TRU Science

Courses

MATH 1000 Pre-Calculus (5,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course provides the mathematical foundation for an introductory calculus course. Topics include equations and inequalities; functions, models, and graphs; polynomial and rational functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric functions, identities and equations.
Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 60% (C) or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 0600 with a minimum grade of B or equivalent.
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1000 or MATH 1001.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1070 Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is designed for Business and Economics students. Topics include linear and non-linear functions and models applied to cost, revenue, profit, demand and supply, systems of equations (linear and nonlinear), matrices, linear programming, difference equations, and mathematics of finance (including simple and compound interest, annuities, mortgages, and loans).
Prerequisite: Foundations of Math 12 / Pre-Calculus 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or equivalent.
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 or MATH 1101.
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MATH 1100 Finite Math with Applications 1 (3, 1.5, 0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is intended primarily for Liberal Arts or Tourism students. Students solve problems that have direct relevance in the “real world." Topics to be covered include sets, counting, probability, matrices, linear programming, and math of finance. Prerequisites: Foundations of Math 11 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or Pre-Calculus 11 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum grade of 60% (C) or MATH 0510 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0520 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0523 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 or MATH 1101.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1130 Calculus 1 for Engineering (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students build a strong mathematical foundation for engineering by learning ideas, methods and applications of single-variable differential calculus. Limits and derivatives are defined and calculated, derivatives are interpreted as slopes and rates of change, and derivatives are then applied to many sorts of problems, such as finding maximum and minimum values of functions.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Engineering program.
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1140 Calculus 1 (3,1.5,0) or (5,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study differential calculus for functions of one variable, with applications emphasizing the physical sciences. Topics include calculation and interpretation of limits and derivatives; curve sketching; optimization and related-rate problems; l'Hospital's rule; linear approximation and Newton's method. Prerequisites: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1150 Calculus for the Biological Sciences 1 (5,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study differential calculus for functions of one variable, with applications emphasizing the biological sciences. Topics include calculation and interpretation of limits and derivatives, curve sketching, and optimization problems. MATH 1140 is recommended rather than MATH 1150 for students planning to take second-year MATH courses.
Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1170 Calculus for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is intended for Business and Economics students. Topics include calculation and interpretation of derivatives, curve sketching, optimization (applied to business and economics), multivariable functions (including partial derivatives, optimization and Lagrange multipliers).
Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1070 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170 or MATH 1171.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1230 Calculus 2 for Engineering (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn the ideas and techniques of single-variable integral calculus from an engineering perspective. Integrals are defined, evaluated and used to calculate areas, volumes, arc lengths and physical quantities such as force, work and centres of mass. Differential equations are introduced and used to model various physical phenomena. Ideas about infinite series are pursued, including some convergence tests, with particular emphasis on Taylor series.
Prerequisite: MATH 1130 with a minimum grade of C.
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1230, MATH 1240, MATH 1241 or MATH 1250.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1240 Calculus 2 (3,1.5,0) or (5,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course covers integral calculus for functions of one variable, with applications emphasizing the physical sciences. Topics include Riemann sums, definite and indefinite integrals, techniques of integration, improper integrals, applications of integration (including area, volume, arc length, probability and work), separable differential equations, and series. Prerequisites: MATH 1130 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1140 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1141 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1150 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1157 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1230, MATH 1240, MATH 1241 or MATH 1250.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1250 Calculus for the Biological Sciences 2 (5,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course covers integral calculus for functions of one variable, with applications emphasizing the biological sciences. Topics include Riemann sums, definite and indefinite integrals, techniques of integration, improper integrals, first-order differential equations and slope fields, applications (including area, probability, logistic growth and predator-prey systems), and series. MATH 1240 is recommended instead of MATH 1250 for students planning to take 2nd-year MATH courses. Prerequisites: MATH 1130 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1140 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1141 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1150 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1157 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1230, MATH 1240, MATH 1241 or MATH 1250.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1300 Linear Algebra for Engineers (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is designed for engineering students, with applications chosen accordingly. Topics include real vectors in two and three dimensions, systems of linear equations and row-echelon form, span and linear dependence, linear transformations and matrices, determinants, complex numbers, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and orthogonality and Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Engineering Program
Corequisite: MATH 1130 Exclusions: MATH 2120 and MATH 2121
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MATH 1420 Mathematics for Visual Arts (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore mathematical concepts and techniques that are useful in a visual arts context. Topics include real numbers, ratios, geometry, and perspective.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus 11 or MATH 0500.
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MATH 1540 Technical Mathematics 1 (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are instructed in mathematical concepts that are relevant to architecture, design, and engineering. Topics include trigonometry, an introduction to two- and three- dimensional vectors, functions and graphs, solving linear and quadratic equations, coordinate geometry, areas and volumes of standard geometric shapes, elementary statistics and probability, and problem solving.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Architectural and Engineering Technology program
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MATH 1640 Technical Mathematics 2 (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This is a calculus course for students in the Architectural and Engineering Technology program. Topics include systems of linear equations and matrices; differentiation and integration, with applications to curve sketching, extreme values and optimization; related rates; areas; volumes. Prerequisites: MATH 1540 and Admission to the Architectural and Engineering Technology program
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MATH 1650 Mathematics for Computing Science (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course surveys several mathematical concepts used in Computing Science. Topics include logic; circuits; number systems; finite state machines; vector and matrix algebra; systems of linear equations; linear transformations; discrete and continuous probabilities; statistics and random variables; decision analysis. Prerequisites: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or MATH 0600 with a minimum grade of B or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following COMP 1380, MATH 1380, MATH 1650 or MATH 1651.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1700 Discrete Mathematics 1 (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the foundation of modern mathematics. Topics include basic set theory; counting; solutions to recurrence relations; logic and quantifiers; properties of integers; mathematical induction; introduction of graphs and trees; asymptotic notations. Prerequisites: Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or MATH 0600 with a minimum grade of B or MATH 0610 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0630 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0633 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following COMP 1390, MATH 1390, MATH 1700 or MATH 1701.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 1900 Principles of Mathematics for Teachers (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is designed for students who wish to enter the Elementary Teaching Program, emphasizes conceptual understanding of elementary mathematical methods and ideas. Topics include problem solving, numbers and number theory, operations, geometry, measurement, proportional reasoning and probability. Additional topics may be included at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisites: Foundations of Math 11 with a minimum 67% (C+) or Pre-calculus 11 with a minimum 67% (C+) or MATH 0510 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0520 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0550 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1900 or MATH 1901.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 2110 Calculus 3 (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

The concepts of single-variable calculus are extended to higher dimensions by using vectors as variables. Topics include vector geometry and the analytic geometry of lines, planes and surfaces; calculus of curves in two or three dimensions, including arc length and curvature; calculus of scalar-valued functions of several variables, including the gradient, directional derivatives and the Chain Rule; Lagrange multipliers and optimization problems; double integrals in rectangular and polar coordinates. Prerequisites: MATH 1230 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 1240 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 1241 with a minimum grade of C.
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 2110, MATH 2111 or MATH 2650.
For more information, search for this course here.

MATH 2120 Linear Algebra 1 (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to linear algebra. Topics include vector spaces, Matrix algebra and matrix inverse, systems of linear equations and row-echelon form, bases and dimension, orthogonality, geometry of n-dimensional space, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, linear transformations. Prerequisites: MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1241 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1700 or MATH 1701 all with a minimum grade of C.
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1300, MATH 2120 or MATH 2121.
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MATH 2200 Introduction to Analysis (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Analysis is a broad area of mathematics that includes calculus. This course presents some basic concepts of analysis in a mathematically rigorous manner, using theorems and proofs. Students are expected to develop some ability to understand proofs and to write their own proofs. After a survey of essential background material on logic, set theory, numbers and functions, the course covers suprema and infima of sets, completeness, basic metric topology of the real numbers (neighbourhoods, interior points and cluster points), continuity and limits.
Prerequisite: MATH 1240 or equivalent calculus. B- minimum strongly recommended. Required Seminar: MATH 2200S
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MATH 2240 Differential Equations 1 (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course examines ordinary differential equations and related initial-value problems, and emphasizes their many applications in science and engineering. Students discuss methods for solving such equations either exactly or approximately. Topics include first-order equations; higher order linear equations; modelling with differential equations; systems of linear equations; and phase plane analysis of nonlinear systems. Prerequisites: MATH 1240, MATH 1241, MATH 2120 or MATH 2121 all with a minimum grade of C.
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MATH 2700 Discrete Mathematics 2 (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is a sequel to MATH 1700. Topics include combinatorial arguments and proofs, deriving recurrence relations; generating functions; inclusion-exclusion; functions and relations; countable and uncountable sets; and graph theory.
Prerequisite: COMP 1390 or MATH 1390 or MATH 1700 or MATH 1701 all with a minimum grade of C.
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MATH 3000 Complex Variables (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the classical complex function theory, a cornerstone of mathematics. Topics include: complex derivatives and the Cauchy-Riemann equations; the complex exponential function and related elementary functions; integration along curves and Cauchy's theorems; Taylor and Laurent series; zeros and singularities; residues; and evaluation of integrals using the residue theorem.
Prerequisite: MATH 2110 or MATH 2111 and MATH 3170 or MATH 2200 all with a minimum grade of C or with departmental permission.
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MATH 3020 Introduction to Probability (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course provides a theoretical foundation for the study of statistics. Topics include basic notions of probability, random variables, probability distributions (both single-variable and multi-variable), expectation and conditional expectation, limit theorems and random number generation.
Prerequisite: MATH 2110
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MATH 3030 Introduction to Stochastic Processes (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine simple random processes, including discrete and continuous Markov chains, Poisson processes and Brownian motion. Renewal theory is also discussed.
Prerequisite: MATH 3020 Required Seminar: MATH 3030S
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MATH 3070 Linear Algebra 2 (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Fundamental ideas about vector spaces and subspaces, bases and dimension, linear transformations and matrices are studied in more depth than in MATH 2120. Topics include matrix diagonalization and its applications, invariant subspaces, inner product spaces and Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization, linear operators of various special types (normal, self-adjoint, unitary, orthogonal, projections), and the finite-dimensional spectral theorem.
Prerequisite: MATH 1300 or MATH 2120 or MATH 2121 all with a minimum grade of C.
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MATH 3080 Euclidean Geometry (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students begin with the axiomatic development of geometry, and briefly explore possible variations in axioms. Students then progress to classical Euclidean geometry; geometric transformations; and the relevance of geometric transformations to computer graphics. The course concludes with a discussion of non-Euclidean geometries and projective geometry.
Prerequisite: MATH 2120 Required Seminar: MATH 3080S
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MATH 3120 Elementary Number Theory (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

The course begins with integer divisibility and the related ideas of prime numbers, unique prime factorization, and congruence. Attention is then directed to arithmetic functions, including the Euler totient function. The Chinese Remainder Theorem and quadratic reciprocity are studied, and some Diophantine equations are considered. Lastly continued fractions and primitive roots are discussed.
Prerequisite: MATH 2120 Required Seminar: MATH 3120S
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MATH 3160 Differential Equations 2 (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is divided into three parts. The first part examines methods for solving ordinary differential equations. Power series methods are applied to obtain solutions near ordinary points and regular singular points, and the real Laplace transform is discussed. In the second part, students consider Sturm-Liouville boundary-value problems, Fourier series, and other series of eigenfunctions, including Fourier-Bessel series. In the last part of the course, the method of separation of variables is used to solve initial-value and boundary-value problems involving partial differential equations, especially the heat equation, the wave equation and Laplace's equation, with applications in physics. Prerequisites: MATH 2240-Differential Equations with a minimum grade of C Exclusion Requisites: PHYS 3120- Introduction to Mathematical Physics
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MATH 3170 Calculus 4 (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

The concept of a definite integral is extended to double and triple integrals and the calculus of vector fields are studied. Topics include triple integrals in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, general change of variables in double and triple integrals, vector fields, line integrals, conservative fields and path independence, Green's theorem, surface integrals, Stokes' theorem and the divergence theorem, with applications in physics. Prerequisites:MATH 2110 and MATH 2111 Exclusion Requisites:MATH 2670
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MATH 3200 Real Variables (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

The core of this course is a careful study of continuity and limits of real functions and convergence of real sequences and series, in addition to basic topology of the real line. Limit points and subsequences are discussed, leading to the Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem and the concept of a compact set. Metric spaces are introduced. Prerequisites: MATH 2200, MATH 3070, MATH 3080, MATH 3120 and MATH 3220
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MATH 3220 Abstract Algebra (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students in this course study some abstract algebraic structures. The main structures are groups and rings. Topics include groups and subgroups, cyclic groups, permutation groups, group homomorphisms and quotient groups, rings and ring homomorphisms, integral domains, ideals and quotient rings, prime and maximal ideals, and fields. Prerequisites:MATH 2120, MATH 2121, MATH 2200, MATH 2700, MATH 3070, MATH 3080 and MATH 3120
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MATH 3400 Introduction to Linear Programming (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Algorithms for linear programming are introduced and studied in this course, from both theoretical and applied perspectives. Topics include the graphic method; simplex method; revised simplex method; and duality theory. Special linear programming such as network flows and game theory are also explored. Prerequisites:MATH 2120 or MATH 2121
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MATH 3510 Problem Solving Applied Math (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course provides learners with a systematic approach to problem solving. Students use a variety of analytical techniques to solve problems drawn from various disciplines. This course is of interest to students in any program where numerical problems may occur. Prerequisites: MATH 1140, MATH 1141, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170, MATH 1171, MATH 1650, MATH 1651, MATH 1700, MATH 1701, STAT 1200, STAT 1201 or STAT 2000
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MATH 3650 Numerical Analysis (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course introduces standard numerical methods, including algorithms for solving algebraic equations (linear and nonlinear, single equations and systems) and for polynomial approximation and interpolation.
Prerequisite: MATH 2110 or MATH 2111 and MATH 2120 or MATH 2121 all with a minimum grade of C.
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following COMP 3320 or MATH 3650.
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MATH 3700 Introduction to the History of Mathematics (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students trace the development of numeration, arithmetic, geometry, algebra and other areas of mathematics, from their beginnings to their modern forms. The historical development studies is enhanced by the solution of mathematical problems using the techniques that were available in the period under study.
Prerequisite: MATH 1240 or equivalent Required Seminar: MATH 3700S
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MATH 4410 Modelling of Discrete Optimization Problems (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Real-world optimization problems are formulated in order to be resolved by standard techniques involving linear programming, integer programming, network flows, dynamic programming and goal programming. Additional techniques may include post-optimality analysis, game theory, nonlinear programming, and heuristic techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 3400-Intro to Linear Programming with a minimum grade of C
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MATH 4430 Introduction to Graph Theory (4,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

An introductory course deals mostly with non-algorithmic topics, including connectivity, Eulerian graphs, Hamiltonian graphs, planarity and Kuratowski's Theorem, matchings, graph colouring, and extremal graphs. Applications of graphs are discussed. Prerequisites: MATH 2700-Discrete Mathematics 2 with a minimum grade of C or A minimum grade of C in at least 12 credits of Mathematics or Statistics courses numbered 2000 or higher.
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STAT 1200 Introduction to Statistics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to statistical reasoning in this course. Students will learn to interpret quantities relating to descriptive statistics; correlation; regression; probability; and probability distributions including the binomial and normal. Students will learn different facets of sampling and experimental design. Students will learn to make appropriate inferences from confidence intervals and hypothesis tests including analysis of variance.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus 11 ,Foundations of Math 12 or MATH 0510 or MATH 0523 or equivalent. MATH 1100 or MATH 1101 is recommended.
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STAT 2000 Probability and Statistics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is intended for math or science students. Students are introduced to probability and statistical reasoning. Students will learn to both calculate and interpret quantities relating to descriptive statistics; correlation; regression; probability; and probability distributions including the binomial and normal. Students will learn different facets of sampling and experimental design and the construction and appropriate inference from confidence intervals and hypothesis tests including analysis of variance. .
Prerequisite: MATH 1140, MATH 1130, MATH 1150, MATH 1157, MATH 1170, MATH 1171
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STAT 3050 Introduction to Statistical Inference (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course examines the theory behind statistical inference.Students will review probability theory, sampling distributions, methods of estimation, and hypothesis testing. Students will learn more advanced inferential techniques such as maximum likelihood estimation, bootstrapping, Bayesian methods, likelihood ratio testing, and confidence intervals. There will be an emphasis on the theory of these approaches in addition to their application.
Prerequisite: STAT 2000 and MATH 3020
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STAT 3060 Applied Regression Analysis (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are exposed to the concepts of regression analysis with an emphasis on application. Students will learn how to appropriately conduct residual analysis, perform diagnostics, apply transformations, select and check models, and augment regression such as with weighted least squares and nonlinear models. Students may learn additional topics such as inverse, robust, ridge and logistic regression.
Prerequisite: MATH 1300 or MATH 2121 or MATH 2120, STAT 2000
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STAT 4040 Analysis of Variance (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students discuss the analysis of variance for standard experimental designs. Topics include single factor designs, fixed and random effects, block designs, hierarchical designs, multiple comparisons, factorial designs, mixed models, general rules for analysis of balanced designs, and analysis of covariance. Co-Requisite: STAT 3060 Required Seminar: STAT 4040S
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STAT 4310 Introduction to Multivariate Analysis (3,0,1)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students analyze and interpret multivariate data in a number of different contexts. Topics include linear models, analysis of variance and covariance, multivariate analysis of variance, principle component analysis, and tree models. Students explore techniques for exploratory data analysis, model identification, and diagnostic checking. The course involves extensive use of software tools to apply the various analytical approaches.
Prerequisite: STAT 2000 or BIOL 3000 Recommended: MATH 2120 OR MATH 3020 OR STAT 3060 OR STAT 4040
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STAT 4990 ***Selected Topics in Statistics (3,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students consider, in depth, a selection of topics drawn from Statistics. The particular topics may vary each time the course is offered.
Prerequisite: At least two of MATH 3020, MATH 3030, STAT 3050, STAT 3060 or permission of the instructor
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