Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University

Third-year psychology courses

PSYC 3000 (SS) : Behaviour Disorders
PSYC 3020 (SS): Infancy
PSYC 3030 (SS): Psychological Testing
PSYC 3060 (SC) : Principles of Animal Behaviour
PSYC 3080 (SS): Social Psychology
PSYC 3100: Clinical Psychology
PSYC 3110: Clinical Psychology: Theories and Systems of Psychotherapy
PSYC 3140 (SS): Health Psychology
PSYC 3150 (SS): Childhood and Adolescence
PSYC 3190: Experimental Design and Quantitative Methods
PSYC 3200 (SS): Theories of Personality 1
PSYC 3210 (SS): Theories of Personality 2
PSYC 3220 (SS): Adulthood and Aging
PSYC 3230 (SC): Principles of Conditioning
PSYC 3240: History and Systems of Psychology
PSYC 3250: Community Psychology
PSYC 3360: The Psychology of Language
PSYC 3380: Psychology of Emotion
PSYC 3390: Human Neuropsychology
PSYC 3400 (SS): Introduction to Psychology and the Law
PSYC 3410 (SS): Forensic Psychology
PSYC 3510 (SC): Sensation & Perception 1
PSYC 3520 (SC): Sensation & Perception 2
PSYC 3540 (SC): Cognition 1
PSYC 3550 (SC): Cognition 2
PSYC 3560: Psychopharmacology
PSYC 3570 (SC): Physiology of Motivation & Emotion
PSYC 3580 (SC): Physiology of Learning & Memory
PSYC 3610: Integrated Methods and Analysis of Psychological Data


PSYC 3000
PSYC 3000
Behaviour Disorders (3,0,0)(3,0,0)
Credits: 6
Campus
AR
PSYC
This course is a detailed scientific overview of abnormal behaviour, and includes discussions of history, definitions and characterizations, and an emphasis on etiology, maintenance and treatment of psychopathology. This course qualifies as a prerequisite for PSYC 3100.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210 or instructor's written consent
PSYC 3020
PSYC 3020
Infancy (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
Students examine biological, social, and cognitive development from conception to the third year of life. The transition to parenthood and influences on parenting (including social policy) are a secondary focus. Content includes theoretical and methodological issues, research findings, and practical implications. Students are introduced to important primary sources as well as secondary texts.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210 or instructor's written consent
PSYC 3030
PSYC 3030
Psychological Testing (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
This course provides an overview of the theory and practice of mental measurement, including test reliability and validity, its uses, administration, scoring, and interpretation.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210 or instructor's written consent
PSYC 3060
PSYC 3060
Principles of Animal Behaviour (3,0,0)(3,0,0)
Credits: 6
Campus
AR
PSYC
Students examine animal behaviour from the perspective of evolutionary theory. Among the topics are an introduction to the theory of evolution and behavioural genetics; social systems as ecological adaptations; mating and parental strategies; learning, instincts, and evolution; and the evolution of human behaviour. Credit is given for only one of BIOL 3100 or PSYC 3060.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210 or instructor's written consent. PSYC 2110 or 2210 recommended.
PSYC 3080
PSYC 3080
Social Psychology (3,0,0)(3,0,0)
Credits: 6
Campus
AR
PSYC
Students discuss theory and research in the areas of individual social behaviour; social motivation; social attitudes; group interaction; socialization; racial prejudice; and other related topics.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210 or instructor's written consent
PSYC 3100
PSYC 3100
Clinical Psychology (3,0,0)(3,0,0)
Credits: 6
Campus
AR
PSYC
Students are provided a comprehensive overview of clinical psychology. The topics include the role of personality theory in clinical psychology, an overview of descriptive psychopathology, a consideration of issues in diagnosis and classification of disorders, an examination of the techniques used in assessment of intellectual and personality functioning, and a review of various approaches to therapeutic intervention. Areas of clinical psychology research are discussed, in addition to issues of professionalism, and models of training. Students are given a sense of what it means to be a "Clinical Psychologist" today, recent developments in clinical psychology, and future directions in the field.
Prerequisite: One of PSYC 2120, PSYC 2160, PSYC 3000
PSYC 3110
PSYC 3110
Clinical Psychology: Theories and Systems of Psychotherapy (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
Students are provided an overview of various psychotherapeutic approaches in the field of clinical psychology. The therapeutic systems and models examined in this course include psychoanalysis, Adlerian psychotherapy, analytic psychotherapy, client-centered therapy, rational emotive behaviour therapy, behaviour therapy, cognitive therapy, existential psychotherapy, Gestalt therapy, and multimodal therapy.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210, and PSYC 2160 or PSYC 3000, or instructor's written consent
PSYC 3140
PSYC 3140
Health Psychology (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
This course offers a critical survey of the basic research findings and theory on the relation between psychological factors (including behaviour, emotion, cognitive, personality, and interpersonal relationships) and health. Topics include health-related behaviours such as smoking and drug use, the effects of stressful events on health, methods of coping with stress, the impact of chronic illness on the family, and social support systems.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210 or instructor's written consent
PSYC 3150
PSYC 3150
Childhood and Adolescence (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
Students examine biological, social, and cognitive development from the third year of life through to adolescence. The development of prosocial and antisocial behaviours are a special focus. Content includes theoretical and methodological issues, research findings, and practical implications. Students are introduced to important primary sources as well as secondary texts.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210 or instructor's written consent
PSYC 3200
PSYC 3200
Theories of Personality 1 (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
Students examine psychoanalytic and dispositional theories on the development of personality. Topics include research findings, applications, and limitations with respect to the two approaches.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210
Note: Students with PSYC 3050 may not take this course for credit
PSYC 3210
PSYC 3210
Theories of Personality 2 (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
Students examine environmental and representational theories on the development of personality. Topics include research findings, applications, and limitations with respect to the two approaches.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210
Note: Students with PSYC 3050 may not take this course for credit
PSYC 3220
PSYC 3220
Adulthood and Aging (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
This course explores human development during adulthood through to old age. Students are provided a background in basic issues, theories, and psychological research regarding adulthood and the aging process.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210 or instructor's written consent
PSYC 3230
PSYC 3230
Principles of Conditioning (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
Students examine the procedures and processes involved in Classical (Pavlovian) and Operant (instrumental) conditioning. A majority of the course material is comprised of research findings from animal studies.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110, PSYC 1210, or permission of the instructor
PSYC 3240
PSYC 3240
History and Systems of Psychology (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
Students are provided a broad overview of psychology's history, beginning with the ancient Persians, and progressing through to the mid-twentieth century. Key figures and thinkers are highlighted, and major philosophies and their founders discussed, all within the context of the political and social climate prevalent at the time.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110, PSYC 1210, and a minimum of six (6) additional psychology credits excluding PSYC 2100, 2110, or 3190
PSYC 3250
PSYC 3250
Community Psychology (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
This is a survey course designed to introduce students to various topics in community psychology. Topics include research methods and social change and intervention strategies within various community settings, such as the legal and justice system, the health care system, the mental health care system, and the educational system.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210 or instructor's written consent
PSYC 3360
PSYC 3360
The Psychology of Language 1 (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
Students consider the fundamental psychological abilities underlying human language. Representative topics include animal versus human communication, language processing, lexical representation, and the principles of on-line conversation.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210 or instructor's written consent. PSYC 2210 recommended.
PSYC 3380
PSYC 3380
Psychology of Emotion (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
Students discuss the theories and research on emotion from cognitive, behavioral, physiological, social, and evolutionary perspectives in the discipline of psychology. Students examine where emotions come from, their function, and meaning. Topics include development and communication of emotion, emotions and decision making, emotion regulation, and the relationship between emotion and psychological well-being.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210, or instructor's written consent
PSYC 3390
PSYC 3390
Human Neuropsychology (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
This course uses clinical and experimental approaches to human neuropsychology as a basis for understanding brain-behaviour relationships in both typical and impaired functioning. Students discuss the impacts of brain disorders, including traumatic brain injury, dementia, and tumors. Students distinguish the structure and function of the human brain, with particular emphasis on the cerebral cortex; gain knowledge and understanding of how behaviour can be used to infer brain function; and think critically about key ideas and research findings in neuropsychology.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210 or instructor's written consent. One of PSYC 2040, 3040, 3570 or 3580 is recommended.
PSYC 3400
PSYC 3400
Introduction to Psychology and the Law (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
Students are provided an overview of the area of psychology and the law. Applications of psychological theories and research to the legal system are examined. Topics covered include the legal system, police investigations, jury decision-making, eyewitness identification and testimony, expert evidence, and sentencing.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110 and PSYC 1210
PSYC 3410
PSYC 3410
Forensic Psychology (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
Students examine the application of clinical psychology (assessment and intervention) to the field of forensics. Topics covered include fitness to stand trial; Not Criminally Responsible By Reason of Mental Disorder (NCRMD); psychopathy, risk assessment and the prediction of dangerousness; Dangerous Offender/Long Term Offender assessments; criminal profiling; parental capacity assessments; assessment and treatment of special populations; and professional responsibilities and ethical issues.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110 and PSYC 1210, and one of PSYC 2160, PSYC 3000 or PSYC 3100
PSYC 3510
PSYC 3510
Sensation and Perception 1 - Visual Processes (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
This course describes the basic research findings and models for visual sensation and perception. Topics include the perception of brightness, contrast, colour, objects, depth, size, and movement. in addition, students discuss the physiological mechanisms of the visual system.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210 or instructor's written consent
Note: Students who have credits for PSYC 3130 may not receive additional credit for this course
PSYC 3520
PSYC 3520
Sensation and Perception 2 (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
This course describes the basic research findings and models for auditory, somatosensory, olfactory, and gustatory sensation and perception. Topics include the physics of sound, physiology of the auditory system, basic sound perception, auditory scene analysis, music perception, language perception, physiology of touch and pain, and the physiology of smell and taste.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210 or instructor's written consent
Note: Students who have credits for PSYC 3130 may not receive additional credit for this course
PSYC 3540
PSYC 3540
Cognition 1: Attention and Memory (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
This course describes the research findings and models of attention and memory, both past and present. Topics include basic attentional processes and models, short-term and working memory, long-term processes, semantic and episodic distinctions, physiology of memory, and false memory.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210 or permission of the instructor
Note: Students who have credit for PSYC 3090 may not receive additional credit for this course
PSYC 3550
PSYC 3550
Cognition 2: Language and Thought (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
This course presents the research findings and models for various aspects of language and thought. Topics include language processing, reasoning, decision-making, problem-solving, and the theoretical nature of consciousness.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110/1210 or permission of the instructor
Note: Students who have credits for PSYC 3090 may not receive credit for this course
PSYC 3560
PSYC 3560
Psychopharmacology (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
This course is a detailed introduction to psychoactive drugs at behavioural, neural and cellular levels of examination. Students learn to define and understand how drugs are processed by the body and how they interact with neurotransmitter systems. Students identify and discuss the major neurotransmitters; gain insight into the therapeutic use of psychotropic drugs to treat affective disorders, anxiety disorders, and schizophrenia; understand the properties of major classes of abused drugs (CNS depressants, stimulants, opiates, hallucinogens, etc.); and think critically about pharmaceuticals and the pharmaceutical industry.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110, 1210, and one of PSYC 2040, PSYC 2050, PSYC 3570, PSYC 3580 or instructor's written consent
PSYC 3570
PSYC 3570
Physiology of Motivation and Emotion (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
This course presents the concepts of motivation and emotion, emphasizing neural and endocrine mechanisms. Students explore the contributions of human and animal research in understanding temperature regulation, hunger and thirst, sleep and biological rhythms, exploration and curiosity, reproductive and parental behaviour, substance abuse, aggression, stress, positive and negative emotions, and feelings. Interaction between physiology and external influences are emphasized, as well as causal and functional explanations. Students think critically about key ideas and research findings in motivation and emotion, and consider how they can be applied practically to issues experienced in their own lives.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110 and 1210, or permission of the Instructor
Note: Students may not take this course if they have credit for the former PSYC 304-6 or PSYC 307-6
PSYC 3580
PSYC 3580
Physiology of Learning and Memory (3,0,0)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
This course provides a detailed presentation of the different types of learning and memory, emphasizing neural mechanisms. Students discuss the interplay of human and animal research (including that with invertebrates) in understanding synaptic plasticity involving long-term potentiation and depression, perceptual learning, classical and instrumental conditioning, and relational learning. Learning disabilities, memory impairment, and recovery from brain injury are also considered.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110 and 1210 or permission of the instructor. PSYC 2040 recommended.
Note: Students who have credits for PSYC 3040 may not receive additional credit for this course
PSYC 3610
PSYC 3610
Integrated Methods and Analysis of Psychological Data (2,0,1)
Credits: 3
Campus
AR
PSYC
This course will provide an integrated presentation of design considerations and statistical methods. The focus of the course will be analysis of research designs with multiple independent variables and a single dependent variable, though the material covered will not be limited to these types of designs. Topics covered include reliability, validity, power, sampling, t-tests, correlation, regression, analysis of variance, nonparametric procedures, and sampling.
Prerequisite: PSYC 2100 and 2110 with a minimum B grade
Corequisite Psychology 2110, with permission of the instructor.
Exclusion: PSYC 3190 Required Seminar: PSYC 3610S