Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University

Chemical Biology Major

First and second year courses

Third and fourth year courses

Notes

1. Students with a B or better in ENGL 1100 or 1110 may proceed into CMNS 2290 or 2300 in their second tear; students with less than a B in first year English must take another 3 credits of 1000-level English before their second year English requirement.

2. Must be taken prior to third year

3. Five or six credits from CHEM 3060, CHEM 3140, CHEM 3230, CHEM 3310, CHEM 3330, CHEM 4220, CHEM 4320, CHEM 4420, CHEM 4480, CHEM 4600, BIOL 3200, BIOL 3510, BIOL 3540, BIOL 3550, BIOL 4350, BIOL 4480, BIOL 4490, PHIL 4330 or 4350.

4. Electives must include 9-12 credits in at least two disciplines outside Science (other than English). The remaining electives may be chosen from any discipline; at least 9 of these must be in courses numbered 3000 or higher


First and second year course descriptions

CHEM 1500
CHEM 1500
Chemical Bonding and Organic Chemistry (4,0,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
PHYS
This course provides an overview of general concepts of chemical bonding, Lewis structures, molecular shape, and valence bond theory of bonding. The organic chemistry portion of the course focuses on the bonding and structure of organic compounds, functional groups, conformational and stereochemical features, oxidation-reduction reactions, substitution and elimination reactions, and enolate chemistry. The laboratory work stresses basic precision techniques in quantitative analytical chemistry as well as experiments in instrumental analysis and organic chemistry. The laboratory also introduces students to some spectroscopic techniques.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 11 or 12; CHEM 0500 or 0600; and Pre-Calculus 12 or MATH 0600/0610
CHEM 1510
CHEM 1510
Fundamentals of Chemistry (4,0,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
PHYS
This is the second half of a fundamental first year chemistry course, designed for students who have completed CHEM 1500: Chemical Bonding and Organic Chemistry, and have a Chemistry 11 background. The topics include a brief review of stoichiometry, gas laws, thermochemistry, equilibrium and electrochemistry. Students are expected to become familiar with these topics, and demonstrate their proficiency in various laboratory techniques. The laboratory stresses fundamental precision techniques in quantitative analytical and physical chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1500 (minimum C-) and Chemistry 11 or CHEM 0500 Required Lab: CHEM 1510L
CHEM 1520
CHEM 1520
Principles of Chemistry (3,0,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
PHYS
This course is the second half of first year chemistry designed for students with a strong background in Chemistry. The Department of Chemistry defines a strong background as at least a B in Chemistry 12 or CHEM 0600; however, the course is available to any student with CHEM 1500 and Chemistry 12 or CHEM 0600. The topics include gas laws, equilibrium, redox reactions, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, entropy and free energy. Students are expected to become familiar with these topics during the course, and demonstrate their proficiency in various laboratory techniques. The laboratory stresses fundamental precision techniques in quantitative analytical and physical chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1500 (C- minimum) and Chemistry 12 or CHEM 0600 (a grade of B or better is recommended) or acceptance into the Engineering Program Required Lab: CHEM 1520L
BIOL 1110
BIOL 1110
Principles of Biology 1 (3,0,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
BIOL
This course is designed for biology or science majors. Students examine the molecular basis of cellular processes including energy transfer and the storage and use of genetic information.
Prerequisite: Biology 11 or 12 with a C+ or better, Chemistry 11 or CHEM 0500 Required Lab: BIOL 1110L
Note: Students repeating a course may be exempt from the laboratory component of that course if they took the course within two years and obtained a grade of at least 70% in the laboratory component of the course. The grade they previously obtained in the laboratory component of the course will be used in the calculation of their course grade.
BIOL 1210
BIOL 1210
Principles of Biology 2 (3,0,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
BIOL
This course offers a survey of the kingdoms of life, while emphasizing their ecology and evolutionary relationships.
Prerequisite: Biology 11 or 12 with a C+ or better, Chemistry 11 or CHEM 0500 Required Lab: BIOL 1210L
Note: Students repeating a course may be exempt from the laboratory component of that course if they took the course within two years and obtained a grade of at least 70% in the laboratory component of the course. The grade they previously obtained in the laboratory component of the course will be used in the calculation of their course grade.
PHYS 1100
PHYS 1100
Fundamentals of Physics 1 (3,0,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
PHYS
An algebra-based introduction to physics intended for students with some secondary school physics background. Students develop a basic understanding of several fields of physics through conceptualization, problem-solving and laboratory exercises. Topics include mechanics, fluid mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics.
Prerequisite: Math Pre-Calculus 12 or equivalent with a C+ minimum and Physics 11 or equivalent with a C+ minimum
Corequisite: MATH 1130 or 1140 or 1150 Required Lab: PHYS 1100L
PHYS 1200
PHYS 1200
Fundamentals of Physics 2 (3,0,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
PHYS
This course is a continuation of PHYS 1100: Fundamentals of Physics 1. Topics include electricity and magnetism, optics, and selected topics from nuclear and modern physics.
Prerequisite: PHYS 1100; MATH 1130 or MATH 1140 or MATH 1150
Corequisite: MATH 1230 or 1240 or 1250 Required Lab: PHYS 1200L
PHYS 1150
PHYS 1150
Mechanics and Waves (3,0,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
PHYS
This course is intended for students with a good secondary school background in physics. Calculus will be introduced and used in the course. Topics covered include a short review of mechanics, simple harmonic motion, mechanical waves, sound, wave optics and geometric optics.
Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 12 (minimum C+) and Physics 12 (minimum C+) or equivalent
Corequisite: MATH 1130, MATH 1140, MATH 1150 or recommended - PHYS 1150/1250 recommended for students planning to major in physics or chemistry, and is strongly recommended for students planning to transfer into Engineering after a year of Science
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of PHYS 1150 or EPHY 1150
PHYS 1250
PHYS 1250
Thermodynamics, Electricity and Magnetism (3,0,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
PHYS
This course is a continuation of PHYS 1150: Mechanics and Waves. Topics include thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, electricity and magnetism.
Prerequisite: PHYS 1150 and MATH 1130, MATH 1140 or MATH 1150
Corequisite: MATH 1230, MATH 1240 or MATH 1250
Note: Students may only receive credit for one of EPHY 1250 or PHYS 1250 Required Lab: PHYS 1250L
MATH 1130
MATH 1130
Enriched Calculus 1 (3,1.5,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
MATH
This course includes an in-depth study of single-variable differential calculus and its applications, and provides a strong foundation for further study in mathematical disciplines. This is a required course for students in the Engineering Transfer program.
Prerequisite: A in Pre-calculus Math 12 or equivalent (British Columbia graduates of 2013 onwards) or A in Principles of Math 12 or equivalent (British Columbia graduates prior to 2013) or admission to the Engineering program
Note: Students who already have credit for MATH 1140, MATH 1150, or MATH 1170 may not take MATH 1130 for further credit Required Seminar: MATH 1130S
MATH 1230
MATH 1230
Enriched Calculus 2 (3,1.5,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
MATH
This course offers an in-depth study of single-variable integral calculus and its applications to provide a strong foundation for further study in mathematical disciplines. It is a required course for students in the engineering transfer program.
Prerequisites: MATH 1130 Required Seminar: MATH 1230S
MATH 1140
MATH 1140
Calculus 1 (3,1.5,0) or (5,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
MATH
Students practice differential calculus for functions of one variable, with applications that emphasize the physical sciences. Topics include calculation and interpretation of limits and derivatives; curve sketching; optimization and related-rate problems; and Newton's method.
Prerequisite: At least C+ in British Columbia Pre-calculus Math 12 or equivalent (British Columbia graduates of 2013 onwards) or Principles of Math 12 or equivalent (British Columbia graduates prior to 2013) or MATH 1000 or MATH 1001 or MATH 0610 or MATH 0633 within the last two years. In exceptional cases, for example, where a student has transferred from another educational system or has been out of school for several years, entry into MATH 1140 may be permitted based on a placement test administered (for these exceptional cases only) by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics during the first week of classes.
Note: Students who have never studied calculus, or who barely satisfy the course prerequisites, are advised to register in a section vectored (5,0,0). Students who have credit for MATH 1130, MATH 1150 or MATH 1170 may not take MATH 1140 for further credit. Required Seminar: MATH 1140S
MATH 1240
MATH 1240
Calculus 2 (3,1.5,0) or (5,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
MATH
This course covers integral calculus for functions of one variable, with applications emphasizing the physical sciences. Topics include Riemann sums; definite and indefinite integrals; techniques of integration; improper integrals; applications to area, volume, arc length, probability, physics; separable differential equations; and series.
Prerequisite: MATH 1140, or MATH 1130, or MATH 1150
Note: Students who already have credit for MATH 1250 may not take MATH 1240 for further credit. Students planning to take 2nd year Mathematics courses are encouraged to enroll in MATH 1140 and MATH 1240 or MATH 1130 and MATH 1230. Required Seminar: MATH 1240S
MATH 1150
MATH 1150
Calculus for the Biological Sciences 1 (5,0,0) or (3,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
MATH
Students are instructed in differential calculus for functions of one variable, with applications that emphasize the biological sciences. Topics include calculation and interpretation of limits and derivatives, curve sketching, optimization problems, and Newton's method.
Prerequisite: At least C+ in British Columbia Pre-calculus Math 12 or equivalent (British Columbia graduates of 2013 onwards) or Principles of Math 12 or equivalent (British Columbia graduates prior to 2013) or MATH 1000 or MATH 1001 or MATH 0610 or MATH 0633 within the last two years. In exceptional cases, for example, where a student has transferred from another educational system or has been out of school for several years, entry into MATH 1150 may be permitted based on a placement test administered (for these exceptional cases only) by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics during the first week of classes.
Note: Students who already have credit for MATH 1130, MATH 1140, or MATH 1170 may not take MATH 1150 for further credit. Students planning to take 2nd year Mathematics courses are encouraged to enroll in MATH 1140 and MATH 1240 or MATH 1130 and MATH 1230
MATH 1250
MATH 1250
Calculus for the Biological Sciences 2 (5,0,0) or (3,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
MATH
Students are instructed in integral calculus for functions of one variable, with applications that emphasize the biological sciences. Topics include Riemann sums, definite and indefinite integrals, techniques of integration, improper integrals, first-order differential equations and slope fields, (applications to area, probability, logistic growth and predator-prey systems), and series.
Prerequisite: MATH 1130, or MATH 1140, or MATH 1150
Note: Students who already have credit for MATH 1240 may not take MATH 1250 for further credit. Students planning to take 2nd year Mathematics courses are encouraged to enroll in MATH 1140 and MATH 1240 or MATH 1130 and MATH 1230
ENGL 1100
ENGL 1100
Introduction to University Writing (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
LIML
This course introduces students to the practices of reading and writing in scholarly contexts. Students will read and analyze scholarly journal articles from a variety of disciplines. They will also develop their abilities to compose in the genres and sub-genres of scholarly writing, including incorporating research and documentation in a grammatically correct style.
Prerequisite: English 12/English 12 First Peoples with a minimum of 73% (with the government exam within the last 5 years); or level 5 on the compositions section of the Language Proficiency Index (LPI), with all other categories of the LPI at a minimum of70% (within the last 2 years); or satisfactory completion of the TRU English Assessment (ACCUPLACER) at the university entrance level; or completion of ENGL 0600 with a grade ofC+ or better; or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a grade of C+ or better.
ENGL 1110
ENGL 1110
Introduction to Fiction (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
LIML
Students are introduced to the literary forms of the short story and the novel based on a particular theme chosen by the professor. Through lecture, class discussion, and written assignments, students develop their ability to explore, appreciate, and make connections among works selected from a wide range of classic and contemporary forms of storytelling.
Prerequisite: English 12/English 12 First Peoples with a minimum of 80% (within the last 5 years) or Level 5 on the composition section of the Language Proficiency Index (within the last 2 years) or ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1210 or ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1140 or ENGL 0600 or on the recommendation of the 0600 instructor to the EML department ESAL 570 with a C+ minimum and ESAL 580 with a C+ minimum
CHEM 2100
CHEM 2100
Introductory Analytical Chemistry (3,0,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
PHYS
Students are introduced to the principles of analytical chemistry and their practical application to solution samples. Topics include statistical method of data analysis, quantitative principles of chemical equilibrium, and fundamental concepts of gravimetric, spectrophotometric, electrochemical, and chromatographic methods of analysis. In the laboratory component, students perform experiments using the same state-of-the-art instrumentation used in many commercial and research laboratories. An analysis of samples of clinical, environmental, and biochemical interest is completed to illustrate the material discussed in lectures.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1500 (minimum C- grade) and either CHEM 1510 or 1520 (minimum C- grade) Required Lab: CHEM 2100L
CHEM 2250
CHEM 2250
Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry (3,0,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
PHYS
This course, intended for science majors, introduces chemical kinetics and thermodynamics with applications to gas behaviour and phase and reaction equilibria. The laboratory work involves preparative and kinetic studies, as well as the experimental study of the aspects of thermodynamic measurements.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1500 (minimum C- grade) and either CHEM 1510 or 1520 (minimum C- grade); MATH 1230 or 1240 or 1250 (MATH 2110 is strongly recommended)
Note: Students with credit for CHEM 2110 and CHEM 2210 will not receive credit for CHEM 2150 and CHEM 2250 Required Lab: CHEM 2250L
CHEM 2120
CHEM 2120
Organic Chemistry 1 (3,0,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
PHYS
This course is a study of the compounds of carbon with an emphasis on reaction mechanisms, to illustrate the basic principles of organic chemistry. The topics include structure and bonding, preparations and reactions of the functional groups, and stereochemistry. Biological and biochemical applications are also discussed. The laboratory work illustrates basic separation, purification and identification techniques, and spectroscopic techniques are introduced.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1500 (minimum C- grade) and either CHEM 1510 or 1520 (minimum C- grade)
Note: ECHE 1110/ECHE 1210 are not prerequisites for 2nd year Chemistry courses. Engineering students who may wish to take 2nd year Chemistry courses should meet with their Engineering Advisor and the Chair of the Department of Physical Sciences as early as possible.
CHEM 2220
CHEM 2220
Organic Chemistry 2 (3,0,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
PHYS
This course is a continuation of CHEM 2120: Organic Chemistry 1, in which students further explore the principles of organic chemistry. Topics include structure and bonding; preparations and reactions of the functional groups; stereochemistry; biological and biochemical applications; and basic separation, purification, identification, and spectroscopic techniques in the laboratory.
Prerequisite: CHEM 2120 (C- minimum) Required Lab: CHEM 2220L
CHEM 2160
CHEM 2160
Structure, Bonding and Spectroscopy (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
PHYS
Students develop fundamental quantum ideas in chemistry and apply them to topics in chemical bonding and spectroscopy. Bonding concepts revolve around electrostatic models applied to ionic compounds and transition metal complexes. Covalent bonding is approached from the molecular orbital point of view, while students survey homo- and heteronuclear diatomics, and briefly consider larger molecules. Fundamental concepts in spectroscopy are introduced, and vibrational, electronic, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is discussed. Fundamental aspects of symmetry guide several of these treatments.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1500 (minimum C- grade) and either CHEM 1510 or 1520 (minimum C- grade)
BIOL 2160
BIOL 2160
Introductory Microbiology (3,0,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
BIOL
Students are introduced to the world of microorganisms, including bacteria, yeasts, fungi, and viruses, and the important roles they play in ecosystem health. Focusing on the principles and applications of microbiology, course topics include microbial physiology; growth and growth control; gene transfer; gene expression and environmental sensing; disease; and environmental biotechnologies such as wastewater treatment, bioremediation and industrial microbiology. Laboratory sessions provide hands-on training in cell culture techniques, applied microbiology, and manipulation of DNA.
Prerequisite: BIOL 1110/1210, CHEM 1500/1510 or CHEM 1500/1520 Required Lab: BIOL 2160L
BIOL 2130
BIOL 2130
Cell Biology (3,1*,3*)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
BIOL
Students examine eukaryotic cells, while relating structure to function. Topics include instrumentation and techniques used for studying cells and their inner workings; molecules common in various cellular structures; the structure and function of the plasma membrane, cytoplasm and organelles; transport of materials within the cell and secretion; intercellular communication and programmed cell death (apoptosis); and the medical implications of understanding cellular and molecular biology.
Prerequisite: BIOL 1110 (C minimum), CHEM 1500/1510 or CHEM 1500/1520. CHEM 2120 recommended
Note: Labs and seminars are offered in alternate weeks Required Lab: BIOL 2130L Required Seminar: BIOL 2130S
BIOL 2340
BIOL 2340
Introduction to Genetics (3,1*,3*)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
BIOL
This course offers a general survey of basic concepts in genetics, with particular emphasis on classical Mendelian genetics, chromosomes and cytogenetics, bacterial genetics with an introduction to gene cloning methods, and the structure, regulation and mutation of genes.
Prerequisite: BIOL 1110/1210 (C minimum)
Corequisite: BIOL 2130 (recommended)
Note: Labs and seminars are offered in alternate weeks Required Lab: BIOL 2340L Required Seminar: BIOL 2340S
CMNS 2290
CMNS 2290
Professional, Business and Technical Writing (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
JOUR
Intended to support students who plan careers in business, government, public service, and research institutions, this course presents the professional skills required for effective oral and written communications. Students learn appropriate background material on relevant communication theory, create a variety of business documents and deliver an oral presentation.
Prerequisite: Six credits of composition and/or communication courses
CMNS 2300
CMNS 2300
Critical Thinking and Writing for Science and Technology (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
JOUR
Students analyse and discuss examples of writing from scientific and technical literature to improve their communication skills for lay and scientific audiences.
Prerequisite: Six credits of composition and/or communication courses; admission to the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Natural Resource Science program; or permission of the instructor

Third and fourth year course descriptions

CHEM 3100
CHEM 3100
Instrumental Analysis (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
PHYS
Students are introduced to the wide range of instrumental methods used in chemical analysis, as they are applied to modern analytical chemistry. The topics include statistical evaluation of chemical data, electrochemical methods, optical spectroscopic methods, mass spectrometry and chromatography.
Prerequisite: CHEM 2100/2250 (C- minimum)
CHEM 3170
CHEM 3170
Instrumental Analysis Laboratory for Chemical Biology (0,0,4)(L)
Credits: 1
Campus
SC
PHYS
This is a laboratory course designed to give students practical hands-on experience with the instrumentation discussed in CHEM 3100: Instrumental Analysis. Students focus on the needs of chemical biologists while performing a variety of chemical analyses and gaining independent experience in analytical experimental design and method application to real samples.
Prerequisite: CHEM 2100 and 2250 (minimum C- grade)
CHEM 3220
CHEM 3220
Advanced Organic Chemistry (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
PHYS
This is a lecture course that covers the theory and practice of modern organic synthesis. The emphasis is on important carbon-carbon bond forming reactions, significant reactions of functional groups and the use of protecting group strategies in organic synthesis. In addition, the chemistry of amino acids, peptides, carbohydrates and heterocycles is studied in the context of the above topics.
Prerequisite: CHEM 2120/2220 (C- minimum)
CHEM 3240
CHEM 3240
Organic Chemistry Laboratory (0,0,4)(L)
Credits: 1
Campus
SC
PHYS
In this laboratory course, students perform a selection of organic chemistry experiments that are designed to develop synthetic skills and application of spectroscopic techniques to organic molecules.
Prerequisite: CHEM 2120/2220 (C- minimum)
CHEM 4450
CHEM 4450
Advanced Chemical Biology (2,1,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
PHYS
Lectures and seminars examine the interface of chemistry and biology, and practical laboratory experience introduces students to advanced chemical biology techniques. The emphasis is on providing the knowledge and theory behind biological systems from a chemical perspective, while exposing students to the modern laboratory techniques that are of current value in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. These industries require professionals who have a strong background in organic chemistry, molecular biology and genomics. Current journal articles are incorporated into a problem-based learning approach that has students researching background material in order to complete an assigned project experiment.
Prerequisite: CHEM 3220/3230/3240 (C- minimum); BIOL 3230/3350 (C- minimum) Required Lab: CHEM 4450L Required Seminar: CHEM 4450S
BIOL 3000
BIOL 3000
Biometrics (3,0,2)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
BIOL
Students are introduced to statistical procedures for biological research. Topics include the nature of data, probability, hypothesis testing, goodness of fit, analysis of variance, correlation, and regression. The computer lab laboratory provides students with hands-on computer experience in graphical and statistical analysis.
Prerequisite: BIOL 1110 or BIOL 1113 and BIOL 1210 or BIOL 1213 and MATH 1140 or MATH 1141 or MATH 1150 or MATH 1130
Note: Students may normally receive credit for only one of the following: PSYC 2100, PSYC 2101, STAT 2000, STAT 1200, STAT 1201, ECON 2320 Required Lab: BIOL 3000L
BIOL 3130
BIOL 3130
Introduction to Biochemistry (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
BIOL
Students examine cellular chemistry and the structure and function of biological molecules including nucleic acids, enzymes and other proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and vitamins. The course also provides an introduction to metabolic pathways and bioenergetics including DNA synthesis, transcription and translation, glycolysis, fermentation and respiration, oxidation of fatty acids, and photosynthesis.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2130 (C minimum), CHEM 2120 and 2220
BIOL 3230
BIOL 3230
Biochemistry (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
BIOL
This course offers a series of comprehensive lectures on the structure, function, synthesis and degradation of macromolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates). In addition, the regulatory mechanisms involved in these processes are addressed.
Prerequisite: BIOL 3130 (C minimum)
BIOL 3350
BIOL 3350
Molecular Genetics (3,1,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
BIOL
The discipline of molecular genetics focuses on the structure, organization and regulated expression of heritable information molecules. A significant segment of the course is devoted to the molecular tools used to query and manipulate biological systems. Students also read and discuss current literature on molecular genetics in Seminars.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2130 and 2340 (C minimum)
Corequisite: BIOL 3130 Required Seminar: BIOL 3350S
BIOL 4150
BIOL 4150
Biochemical Techniques 1 (1,1,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
BIOL
In this laboratory-based course, students are introduced to the techniques used to isolate and study enzymes and other proteins. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic laboratory skills in the context of isolating, purifying and analyzing an enzyme, and lactate dehydrogenase.
Prerequisite: BIOL 3230 (C minimum) Required Lab: BIOL 4150L Required Seminar: BIOL 4150S
BIOL 4250
BIOL 4250
Biochemical Techniques 2 (Recombinant DNA) (1,1,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
BIOL
In this laboratory-based course, students practice the techniques used to isolate and manipulate nucleic acids. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic laboratory skills and their application to manipulate recombinant DNA molecules.
Prerequisite: BIOL 3130 and 3350 (C minimum). BIOL 3230/4150 recommended. Required Lab: BIOL 4250L Required Seminar: BIOL 4250S
BIOL 3520
BIOL 3520
Cell Physiology (3,0,3)(L)
Credits: 3
Campus
SC
BIOL
Students are introduced to the physiochemical basis for cellular activity, with emphasis on energy relationships, functions of cell parts, integration and internal control of cellular activities, and the mechanisms of influence of external factors. Laboratory work provides hands-on experience with the techniques and apparatus used to study cell function.
Prerequisite: BIOL 3130 (C minimum) Required Lab: BIOL 3520L