Exams

Apprentice alpine exam

Goal

To train, examine and certify candidates to work with supervision in alpine climbing terrain; and to provide leadership and direction to candidates working toward the Alpine Guide Certificate.

Format

This is a 2 week exam which includes learning from instruction, coaching and debriefing. The exam continues the process of the apprenticeship started in the training course. The focus is on principle based learning giving the candidates the strategies for problem solving through coaching and practical application in simulated guide/client scenarios. Participants are marked in categories indicating their decisions, terrain choices, and technical skills demonstrated.

Expectations

Participants are expected to arrive prepared and able to demonstrate guide skills, and be examined on information contained in the ACMG manual "Technical Handbook for Professional Mountain Guides", subjects taught on Guide Training Rock, the Assistant Rock Guide, and the CAA Level 1 Avalanche courses. The guiding standard requires movement up to 5.10 in rock shoes; 5.8 in mountain boots, alpine ice to 70 degrees and water ice to Grade 4 with confident and efficient movement.

Special exam areas

Participants should be prepared to be tested in the following - Crevasse Rescue, Rock Rescue, Navigation, Shortroping, Record Keeping, Teaching.

Location and length

These are often mobile courses and will visit several alpine locations in B.C. and Alberta over a 2 week period starting mid August. See Dates and Fees.


Alpine guide exam

Goal

To certify guides to work without supervision in an alpine climbing environment, and to continue the aspirant guide's learning process in applying techniques in a wide variety of conditions.

Format

A multi- day exam often base camped for several days in a popular mountain guiding area. Classic guiding routes are completed as part of the daily task. Candidates play the role of guide, making the appropriate decisions regarding objectives, terrain choices and options, and client management. The candidate is given enough information to make his or her decisions and is expected to carry out options should the given objective be out of condition or inappropriate.

Candidates should expect to guide a variety of routes with different types of climbing including technical rock, snow and ice faces, mixed routes, some short aid sections, and lengthy moderate ridge routes. The successful candidate demonstrates safe, efficient guiding that comes as close to meeting trip objectives as conditions allow.

Expectations

Come prepared and able to demonstrate and be examined on information contained in the ACMG manual "Technical Handbook for Professional Mountain Guides" and taught on the Guide Training Rock, Guide Training Alpine, Assistant Rock Guide, Assistant Alpine Guide, and the CAA Level 2 Avalanche courses. The guiding standard requires movement up to 5.10 in rock shoes, 5.8 in mountain boots, alpine ice to 70 degrees, and waterfall ice to Grade 4.

Special exam areas

In addition there may be exams in the following topics: Crevasse Rescue, Rock Rescue, Navigation, Shortroping, Record Keeping, Teaching Session.

Location and length

These are often mobile courses and will visit several alpine locations in BC and Alberta over a 9 day period toward the end of August.