students will reflect upon their own use of natural resources and how it affects sustainability. Topics include an introduction to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, water resources, fisheries and wildlife management, and ecosystem restoration.
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 1120
Dendrology 1 (3,0,2)(L)

NRSC 1120 Dendrology 1 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a holistic understanding and appreciation for the ecological, cultural, economic, and social benefits of North American deciduous trees. Students explore, through an historical and contemporary lens, tree manufacturing, indigenous tree use, cultural modification, and species preservation within the context of climate change. Topics include tree reproduction, development, anatomy, and morphology and physiology. Field trips provide students with hands-on experience in tree identification.
Corequisite: BIOL 1110
For more information, search for this course here.

BIOL 1110
Principles of Biology 1 (3,0,3)(L)

BIOL 1110 Principles of Biology 1 (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is designed for biology or science majors. Students examine the molecular basis of cellular processes including energy transfer and the storage and use of genetic information.
Prerequisite: Life Sciences 11 with a minimum grade of C+ or Anatomy & Physiology 12 with a minimum grade of C+ and Chemistry 11 or CHEM 0500.
Note: Students repeating a course may be exempt from the laboratory component of that course if they took the course within two years and obtained a grade of at least 70% in the laboratory component of the course. The grade they previously obtained in the laboratory component of the course will be used in the calculation of their course grade.
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 2000
Introduction to the Study of Soils (3,0,2)(L)

NRSC 2000 Introduction to the Study of Soils (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

With a focus on forest soils, students investigate the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Students will apply this knowledge to better understand the implication of land management on soil properties. Topics include soil formation, classification, use, and conservation.
For more information, search for this course here.

Winter Semester
BIOL 1210
Principles of Biology 2 (3,0,3)(L)

BIOL 1210 Principles of Biology 2 (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students will explore evolution as unifying principle of biology: how it occurs, and how it leads to increasing biological diversity through speciation. They will develop an understanding of how evolutionary opportunities and constraints are reflected in the history of life on Earth and will examine the evolutionary conundrum of sexual reproduction (or lack thereof) in both plants and animals. They will develop important skills useful for biologists such as working in teams, finding and disseminating information, conducting research projects by developing and testing hypotheses, and communicating research results effectively. Pre-requisites: Life Sciences 11 with a minimum grade of C+ or Anatomy & Physiology 12 with a minimum grade of C+ or BIOL 0500 with a score of C+ or better or BIOL 0600 with a score of C+ or better or BIOL 0620 with a score of C+ or better and Chemistry 11 with a score of C+ or better or CHEM 0500 with a score of C+ or better
For more information, search for this course here.

CMNS 2300
Critical Thinking and Writing for Science and Technology (3,0,0)

CMNS 2300 Critical Thinking and Writing for Science and Technology (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students analyze and discuss examples of writing from scientific and technical literature to improve their communication skills for lay and scientific audiences. Students learn to identify and produce writing styles and formats appropriate for science-based contexts and audiences, as well as develop skills in writing and documenting research documents on science and technology topics. Prerequisites: Admission to the Bachelor of Science Program OR Bachelor of Natural Resource Science Program OR Permission of the instructor AND CMNS 1290 OR CMNS 1291 OR ENGL 1100 OR ENGL 1101
Note: Students cannot receive credti for both CMNS 2300 and ENGL 2300
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 1220
Dendrology 2 (3,0,2)(L)

NRSC 1220 Dendrology 2 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students build on skills and concepts learned in NRSC 1220 - Dendrology 1. Students explore a variety of British Columbian, North American, and introduced coniferous tree species.
Corequisite: NRSC 1120
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 2100
Forest Ecology and Silvics 1 (3,0,2)(L)

NRSC 2100 Forest Ecology and Silvics 1 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an understanding and appreciation of the complexities and interactions that encompass forest ecosystem structures and functions, and learn how to apply this knowledge to predict forest ecosystem responses to natural and human-induced disturbances. Students assess how forest ecosystem structures and function interact, how they change over time, and how they affect forest management practices. This course provides hands-on practical experience for students.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Natural Resource Science Program or permission of the Natural Resource Science program coordinator.
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 1500
Introduction to Climate Change Science (3,0,1)(L)

NRSC 1500 Introduction to Climate Change Science (3,0,1)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students analyze the evidence for, and impacts of climate change, and develop an understanding of observed changes in climate, the causes of climate change, projected future climate change, and mitigation options for decreasing the impact of climate change.
For more information, search for this course here.

Year 2
Fall Semester
CHEM 1500
Chemical Bonding and Organic Chemistry (4,0,3)(L)

CHEM 1500 Chemical Bonding and Organic Chemistry (4,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course develops an understanding and historical context of atomic and molecular structure. Students will organize and synthesize existing knowledge of chemical structure, and engage in reflective review of their understanding. Topics include electron configurations, periodic trends, chemical bonding, Lewis structures, molecular shapes, valence bond and molecular orbital theory. The organic chemistry portion of the course focuses on the bonding and structure of organic compounds, functional groups, conformational and stereochemical features including applications to biochemistry. The laboratory stresses precision techniques in analytical chemistry. Students collect and analyze data and draw evidence-based conclusions. The laboratory provides opportunity for students to expand their existing knowledge and immerse them in challenging laboratory environment. Students receive weekly feedback and mentorship in the lab and lecture.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 11 or 12 or CHEM 0500 or 0600; and Pre-Calculus 12 or MATH 0600/0610
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 2200
Forest Ecology and Silvics 2 (3,0,2)(L)

NRSC 2200 Forest Ecology and Silvics 2 (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the ecological and silvical characteristics of forest trees of Western Canada, with an emphasis on ecological site assessment and applications of silvics in silviculture. Topics include the identification and interpretive use of indicator plant species in the description of forest ecosystems, soil and site features used in determining site quality, and the diagnostic procedures used in determining site quality.
Prerequisite: NRSC 2100
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 3000
Evolution and Diversity of the Vertebrates (3,0,3)

NRSC 3000 Evolution and Diversity of the Vertebrates (3,0,3)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to vertebrate biology through an examination of the diversity, evolutionary ecology, and life histories of amphibians, reptiles, mammals and birds. Key topics include the diversity and adaptive significance of vertebrate traits, basic vertebrate anatomy and functional morphology, and taxonomic identification of terrestrial vertebrates. Students engage in hands-on work including species identification and dissection.
Prerequisite: BIOL 1210 or BIOL 1213 and BIOL 1215
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of BIOL 4270 or NRSC 3000
For more information, search for this course here.

One of ANTH
TMGT 4700
Indigenous Tourism: Colonial Power, Politics and Practices (3,0,0)

TMGT 4700 Indigenous Tourism: Colonial Power, Politics and Practices (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course will provide a critical overview of the historical and contemporary issues in Indigenous tourism economies.
Prerequisite: TMGT 3050 and 3rd year standing
For more information, search for this course here.

ANTH 3270
Indigenous peoples Natural Resource Management (2,1,0)

ANTH 3270 Indigenous peoples Natural Resource Management (2,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

A review of historical and contemporary issues shaping Indigenous peoples' relationship to their lands and resources and the impact of governmental policies on this relationship. Topics will include the Indian Act, traditional indigenous views of resource management, treaties, and analysis of current policies on resource management and aboriginal life.
Prerequisite: ANTH 1210
For more information, search for this course here.

ANTH 3280
Indigenous Peoples in Comparative Perspective (3,0,0)

ANTH 3280 Indigenous Peoples in Comparative Perspective (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course takes a cross-cultural comparative approach to the study of contemporary Indigenous Peoples. Indigenous Peoples constitute a diverse range of groups throughout the world. What they have in common is the shared experience of colonization. Recognizing the diversity of Indigenous Peoples throughout the world, this course will explore both those experiences shared between groups, and those unique to local contexts.
Prerequisite: ANTH 1210
For more information, search for this course here.

ANTH 2140
Indigenous Peoples (2,1,0)

ANTH 2140 Indigenous Peoples (2,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

An introduction to the present situation of Canada's Indigenous, Metis and Inuit, interpreted on the basis of contemporary and historical political, economic and cultural developments. Major topics include: the Indian Act, the reserve system, land claims, directed culture change, social consequences of paternalism.
Prerequisite: ANTH 1210 recommended but not required
For more information, search for this course here.

ANTH 4040
People and Cultures of the North American Arctic (2,1,0)

ANTH 4040 People and Cultures of the North American Arctic (2,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course introduces the North American sub-Arctic, Arctic, and High Arctic as discrete cultural regions. Surveying the historical, ecological and cultural diversity of the Arctic, this course reviews anthropological perspectives on the past and present lives and experiences of indigenous peoples who have made the high latitudes their home for millenia. This course documents patterns of social organisation among Inuit, Dene, and Metis with a secondary focus directed towards recent economic, political, and cultural trends in the region resulting from European contact, colonisation, and political devolution.
Prerequisite: ANTH 1210 and completion of 45 credits (any discipline)
For more information, search for this course here.

One of MATH
MATH 1000
Pre-Calculus (5,0,0)

MATH 1000 Pre-Calculus (5,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course provides the mathematical foundation for an introductory calculus course. Topics include equations and inequalities; functions, models, and graphs; polynomial and rational functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric functions, identities and equations.
Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 60% (C) or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 0600 with a minimum grade of B or equivalent.
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1000 or MATH 1001.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1140
Calculus 1 (3,1.5,0) or (5,0,0)

MATH 1140 Calculus 1 (3,1.5,0) or (5,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study differential calculus for functions of one variable, with applications emphasizing the physical sciences. Topics include calculation and interpretation of limits and derivatives; curve sketching; optimization and related-rate problems; l'Hospital's rule; linear approximation and Newton's method. Prerequisites: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1150
Calculus for the Biological Sciences 1 (5,0,0)

MATH 1150 Calculus for the Biological Sciences 1 (5,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study differential calculus for functions of one variable, with applications emphasizing the biological sciences. Topics include calculation and interpretation of limits and derivatives, curve sketching, and optimization problems. MATH 1140 is recommended rather than MATH 1150 for students planning to take second-year MATH courses.
Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
For more information, search for this course here.

Winter Semester
ECON 1900
Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1900 Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the interactions between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include a definition of economics; demand and supply analysis; consumer theory; production and cost; market structure including perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly; market efficiency and market failure; resource markets; and international trade.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B OR MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 1900 and ECON 1901
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 2110
Forest Mensuration (3,0,2)(L)

NRSC 2110 Forest Mensuration (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop and practice, through the use of maps and mapping systems, techniques used in basic photogrammetry, photo mapping, and photo-based inventory systems. Topics include tree stand variables measurement, tree volume calculation, form and taper estimation, and timber scaling and grading.
Corequisite: STAT 2000 or equivalent or BIOL 3000 or equivalent
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 3170
Ichthyology (3,0,3)(L)

NRSC 3170 Ichthyology (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an understanding of the systematics, anatomy, physiology, life history, and ecology of freshwater and marine fishes. Students gain practical skills in the identification of local freshwater fishes and salmon species
Prerequisite: NRSC 2100 or Permission of the Natural Resource Science program coordinator. NOTE: Students may only receive credit for one of NRSC 3170 or BIOL 3290.
For more information, search for this course here.

BIOL 3000
Biometrics (3,0,2)(L)

BIOL 3000 Biometrics (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to statistical procedures for biological research. Topics include the nature of data, probability, hypothesis testing, goodness of fit, analysis of variance, correlation, and regression. The computer lab laboratory provides students with hands-on computer experience in graphical and statistical analysis.
Prerequisite: BIOL 1110 or BIOL 1113 and BIOL 1210 or BIOL 1213 and MATH 1140 or MATH 1141 or MATH 1150 or MATH 1130
Note: Students may normally receive credit for only one of the following: PSYC 2100, PSYC 2101, STAT 2000, STAT 1200, STAT 1201, ECON 2320
For more information, search for this course here.

GEOG 2750
Geographic Information Systems (3,0,2)(L)

GEOG 2750 Geographic Information Systems (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course introduces students to geodesy and geoinformatics, topics of study commonly referred to collectively as geomatics. Course topics include: common geographic coordinate systems; common map projections; geospatial data models; setting coordinate systems; loading geospatial data; visualization of geospatial data; manipulating feature and coverage values; and basic geoprocessing procedures. Labs will provide hands-on experience with ArcGIS, the leading GIS software in the industry, towards the goal of developing marketable skills geographic information management.
Note: This course is identical to NRSC 2230.
For more information, search for this course here.

Year 3
Fall Semester
NRSC 3200
Silviculture (3,0,2)(L)

NRSC 3200 Silviculture (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore silvicultural concepts as they apply to forest stand and landscape level management, as well as silviculture systems as they relate to economics, wildlife, biodiversity, and sustainability. Topics include principles of forest tree improvement, seed handling, nursery practices and artificial regeneration, and natural regeneration and stand tending practices. Field trips provide students the opportunity to observe forest nursery operations, forest operations, and woodlot management. Prerequisites: NRSC 2000 and 2100 and 2110 and 2200 or permission of the Natural Resource Science program coordinator.
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 3260
Limnology (3,0,3)(L)

NRSC 3260 Limnology (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is grounded in the theoretical and applied aspects of limnology. Students explore the ecology of inland water organisms in relation to the physical, chemical, and biological factors that affect their interactions and production.
Prerequisite: NRSC 2100 and STAT 2000 or equivalent, or BIOL 3000 or equivalent or Permission of the Natural Resource Science program coordinator. NOTE: Students may only receive credit for one of NRSC 3260 or BIOL 4020.
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 4020
Natural Resource Entomology (2,0,2)(L)

NRSC 4020 Natural Resource Entomology (2,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an understanding of entomological issues associated with natural resources. Topics include the ecological, economic and social roles of insects as well as identification and basic biology of major groups of insects associated with natural resources. Insect behavioural and chemical ecology and the population dynamics of major insect pests, especially in forests, are reviewed. Students will develop an understanding of ecosystem health, the beneficial and economically positive roles of insects, and the precepts of Integrated Pest Management. Pre-requisite: NRSC 2200
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 4030
Natural Resource Pathology (2,0,2)(L)

NRSC 4030 Natural Resource Pathology (2,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the common tree diseases of western and eastern North American forests, with a focus on British Columbian forests. Topics include the biology, ecology, identification, and management of tree diseases.
Prerequisite: NRSC 2100 and NRSC 2200
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 4110
Watershed Management (3,0,2)

NRSC 4110 Watershed Management (3,0,2)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the basic principles of wildland hydrology and watershed management. Students use a process-based approach to investigate how vegetation, physiography, climate and land management interact to affect watershed function.
Prerequisite: NRSC 2000 or Permission of the Natural Resource Science program coordinator.
For more information, search for this course here.

Winter Semester
NRSC 3110
Grassland Ecology (3,0,2)(L)

NRSC 3110 Grassland Ecology (3,0,2)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an appreciation for grassland ecology principles, with a focus on BC grassland communities. Key concepts include grassland characteristics and ecosystems, plant physiology, succession, assessment theories and the techniques used to monitor grassland, shrub land, and savanna ecosystems. Students gain grassland plant identification skills.
Prerequisite: NRSC 2100
For more information, search for this course here.

BIOL 3030
Population Biology (3,1,0)

BIOL 3030 Population Biology (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the study of plant and animal populations and their physical and biological environments. Topics include natural selection and microevolution, demography, population dynamics, competition and predation.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2170 or NRSC 2100 (C minimum)
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 4300
Ecosystem Reclamation (3,2,0)

NRSC 4300 Ecosystem Reclamation (3,2,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine reclamation and restoration techniques of aquatic and terrestrial systems. Using case studies from different disturbance types – mining, oil and gas, forestry, agriculture – students develop techniques to create a complete reclamation/restoration plan.
Prerequisite: NRSC 3260 and NRSC 3110 or Permission of the Natural Resource Science program coordinator.
For more information, search for this course here.

Elective
One of ECON
ECON 3410
Economics of Climate Change (3,0,0)

ECON 3410 Economics of Climate Change (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students investigate the climatic changes resulting from global warming and the policy actions being taken to address these problems. Topics include an overview of the science and economics of climate change; the impact of climate change on growth and economic development; the economics of stabilization including efficiency, externalities, public goods, and environmental policy instruments; inter-temporal decisions and uncertainties about the impacts of climate change; the policy responses to mitigation and adaption and their cost; international collective action and its challenges; and prominent climate policy approaches, such as the United Nations Framework Convention and the Kyoto Protocol.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3740
Land Use Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3740 Land Use Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students focus on land use issues with particular emphasis on government policies relating to the preservation and conservation of agricultural lands. Topics include rent theory; welfare measurement; property rights and externalities; project evaluation using cost-benefit and multiple accounts analysis; the economics of soil conservation; efficiency and equity in land use planning, including zoning changes; government land preservation and conservation policies, and agricultural subsidies; water use in agriculture; forest management; and multiple uses of public lands.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3710
Environmental Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3710 Environmental Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students apply the tools of microeconomic analysis to environmental issues. Topics include property rights and efficient resource use, market failure, the over-utilization of common pool resources, the Coase Theorem, non-market valuation techniques, government policies designed to cost-effectively control pollution, and real-world strategies for controlling pollution.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 3730
Forestry Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 3730 Forestry Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the concepts and analytical techniques used in forestry economics and their application to forest management, conservation, and policy analysis. Topics include techniques for analyzing forestry investments; timber demand, supply, and pricing; valuation of non-marketed goods and services, such as recreation and wildlife habitat; land allocation and multiple use; forest management issues, such as planting, thinning, and optimal age of crop rotation; and regulatory issues, including allowable annual cut regulations, property rights, tenure, and taxes.
Prerequisite: ECON 1900
For more information, search for this course here.

Year 4
Fall Semester
NRSC 3210
Range Management (3,0,2)

NRSC 3210 Range Management (3,0,2)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore applied range ecology and range management planning. Lecture topics include range history; range inventory and monitoring; animal management; stocking rates; animal distribution; grazing systems; cultivated forages; range improvements and developments; integrated use; legislation; and current grassland issues. Utilizing course material and working in groups to collect field data, students develop an integrated range management plan.
Prerequisite: NRSC 3110 or Permission of the Natural Resource Science program coordinator.
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 4040
Wildlife Management and Conservation 1: Theory and Principle (3,0,3)(L)

NRSC 4040 Wildlife Management and Conservation 1: Theory and Principle (3,0,3)(L)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a basic understanding of the history, theory, and scientific principles of wildlife conservation and management. Students explore a range of topics including metapopulations and reserve design, population viability analysis, principles of wildlife genetics, introduced species, fragmentation, wildlife habitat analyses, and the demography and extinction risk of small populations. Pre-requisites: BIOL 3030 and NRSC 3000 or BIOL 4270
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 4100
Fisheries Management (3,0,2)

NRSC 4100 Fisheries Management (3,0,2)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an understanding of fisheries management. Topics include quantitative stock assessment methodologies, fisheries regulations, habitat restoration, stocking, government policy, and perspectives in global fisheries. Students engage in hands-on fish collection and develop the skills to apply statistical and graphical methods to assess fish populations.
Prerequisite: NRSC 3170 Recommended Requisites: NRSC 3260
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 4140
Natural Resource Policy and Planning (3,2,0)

NRSC 4140 Natural Resource Policy and Planning (3,2,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore and build the skills to analyze the land and resource use policies and laws in British Columbia, particularly as affected by indigenous rights and title.
Prerequisite: Minimum 3rd year standing in the Bachelor of Natural Resource Science program
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 4130
Fire Ecology and Management (3,0,2)

NRSC 4130 Fire Ecology and Management (3,0,2)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an understanding and awareness of the role fire plays in ecosystems, communities, species, and human society. Students examine key elements of fire, specifically, how it interacts with abiotic and biotic environments, its importance in historical, social, and political contexts, and fire management, as it applies to British Columbia and other regions of Canada. Students receive hands-on experience with fire behaviour modelling, and conduct field activities to assess fuel management and wildland urban interface threat.
Prerequisite: NRSC 2100 or Permission of the Natural Resource Science program coordinator.
For more information, search for this course here.

Winter Semester
NRSC 4050
Wildlife Management and Conservation 2: Practice and Application (3,0,3)

NRSC 4050 Wildlife Management and Conservation 2: Practice and Application (3,0,3)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students build upon the theory and principles presented in NRSC 4040: Wildlife Management and Conservation 1, by further examining the application of scientific principles to the conservation of wildlife. Students also focus on the philosophy and human dimensions of wildlife conservation and management, particularly the need to balance multiple values in developing sustainable management planning. The course provides for the analysis and discussion of local and global case studies.
Prerequisite: NRSC 4040 and STAT 2000 or equivalent, or BIOL 3000 or equivalent such as ECON 2320, PSYC 2100, PSYC 2101, STAT 1200, STAT 1201 or STAT 2000.
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 4210
Conflict Resolution in the Natural Resources (2,2,0)

NRSC 4210 Conflict Resolution in the Natural Resources (2,2,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the principles of conflict and conflict resolution in the context of natural resource management. Topics include a definition of conflict, how conflict arises, and how consensus is achieved by facilitation, interest-based negotiation, and mediation, with emphasis placed on moving beyond simple problem-solving to the actual resolution of underlying conflicts and issues. Students engage in hands-on role-playing exercises that simulate past, current, and emerging conflicts in the natural resource sector.
Prerequisite: Minimum 3rd year standing in the Bachelor of Natural Resource Science program or permission of the Natural Resource Science program coordinator.
For more information, search for this course here.

NRSC 4230
Graduating Essay (3,0,0)

NRSC 4230 Graduating Essay (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students apply the scientific method to answer a natural resource related question using the major concepts of conservation, restoration, and management. This course is completed at the end of a student's studies and develops practical research, writing and presentation skills. The student is expected to professionally collaborate with individual faculty, community and/or industry partners to provide sustainable solutions to the research question. The students will produce both an essay and oral presentation that effectively and accurately conveys information for both professionals and non-professionals.
Prerequisite: 4th year standing in the Bachelor of Natural Resource Science program.
For more information, search for this course here.

Elective
Elective

Fieldwork experience

Field study offers a valuable learning experience. Many of the courses offered by the natural resource science department include a field component. As you progress through the program, you will gain field experience in areas including vegetation analysis, soil analysis, forest stand measurements, lake analysis, and vertebrate and invertebrate sampling techniques.

Course field trips are numerous and diverse. They include visits to the TRU Education and Research station adjacent to Wells Gray Provincial Park, grassland ecosystems, coastal and interior forest ecosystems, forest research stations, active mining sites (reclamation), local ranches, and fish hatcheries (locations change from year to year).

 International Field School in Belize

BNRS students atop ancient structure
BNRS students scubadiving
BNRS students observing ancient ruins

This course examines the issues, approaches and people involved with natural resource management in a tropical country. We run this course in Belize, Central America, because the country is relatively accessible and English is the main spoken language (we incorporate a large number of guest speakers from Belize into the course).

Belize Field School

  • Course length is 14 days in Belize, Central America - Date TBA
  • Apply by November 29
  • More Info - belize@tru.ca

Questions? Contact Didi Ledohowski, NRSC Program Assistant: nrsc@tru.ca