Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University

Sociology Courses


SOCI 1110
SOCI 1110
Introduction to Sociology 1 (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students are introduced to the core concepts of the discipline of sociology by examining key concepts (such as culture, socialization, social interaction, social roles, and educational issues) that allow us to locate ourselves within society. Students also explore theoretical perspectives within sociology and the fundamentals of research methods, including how sociologists gather information about society. Required Seminar: SOCI 1110S
SOCI 1210
SOCI 1210
Introduction to Sociology 2 (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
In this second half of Introduction to Sociology, students are introduced to such topics as crime and deviance, social control, large scale organizations, principal institutions such as religion, politics, and economy. Students also critically examine the impact of social structure, such as race and ethnicity, social stratification, and gender relations, on individual's lives.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110 Required Seminar: SOCI 1210S
SOCI 2010
SOCI 2010
Race and Ethnic Relations (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students examine sociological descriptions and theoretical explanations for race and ethnic inequality in Canada. This course challenges students to critically examine race and ethnic relations in Canada vis-a-vis other countries.
Prerequisites: SOCI 1110/1210
SOCI 2100
SOCI 2100
Canadian Social Issues (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
This course offers a descriptive and analytic survey of features in Canadian society as a basis for understanding current social issues. These features include demographic characteristics, class structure, ethnicity, and regional variation.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210
SOCI 2130
SOCI 2130
Women in Global Perspective (3,0,0) or (3,0,0)(3,0,0)
Credits: 6
Campus
AR
SOAN
This course provides a global approach to the study of women's lives. Topics include sexuality, the sex trade, family relations, violence, the global economy, domestic work, and politics.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210
SOCI 2160
SOCI 2160
The Family in Cross-Cultural Perspectives (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students are introduced to the study of family life in its formation, the relevance of marriage and cohabitation, bringing up children, and the impact of family issues. In this cross-cultural comparison of family life, students are familiarized with the variations that occur throughout the world in the structure and meaning of marriage relations; forms of domestic organization; the sexual division of labour, property and inheritance, and the familial influence in the construction of gender relations in different cultures around the world.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210
SOCI 2170
SOCI 2170
The Sociology of Popular Culture (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students are introduced to the sociological implications of popular culture, and focus on issues central to the presentation, consumption, and construction of current social life. Popular culture affects everyone; however, everyone does not participate in it equally. Thus both the unequal consumption of popular culture, and the representations (and justifications) of inequality between groups in Western society as presented in popular culture is studied in the course.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 Required Seminar: SOCI 2170S
SOCI 2230
SOCI 2230
Collective Behaviour (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students are introduced to explanations and analyses of crowd and mass action. Students aim to describe and analyze such behaviors as riots, fads, demonstrations, public opinion, and emergent social movements.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 Required Seminar: SOCI 2230S
SOCI 2260
SOCI 2260
Medical Sociology (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students focus on the social factors which influence help seeking and illness behaviour, as well as the nature and organization of Canada's health care system. The main purpose of this course is to illustrate that health and illness are not entirely individual phenomena, but that the cause, distribution, and consequences of injury and illness are at least partly the product of social, economic, and political factors. Topics include policy and delivery of health care; interaction between health care providers and patients; occupational health and safety; environment, work and illness; health care and the elderly; and inequality and health care.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 Required Seminar: SOCI 2260S
SOCI 2270
SOCI 2270
***Selected Topics in Sociology (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students are provided an opportunity to explore theories, topics, or issues that are not normally offered by the department, or in the permanent course rotation. Subtitles reflect the topic for a specific offering and therefore vary. Students may enroll in SOCI 2270 twice, providing the subtitles are different at each enrolment.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 Required Seminar: SOCI 2270S
SOCI 2500
SOCI 2500
Crime and Society (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students are introduced to the central issues of criminology, such as the definition of crime; methods of research into criminal activities, the operation of the criminal justice system in the "making" and "controlling" of crime, and theories that are used to explain the origins of crime and criminality.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 Required Seminar: SOCI 2500S
SOCI 2590
SOCI 2590
Deviance and Control (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students learn to adopt a sociological perspective when thinking about 'deviant' behaviour, while examining the complex task of defining 'deviance' and how these definitions vary over time and place. Students critically evaluate the social category of deviance and its use in social institutions and daily social interactions, and consider the role of power in reinforcing and challenging 'deviant' identities. Major topics may include an exploration of sexuality, youth, physical appearance, mental disorders, religion, and scientific beliefs.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210
SOCI 2620
SOCI 2620
Sociology of the Environment (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students are introduced to several theories that sociologists use to explain the exploitation and despoiling of the natural environment. How and why society defines and uses natural resources is examined, in addition to how and why environmental degradation is defined as an issue while other degradation is not. Students learn that values, norms and definition change across time and place. Due to the nature of environmental issues and problems, students focus on global and Canadian issues.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210
SOCI 2720
SOCI 2720
Introductory Social Research Methods (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students are introduced to an overview of the philosophy and practice of social research. Topics include research ethics, research design, survey research, field research, interviewing, quasi-experimentation, and data analysis. This is a core course for students in the sociology major program.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 (Grade of C or better) Required Seminar: SOCI 2720S
SOCI 3100
SOCI 3100
Canadian Society (3,0,0) or (3,0,0)(3,0,0)
Credits: 6
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students examine selected features of the social organization of Canadian society. Topics may include the relationships between industrial organization and other social institutions and processes, such as family structure, welfare systems, crime rates, ethnic relations, industrial, and political conflict.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210
SOCI 3120
SOCI 3120
Gender Relations (3,0,0)(3,0,0)
Credits: 6
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students examine the nature of gender relations, their social and cultural expression, and theories of gender inequality drawn from anthropological or sociological research.
Prerequisites: SOCI 1110/1210
Note: Course is equivalent to ANTH 3120
SOCI 3160
SOCI 3160
Sexuality (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Sexuality is a set of discourses about `good' and `bad' sexual practices, and it is a part of any society's social institutional structure. Students examine sexuality in its multiple dimensions, and as the basis for progressive and regulatory, or repressive, counter-movements.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210
SOCI 3200
SOCI 3200
Classical Social Theory (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students are introduced and guided through the study of complex works by three influential founders of sociology (Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, and Max Weber), as well as other relevant theorists who contributed to the formation of the basic concepts and methods of the social sciences. Students also examine the pitfalls of a male-centred perspective on society in the classical canon, and the contributions of early feminist social theorists. The course focuses on the development of capitalism, the formation of modern society, and the discovery of the society as an object of knowledge.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Sociology Major Program Required Seminar: SOCI 3200S
SOCI 3210
SOCI 3210
Feminist Theory (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students are introduced to the history of Western feminist thought and the major traditions of feminist theory. Classical and contemporary debates on gender relations relevant to sociologists and other social theorists are examined in depth. This is a core course for students in the sociology major program.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110, 1210 and 3200 Required Seminar: SOCI 3210S
SOCI 3220
SOCI 3220
Contemporary Issues in Social Theory (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students examine contemporary issues in social theory, and learn to evaluate the range of strategies theorists use to clarify and resolve theoretical problems. Links between theory, research, and explanation are also explored. This is a core course for students in the sociology major program.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 and 3200
SOCI 3520
SOCI 3520
Organization of Work (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students explore the meaning of work and leisure, and the properties of work organization, such as division of labour and specialization; technology and working knowledge; and the means of coordinating work, such as cooperation, authority, and exchange. Student may also research topics such as work in households, offices and industry, division of labour by gender, industrial democracy, and the relation of work and social inequality.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210
SOCI 3600
SOCI 3600
Sociology and Natural Resources (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students examine sociological perspectives on property, resource development, resource communities, and resource industries. Social causes and consequences of change in the social organization (e.g. ownership and labour force), and social policies (e.g. land use, property rights) in industries such as agriculture, fishing, forestry and mining may also be examined.
Prerequisites: SOCI 1110 and 1210; SOCI 2620 or GEOG 1100 recommended
SOCI 3610
SOCI 3610
Social Inequality (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students examine the tendencies toward equality and inequality; the manifestations of inequality and their consequences, including occupation, ethnic groups, income, and power; caste and class features of major stratification systems; theories of social class; and the stratification profile of contemporary industrial societies.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210, 3rd year standing
SOCI 3620
SOCI 3620
***Special Topics in Social Problems (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students focus on a selected social problem, or area within the sociology discipline. The specific social problem varies from year to year. Prospective students should consult the current sociology at TRU handbook or a member of the Department for information concerning the availability of this course.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210, 3rd year standing Required Seminar: SOCI 3620S
SOCI 3680
SOCI 3680
Deviance and Social Control (3,0,0)(3,0,0)
Credits: 6
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students learn the analytic framework for the study of the generation and control of deviant activities. The course aims to explore the essence of deviant behaviour, including its construction, explanation, commission, and control. Students focus on the major theoretical approaches to the study of deviance and deviants, and may discuss classical and contemporary theories.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210
SOCI 3800
SOCI 3800
Introduction to Social Survey Design and Analysis (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students learn to design questionnaires, complete interviews, draw samples, and analyze survey data. This is a core course for the sociology major program.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 and Soci 2720 Required Seminar: SOCI 380S
SOCI 3820
SOCI 3820
Socio-Ethnographic Research Methods in Sociology (Qualitative Methods) (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students are introduced to the six main ways of collecting qualitative (non-numerical) data: interviewing, focus groups, ethnography, sociometry, `unobtrusive' measures, and historiography. Students also discover methodologies for how to make sense of this data.This is a core course for sociology major students.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 and 2720 Required Seminar: SOCI 3820S
SOCI 4030
SOCI 4030
Ethnography of Special Areas - Field Course in East/Central Europe (3,0,0)
Credits: 6
Campus
AR
SOAN
This course offers an advanced introduction to the societies and cultures of East and Central Europe by way of a month-long field trip to Austria, Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Ukraine. While immersed in the geographical area, students ethnographically examine the religions, ethnic relations, economies, and politics shaping the buffer zone between the European East and West.
Note: This course is equivalent to ANTH 4030
SOCI 4130
SOCI 4130
Family and Kinship (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students are exposed to a cross-cultural survey of methodologies for defining family relations and kinship organizations through theoretical analysis and case studies.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210
SOCI 4200
SOCI 4200
Complex Organizations (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students explore the history of the formation of complex organizations during the industrial and political revolutions of modernity, including their initial bureaucratic arrangement, and their newer, more flexible and dynamic forms due to technological change and globalization. A critical sociological perspective on organizational analysis is discussed, including how to recognize the different `species' of organizations, and how they touch virtually all aspects of modern life. This perspective allows students to appreciate the relationships between modern complex organizations and individuals, and how organizations interact with the larger institutions of society and the world.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 or instructor's written consent Required Seminar: SOCI 4200S
SOCI 4600
SOCI 4600
Globalization (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students examine the origins, nature, and impact of globalization in the modern world. Links between nations, regions, and peoples are increasing at an unprecedented rate. New technologies make possible previously unimaginable forms of interdependence, but the consequences of these changes are not uniform. The impacts vary from region to region. Students explore how people from different nations may view globalization, and consider how groups work to ensure that globalization contributes to desirable outcomes in local contexts.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210 Required Seminar: SOCI 4600S
SOCI 4660
SOCI 4660
Socialization and Education (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
This course provides a study of the induction into social structures and the acquisition of membership in society. Students analyze the structure and influence of education, and other socializing institutions.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210
SOCI 4700
SOCI 4700
Sociology of Crime and Justice (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
This course offers a critical examination of specific forms of crime and delinquency in relation to the criminal justice systems of the common law (adversarial) and civil (inquisitorial) law traditions. These include law, law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Issues of ethics, morality and social justice are raised.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210
SOCI 4730
SOCI 4730
Global Social Change (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students examine the societal developments that gave rise to colonization and prepared the grounds for globalization. The issues facing ordinary people, from Asia, Africa and Latin America, are explored as a consequence of colonization and the imbalance of power in the world. Topics include dictatorship and human rights abuses; unequal economic development; struggles for decolonization and independence; the status of women; environmental degradation; and the circumstances of ethnic minorities and aboriginal peoples. Students also discuss grass-roots social movements that have achieved transnational organization and that oppose the effects of global neo-colonialism.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210
SOCI 4810
SOCI 4810
Directed Studies in Sociology (3,0,0) or (6,0,0)
Credits: 6
Campus
AR
SOAN
This course is designed to allow upper-level students to undertake an investigation on a specific topic as agreed upon by the faculty member and the student.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210, one 2nd year methods and one 3rd year theory course in Sociology. One specific Sociology course on the general topic of the directed studies course. Declared major in Sociology. GPA minimum as per TRU Honours Degree Policy ED 16-2. Permission of the Instructor.
SOCI 4840
SOCI 4840
Sociology of Health and Illness (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
SOAN
Students explore sociological perspectives on health, illness, and health care as represented in classic and contemporary sociological studies. Topics may include illness experience, social aspects of the practice of health professionals, training of health professionals, and the social organization of health delivery systems.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110/1210