Faculty of Arts

Second Year English Courses


ENGL 2000 Introduction to Canadian Studies (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore Canadian Studies by examining some key concepts and themes that have emerged across a wide spectrum of scholarship on Canada. Students increase their awareness of the dynamics of all aspects of Canadian literature and culture. At the discretion of the individual instructor, this course may focus on a particular time period, relationship, or theme.
Prerequisite: 6 credits of first year English (with the exception of ENGL 1150) or equivalent or permission of the instructor or department chair
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2010 Writing and Critical Thinking: The Personal in Academic Discourse (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

The subject of this course includes reading and writing, with a focus on the literacy narratives genre. Students read and interpret a selection of literacy narratives by scholars as well as scholarly articles that explore the role of the personal in academic discourse. Students gain extensive practice in thinking critically and writing about their own literacy experiences.
Prerequisite: Any two of: ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1110 or ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1140 or ENGL 1210
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ENGL 2020 Writing and Critical Thinking: Research (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

The subject of this course is academic writing, with a focus on the research genres, including critical summaries, research proposals and research papers. Students analyze and gain extensive practice in research writing, while also considering various stylistic strategies.
Prerequisite: Any two of ENGL 1100, 1110, 1120, 1140 or 1210
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2040 Canadian Drama: From Page to Stage and Screen (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Through a focus on modern and contemporary plays, this course introduces students to various theatrical techniques and dramatic modes. Works by such playwrights as Tremblay, Ryga, Highway, Clements, and Lepage may be among those studied. Whenever possible, texts are studied in conjunction with local theatrical productions.
Prerequisite: two 1st year Academic English courses with a C or better or instructor's written consent.
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2060 Creative Writing - Fiction (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course consists of lectures and workshops on writing literary fiction. Through lectures, readings and tests, students identify and critique the use of fictional techniques in contemporary fiction. Assignments require students to apply their knowledge of fiction and skills by writing original creative work.
Prerequisite: Any two of ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1110 or ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1140 or ENGL 1210 and ENGL 1150 (Recommended)
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2070 Creative Writing - Drama (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course consists of lectures and workshops on writing stage plays. Lectures and assignments focus on the techniques and requirements of contemporary play writing.
Prerequisite: Any two of ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1110 or ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1140 or ENGL 1210 and ENGL 1150 recommended
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ENGL 2080 Creative Writing - Poetry (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course consists of lectures and workshops on writing poetry, with an emphasis on the study and practice of basic poetry writing techniques. Through lectures, readings and assignments, students identify and apply various stylistic elements of contemporary poetry writing.
Prerequisite: Any two of ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1110 or ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1140 or ENGL 1210 and ENGL 1150 (Recommended)
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2110 Literary Landmarks in English to 1700 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students from all disciplines, and especially English Majors, develop advanced reading and writing skills as well aspractical tools for success in writing and literature courses. Students learn greater appreciation for the language ofliterature and practice close reading skills as well as analysis of the historical, political, and cultural dimensions ofworks from three genres: poetry, drama, and fiction. In addition, students explore diverse critical approaches to thestudy of literature. Prerequisites: 6 credits of first-year English (with the exception of ENGL 1150) or equivalent OR permission of instructor or department Chair
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2120 Reading Literature: Essential Skills (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is recommended for all English Majors, but anyone hoping to develop advanced reading and writing skills will find this course interesting as well as useful for developing practical tools for success in writing and literature courses. Students learn greater appreciation for the language of literature. The course emphasizes close readings as well as analysis of the historical, political, and cultural dimensions of works from three genres: poetry, drama, and fiction. Critical approaches to literature are briefly introduced. Course availability: This course is offered every year.
Prerequisite: C (or better) in two first-year Academic English courses, or instructor's written consent
Note: This course is recommended for English majors
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2140 Biblical and Classical Backgrounds of English Literature 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

The course introduces students to Classical literature (mainly Greek) and the Bible (Old Testament: Hebrew Scriptures)& texts that are relevant and significant to subsequent culture, and especially for written works in English. Students also read and discuss additional representative works in English that have been influenced by the Bible and by Classical literature.
Prerequisite: two 1st year Academic English courses with a C or better or instructor's written consent.
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2150 Women and Literature: Voice, Identity and Difference (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore women's voices, past and present, in fiction and non-fiction. The focus is on issues related to women's self-expression, paying attention to the formation of identity, and taking into account elements of difference such as social class, ethnicity, and culture. Students gain an appreciation of the creative approaches women have used to voice their life experiences and their visions. Through lecture, class discussion, and written assignments, students develop their ability to think critically and write about literature.
Prerequisite: two 1st year Academic English courses with a C or better or instructor's written consent
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2160 Introduction to American Literature 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine major writers and works in American literature up to 1900. Students analyze and discuss nineteenth-century works that explore the development of American literary identity, including poetry, nonfiction, and prose fiction.
Prerequisite: two 1st year Academic English courses with a C or better or instructor's written consent.
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2170 Contesting Time, Space and Genre in Canadian Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course investigates Canadian literature, in relation to changing concepts of national identity, and as expressed through Canadian attitudes toward our history and geography. Students consider literary work across a wide range of historical periods, spaces, and genres, with a special thematic emphasis on one of the following in any given calendar year: history in Canadian literature, country vs. city life in Canada, or re/writing the Canadian landscape. Please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department for the current thematic offering.
Prerequisite: in two 1st year academic English courses with a C or better or instructor's written consent.
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2180 Studies in Literature and Culture (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the relationship between literature and cultural contexts. The approach of the course varies, sometimes focusing on a specific literary and cultural theme in a variety of genres and time periods, sometimes focusing on a specific cultural period, place, or movement and the literary texts and issues that emerged from it.
Prerequisite: 6 credits of first-year English (with the exception of ENGL 1150) or equivalent OR permission of instructor or department chair
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2190 Studies in Literature and Film (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the connected arts of literature and film by studying the relationships between written and filmed forms of selected literary texts, such as novels, short stories, poems and plays. The selected literary genres and films change each year.
Prerequisite: Six credits of first-year English (with the exception of ENGL 1150) or equivalent OR permission of instructor or department chair
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2200 ***Studies in Literature 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore literary topics, themes, or issues within the discipline. Topics may vary depending on faculty andstudent interest and current developments in the field.
Prerequisite: 6 credits of first-year English (with the exception of ENGL 1150) or equivalent OR permission of instructor or department Chair
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2210 Survey of English Literature, 18th and 19th Century (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course examines selected major authors of the Augustan, Romantic and Victorian periods in English literature. Authors may include Dryden, Pope, Swift, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Shelley, Tennyson and Arnold, and representative novelists.
Prerequisite: C (or better) in two 1st year Academic English courses, or instructor's written consent
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2240 Biblical and Classical Backgrounds of English Literature 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course introduces students to Classical literature (mainly Roman) and the Bible (New Testament) - texts that are relevant and important for subsequent culture and especially for writing in English. Representative works in English that have been influenced by the Bible and by Classical literature are also read and discussed.
Prerequisite: C (or better) in two 1st year Academic English courses, or instructor's written consent
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2250 Women and Literature: Women's Bodies/Women's Roles (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students read a diverse range of fiction and non-fiction about the experiences connected to inhabiting a female body and the roles women have assumed over time with varying degrees of acceptance or resistance. Through lecture, class discussion, and written assignments, students deepen their understanding of women's ideas on these matters as well as develop their ability to think critically and write about literature.
Prerequisite: C (or better) in two 1st year Academic English courses, or instructor's written consent
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2260 Introduction to American Literature 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine major writers and works in American literature after 1900. The course may include poetry, nonfiction, prose fiction, and drama, with a focus on the rise of American modernism.
Prerequisite: C (or better) in two 1st year Academic English courses, or instructor's written consent
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2270 Subversion and Social Justice in Canadian Literature (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the ways in which Canadian poets, dramatists and fiction writers have been in the forefront of movements for social change, expressing new visions of responsible government, economic fairness, and social equity. The course investigates Canadian literature and expressions of subversion and social justice via special thematic emphasis on one of the following in any given calendar year: protest literature in Canada and satire; and Canadian literature and creativity; and citizenship in Canada. Since the content of this course changes each year, please visit the English and Modern Languages web pages, pick up a booklet of course offerings, or contact the English Department to request more information.
Prerequisite: C (or better) in two 1st year Academic English courses, or instructor's written consent
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2400 ***Studies in Literature 2 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore literary topics, themes, or issues within the discipline. Topics may vary depending on faculty and student interest and current developments in the field.
Prerequisite: 6 credits of first-year English (with the exception of ENGL 1150) or equivalent OR permission of instructor or department Chair.
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 2410 Indigenous Narratives in Canada (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the contemporary application of narrative structure that shapes the literature of Indigenous cultures,focusing on modern and contemporary poetry, drama, short stories, novels, and essays. Through close reading ofIndigenous narratives from a variety of nations, including local Secwepemc narratives, students gain culturalcompetency and an appreciation of the real-world application of issues studied.
Prerequisite: 6 credits of first-year English (with the exception of ENGL 1150) or equivalent OR permission of instructor or department Chair.
For more information, search for this course here.