Indigenous Courses

HLTH 2300 Interdisciplinary Indigenous Health (2,1,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course introduces students to Indigenous people's health in Canada. Students experience Indigenous ways ofknowing through a decolonization framework, engaging in local knowledge, methodologies and practices ofIndigenous peoples. Students engage in experiential, reflexive learning informed by local Knowledge Keepers. Thecourse embraces Indigenous Knowledge and uses the premise of 'two-eyed seeing'. Students are guided through aninter-professional framework of practice to facilitate collaboration and planning of services to improve Indigenous health.
Prerequisite: Completion of Semester 3 of the BScN program or Special Arrangements with the instructor
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HLTH 4441 Population Based Mental Health Assessment and Intervention

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Distance

Students will be introduced to best practices in working with specific populations, such as younger adults, older adults, aboriginal people, LGBT populations, women and families who are experiencing mental health problems.
Prerequisite: HLTH 4531
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HUMS 1770 Introduction to Human Service Practice with Indigenous Communities (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the historical and continuing process of colonization in Canada, and the resulting societal, political, linguistic, spiritual, and cultural impacts that are challenging First Nations people today. The development of cultural understanding and the beginning of culturally competent practice occur in this course. Additional topics include self-government, cultural healing and empowerment, and human service practice in First Nations communities.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Human Service Diploma program or permission of the Program Coordinator
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both HUMS 1771 and HUMS 1770.
For more information, search for this course here.

SOCW 3540 Indigenous People and Human Services (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students critically examine the historical process of colonization in Canada, the resulting barriers embedded in policy and practice, and alternative ways of viewing the social-psychological position of Indigenous People in Canadian society. Contemporary issues and the movement toward self-determination are discussed in relation to social work theory and practice.
Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program or permission of the program coordinator
Note: Students must maintain a grade of C or better to successfully complete this course
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SOCW 4540 Decolonizing Social Work Practice ne Secwepemcul'ecw (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine social workers' roles and responsibilities in working with Indigenous people. The concept and process of decolonization is introduced and connected to contemporary stories, community social work program initiatives, and practices of Indigenous people. This course utilizes a gendered Indigenous perspective and explores strategies for reconciliation, building relationships, and practices within the social work profession.
Prerequisite: SOCW 2060, SOCW 2120, SOCW 3540 and admission to the Bachelor of Social Work program, or permission of the program coordinator.
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EDFN 4200 Aboriginal Culture and Learning (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

The course begins with an overview of the history of Aboriginal Education in British Columbia and Canada. The course focuses on effective teaching and learning practices for Aboriginal students including developing relationships with parents and extended family members. Teacher candidates examine how to enrich the regular school curriculum by adding Aboriginal content and including the cultural background of their Aboriginal students. The class format is presentation and discussion based on articles and videos provided by faculty, presentations from other Aboriginal educators, community members, and teacher candidates. Field experiences typically include visits to local band-operated schools, the Secwepemc Museum, the Kamloops Residential School and the Interior Indian Friendship Centre.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Bachelor of Education program or permission of the instructor
For more information, search for this course here.

HUMS 1771 Introduction to First Nations Studies and Human Service Practice

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Distance

Students examine the historical and continuing process of colonization in Canada, and the resulting societal, political, linguistic, spiritual, and cultural impacts that are challenging Indigenous people today. The development of cultural understanding and the beginning of culturally competent practice occur in this course. Additional topics include self-government, cultural healing and empowerment, and human service practice in Indigenous communities. Prerequisites: Admission to the Human Service Diploma Program or permission of the Program Coordinator.
Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of HUMS 1770, HUMS 1771.
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EDFN 4201 Aboriginal Teaching and Learning

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Distance

Students are given an overview of the history of Aboriginal Education in British Columbia and Canada. The course focuses on effective teaching and learning practices for Aboriginal students including developing relationships with parents and extended family members. Teacher candidates examine how to enrich the regular school curriculum by adding Aboriginal content and including the cultural background of their Aboriginal students. The class format is presentation and discussion based on articles and videos provided by faculty, presentations from other Aboriginal educators, community members, and teacher candidates. Virtual field experiences could include visits to local band-operated schools, Aboriginal museums, residential schools and/or Aboriginal Friendship Centres. Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the course, but EDTE 3180 is recommended.
Note: Students cannot get credit for more than one of EDFN 4200, EDFN 4201.
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ANTH 3280 Indigenous Peoples in Comparative Perspective (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course takes a cross-cultural comparative approach to the study of contemporary Indigenous Peoples. Indigenous Peoples constitute a diverse range of groups throughout the world. What they have in common is the shared experience of colonization. Recognizing the diversity of Indigenous Peoples throughout the world, this course will explore both those experiences shared between groups, and those unique to local contexts.
Prerequisite: ANTH 1210
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2410 Indigenous Narratives in Canada (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the contemporary application of narrative structure that shapes the literature of Indigenous cultures,focusing on modern and contemporary poetry, drama, short stories, novels, and essays. Through close reading ofIndigenous narratives from a variety of nations, including local Secwepemc narratives, students gain culturalcompetency and an appreciation of the real-world application of issues studied.
Prerequisite: 6 credits of first-year English (with the exception of ENGL 1150) or equivalent OR permission of instructor or department Chair.
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GEOG 4850 Geography of First Nations Issues in British Columbia (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course offers an examination of the issues involved in the creation of new relationships that are evolving and inclusive of First Nations concerns in British Columbia. Students explore the past relationships between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples of the province, the legal principles and precedents in force, the present situation of ongoing negotiations, and an analysis of future possibilities. Land and resource agreements and disagreements are the focus of this course, as well as the mechanisms available for compromise and resolution.
Prerequisite: Completion of 60 credits (any discipline) or permission of the instructor.
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ENGL 1021 Composition and Indigenous Literature in Canada I

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Distance

This course introduces students to an exciting range of Indigenous Canadian literature and orature, including autobiographies, speeches, essays, short stories and storytelling. Students will also have the opportunity to listen to audio CDs of interviews and readings by many of the authors studied in the course, and view a video of a storytelling performance, and an interview with a contemporary Indigenous multimedia artist. Prerequisites: English Studies 12 or equivalent.
Note: This course satisfies the first half of the introductory English literature and composition requirement of TRU-Open Learning degrees. Students with credit for ENGL 1001, ENGL 1019 or ENGL 1011 may not take this course for further credit. Students with credit for ENGL 1021 may not take ENGL 1061 or ENGL 1999 for further credit in some programs. Students cannot get credit for more than one of ENGL 1001, ENGL 1011, CMNS 1811.
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ENGL 1031 Composition and Indigenous Literature in Canada II

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Distance

This course is comparable to the second half of other first-year university English courses. Course requirements include reading: novels, a novel excerpt, one-act and full-length plays, and a wide range of poems. The six instructional units in this course cover a broad and exciting range and depth of literature written in English by Canadian Indigenous writers, beginning in the twentieth century. Students will develop an appreciation for both the significance of oral storytelling to contemporary Aboriginal writers as well as the diverse contributions of these writers to contemporary literature. Students will identify, analyze and discuss many literary conventions related to fiction, drama and poetry. In addition, students will receive further experience in composition and in writing critical essays, including a formal research paper. Prerequisites: English Studies 12 or equivalent. ENGL 1001 or ENGL 1021 are recommended.
Note: This course satisfies the second half of the introductory English literature and composition requirement of TRU degrees. Students with credit for ENGL 1011 or ENGL 1029 may not take this course for further credit. If in doubt, please contact your academic advisor. Students cannot get credit for more than one of ENGL 1011.
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ANTH 4010 Native Peoples of North America (3,0,0) or (3,0,0)(3,0,0)

Credits: 6 credits
Delivery: Campus

Native cultures of the United States and Canada; linguistic and cultural relationships; the culture of reserves and the reserve system in both countries.
Prerequisite: ANTH 1210 or permission of the instructor.
For more information, search for this course here.

BIOL 3220 Natural History (2,0,4)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Defined as "the direct knowledge of organisms in their environments," natural history remains a critical link between science and society. In this course, students learn to identify the dominant flora and fauna, as well as their patterns of distribution, in key ecosystems throughout southern British Columbia (or another regional location). Students synthesize key climatic, geological and biotic processes responsible for the observed patterns. Through close reading and emulation of writer-naturalists, students relate the science of natural history to a larger human truth or societal concern. In addition, students evaluate the changing relationship between humans and their inhabited landscapes by considering such topics as invasive species, habitat fragmentation and climate change.
Prerequisite: Completion of 60 credits or permission of the instructor Required Lab: BIOL 3220L
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