Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University

Bachelor of Arts - Year 1

Highlights

Many different options allow you to focus your studies in one or two areas of interest. As a TRU Williams Lake student, you will have a great deal of freedom to design a program of study that suits your particular needs and interests. With experienced program advisors to guide you, a broad-based Arts education can help you to explore and communicate the important issues in your life.

One of the best things is that you don't have to choose a major or area of concentration as you can try different courses you may be interested in if you are not sure which direction you want to follow right now.

View Courses

Majors

TRU Williams Lake offers year 1 of the Bachelor of Arts. Courses in anthropology, archaeology, English, history, philosophy, psychology and sociology are offered on an annual basis. These courses can accumulate credits towards various programs while you choose the path best for you. These courses can also help you prepare for the following degrees:

  • Bachelor of Arts
  • Bachelor of Education
  • Bachelor of Journalism
  • Bachelor of Social Work

Careers

Graduates of the Bachelor of Arts enter a wide range of positions spanning private and public sectors, non-profit organizations and self-employment. Positions include: project coordinator, researcher, public relations specialist, manager, communications specialist, teacher, marketing specialist, adjuster and counsellor.

Admission Requirements

The Bachelor of Arts is an Open Admission program. Admission decisions are made on a first-applied, first-admitted basis for qualified applicants, using the date by which the application was received. Students who apply while still in Grade 12 will be given conditional admission.

Note: If you lack high school English, Math or Science requirements, you may begin your first year univesity studies while taking University Preparation courses to complete these requirements.

  • Grade 12 (or equivalent) or Mature Student Status
  • English 12/English 12 First Peoples 73% (B)
  • Recommended: Any second language to Grade 12
  • Considering Education? Take Mathematics 11 or higher (Pre-calculus, Foundations)

Bachelor of Arts admission information package

Courses

The following is list of the courses typically offered by TRU Williams Lake. Please note course availablity is subject to change.

ANTH 2600
Minorities in the Modern World (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
An introduction to the anthropological study of minorities, with special reference to the present position of indigenous peoples around the world. Case studies from North America, Europe, Asia, Russia and Oceania illuminate the concepts of genocide, ethnocide, pluralism and multiculturalism.
Prerequisite: ARCH 1110/ANTH 1210 recommended but not required
Required Seminar: ANTH 2600S

ARCH 1110
Human Origins (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
An introduction to the anthropological study of human origins. The course addresses the distinction between mythical and scientific explanations of the emergence of animal and human life. It outlines the basic principles of evolution and reviews the major stages of human prehistory. Although some attention is paid to the interplay between biology and culture, the course is designed for social science students who may lack extensive knowledge of biology.
Required Seminar: ARCH 1110S

ARCH 2010
Introduction to Archaeology (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
An introduction to the discipline of archaeology, including the ways in which archaeologists reconstruct past cultures and lifeways, the development and major discoveries of archaeology, and the relationships between human material remains and human behavior. Students will gain an appreciation of what the past was like, what archaeological data are, and how archaeology is used to answer questions about the human condition.
Required Seminar: ARCH 2010S

ARCH 2230
Indians of British Columbia 2 (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
A survey of the traditional Indian cultures of British Columbia as known through ethnography and archaeology. Topics will include regional variation and adaptation in economy, technology, language, religion, art, medicine, kinship, and social organization. The contemporary social problems of the native peoples are not part of this course.
Prerequisite: An intro course in Anthropology is recommended
Required Seminar: ARCH 2230S

BIOL 1592
Human Biology: Anatomy and Physiology 1 (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
This course is intended primarily for students taking the Nursing and Respiratory Therapy programs. However, space is also available for Academic students. Students examine the anatomy and physiology of human organ systems over the course of two semesters, while focusing on the relationship between structure and function.
Prerequisite: Biology 12 with a C+ minimum or BIOL 0600 and Chemistry 11 or CHEM 0500
Note: Students do not receive credit for more than one of BIOL 1592 and BIOL 1593 or BIOL 3540

BIOL 1594
Human Biology: Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory 1 (0,0,2)(L)
Campus
This course covers the first half of the laboratory component of anatomy and physiology. Students are introduced to the structure and function of the human body, beginning with an orientation of the body and continuing with the functions of cells, tissues, organs and organ systems (including the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems). As well, the healthy functioning of the body and consideration of how each system contributes to overall health and maintenance of homeostasis will be covered.
Prerequisite: BIOL 1592 or BIOL 1593
Corequisite: BIOL 1592
Note: Same course as BIOL 1595

BIOL 1692
Human Biology: Anatomy and Physiology 2 (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
This is a continuation of BIOL 1592: Human Biology: Anatomy and Physiology 1, in which students examine the anatomy and physiology of the human organ systems over the course of two semesters, while focusing on the relationship between structure and function.
Prerequisite: BIOL 1592
Note: Students do not receive credit for more than one of BIOL 1692 and BIOL 1693 or BIOL 3550

BIOL 1694
Human Biology: Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory 2 (0,0,2)
Campus
This course is the second half laboratory course in anatomy and physiology. Students in the course will learn about the nervous system and the senses as well as the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, urinary, digestive and reproductive systems.
Prerequisite: BIOL 1692 or BIOL 1693
Corequisite: BIOL 1692
Note: Same course as BIOL 1695

CMNS 2290
Professional, Business and Technical Writing (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
Intended to support students who plan careers in business, government, public service, and research institutions, this course presents the professional skills required for effective oral and written communications. Students learn appropriate background material on relevant communication theory, create a variety of business documents and deliver an oral presentation.
Prerequisite: Six credits of composition and/or communication courses

ENGL 1100
Introduction to University Writing (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
This course introduces students to the practices of reading and writing in scholarly contexts. Students will read and analyze scholarly journal articles from a variety of disciplines. They will also develop their abilities to compose in the genres and sub-genres of scholarly writing, including incorporating research and documentation in a grammatically correct style.
Prerequisite: English 12/English 12 First Peoples with a minimum of 73% (with the government exam within the last 5 years); or level 5 on the compositions section of the Language Proficiency Index (LPI), with all other categories of the LPI at a minimum of70% (within the last 2 years); or satisfactory completion of the TRU English Assessment (ACCUPLACER) at the university entrance level; or completion of ENGL 0600 with a grade ofC+ or better; or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a grade of C+ or better.

ENGL 1110
Introduction to Fiction (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
Students are introduced to the literary forms of the short story and the novel based on a particular theme chosen by the professor. Through lecture, class discussion, and written assignments, students develop their ability to explore, appreciate, and make connections among works selected from a wide range of classic and contemporary forms of storytelling.
Prerequisite: English 12/English 12 First Peoples with a minimum of 80% (within the last 5 years) or Level 5 on the composition section of the Language Proficiency Index (within the last 2 years) or ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1210 or ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1140 or ENGL 0600 or on the recommendation of the 0600 instructor to the EML department ESAL 570 with a C+ minimum and ESAL 580 with a C+ minimum

ENGL 2200
Studies in Literature 1 (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
The content of this course changes each year; please contact the English Department to request more information.
Prerequisite: C (or better) in two first-year Academic English courses, or instructor's written consent

ENGL 2410
Aboriginal Canadian Literature: Humour and Storytelling (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
Students are introduced to the tradition of storytelling in Indigenous cultures and focus on modern and contemporary poetry, drama, short stories, novels, and essays.
Prerequisite: C (or better) in two 1st year Academic English courses

HIST 2020
Native History of Canada (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
Students explore the history of the Aboriginal peoples of what is now Canada. The course begins with pre-contact perspectives, however, emphasis is on the social, cultural, political, economic and military interactions between Aboriginal peoples and newcomers. Examples are drawn from all regions to reveal the breadth and variety of Aboriginal culture, history, and experience. Topics include Aboriginal involvement in the fur trade and later economic developments, the treaty-making process, and Aboriginal responses to government policy.
Required Seminar: HIST 2020S

PHIL 1110
Introduction to Critical Thinking (2,1,0) or (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
This course enables students to distinguish between good and poor reasoning. Students are introduced to logical analysis, which entails an examination of the meaning of logical terms and an investigation of their contribution to the arguments in which they occur. Considerable attention is given to representing the logical structure of arguments and deciding their validity or invalidity.
Required Seminar: PHIL 1110S

PSYC 1110
Introduction to Psychology 1 (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
Students explore selected topics in contemporary psychology, including the history of psychology, methodology, heredity and learning, physiology and neuropsychology, consciousness, sensation and perception, learning, and memory.

PSYC 1210
Introduction to Psychology 2 (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
Students explore selected topics in contemporary psychology, including intelligence, development, personality, social psychology, emotion, motivation, and psychopathology.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110 or instructor's written consent

PSYC 2130
Introduction to Developmental Psychology: Childhood and Adolescence (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
Students explore the developmental process from conception to adolescence. Theoretical perspectives and research data are examined as they relate to physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of development.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210 or instructor's written consent
Required Seminar: PSYC 2130S

PSYC 2230
Introduction to Developmental Psychology: Adulthood and Aging (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
This course is an inquiry into the developmental changes from adolescence onwards with an emphasis on adolescent adjustment, adult maturity and growth, middle age, retirement, old age, dying and death. Current research is examined as it relates to physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development.
Prerequisite: PSYC 2130 or instructor's written consent
Required Seminar: PSYC 2230S

SOCI 1110
Introduction to Sociology 1 (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
Students are introduced to the core concepts of the discipline of sociology by examining key concepts (such as culture, socialization, social interaction, social roles, and educational issues) that allow us to locate ourselves within society. Students also explore theoretical perspectives within sociology and the fundamentals of research methods, including how sociologists gather information about society.
Required Seminar: SOCI 1110S

SOCI 1210
Introduction to Sociology 2 (2,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
In this second half of Introduction to Sociology, students are introduced to such topics as crime and deviance, social control, large scale organizations, principal institutions such as religion, politics, and economy. Students also critically examine the impact of social structure, such as race and ethnicity, social stratification, and gender relations, on individual's lives.
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110
Required Seminar: SOCI 1210S